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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Zaraa Dheere Se Bol Koi Sun Lega

Posted on: November 25, 2015


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

HFM Songs Statistics by Year – 4
————————————————–
Year 1935
—————–

1935 – wow, what a year it was.  The pioneering spirit in the industry touched an epitome. The events, the people, the films – all proved to be significant milestones as also trend setters.  And in one field, an innovation happened, which changed the game once and for all.  The field – sound recording. The innovation – playback singing.

New Theatres had an eminent director – Nitin Bose. Nitin Bose had a younger brother – Mukul Bose. Mukul Bose was the sound recordist at New Theatres. And the sound recordist had an idea, which changed the world of song recording, once and forever.  The innovation called the playback technique brought in two very significant changes to how the songs were recorded and filmed. For one, it took away the need to assemble an orchestra of musicians, to play live the music for the song being picturized. And two, of course, it cut down drastically the time it used to take to picturize a song. The song – “Main Khush Hona Chaahoon, Khush Ho Na Sakoon” – a four minute group song that contains three voices – Parul Ghosh, Suprova Sircar and Harimati Dua, was filmed in record time, of just about the duration of the song.  In one stroke, it was a change that everyone just accepted – no discussion. And of course, besides being the cradle for this game changing innovation, the film ‘Dhoop Chhaaon’, in its own right, turned out to be one of the significant films of that year.  The story of an orphan child, who is taken in by a blind singer, who raises and takes care of him as his own.  The key roles were played by KC Dey, Pahadi Sanyal and Uma Shashi.

But for the pioneering technique of playback recording, the film that made 1935 as the memorable landmark was of course ‘Devdas’.  Recognized as probably the first film in which the dialogues were the simple language transactions of everyday life of the common man, the transition from the stage drama to the medium of the film with its own distinctive identity, was now complete.  The radical and non-conformist protagonist of the novel by Sarat Chandra – whom the traditional middle class Bangla community would look down upon with disdain, because he would visit the house of a dancing girl in spite of belonging to the upper caste of the society – caught the fancy of audiences across the length and breadth of the country.  One reason could well have been the spatial spread of story canvas as the heartbroken young man travels by train all the way from Calcutta to Lahore and back.  The term ‘Tragedy King’ was coined.  And KL Saigal was now firmly entrenched as the most impressive and successful singing star – a pioneer who would be endlessly emulated decade after decade.

‘Devdas’ was a trend setter film in ways more than one.  And it set individuals on career paths that would take them to stalwart status in the coming years. The camera in this film was handled by Bimal Roy.  The dialogue and songwriter was Kedar Sharma.  Both debutante individuals who went on to become luminaries in Indian cinema. The music of Timir Baran remained on the lips of the common man for decades – especially the song “Baalam Aaye Baso Morey Mann Mein”.

Anything that New Theatres put out in those years turned out to be a landmark.  Two other films came from this banner.

‘After The Earthquake’ came in the wake the massive earthquake of 1934 in Bihar.  It is a story of the conflict between a husband and wife, against the backdrop of the earthquake – the husband being a greedy and opportunist businessman (role played by Prithviraj Kapoor) and the wife being a humanitarian and socially conscious philanthropist (role played by Durga Khote). The film had the very first appearance by a child artist who would go on to become the greatest showman the industry has known – Raj Kapoor.

And ‘Karwaan e Hayaat’ was a love story of young royals, starring KL Saigal, Pahadi Sanyal and Rajkumari (Calcutta).

1935 also saw the birth of an unlikely star, that went on to become a cult figure and a legend that sustained for many decades. And this beginning came from Wadia, Nadia and ‘Hunterwali’.  Yes, this is the title of the film produced by the banner Wadia Movietone.  And it was the start of her career as a master stuntwoman for Nadia, (original name Mary Ann Evans). She had earlier appeared in two films (also released in 1935) (‘Desh Deepak’ and ‘Noor e Yaman’, both from Wadia Movietone) in small roles.  Then, on the advice of a fortune teller, who predicted great fame and prosperity for her, if her name was changed to start with the letter ‘N’, she changed her name to Nadia, and the Wadia brothers prepared her to be a star with ‘Hunterwali’.  The stuntwoman sustained on the screen for well over two decades.  The legend continues to prosper even now.

The story of 1935 will never be complete without telling about a new production company that was born this year, and the eminent music director-ess who debuted her career with them.  Himanshu Rai had been active as a producer director since the time of silent films.  Most of his productions were with British or German collaboration.  And the films he created seemed to cater more to the audiences in the West.  Then in 1935, he floated a public limited company and invited some eminent and rich people in Bombay to invest in his new venture.  The company – ‘Bombay Talkies’, boasted of many foreign trained technicians and cinema people. Their first outing was the film ‘Jawaani Ki Hawaa’, a romance cum murder mystery, that was penned by Niranjan Pal .  The action in the film almost entirely takes place in a moving train, which made for an innovative presentation for the audiences. The lead roles were played by Najmul Husain and Devika Rani.

With this film, a new music director-ess made her debut in the industry. Her name – Khursheed Minocher Homji, a young lady with earlier experience of having worked in the music department of All India Radio.  Coming from a Parsi family, she chose to change her name, to avoid any conflicts with the family and friend circle. It is on record that when the film was released, the otherwise mild and gentle Parsi community was furious and up in arms.  There was picketing and slogan shouting outside cinema halls, there was a mild lathi charge and a few comical arrests, and everything quickly fizzled out too.  And the music director-ess, ah yes, we know her more by the assumed name – Saraswati Devi. She went on to be the resident music director for ‘Bombay Talkies’ for many years.

From the banner of Prabhat came two films this year – ‘Chandrasena’ and ‘Dharmaatma’. ‘Chandrasena’, starring Nalini Tarkhud and Suresh Babu, was a social with a message.  This film was about evils of drinking, and how it wrecks the lives of those who drink, as well as their families. ‘Dharmaatma’ was made on the life of Sant Eknaath, an eminent saint of Maharashtra from the sixteenth century. This film also carried a social message – against the evils of the practice of untouchability.  The film was earlier titled ‘Mahatma’.  However, the theme and the title seemed too close to the then contemporary figure of Mahatma Gandhi, that the producers decided to change the title of the film.  The famous maestro of the Marathi stage, Bal Gandharv (real name Narayan Shripad Rajhans), played the title role.  Apparently, the audiences did not take in this role very kindly, as Bal Gandharv was very famous for the female roles he portrayed on stage.  Bal Gandharv had contracted to do six films with Prabhat. The contract was however dissolved just after this one film.

This year also saw the dawn of two names who would go on to become legends in the annals Indian cinema.  Sohrab Modi, who was already a very active and famous personality in the theatre world of Bombay, started his film career by bringing the famous Shakespearean tragedy, ‘Hamlet’, to the screen for the first time, with the title ‘Khoon Ka Khoon’.  The entire film was shot in the studio against the backdrop of curtains on which were painted the various scene settings.  This film also saw the debut of the enchanting Naseem Banu.

Starting with playing an extra in silent films, and then moving on to small bit roles in silent and talkie films, Mehboob Khan eventually was granted his first opportunity by Saagar Movietone, to direct a film.  The film was titled ‘Judgment of Allah’ (also known as ‘Al Hilal’). Mehboob went on to become one of the greatest producer director that Indian cinema has seen.

Other notables of this year.

Jaddanbai setup her production banner, Sangeet Film Company, and produced ‘Talaash e Haq’ which she herself produced, directed, acted in and composed music for. A child artist appeared in this film for the first time – Baby Rani, her own daughter, Fatima Rashid. Baby Rani was destined to later make a name and fame for herself as the actress Nargis. Hmmm. . . interesting to note that both Raj Kapoor and Nargis made their first screen appearances as child artists in the same year.

Debaki Bose produced and directed ‘Jeevan Natak’ starring Durga Khote and P Jairaj. The film was a sardonic commentary on the “artificial and brittle values of the modern society”.  It was a well directed and well performed film, which was Indian representation that year at the Vienna Exhibition.

Imperial Movietone remade their 1928 silent production ‘Anarkali’ by the same name.  the film starred Sulochna and D Billimoria, and turned out to be one of the hit films for the year.

‘Barrister’s Wife’ from the banner of Ranjeet was another hit this year, with the title role played by Gohar.  It told the story about a woman trying to find a place for herself in a man’s world. This film carries the distinction of carrying the first qawwaali song recorded and picturized in Hindi films – “Nazariya Taane Hai Ter Kamaan, Jaane Legi Yeh Kis Kis Ki Jaan” written by Pandit Narayan Prasad ‘Betaab’, with music by Rewa Shankar Marwadi and Banne Khan, fimed on Noor Mohammad “Charlie” and friends.

From the banner of Saagar Movietone came ‘Dr.Madhurika’, another social about the man-woman divide in the society.  The film was based on the story written by the eminent Shri KM Munshi. The title role was played by Sabita Devi. It is a story about a doctor wife of a lawyer husband, and their tussle to balance the professional and personal lives in a society that was being influenced more and more by western values.

And yes, balle-balle, this year saw the birth of Punjabi cinema with the production of the film ‘Ishq e Punjab’.

Anil Biswas presented his first full music score as an independent music director for the film ‘Dharam Ki  Devi’.  He appeared on the screen as a mendicant, and sang three songs.  The song “Kuchh Bhi Nahin Bharosa Duniya Hai Aani Jaani” was the first song that he sang and performed on screen.

Cine actor Harold Luis made his debut this year with the film ‘Majnu’, playing the title role. And guess what, the screen name stuck to him. No one now remembers him as Harold Luis, but everyone knows the comedian and producer director Majnu.

Before he made his mark as a music director, Ramchandra Narhar Chitalkar acted in films. He also made his debut in this year, appearing for the first time in the film ‘Naaganand’.  And he sang two songs, which sound very romantic, just by the words – “Ras Se Bhari Aawat Hai, Koi Virahi Rambha Bade Naaz Se Gaawat Hai” and “Baanke Nayan Waa Ke Baan Lagey, Mohey Pal Pal Mein Aa Aa Ke Chheran Lagey”.

Shobhna Samarth, also made her debut this year in the film ‘Nigaah e Nafrat’, setting a tradition that is still being carried forward by her third generation descendants.  The film also happens to be the directorial debut for Master Vinayak.

Let us now take a look at the numbers.  The year saw the release of 152 films.  The films carry 1513 songs, as listed in the Geet Kosh, with names of 74 music directors.  So far, two films are traceable and available – ‘Devdas’ and ‘Dhoop Chhaon’, both from New Theatres.

As per the information compiled from Geet Kosh and the friend circle of collectors, songs from 28 films are identified and / or available.  HFGK identifies 21 films for which it documents (some) 78 rpm records being released.  After the publication of the HFGK volume 1, information about more 78 rpm records has been traced, for seven additional films.  On the other hand, the physical 78 rpm records for 4 of the 21 films identified in the HFGK, have not yet been traced.  So the net is that records information is available for 28 films, but the actual records are available only for 24.

Coming to songs. These 28 films have a total of 293 songs listed in the HFGK. Of these, 78 rpm records are identified for 60 songs. Of these 60, only 36 songs are available on actual records.  Although the 78 rpm records are identified, the actual records have not yet surfaced in the public domain for 24 of these songs.  In addition to the 60 records identified in the Geet Kosh, 12 more songs have surfaced, as being available on actual physical gramophone records.  Further, 10 additional songs also become available, from the 2 films that are available as videos.  That gives us a net of 58 songs that are currently available in public domain from 24 films.

I repeat the phrase ‘public domain’ because there is good possibility that there are records (and possibly films) that may be in private hands that are not yet shared. At least 24 songs, whose records numbers are listed, and they are not available in public domain, are most likely sitting in some private collections, since these physical records have been issued.

This number of 58 songs as being available, is also confirmed by Shri Girdhari Lal ji. Of these, 32 songs are already posted on our blog. This is the 33rd song from 1935 to appear here. That leaves 25 more songs, that are available, and are yet to be showcased here. The following table summarizes these statistics, and are listed by film name.

1935 Songs Stats

And now, coming to the song in this post.  The film is ‘Yaasmeen’, from 1935, with alternate title ‘Ba-wafaa Aashiq’.  The film makes its debut on the blog today.  Two songs of this film are identified as available.  The film is produced under the banner of Eastern Arts, Bombay.  The film is directed by a gentleman named HK Shivdasani.  Now a query to the more knowledgeable friends and readers.  Is this person the same as the character actor Hari Shivdasani, whom we have seen on the screen, well into the 1970s, and is the father of actress Sadhna?  I am not sure, so I request other friends and readers to comment on this.

The cast of actors listed the Geet Kosh, is Ratan Bai, Ameerbai Karnataki, Siddiqui, Gope Kamlani, M Mirza, D Manek, Hameed, Bhagwan, and Alexander.  Some names are familiar – Bhagwan, Gope Kamlani, and Ameerbai Karnataki.  And what about M Mirza? Is he the same as the one we are more familiar with as Mirza Musharraf?  Year is 1935. What an excitement it would have been. These names are more familiar to us from later years as we have heard them and seen them from the more familiar and more accessible material from 1940s, 50s and later.  But back in the mid 1930s, these artists were starting their careers and were cutting their credentials into this budding industry.  Yes, those were the most exciting years – in its infancy, an industry that was finding its feet and slowly and surely starting to make inroads into the hearts and minds of the people this subcontinent.

There are 13 songs listed for this film.  The music is by Master Chandiram, a name that makes its appearance on our blog for the first time.  I tried to search for more information, but could locate only one reference, which states that Master Chandiram was the father of music director Bulo C Rani, a name that we are more familiar with.

The lyrics for all the songs are written by Gauri Shankar Lal ‘Akhtar’.  Another name that makes a debut with this song today. And again, not much information is available other than a career filmography that can be surmised from the information available in the Geet Kosh.  Gauri ‘Akhtar’ has written approximately 210 songs in 21 films. His active years were from 1933 to 1939, with ‘Lanka Dahan’ (1933) as his first film as a songwriter.  Majority of his work as a songwriter was in the company of music director Anil Biswas. To his credit are some of the more popular film qawwalis that he wrote for the films ‘Delhi Express’ (1935) – “Marnewaala Aapka Is Darja Khush Anjaam Thaa” and “Sair Ko Ban Sanwar Kar Wo Jaane Lage”; ‘Sangdil Samaaj’ (1936) – “Kya Lutf Zindagi Kaa Jo Rashke-Udoo Na Ho” and ‘Sher Ka Panja’ (1936) – “Chilam Jo Gaanje Kee Bhari Peete Hain Sab Yaar”.

The song is sung by Ratanbai.  As per the list of actors, and the notation in the Geet Kosh, the song is also performed on screen by her.  This name is not new on our blog. There are two songs sung by her already present here.

Singer-actress Ratanbai was born in Calcutta in 1911. Her real name was Imaam-baandi. She had a good singing voice from childhood. Not much other information about her early years is available. Her name appears when the talkie films were introduced in 1931, and there was a need for lady artists who could act and also had good singing capabilities.  She made her debut in New Theatres, with the film ‘Subah Ka Sitaara’.  The songs of this film are not available, but from available information, it is known that she and KL Saigal had sung songs in this film.  As per the book ‘Swaron Ki Yatra’ (by Shri Anil Bhargav) she sang a solo song in this film – “Hato Jaao Na Humko Sataao Jee”, which became a hit.

In 1933, she appeared as the female lead opposite to KL Saigal in ‘Yahudi Ki Ladki’.  Once again, a solo hit is credited to her in this film “Apne Maula Ki Jogan Banungi”. In 1934, she again appeared as the female lead in ‘Rooplekha’.  In the next film ‘Karwaan e Hayaat’ (1935), her position was changed to being the second female lead, the female lead role going to Rajkumari (Calcutta). By this time, actress Uma Shashi had also made her presence at New Theatres. Sensing her position moving downhill at New Theatres, Ratanbai moved to Bombay, and appeared as the female lead in 3 films in 1935 – ‘Bhaarat Ki Beti’, ‘Bhikhaarin’ and ‘Yaasmeen’. The song “Tere Poojan Ko Bhagwan. . .” from the film ‘Bhaarat Ki Beti’ is one of the finest songs credited to her.  She continued to work in Bombay for another decade or so.  Her last film was ‘Dharm’(1945) in which she sang three songs under the music direction of Sajjad Husain.  Not much is known about her after 1945. With no more films coming her way, she slowly faded away from the industry and from people’s memory. The closing comment by Shri Anil Bhargav is that she appeared to have lived through difficult times after that, and passed away in poverty.

The song is a light bandish, with more than just a touch of naughtiness.  The lady is impressing upon her beau to keep the conversations low, or it is possible that they might be caught.  Now where they are and what they may be talking about, is not specified, but the curious part is what the lady apprehends will happen if they are caught.  Way back in 1935, that is eighty years ago, she is talking about ‘making a payment’ to get free if the police catches you.  It is mind boggling, to realize that this ‘transactional’ behavior is being expressed so openly in this song from eight decades ago.  And the most interesting part is that the ‘rate’ at which the ‘payment’ is expected to be made, increases with the stature of the police officer who may apprehend you.  A police constable would simply be bought with a payment of few rupees, where as a Munshi at the police station might be ‘bought’ by giving some jewellery. And the icing on this delightfully naughty cake is the ‘kotwal’ – the lady apprehends that the ‘kotwal’ may put the man behind the bars and ‘keep’ her.  Wow – and to imagine that these words were written and sung eighty years ago. Quite a rib-tickling song – and it tells us that the social circumstances were quite the same at that time, as they are today.  Something to contemplate. 🙂

The song has recently been uploaded by Shri Shalin Bhatt.  Listen to this playful song, and marvel – the sounds and the ideas are coming through the mists of past, from eighty years ago. Enjoy.

[Note: I have referred to the following resources for compiling this article.

  • ‘Hindi Cinema – Sadi Ka Safar’ (Hindi Cinema – Journey of a Hundred Years); written by Shri Anil Bhargav
  • ‘A Year In Hindi Movies – 1935’; written by Shri Surjeet Singh, and available on his web page here
  • ‘Seventy Five Years of Indian Cinema’; by Shri Feroze Rangoonwala
  • ‘Dhunon Ki Yatra’; by Shri Pankaj Raag
  • ‘Swaron Ki Yatra’;  by Shri Anil Bhargav
  • Information on songs availability, supplied by Shri Girdhari Lal ji Vshwakarma, (Jodhpur) and Zafar Bhai (Delhi).
  • And last, but not the least – Hindi Film Geet Kosh Vol. 1 (1931-1940); compiled and annotated by Shri Harmandir Singh ‘Hamraaz’

I duly and gratefully acknowledge the immense contribution by the above listed personalities towards original research, documentation and preservation of information and artifacts related to the early history of Indian Cinema.]


Song – Zaraa Dheere Se Bol Koi Sun Lega (Yasmeen) Singer – Ratnabai, Lyrics – Gauri Shankar Lal Akhtar, MD – Master Chandiram

Lyrics

aaaa
aaaaa aaaaa aaaaa
aaaaa aaaaaaa

zara..aa dheere se bol koi sun lega
zara dheere se bol koi sun lega
zara dhee. . .
. . . dheere se bol koi sun lega
zara dheere se

jo sun paave
thaane ka sipahiya
jo sun paave
thaane ka sipahiya
tere se paanch mose das lega
zara dheere se
tere se paanch mose das lega
zara dheere
arre haan
zara dheere
arre haan
zara dheere se bol koi sun lega
zara. . .
zara dheere se bol koi sun lega
zara dheere se

jo sun paave munshi daroga
jo sun paave munshi daroga
teri angoothi meri nath lega
zara dheere se
teri angoothi meri nath lega
zara dheere
arre haan
zara dheere
arre haan
zara dheere
arre haan
zara dheere
arre haan
zara dheere se bol koi sun lega
zara. . .
. . . se bol koi sun lega
zara dheere se

jo sun paave shehar kotwalva
jo sun paave shehar kotwalva
tujhe baandhega mujhe rakh lega
zara dheere se
tujhe baandhega mujhe rakh lega
zara dheere
arre haan
zara dheere
arre haan
zara dheere
arre haan
zara dheere
arre haan
zara dheere se bol koi sun lega
zara dheere se. . .

. . . dheere se bol koi sun lega
zara dheere se bol koi sun lega
zara dheere se bol koi sun lega
zara dheere se

———————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–

आss
आsss आsss आssss
आsss आsssss

ज़रा॰॰आ धीरे से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा धीरे से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा धी॰॰॰
॰॰॰ धीरे से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा धीरे से

जो सुन पावे थाने का सिपहिया
जो सुन पावे थाने का सिपहिया
तेरे से पाँच मो से दस लेगा
ज़रा धीरे से
तेरे से पाँच मो से दस लेगा
ज़रा धीरे
अरे हाँ
ज़रा धीरे
अरे हाँ
ज़रा धीरे से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा॰॰॰
ज़रा धीरे से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा धीरे से

जो सुन पावे मुंशी दरोगा
जो सुन पावे मुंशी दरोगा
तेरी अंगूठी ज़रा धीरे से
मेरी नथ लेगा
तेरी अंगूठी मेरी नथ लेगा
ज़रा धीरे
अरे हाँ
ज़रा धीरे
अरे हाँ
ज़रा धीरे
अरे हाँ
ज़रा धीरे
अरे हाँ
ज़रा धीरे से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा॰॰॰
॰॰॰से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा धीरे से

जो सुन पावे शहर कोतवलवा
जो सुन पावे शहर कोतवलवा
तुझे बाँधेगा मुझे रख लेगा
ज़रा धीरे से
तुझे बाँधेगा मुझे रख लेगा
ज़रा धीरे
अरे हाँ
ज़रा धीरे
अरे हाँ
ज़रा धीरे
अरे हाँ
ज़रा धीरे
अरे हाँ
ज़रा धीरे से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा धीरे से॰॰॰

॰॰॰ धीरे से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा धीरे से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा धीरे से बोल कोई सुन लेगा
ज़रा धीरे से

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9 Responses to "Zaraa Dheere Se Bol Koi Sun Lega"

Simply Great Post Sir !!
1935 – Hindi films – the year becomes ‘live’ here in 2015 for us !!
Great !!

zara zor se bol sab sun lenge. Ratanbai ki aawaz ek ratna hai. Great voice. Greater orchestration.
She sang and acted in Yahoodi Ki Ladki-1933 apne maula ki main jogan banungi 2) laakh sahi haa
Gaazi Salauddin-1939> mujhko gham-e-tanhaai har zulm gavaara hai

Gauri Shankar Lal, ‘Akhtar’ penned in Pratima/ Prem Moorti-1936> bhaagya chakra nit chalta hai karmon ki gati nyaari hai
Dukhiari/ A Tale Of Selfless Love -1937 and Zamana -1938>> iss paap ki duniya se ab aur kahin le chal

I was told that the onus to produce the records was on the producer. HMV and others were not making any records of threir own. If the the producer felt the songs would become popular then only he would finance the production of records. That’s why we find so many songs without records.

Sudhir ji,
Many thanks for the information, research and compilation from various sources in one post.
Truly and Highly commendable indeed.

Sudhirbhai,
“Vow” That is my shortest review to your beautifully written long article. (How can you do this?)
Is this Ratanbai same who has sung many lokgeet?
In that case MD Jaidevji borrowed the lyrics (even tunes to some extent) for the film ‘Mujhe Jeene Do’. (‘Nadi Naare Na Jao’ and ‘Moko Pihar Mein Mat Chhed’.)
Enlighten me please. (Tamaso ma Jyotirgamaya.)

So, this evil of bribing seems to have been in blatant practice, since I was even just two years old !!
Now we know why it is taking enormous time to eradicate the evil.

Sudhir ji,

H K Shivdasani is Hari Shivdasani, the father of Sadhna. I have read his interview published in July 1942 issue of ‘Filmindia’ where it was confirmed that he directed the film ‘Yaasmeen’ (1935).

Incidentally, Hari Shivdasani was a partner in Eastern Arts and in that capacity, he produced about 8 films under that banner.

Hari Shivdasani is father of Babita actually, and uncle of Sadhana.

Oh!
I stand corrected.

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(© 2008 - 2019) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 14900 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3800 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

14949

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1164
Total Number of movies covered =4085

Total visits so far

  • 11,476,133 hits

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Category of songs

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Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

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