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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Hashmat


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4125 Post No. : 15280 Movie Count :

4205

Today’s song is from film Baraat-42. There was a film in 1960 with the same title and another one in 1954 titled Baraati.

The film was made by Kirti Pictures. The director was Dada aka V M Gunjal. The Lyricist was Gujarat’s famous poet Raskavi Raghunath Bramhabhatt. The music was by Ratanlal and Khemraj ( it was a pseudo name of Khemchand Prakash). The cast of the film was Shobhana Samarth, Harish Manmohan, Kaushalya, Mirza Musharraf, Rampyari, Nayampalli, Vatsala Kumthekar, Putlibai, Prakash, Sankata Prasad etc etc.

From the cast one will find few uncommon names like, Rampyari, Nayapalli, Vatsala Kumthekar, Putlibai and Prakash. The first four artistes were major actors in early era films of the Silent and the Talkie films of the 30s. The decade of 40s was a time when their careers were downhill and coming to an end. The last days of Rampyari and Vatsala Kumthekar were very sad and pathetic. Sankatha Prasad was actually a regular actor at Sagar films, but after the eclipse of Sagar, National and Amar, he became a Free Lancer. His younger brother was Kanhaiyalal Chaturvedi, who had joined film line as a writer and Lyricist, but settled with little fame as comic villain and character roles.

If you take a look at, say, 100 artistes who were active in Silent films and switched over to Talkie films, I feel a major chunk of them had a very bad period at the end of their life. Well known artistes like Rattanbai and Wasti-a one time Hero of successful films, became beggars on the street. Vatsala Kumthekar-a well known singer of repute and a Heroine, roamed the streets of Bombay as a Mad woman and died one day as an unclaimed unknown body ! Same was the case with actor singer Parshuram who became a beggar and died on road in Bandra. There are so many cases like this.

Why did this happen to these people ? Thinking about it, I found that many or rather most of the artistes of early era were from poor families and had joined films to survive. When they got money, they enjoyed life fully, without thinking about future. As such in those days actors did not earn so much as today. Further, there were no investment opportunities like today to secure the future. Film artistes did not enjoy respect in the society, so they enjoyed in wine, dine and women, thus spending what they earned. In few cases, the near and dear ones deserted or cheated them, leaving them penny less. All in all, it was a tough life, no doubt.

The case of Master Nisar, who was at one time the only actor in Bombay to own a car and for whom the Governor of Bombay had to make way due to his fan crowd, is very touching. This one time Prince of acting, having 2 Cars, 2 Bungalows, 4 wives and millions of fans, died a pauper in a slum of Kamathipura in Bombay. His last rites were done by the Actors’ Association.

One of the actresses of the film Baraat-42 was Rampyari. Rampyari hailed from a Telugu family of highly skilled professional dancers and singers. She lived in Nagulchinta area of old Hyderabad city.

She was born in 1908 December, the year Hyderabad witnessed devastating floods. She was taught Urdu and English. Apart from her mother tongue Telugu, she was also proficient in Marathi and Kannada. She was trained in Dancing and singing. In 1918, at the age of 10 years, she was taken to Madras by her aunt, who trained her in Bharat Natyam. After 4 years of rigorous training, she became the best dancer of Madras.

In 1926, a film producer from Kohinoor Film company, Bombay, visiting Madras, saw her dancing and invited her to Bombay. It was the era of Silent movies. Her first film was Gunsundari, with Miss Gauhar and Raja Sandow. It was directed by Chandulal Shah and was released in 1927. Her supporting role as a dancer in the film was lauded by the audience. Next film Vile woman was also successful. She acted in more than 20 Silent films as a Heroine and dancer and established her name as a seasoned actress of the 30s.

With the advent of Talkies, she easily switched over. She had no difficulty in delivering Urdu dialogues. In 1931, she acted in Paak Daman, Laila Majnu and Ghar ki laxmi, Gunsundari in 1934 and Azad Abla, Meethi Nazar and Hamlet in 1935.

Famous director Debki Bose from New Theatres, Calcutta invited her and signed up for ” Sunehra Sansar”-36 and Vidyapati-37, which was a mega hit. She had a big dispute with New Theatres and there was mud slinging through legal letters between her and the company, which called her ‘ a street singer ‘ who was helped by the company. She refuted their charges successfully.

She toured the entire south India and gave dance performances in major cities. She became so famous that the Ceylon Labour Union invited her to Ceylon and presented her with Gold Mementos. She was greatly inspired by the acting of Sulochana aka Ruby Meyers and Miss Gauhar of Ranjit, with whom she acted in many films.

She shifted to Bombay permanently in the 30s. Her family also moved out of Hyderabad and came to Bombay. She had a large fan following in Hyderabad. She had a great fan mail too, which she replied in fluent Urdu and English. Later she got married and retired from films.

She acted in 30 films. Her last film was Dak Bungla-47. She sang 14 songs in 8 films.

The other uncommon name in the cast is that of Nayampalli. S.B. Nayampally (or Nayampalli) was working at the firm of Killick, Nixon and Company when he was discovered by film director P.Y. Altekar at a gym where Nayampally regularly exercised. Altekar felt that Nayampally very much resembled the famous French boxer Georges Carpenter and would be perfect for the stunt films that had become popular at the time. At Altekar’s urging, Nayampally joined Imperial Studios and was quickly cast in his first film, Wedding Night(1929), opposite the popular actress Jilloo.

When he arrived at Imperial to begin his first day of filming he was amused to find that the building now used for the studio had formerly housed the school he’d attended as a child.“Wedding Night was a stunt film of the Robin Hood type,” Nayampally explained in a 1964 interview. “It had a little more of a plot to it than many films of the same class. My next film, Hell’s Paradise (1929), I remember for three reasons. One, it was based on a real-life episode involving an Indian prince and a foreign girl, described as an adventuress. Two, Mama Warerekar, the noted writer, did the story. Three, the film had a kissing scene, probably the first ever in an Indian film.”

Nayampalli was cast in Imperial’s Noorjehan (1931), which was initially to be a silent picture, but because of the success of their film Alam Ara (1931), which was India’s first talkie, the studio decided to make Noorjehan partly with sound. Nayampally was not originally cast in Noorjehan, but a chance meeting with the film’s director, Ezra Mir, got him the role of Prince Salim in the film.Nayampally then played Karna in Imperial’s next sound film, the mythological Draupadi (1931), but the actor considered his best mythological role to be that of the wily Shakuni in Mahatma Vidur (1943), a part that was appreciated by critics and the public, alike.

As sound films came in, silent actors were being discarded in favor of those with stage backgrounds and could not sing, so Nayampalli joined the Grant Anderson Theatrical Company which specialized in Shakespearean plays. After gaining some experience he tried to rejoin films, but without much luck. His previous roles had been leads, so he decided if he wanted to work regularly, maybe he should take a different approach and he offered himself up for character parts.His break came in the role of a hunchback in love with the heroine in Ezra Mir’s Zarina which starred Jal Merchant and Zubeida. The dentures he wore for the role were created specially by a dentist named Jimmy Gheista who had trained abroad with the dentist who had made similar dentures for Lon Chaney.

Nayampally had learned early on how to apply make-up for his roles and, in fact, he became so good at it he eventually came to specialize in horror make-up, which earned him the nickname “The Indian Lon Chaney.” Indeed, Chaney, Erich von Stroheim, Emil Jannings, and John Barrymore were the actors that Nayampally most tried to emulate. Boris Karloff was another of his role models. He was able to put his make-up expertise to good use for the film Sair-e-Paristan (1934), where he was a vampire-like devil, and in Zingaro(1935), in which he played a monster created by a mad scientist, and then as a the hairy “missing link” in Zambo (1937) and its sequel Zambo Ka Beta (1938). For Kalkoot (1935) he created a make-up to resemble the wrinkled effect that Karloff had used in The Mummy(1932).

Nayampally continued working in films throughout the 1940s and 50s, particularly in mythologicals and costume pictures including Raj Nartaki (1941), Nagad Narayan (1943), Vishwas 1943), Taramati(1945), Urvashi (1946), Jhansi-Ki-Rani (1953), Durgesh Nandini (1956), Basant Bahar (1956) and Shiv Parvati (1962) His last credited film appearance was in 1970’s Priya.

After the career in films ended, he started making Documentaries. He made about 35 documentaries. He won ‘ Silver Dolphin’ award for his documentary in the International Film Festival at Teheran in 1970. He died on 7-5-1994, in Mumbai.

The story of the film Baraat-42 was that of a Love pair who get separated and in the end get united, when the Lover Boy brings a Baraat to the Girl’s house. It is also a story of 2 friends who get distanced due to wealth. The story is….Jwala Prasad and Kabirchand are 2 friends staying as neighbours. Jwala has a son Savan and a daughter Lalima. Kabir has 2 daughters- Nayna and Kiran.

Savan and Nayna are betrothed in childhood. By the time they grow up, Jwala Prasad becomes very rich and Kabir remains poor. This creates a distance between the two families and also the marriage of their children is also in jeopardy. The lovers are banned to see each others.

The film is full of emotional scenes and improbable situations. Dada Gunjal’s direction is unable to fill in the gaps in the storyline. The story brings changes in the mindset of Jwala Prasad and finally, he agrees to the marriage.

Today’s song is sung by Suhas and Hashmat. I am not aware who is Suhas, but Hashmat is the real name of actor Prakash, who is in this film. In all probabilities, he is the same person who sang this duet. Hashmat (Prakash) had worked on A.I.R.Delhi as a singer for 2 years, 1938 to 1940, before he came back to Bombay to restart his acting career with Rani Sahiba-1940.

With this song, film Baraat-42 and Suhas and Hashmat make their debut on this Blog.

(Thanks to book ‘ The Lost Treasure ‘ by Kamlakar P. for some information used herein along with my notes.)


Song-Hans le hans le hans le (Baaraat)(1942) Singers – Hashmat, Suhas, Lyrics- Raskavi Raghunath Bramhabhatt, MD – Ratanlal- Khemchand Prakash

Lyrics

Hans le
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le
hansi se jeevan bhar le ae
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le

tera jaag uthha sansaar
gulshan mein aayi bahaa aar
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le
kali kali upwan mein hansti
haan panchhi hanste lataayen hanstin
panchhi hanste lataayen hanstin
hanste gaate kisaan jaayen
hanste gaate kisaan jaayen
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le

jhaanjhaniyaa jhankaati jaatin
panghat pe purnaar
jhaanjhaniyaa jhankaati jaatin
panghat pe purnaar
tera jaag uthha sansaar
tera jaag uthha sansaar
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le

murli waale
hans khushi se
royen un ko rone do
beh chali nainon ki dhaara
beh chali nainon ki dhaara
man dhoye unko dhone do
tum gaao megh malhaar
tum gaao megh malhaar
waise to mera ujad gaya hai
hara bhara gulzaar

aasha ko mat kar le niraasha
aasha hai sansaa aar
aasha ko mat kar le niraasha
aasha hai sansaar
sun le pyaari
aasha ki jhankaa aar
sun le pyaari
aasha ki jhankaar
tera jaag uthha sansaar
tera jaag uthha sansaar
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le
Hans le

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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