Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘SK Pal


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4749 Post No. : 16484

So. Finally it is official.

We are teenagers now, the first step into the growing up years. The childhood years left behind and now the coming of age years are starting.

What started off as a ‘let’s-try-it’ hobby run with the simplest of the simple philosophical musings – “Miley Na Phool To Kaanton Se Dosti Kar Li“, has come of age today and has blossomed into a huge tree with thousands of branches spread out, with roots that are deep and strong, and are full of conviction. A tree that provides shade in terms of solace to the lovers of music, which in turn are spread out all over the globe. This is the world tree of music and songs. This is a tree that has a flavor for every palate, a tree that has fruits of everlasting tastes for the connoisseurs, a tree that conserves and perpetuates that enchanting phenomena that is the lovely Hindi Film Music – this is a tree that has many different meanings and many different treasures for the seekers of pleasure in music. There is a whole universe of music that has  settled itself around this tree. Although the desires abounded for flowers, but when none were forthcoming this direction, the protagonist settled for the proverbial thorns to start with. That humble gesture ensured that flowers of all shades and colors, and also, flower bearers of all tastes and wonders, kept on coming together one by one, till a complete orchestra of performers was formed, and the bandwagon got its name.

Thirteen years and counting. And if you talk of counting, here are some counts that will really make you happy with wonder.

Do you know that we have a visitor to this blog, every thirty seconds – the total count (and still counting) is upwards of 14.5 million visitors. Now that is a number to really wonder about.

Do you know that we have been averaging quite, quite close to one new film per day since the inception of this blog. 4749 days today and 4480 films showcased. And oh yes, that is not counting the Non-Film songs categories. Adding them categories, we shall surely be at 1+ new film or new non-film song category per day. Isn’t that a wow that makes one feel like flying.

Do you know that the average daily rate of posting is upwards of three posts per day. Try doing that seven days a week, 365 days a year, and continuously at that rate for 13 years. Try writing a letter each to three friends every day, day on day, for 13 years. My, does that no yet boggle the mind.

And that is where the superlatives start ceasing to have an impact.

13 years – 4,749 days – 16,484 posts. . .

And just ONE person.  Now isn’t that something to boggle the google. Especially when we know it is a labor of love, and that it is not an endeavor for remuneration. Ah yes, it does finally boil down to love. As does of course, everything else in this universe.

That one person, carrying the entire earth on his shoulders, like the legendary Atlas. Not pausing for even a day to rest. Of course yes, there have been rarities that we have had dot days. But in the final count, the averages will speak for themselves. No matter how many runs and how many centuries – double, triple – any other batsman has scored, the Don Bradman remains the Don Bradman when the averages are calculated.

Atul ji, over the years that we have been associated for this endeavor, we have completely used up all the possible epithets and adjectives to address our appreciation of your work. And now, we are at a loss to articulate this emotion any further. And will finally end up saying these lines that I borrow from another legend – ABBA,

So I say
Thank you for the music, the songs I’m singing
Thanks for all the joy they’re bringing
Who can live without it? I ask in all honesty
What would life be?
Without a song or a dance, what are we?
So I say thank you for the music
For giving it to me

And not just to me – to this entire world, a compilation that is sans any peers. Who would have thought it could have been possible. Your own words have been that your earliest flights of imagination brought you to a number of maybe 2,500. And that then you would rest.

Aah, but for the passion this ignited, within yourself, and within this motley crew of the musical bandwagon. The counter is ticking oh so close to 16,500 posts. And not a day’s breather seems to be in view. Mightier and stronger and higher we ride the Olympian altitudes. And the bandwagon keeps chugging along, day on day, week on week, month on. . .

I just thought of taking a look at the date of 19th July across our travels. We have had a total of 68 posts that have been celebrating this anniversary, after the intial 19th July post of 2008. Seven posts in 2009, 4 posts in 2010, 5 posts in 2011, 6 posts in 2012, 5 posts again in 2013, then on to 7 posts once again in 2014, 5 posts in 2015, and wow, a whopping 8 posts in 2016, back to 4 posts in 2017, aah – 3 posts in 2018, 4 posts in 2019, back up to 6 posts in 2020, and then today, 4 posts again to celebrate this wondrous milestone. With songs posted across the entire spectrum of decades, from 1936 all the way up to 2002, the celebrations of this anniversary have been multifarious and varied.

Ah but let me not bore you with any more statistics and analyses. And bring you to this song for the celebration today.

Geeton Ka Sansaar Yahaan Par

Took me a while to locate this wonderfully complementary theme song for this celebration. And for its rarity, it is – sorry, it was not yet available online. The film is ‘Nai Reet’ from 1948. The film itself makes a debut on our blog today.

The film has been produced under the banner of India Film Corporation, Bombay and is directed by Shubh Karan Ojha. This relatively obscure film that probably did not garner much attention and box office receipts when it was released in 1948, has the cast listed as Sulochana Chatterjee, Geeta Bali, Rajendra, Krishankant, Tiwari, Badri Prasad, Tara Bai, Leela Mishra, and Ramesh Sinha. Most names are familiar, and I am sure the full cast would be carrying more names.

The film has 8 songs in total. All the songs are written by a team of two songwriters in collaboration – Bal Krishan Gupta and Ratan Kumar Gupta. The footnote that is carried in the Geet Kosh, succinctly states that – “As per the information recieved from Lyricist Bal Krishna Gupta all songs this film were written by both Lyricists working together, i.e. `Kumar-Gupta` (Ratan `Kumar` Gupta + Bal Krishna `Gupta`. However the records carry the name as `Kumar Gupta`.” So by this input, we would also use the lyricist’s name as Kumar-Gupta.

The music is by SK Pal, and the singing voice is that of Meena Kapoor.

And the words – they oh so well sum up the emotions of this celebration today – that here is a universe of songs that has been put together for us.

गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है
पत्ती पत्ती झूम रही
हर फूल में जादू फैला है

A world of songs is here
It is a festival celebration of smiles
Every leaf is swaying with delight
There is a joyous magic spread through every flower

मैं भी अपनी झोली लाई
भर लेने को बिखरी दौलत
मैं भी दौड़ी दौड़ी आई
क्या छोड़ूँ क्या चुन लूँ इस में
लगता बड़ा झमेला है

In haste I come here
To gather this treasure spread about
I try to garner it all in my arms
And the mind is in a dilemma
What all shall I take
And what all shall I leave

एक अनोखा बाग है दुनिया
सुन्दर सुन्दर प्यारा प्यारा
मानो मीठा राग है दुनिया
पागल मन मेरा मस्ती में
कली सा खिल खिल खेला है

What a joyful garden this world is
So beautiful and lovely
The whole world is a sweet melody
And my mind is untamed in passion
Blossoming like new buds playing

Yes, all these emotions run through the mind when I look at this incredible and phenomenal treasure of enchanting melodies – this world of songs, here, with us.

A grand celebration for this inception day milestone.

A wonderful musical greetings to all readers and all members of the musical bandwagon.

And a bagful of wishes and blessings, that this tree may only proliferate further, day by passing day.

And that this journey may never cease.

तमन्ना है ये साथ चलते रहें हम ना बीते कभी ये सफर. . .

Song – Geeton Ka Sansaar Yahaan Par  (Nai Reet) (1948) Singer – Meena Kapoor, Lyrics – Kumar-Gupta, MD – SK Pal

Lyrics

geeton ka sansaar yahaan par
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
geeton ka sansaar yahaan par
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
mela hai
patti patti jhoom rahi
jhoom rahi
patti patti jhoom rahi
jhoom rahi
har phool mein
har phool mein jaadu phaila hai
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
mela hai
geeton ka sansaar yahaan par
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai

main bhi apni jholi laai
main bhi apni jholi laai
bhar lene ko bikhri daulat
main bhi daudi daudi aayi
kya chhodoon kya chun loon is mein
kya chhodoon kya chun loon is mein
lagta bada jhamela hai
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
mela hai
geeton ka sansaar yahaan par
muskaanon ka mela hai

ek anokha baag hai duniya
ek anokha baag hai duniya
sundar sundar pyaara pyaara
maano meetha raag hai duniya
maano meetha raag hai duniya
paagal mann mera masti mein
paagal mann mera masti mein
kali sa khil khil khela hai
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
mela hai
geeton ka sansaar yahaan par
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
mela hai

————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
————————————————
गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
मेला है
पत्ती पत्ती झूम रही
झूम रही
पत्ती पत्ती झूम रही
हर फूल में
हर फूल में जादू फैला है
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
मेला है
गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है

मैं भी अपनी झोली लाई
मैं भी अपनी झोली लाई
भर लेने को बिखरी दौलत
मैं भी दौड़ी दौड़ी आई
मैं भी दौड़ी दौड़ी आई
क्या छोड़ूँ क्या चुन लूँ इस में
क्या छोड़ूँ क्या चुन लूँ इस में
लगता बड़ा झमेला है
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
मेला है
गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है

एक अनोखा बाग है दुनिया
एक अनोखा बाग है दुनिया
सुन्दर सुन्दर प्यारा प्यारा
मानो मीठा राग है दुनिया
मानो मीठा राग है दुनिया
पागल मन मेरा मस्ती में
पागल मन मेरा मस्ती में
कली का खिल खिल खेला है
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
मेला है
गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
मेला है


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4393 Post No. : 15761

Screenplay is the first stage when a film is said to be born on paper. A screenplay writer translates the story/script from its literary form to an audio-visual presentation incorporating the ideas of the directors as to how each character is to be presented, the mood of the scenes, the surrounding environments, the stance of dialogue deliveries, the camera angles, lighting etc. Some screenplay writers also incorporate the dialogues. Directors like Satyajit Ray would write the screenplay in sketch form, visually presenting the scenes in each sheet of paper, something like what we used to see RK Laxman’s ‘You Said It’ in newspapers. In other words, screenplay is a complete document, representing a film in a paper format.

In a professional set-up, a director of the film would like to have with him a bound copy of the screenplay, a copy of which he would also handed over to each one of main actors, cinematographer, art director, sound engineer, choreographer, lyricists, music directors etc. before the film’s shooting commences. Some of the directors like Bimal Roy used to follow the system (as revealed by Dilip Kumar in an interview) while directors like Guru Dutt did not give much importance to this system as quite often, he used to make changes in the screenplay at the spur of the moment  while shooting (as revealed by Abrar Alvi in his book, ‘Ten Years With Guru Dutt’). In our office parlance, we can call screenplay as a manual of instructions for all those who are closely associated with the making of a particular film.

From the above description, it is apparent as to how important the role of screenplay writers have in the making of films. Unfortunately, most of the screenplay writers are ‘faceless’ in the sense that their faces seldom appear on the film magazines. It was Salim-Javed, the duo who, as a story, screenplay and dialogue writer, attained the status of stars during 1970s and early 80s and their faces became familiar to most of the cinema-lovers.

I am discussing in this article, one of the most prominent ‘faceless’ screenplay writers, an introvert who kept a low profile despite writing screenplays for many Hindi films for over 3 decades, which became popular. Some of his works attained the classic status such as ‘Parineeta’ (1953), ‘Devdas’ (1955), ‘Sujata’ (1959), ‘Bandini’ (1963), ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966), ‘Abhiman’ (1971). He is the Bengali novelist and short-story writer, dancer, theatre actor and the director, Nabendu Ghosh who became a screenplay writer by default.

I came to know about Nabendu Ghosh for the first time about 3 years back when I was going through a book ‘Gulzar in Conversations with Nasreen Muni Kabir’ and Gulzar’s many interviews on the newspapers. In the book and the interviews, Gulzar gave credit to Nabendu Ghosh in shaping his career as a screenplay writer. I became interested in knowing him in details only when I came to know that he had made a statement as early as in 1945 that if at all he joined the film industry, it would be only under Bimal Roy. I found this statement surprising because in Bengali literary circle, he had already attained the status of a star writer due to popularity of his novels and short stories.

During the past few days, I have read books and interviews on Nabendu Ghosh given by his colleagues in the film industry, his own interview on Vividh Bharati and the extracts from his Bengali autobiography, ‘Eka Naukar Yatri’ (‘Traveler of the Lonely Boat’) translated in English by his daughter, Ratnottama Sengupta. On the basis of these sources, I have written his profile incorporating the important events in his life which is given below:

Nabendu Bhushan Ghosh (27/03/1916 – 15/12/2007) was born in Dhaka where he did his early schooling. The family shifted to Patna when his father, an advocate started practicing at the Patna High Court. Nabendu continued his secondary school in Patna and continued his college there completing MA in English literature. During his Patna days, Nabendu joined a local theatre group where he acted, mostly in the female role. He also learnt dancing at Uday Shankar’s Almora Cultural Centre.

Nabendu got a job in DIG’s office in Patna. However, during Quit India Movement, he wrote articles against the British rules. For this, he got warning from his sympathetic superiors from the office not to indulge in writing anti-British articles. Instead of heeding their advice, he preferred to resign from the job and shifted to Kolkata in 1944 where his life as a novelist and short story writers began. By the end of 1940s, Nabendu had became a star writer as his novels and short stories were very popular. During this period, he had written stories depicting almost every aspects of life in Bengal – the famine, the tram, the strike, the rationing, communal violence, partitions victims etc.

On a visit to Rajshahi (now in Bangla Desh) sometime in 1945, he watched a Bangla film ‘Udayer Pathe’ (1945) in a theatre. The film had influenced him so much that he took a vow that if he ever become a writer for the films, it would be for Bimal Roy, the director of the film. Probably, this was more like an emotional reaction to the film rather than his serious intention at that time. After a couple of years, Nabendu had a chance meeting with Bimal Roy in Kolkata who was impressed with writings. But it was not until 1951 when Ashok Kumar invited Bimal Roy to direct the film ‘Maa’ (1952) that Bimal Roy thought of taking Nabendu along with him.

Both for Bimal Roy and Nabendu Ghosh, the migration to Mumbai was not by choice but because of the compelling circumstances. With the creation of East Pakistan (now Bangla Desh), the markets for Bangla films and the Bangla novels and short stories had considerably dwindled thanks to the then East Pakistan Government’s policy of suppressing Bangla language in favour of Urdu. What was thought to be a temporary assignment in Mumbai in 1951 became a long creative association between Bimal Roy and Nabendu Ghosh from 1951 to 1966 as a screenplay writer in 9 films besides doing cameo roles in ‘Do Bhiga Zameen’ (1953) and ‘Sujata’ (1959).

During his 3 decades of association with Hindi films, Nabendu Ghosh wrote screenplay for a little over 30 films which included apart from Bimal Roy’s films mentioned above, films like ‘Aar Paar’ (1954), ‘Baadbaan’ (1954), ‘Milap’ (1955), ‘Detective’ (1958), ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966), ‘Sharafat’ (1970), ‘Laal Pathar’ (1971), ‘Abhiman’ (1973), “Pratigya’ (1975), ‘Ganga Ki Saugandh’ (1978), ‘Krodhi’ (1981) etc. He also directed ‘Trishagni’ (1988) which gave him the National Film Award for the best debut director. Sometime in the middle of his filmy career, he had directed ‘Doctor Babu‘ (based on Phanishwarnath Renu’s story, ‘Maila Aanchal’) with Dharmendra and Jaya Bahaduri in the lead roles and RD Burman as the music director. When 70% of the film was canned, the producer of the film died leaving the film unfinished.

In 1995, he directed a television serial for Doordarshan, ‘Anmol Moti’ on Ashok Kumar. He directed Children Film Society’s ‘Netraheen Sakshi’ and for Ministry of Health, the film ‘Ladkiyaan’ (1997). He was a visiting faculty at FTII and conducted workshops on screenplay writing during 1967 to 1980. During his life time, Nabendu wrote 26 Bengali novels, 18 collections of Bengali short stories and his only English book – ‘Ashok Kumar – His Life and Times’.

Nabendu Ghosh passed away in Kolkata on December 15, 2007 at a ripe age of 91. Nabendu Ghosh’s last novel, ‘Kadam Kadam’ based on the experiences of character actor, Nazir Hussain in INA, was released during his birth centenary year 2016.

If we go through the list of the films for which Nabendu Ghosh wrote screenplays, it would be observed that most of the films were based on stories from literature. His screenplay writings were so powerful that even in respect of women displayed in the films as fallen from the grace from the eyes of the society, the cine audience loved those characters like Chandramukhi in ‘Devdas’ (1955), Kalyani in ‘Bandini’ (1963), Bijli in ‘Chanda Aur Bijli’ (1965), Hirabai in ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) and Chandni in ‘Sharafat’ (1970). Raj Kapoor had said after the release of ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) that Nabendu Ghosh’s screenplay brought in him the character of  ‘Hiraman’ more than that of Raj Kapoor.

Ratnottama Sengupta, the daughter of Nabendu Ghosh directed one-hour documentary film, ‘And They Made Classic Films’ on the bonding between Bimal Roy and her father based on his interviews. The film was shown at 23rd Kolkata International Film Festival, 2017. One of the interesting anecdotes which Ratnottama Sengupta narrated from the documentary film is –

“On the first day of shoot of ‘Devdas’ (1955), Dilip Kumar was in a tense mood walking up and down on the studio floor. When Nabendu Ghosh asked the reason, Dilip Kumar said that all three are sitting on his shoulders, referring to Pramathesh Barua who directed ‘Devdas’ (1935), KL Saigal who acted in it and Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay who wrote the novel. She said that Nabendu Ghosh buried all three ghosts and painted a fresh picture of Devdas in his screen-play in such a way that even today when we talk of Devads, we think of Dilip Kumar.” [Quoted in an article by Anuj Kumar in ‘The Hindu’, January 5, 2018).

There were some pitfalls in Nabendu Ghosh’s filmy career also. He never got credit for writing screenplay for the film ‘Madhumati’ (1958). In fact, there is no mention of screenplay writer in the credit title of the film. When Guru Dutt selected one of his stories and wanted him to write screenplay for ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’ (1959) on his story, Nabendu Ghosh declined by saying that he was busy with the screenplay of ‘Sujata’. He gave his story to Guru Dutt requesting him to get the screenplay written by someone else. When the film was released, Nabendu Ghosh was surprised to note that he was not credited in the film as a story writer while Abrar Alvi was duly credited as screenplay and dialogue writer.

‘Baadbaan’ (1954) for which Nabendu Ghosh wrote the screen-play, is regarded as a classic film though the film did not fare well at the box office. Vijay Anand who claimed in an interview at Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute, Kolkata in 2003 that he had seen this film 10 times. He regards it as a piece of literature appearing on the screen. It was more of a screenplay writer’s triumph than the director.

I am presenting a song “Thukra Ke Teri Duniya Ko” from ‘Baadbaan’ (1954) which is rendered by Asha Bhosle. The song is written by Indeevar which is set to music by Timir Baran-S K Pal. In this song, Asha Bhosle seems to be trying to sing like Lata Mangeshkar, that too the way Lata has sung in ‘Anarkali’ (1953). Of course, this is my hunch.

Song – Thukra Ke Teri Duniya Ko (Baadbaan) (1954) Singer – Asha Bhosle, Lyrics – Indeewar, MD – Timir Baran, SK Pal

Lyrics

thukra ke teri duniya ko
chaahoon to kar doon choor
magar tere pyaar se hoon majboor
thukra ke teri duniya ko
chaahoon to kar doon choor
magar tere pyaar se hoon majboor
piya teri preet se hoon majboor
 
beh jaaye na teri duniya
aansoo na bahaaungi main
beh jaaye na teri duniya
aansoo na bahaaungi main
meri haaye na tujhko jalaa de
tere paas na aaungi main
mujhe dekhe na teri nazren
dekhe na teri nazren
ho jaaun itni door
magar tere pyaar se hoon majboor
piya teri preet se hoon majboor
 
baddua na dil de baithe
tujh ko na dosh doongi main
baddua na dil de baithe
tujh ko na dosh doongi main
taqdeer ke bair kiya hai
taqdeer se lad loongi main
main tod chalun
main tod chalun ek pal mein
tod chalun ek pal mein
duniya ka har dastoor
magar tere pyar se hoon majboor
piya teri preet se hoom majboor

thukra ke teri duniya ko
chaahun to kar doon choor
magar tere pyaar se hoon majboor
piya teri preet se hoon majboor

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

ठुकरा के तेरी दुनिया को
चाहूँ तो कर दूँ चूर
मगर तेरे प्यार से हूँ मजबूर
ठुकरा के तेरी दुनिया को
चाहूँ तो कर दूँ चूर
मगर तेरे प्यार से हूँ मजबूर
पिया तेरी प्रीत से हूँ मजबूर

बह जाये ना तेरी दुनिया
आंसूँ ना बहाऊँगी मैं
बह जाये ना तेरी दुनिया
आंसूँ ना बहाऊँगी मैं
मेरी हाए ना तुझको जला दे
तेरे पास ना आऊँगी मैं’
मुझे देखें ना तेरी नज़रें
देखें ना तेरी नज़रें
हो जाऊँ इतनी दूर
मगर तेरे प्यार से हूँ मजबूर
पिया तेरी प्रीत से हूँ मजबूर

बद्दुआ ना दिल दे बैठे
तुझको ना दोष दूँगी मैं
बद्दुआ ना दिल दे बैठे
तुझको ना दोष दूँगी मैं
तक़दीर ने बैर किया है
तक़दीर से लड़ लूँगी मैं’
मैं तोड़ चलूँ
मैं तोड़ चलूँ इक पल में
तोड़ चलूँ इक पल में
दुनिया का हर दस्तूर
मगर तेरे प्यार से हूँ मजबूर
पिया तेरी प्रीत से हूँ मजबूर

ठुकरा के तेरी दुनिया को
चाहूँ तो कर दूँ चूर
मगर तेरे प्यार से हूँ मजबूर
पिया तेरी प्रीत से हूँ मजबूर


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4380 Post No. : 15725

‘Baadbaan’ (1954) was produced by Bombay Talkies Workers’ Industrial Society, the last-ditch efforts by the workers of The Bombay Talkies to keep the banner alive. The Bombay Talkies was on the verge of its closure when it faced the financial crunch following the failures of ‘Tamaasha’ (1952) and ‘Maa’ (1952) at the box office. ‘Baadbaan’ had star cast comprising of actors who were mostly the well-wisher of The Bombay Talkies. They included Ashok Kumar, Dev Anand, Meena Kumari, Usha Kiran, Jairaj, Leela Chitnis, Sheikh Mukhtar, Krishnakant, Bipin Gupta, Gope etc.

The film was majorly shot in Versova, (locals call it as ‘Vesave’), a fishing village at the outskirt of the then Bombay City. Among the names of the other crew members of the film mentioned here , is the name of Raja H Mura (Harishchandra Mura) as one of the Assistant Directors who assisted Phani Majumdar in the film. I came to know from a facebook upload of a print page concerning the film that Raja H Mura was a fisherman of Versova village near Andheri in Mumbai who also worked as a junior artist in films. It was Raja who made all the logistic arrangements for shootings in the Varsova village and also in the sea. Probably, with his experience of sailing in high sea, the shots involving the sailing of boats and their capsizing in the sea may have been supervised by Raja.

The name of Versova fishermen’s village took me back by over 6 decades. I recalled that I had accompanied my family members to Versova village sometime in mid-1950s to pay a social visit to one of our relatives who ran a grocery shop and a small restaurant in the village.  He was staying in one of the Portuguese types of house, almost similar to the ones I have seen later in Goa. The visit was a full of adventure. From Andheri railway station, we took a horse carriage which dropped us near Four Bungalows (or Seven Bungalows?). From this point, we had to walk through a narrow muddy path for about 15-20 minutes which passed through a swamp to reach the village. Now, Versova is an upscale locality in the suburb of Mumbai though a part of it still retains its old world village charm.

The print of ‘Baadbaan’ (1954) was lost in a studio fire along with some more films. So, the chances of watching this film in the future looks very bleak. Based on Encyclopaedia of Indian Cinema, the broad story of the film is as under:

Lalan (Jairaj), the village headman, leaves to warn fishermen about an impending storm but he goes missing during the storm followed by his wife Leela (Leela Chitnis). Their orphaned child who is left in the house is adopted by the District Magistrate, Choudhary (Bipin Gupta). The child grows up to become Naren (Dev Anand). Educated abroad, he is to wed Bina (Meena Kumari), the daughter of a family friend. Shankar (Ashok Kumar), Naren’s friend and Bina’s music teacher, is also in love with her but keeps his feeling to himself. The marriage of Naren with Bina is called off when Choudhary admits that Naren is the son of a fisherman, adopted by him.

With this background, Naren shifts to  his village where he decides to dedicate his life to the welfare of the fishermen. He starts an ice factory and the workers co-operative society. He falls in love with the village girl, Mohnia (Usha Kiran). In the meanwhile, seeing that Bina is very sad as she misses Naren, Choudhury agrees to her marriage with Naren. But she is unhappy about his rural activism. The death of his wife, Bina in a tragic circumstance leads Naren to be with his own people and also with Mohnia who shares his passion for improving the lots of fishermen in his village.

There are 7 songs in the film written by Indiwar (5) and Uddhav Kumar (2) of which two songs have already been covered in the blog. All songs were set to music by Timir Baran and SK Pal. I am presenting the third song of the film, “Har Roz Kaha, Har Roz Suna” sung by Geeta Dutt. The song is written by Indiwar under the music direction of Timir Baran and SK Pal. Going by the wordings of the song, I guess this song is picturised on Meena Kumari and the situation of the song could be after her marriage with Dev Anand is called off, she is in a sad state of mind.

It is a poignant song which surprisingly eluded the blog for so long.

Song – Har Roz Kaha Har Roz Suna (Baadbaan) (1954) Singer – Geeta Dutt, Lyrics – Indeewar, MD – Timir Baran – SK Pal

Lyrics

har roz kaha har roz suna
ek baat na poori ho paayi..ee
ho paayi
har roz kaha har roz suna
ek baat na poori ho paayi..ee
ho paayi
har roz kaha
 
dil de bhi chuke dil le bhi chuke
dil de bhi chuke dil le bhi chuke
saugaat na poori ho paayi..ee
ho paayi
har roz kaha
 
aakash mein jaise chaand badhaa
aakash mein jaise chaand badhaa
badhti hi gayi mann ki aasha
saagar chalka dhaara nikli
phir bhi ye jeevan hai pyaasa
chhaayi bhi ghata paani barsa
barsat na poori ho paayi..ee
ho paayi
har roz kaha
 
uthti hi rahi saagar mein lahar
uthti hi rahi saagar mein lahar
kuchh kam na huyi chaahat dil ki
paa kar bhi tumhen ye dil na bhara
kuchh aur badhi hasrat dil ki
shehnaai baji aur raat saji
baarat na poori ho paayi..ee
ho paayi
har roz kaha

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

हर रोज़ कहा
हर रोज़ सुना
एक बात ना पूरी हो पाई॰॰ई
हो पाई
हर रोज़ कहा
हर रोज़ सुना
एक बात ना पूरी हो पाई॰॰ई
हो पाई
हर रोज़ कहा

दिल दे भी चुके
दिल ले भी चुके
सौगात ना पूरी हो पाई॰॰ई
हो पाई
हर रोज़ कहा

आकाश में जैसे चाँद बढ़ा
आकाश में जैसे चाँद बढ़ा
बढ़ती ही गई मन की आशा
सागर छलका
धारा निकली
फिर भी ये जीवन है प्यासा
छाई भी घटा
पानी बरसा
बरसात ना पूरी हो पाई॰॰ई
हो पाई
हर रोज़ कहा

उठती ही रही सागर में लहर
उठती ही रही सागर में लहर
कुछ कम ना हुई चाहत दिल की
पा कर भी तुम्हें ये दिल ना भरा
कुछ और बढ़ी हसरत दिल की
शनहाई बजी
और रात सजी
बारात ना पूरी हो पाई॰॰ई
हो पाई
हर रोज़ कहा


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3744 Post No. : 14701

Today’s song is from a comparatively less known film, ‘Prem Sangeet’ (1943). It was produced and directed by WZ Ahmed, under his own banner, Shalimar Pictures, Poona. The music was by its resident MD SK Pal aka Suryakant Pal (nephew of MD Ramchandra Pal, who was with Bombay Talkies). The lyricist was Bharat Vyas. The cast of the film was Neena, Jairaj, H Prakash, Shanta Thakkar, Rajkumari Shukla, Tiwari, Anwar, Gulab, Randhir and many more. The song is sung by Bharat Vyas and Shanta Thakkar.

Bharat Vyas (18-12-1918 to 4-7-1982) wrote 1247 songs in 189 films. In addition, he acted in 3 films, ‘Ghulami’ (1945), ‘Prithviraj Sanyogita’ (1946) and ‘Maa’ (1952). He directed a film also – ‘Rangila Rajasthan’ (1949). He sang 8 songs in 6 films – ‘Prem sangeet’ (1943), ‘Mann Ki Jeet’ (1944), ‘Ghulami’ (1945), ‘Chandralekha’ (1948), ‘Navrang’ (1959) and ‘Santaan’ (1980). He was one of the MDs for film ‘Rangila Rajasthan’ and had composed 3 songs. Shanta Thakkar, who sang with him was also not a regular singer. She had sung just one song in ‘Nirdosh’ (1941), and after today’s song, she sang one more song in ‘Mann Ki Jeet’ (1944) – only 3 songs in career.

There are many books on Hindi film related subjects in almost all languages. Most books give factual or biographical information. There was one author – Saadat Hasan Manto – whose books combined facts, myths, opinions, humour and lascivious stories about the film people he came in contact with, while he was in India before partition. I have some of his books like Meena Bazaar, Stars from Another Sky, and Dastavej Vol 5. One gets to know about the conditions prevailing in the film world in those times, through the eyes of one amongst them. Manto was close to many heroes like Shyam, Ashok kumar and others like Nazir Ahmed, Rafiq Ghaznavi etc. In one of his books, he has revealed the inside story how a shy housewife – Shahida – became a popular film heroine Neena and what magic her mentor (husband later on) WZ Ahmed played to convert her.

About two years back Sadanand Kamath ji had also written about her in one of his articles on song from film ‘Ek Raat’ (1942). I have used some part of his story along with additional information gathered from the All India Film Directory and Who’s Who – 1946, some Pakistani sites and my notes to make her story a wider one.

Neena (real name Shahida) was born on 18th July 1919 in Aligarh in a cultured Muslim family. She was the eldest of six siblings. Her father was  Prime Minister of a small state. Later he was appointed as a  magistrate in Lucknow. Subsequently, he became a member of Federal Public commission. She studied in Aligarh and completed her graduation. During her college days, Moshin Abdullah fell in love with her. They got married and she settled for her domestic duty. Her husband got a job in Bombay Talkies laboratory where Shashdhar Mukherjee was his colleague. Shahida accompanied her husband and stayed in Malad.

When WZ Ahmed set up his film production company, Shalimar Pictures, Moshin Abdullah joined him in the same capacity which he was holding in Bombay Talkies and shifted to Poona (Pune) with his wife Shahida. Probably it was during this period that WZ Ahmed came to know about Shahida and offered her the lead role in his first film ‘Ek Raat’ (1942). Even though her husband was connected with Hindi films and her sister-in-law (husband’s sister), Renuka Devi (Begum Mirza) was an established actress in Bombay Talkies, Shahida was not interested in pursuing a career in films. It was her husband who persuaded her to take the lead role in ‘Ek Raat’ (1942) offered by WZ Ahmed. Saadat Hasan Manto, in his book ‘Stars From Another Sky’ has pointed out that for Moshin Abdullah, Shahida taking up the role in the film was a necessity as he was always short of money due to his gambling habit.

Before the film went on floor, a massive publicity of the film with Shahida getting her screen name ‘Neena’ as a mystery woman was launched, with giant billboards on the roads of Karachi – without showing her face. This created a suspense and she started getting fan mail too, before her film was released. The film was first released in Karachi on 18th July 1942 where it ran for 9 weeks. With the positive feedback from the cine goers, the film was next released in Hyderabad (Deccan) followed by an all-India release. The film was a box office success.

WZ Ahmed announced his next film ‘Mann Ki Jeet’ (1944) with Neena and Shyam in the lead roles. However, in the meantime, he released a quickie , his second film ‘Prem Sangeet’ (1943) with Neena and Jairaj in lead roles without much publicity as there was no more mystery about Neena. His concentration was now on ‘Mnan Ki Jeet’ (1944). She was quite good looking. In 1945, she was voted “The best dressed beauty of the Indian film world” award from I.F.J.A. She worked in only 5 films, ‘Ek Raat’ (1942), ‘Prem Sangeet’ (1943), ‘Mann Ki Jeet’ (1944), ‘Prithviraj Sanyogita’ (1946) and ‘Meerabai’ (1947). One more ambitious film was planned and announced – ‘Shri Krishna Bhagwan’, in which she was to play Radha. However due to partition and their migration to Pakistan, this was cancelled.

WZ Ahmed in his capacity as a producer-director was virtually in full control of Neena. Her husband Moshin Abdullah being removed from Shalimar Pictures for not doing his allotted work, had lost his grip over his wife. On the other hand, Neena found wide differences in attitudes towards her of WZ Ahmed who was courteous and her husband who was not only swindling her money in gambling but he was also a womaniser. Slowly, she became close to WZ Ahmed. In 1946, Neena divorced her husband and married WZ Ahmed.

After the partition, both WZ Ahmed and Neena migrated to Pakistan lock stock barrel, leaving the staff of Shalimar Pictures in a lurch as many of the staff had not received their salary for months. In August 1948, Bombay High Court adjudged WZ Ahmed, the sole proprietor of Shalimar Pictures as insolvent. Thus the saga of a ‘mystery woman’ of Hindi films ended in mysterious circumstances.

Although, Ahmed was declared as insolvent, the workers of Shalimar made an attempt to revive the Shalimar Pictures company. They pooled their resources and Bharat Vyas produced a movie, ‘Rangeela Rajasthan’ in 1949, under the banner of Shalimar Pictures. Many ex employees like Bharat Vyas , SK Pal and Shyama Dulari etc. worked for free. However this last attempt was also not enough to save the company and it was sold out, to pay the dues of suppliers etc.

In Pakistan, Neena worked for her husband’s 2 films – ‘Roohi’ (1954) and ‘Vaada’ (1957). The third film remained unfinished, and she retired to remain a housewife – a second time. She died sometime in April 1990, in Karachi.

Waheeduddin Ziauddin Ahmed, the smart brain behind showing tempting dreams to a housewife and making her an actress in 5 films, died in a hospital in Lahore, after a prolonged illness, on 15-4-2007. It was/is believed by some even now that Neena sang her own songs initially. However, during one of his visits to India , Ahmed made it very clear that ALL songs including those attributed to Neena were sung by Sitara Kanpuri only. This is recorded in Listener’s Bulletin no. 134 of July 2007. So, there should be no doubt whatsoever about this. After his death in Lahore, the leading Newspaper of Pakistan, ‘The Dawn’ wrote a short obituary on him, on 17th April 2007. It throws light on his work. Here it is..

W.Z. Ahmed, 91, one of the most outstanding film directors of the subcontinent, passed away at a local hospital late on Sunday night (15-4-2007). He was suffering from an infection of the lung. He was laid to rest at the Bagh-i-Rehmat graveyard on Monday afternoon.

After coming up with a series of films in only five years, Wahiduddin Ziauddin Ahmed, was not as prolific as some of his successors in the film industry. He directed-produced five films before the partition of the sub-continent: ‘Aik Raat’, ‘Mann Ki Jeet’, ‘Prem Sangeet’, ‘Prithaviraj- Samyukta’ and ‘Mira Bai’ — all released between 1942 and 1947.

After partition, he made just two films ‘Roohi’ and ‘Wada’, while a third one, ‘Wafa Ki Ada’, remained incomplete. The country’s environment was obviously not suited to his brand of cinema and his creation as one of his masterpieces, ‘Roohi’, has the distinction of being the first-ever film to be banned in Pakistan. The government said the film generated ‘class hatred’, and if that was not bad enough, portrayed a ‘rich married woman having an affair with a young, unmarried man’.

The ban was later revoked and ‘Roohi’ was released in 1954. The same year W.Z. Ahmed was at the forefront of the campaign against the screening of Indian films. The protest was known as ‘Jaal agitation’ after a Dev Anand-starrer of the same name that had been imported out of East Pakistan’s quota — a limited number of Indian films were allowed into Pakistan until then — and then brought over to West Pakistan. The protest led to the arrest of Mr Ahmed and many others in Lahore.

Mr Ahmed owned the Shalimar Pictures in Pune and another studio in Madras before 1947. Some very famous writers and lyricists worked for Shalimar, including Josh Malihabadi, Krisan Chander, Ramanand Sagar, Akhtar-ul-Iman and Sagar Nizami. He established the W.Z. Studio at Wahdat Road in Lahore after some years after partition. He spent many years of his life pursuing the ideal of a filmmakers’ cooperative.

Sanaullah Khan Gandapur, who worked as an assistant to W.Z. Ahmed, remembers his guru as an excellent story-writer and a director with a vision and skill to mould actors according to his requirement. “He was a man of diversified interests and immense knowledge,” Mr Gandapur says.

Mr Ahmed was born in Gujarat, India, in 1916 where his father was a senior police officer. He is said to have been moved into entering filmdom by K.L. Sehgal’s Dev Das. It is said Mr Ahmed went to watch Dev Das and was so disappointed with the production that he decided to direct films himself.

He married twice. His first wife was a daughter of Sir Ghulam Husain Hidayatullah. Later on, he married Shahida, who acted in films under the adopted name of Neena. She died a few years ago (April 1990). Mr Ahmed had a son, Fariduddin Ahmed, and a daughter, Afia Rabbani.

Fariduddin Ahmed, well known as Farid Ahmed, was a talented filmmaker who married television and stage actor and producer, Samina Ahmed. Farid died in 1993.

Today’s song is a duet and is a parody of the famous and popular song from film ‘Jhoola’ (1941) – “Main To Dilli Se Dulhan Laaya Re”, sung by Arunkumar and Rehmat Bano. It was filmed on Mumtaz Ali and a debutant actress Shehzadi (not the sister of Zubeida, Sultana and Mehtab). I feel in this song some other tunes of songs are also present, but I could not identify them. This was the first ever song sung by Bharat Vyas in Hindi films.
 


Song – Main To Aagre Se Joota Laaya Re Ho Rani Ji (Prem Sangeet) (1943) Singers – Bharat Vyas, Shanta Thakkar, Lyrics – Bharat Vyas, Music – SK Pal

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

main aagre se
main jaipur se
o main aagre se
o main jaipur se

main aagre se joota laaya re
ho rani ji
main aagre se joota laaya re
ho rani ji
main jaipur se chunri laayi re
ho raja ji
main jaipur se chunri laayi re
ho raja ji
o main aagre se joota laaya re
ho rani ji

aao paniya
aao paniya bharan ko chalen
haan haan paniya bharan ko chalo na re
haan chalo na re
ui chalo na re
aao paani pioge raja
na na chaai pilaao
na na paani pio
na na chaai pilaao
na na paani pio
pio pio
ye paani ka pyaala hai
pio pio
main naahin piunga
main naahin piunga
hato to to to. . .

mora jiya ghanda mera
keh sakoon ganwaar hai
mora jiya ghanda mera
keh sakoon ganwaar hai
hua hai qusoor humse zuroor
maaf hamen karo huzoor

khaao khaao kasam
tum ram ji ki
haan haan ram ji ki
hanuman ji ki
ho siya jaanki ki
aaj gori women ko haraaya re
ho ram ji
aaj gori women ko haraaya re
ho ram ji

main aagre se
o main jaipur se
o main aagre se
o main jaipur se
main aagre se joota laaya re
ho rani ji
main aagre se joota laaya re
ho rani ji
main jaipur se chunri laayi re
ho raja ji
main jaipur se chunri laayi re
ho raja ji
ho main aagre se
main aagre se joota laaya re
ho rani ji

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

मैं आगरे से
मैं जयपुर से
हो मैं आगरे से
हो मैं जयपुर से

मैं आगरे से जूता लाया रे
हो रानी जी
मैं आगरे से जूता लाया रे
हो रानी जी
मैं जयपुर से चुनरी लाई रे
हो राजा जी
मैं जयपुर से चुनरी लाई रे
हो राजा जी
ओ मैं आगरे से जूता लाया रे
हो रानी जी

आओ पनियां
आओ पनियां भरन को चलें
हां हां पनियां भरन को चलो ना रे
हाँ चलो ना रे
ऊई चलो ना रे
आओ पानी पीओगे राजा
ना ना चाय पिलाओ
ना ना पानी पियो
ना ना चाय पिलाओ
ना ना पानी पियो
पीओ पीओ
ये पानी का प्याला है
पीओ पीओ
मैं नाहीं पीऊँगा
मैं नाहीं पीऊँगा
हटो टो टो टो॰ ॰ ॰

मोरा जिया घणा मेरा
के सकूँ गंवार है
मोरा जिया घणा मेरा
के सकूँ गंवार है
हुआ है क़ुसूर हमसे जुरूर
माफ हमें करो हुज़ूर

खाओ खाओ कसम तुम राम की
हाँ हाँ राम जी की
हनुमान जी की
हो सिया जानकी की
आज गोरी वुमेन को हराया रे
हो राम जी
आज गोरी वुमेन को हराया रे
हो राम जी

मैं आगरे से
ओ मैं जयपुर से
हो मैं आगरे से
हो मैं जयपुर से

मैं आगरे से जूता लाया रे
हो रानी जी
मैं आगरे से जूता लाया रे
हो रानी जी
मैं जयपुर से चुनरी लाई रे
हो राजा जी
मैं जयपुर से चुनरी लाई रे
हो राजा जी
हो मैं आगरे से
ओ मैं आगरे से जूता लाया रे
हो रानी जी


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

‘Shehzaadi’ (1947) is a film about which not much information is available online except that it was produced under the banner of Shalimar Pictures owned by WZ Ahmed and the film belonged to the costume drama genre. I had searched extensively on the internet about the star cast and the director but drew a blank. Earlier, I had even a doubt whether the film was actually released.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Forgotten Melodies of the 1940s – 30
———————————————————

The date was 11th March 1947. The place was Jeevan House, Bombay. The Secretary of the Progressive Writers Association (PWA) was reporting the proceedings of its weekly meeting. Around 50 poets and writers had assembled at the meeting. Among them were Josh Malihabadi, Saghar Nizami, Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri, Majaz Lucknawi, Ali Sardar Jafri, Vishwamitra Adil, Kaifi Azmi, Sahir Ludhianvi and Majrooh Sultanpuri.
Read more on this topic…


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16500 song posts by now.

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