Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Thukra Ke Teri Duniya Ko

Posted on: July 28, 2020


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4393 Post No. : 15761

Screenplay is the first stage when a film is said to be born on paper. A screenplay writer translates the story/script from its literary form to an audio-visual presentation incorporating the ideas of the directors as to how each character is to be presented, the mood of the scenes, the surrounding environments, the stance of dialogue deliveries, the camera angles, lighting etc. Some screenplay writers also incorporate the dialogues. Directors like Satyajit Ray would write the screenplay in sketch form, visually presenting the scenes in each sheet of paper, something like what we used to see RK Laxman’s ‘You Said It’ in newspapers. In other words, screenplay is a complete document, representing a film in a paper format.

In a professional set-up, a director of the film would like to have with him a bound copy of the screenplay, a copy of which he would also handed over to each one of main actors, cinematographer, art director, sound engineer, choreographer, lyricists, music directors etc. before the film’s shooting commences. Some of the directors like Bimal Roy used to follow the system (as revealed by Dilip Kumar in an interview) while directors like Guru Dutt did not give much importance to this system as quite often, he used to make changes in the screenplay at the spur of the moment  while shooting (as revealed by Abrar Alvi in his book, ‘Ten Years With Guru Dutt’). In our office parlance, we can call screenplay as a manual of instructions for all those who are closely associated with the making of a particular film.

From the above description, it is apparent as to how important the role of screenplay writers have in the making of films. Unfortunately, most of the screenplay writers are ‘faceless’ in the sense that their faces seldom appear on the film magazines. It was Salim-Javed, the duo who, as a story, screenplay and dialogue writer, attained the status of stars during 1970s and early 80s and their faces became familiar to most of the cinema-lovers.

I am discussing in this article, one of the most prominent ‘faceless’ screenplay writers, an introvert who kept a low profile despite writing screenplays for many Hindi films for over 3 decades, which became popular. Some of his works attained the classic status such as ‘Parineeta’ (1953), ‘Devdas’ (1955), ‘Sujata’ (1959), ‘Bandini’ (1963), ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966), ‘Abhiman’ (1971). He is the Bengali novelist and short-story writer, dancer, theatre actor and the director, Nabendu Ghosh who became a screenplay writer by default.

I came to know about Nabendu Ghosh for the first time about 3 years back when I was going through a book ‘Gulzar in Conversations with Nasreen Muni Kabir’ and Gulzar’s many interviews on the newspapers. In the book and the interviews, Gulzar gave credit to Nabendu Ghosh in shaping his career as a screenplay writer. I became interested in knowing him in details only when I came to know that he had made a statement as early as in 1945 that if at all he joined the film industry, it would be only under Bimal Roy. I found this statement surprising because in Bengali literary circle, he had already attained the status of a star writer due to popularity of his novels and short stories.

During the past few days, I have read books and interviews on Nabendu Ghosh given by his colleagues in the film industry, his own interview on Vividh Bharati and the extracts from his Bengali autobiography, ‘Eka Naukar Yatri’ (‘Traveler of the Lonely Boat’) translated in English by his daughter, Ratnottama Sengupta. On the basis of these sources, I have written his profile incorporating the important events in his life which is given below:

Nabendu Bhushan Ghosh (27/03/1916 – 15/12/2007) was born in Dhaka where he did his early schooling. The family shifted to Patna when his father, an advocate started practicing at the Patna High Court. Nabendu continued his secondary school in Patna and continued his college there completing MA in English literature. During his Patna days, Nabendu joined a local theatre group where he acted, mostly in the female role. He also learnt dancing at Uday Shankar’s Almora Cultural Centre.

Nabendu got a job in DIG’s office in Patna. However, during Quit India Movement, he wrote articles against the British rules. For this, he got warning from his sympathetic superiors from the office not to indulge in writing anti-British articles. Instead of heeding their advice, he preferred to resign from the job and shifted to Kolkata in 1944 where his life as a novelist and short story writers began. By the end of 1940s, Nabendu had became a star writer as his novels and short stories were very popular. During this period, he had written stories depicting almost every aspects of life in Bengal – the famine, the tram, the strike, the rationing, communal violence, partitions victims etc.

On a visit to Rajshahi (now in Bangla Desh) sometime in 1945, he watched a Bangla film ‘Udayer Pathe’ (1945) in a theatre. The film had influenced him so much that he took a vow that if he ever become a writer for the films, it would be for Bimal Roy, the director of the film. Probably, this was more like an emotional reaction to the film rather than his serious intention at that time. After a couple of years, Nabendu had a chance meeting with Bimal Roy in Kolkata who was impressed with writings. But it was not until 1951 when Ashok Kumar invited Bimal Roy to direct the film ‘Maa’ (1952) that Bimal Roy thought of taking Nabendu along with him.

Both for Bimal Roy and Nabendu Ghosh, the migration to Mumbai was not by choice but because of the compelling circumstances. With the creation of East Pakistan (now Bangla Desh), the markets for Bangla films and the Bangla novels and short stories had considerably dwindled thanks to the then East Pakistan Government’s policy of suppressing Bangla language in favour of Urdu. What was thought to be a temporary assignment in Mumbai in 1951 became a long creative association between Bimal Roy and Nabendu Ghosh from 1951 to 1966 as a screenplay writer in 9 films besides doing cameo roles in ‘Do Bhiga Zameen’ (1953) and ‘Sujata’ (1959).

During his 3 decades of association with Hindi films, Nabendu Ghosh wrote screenplay for a little over 30 films which included apart from Bimal Roy’s films mentioned above, films like ‘Aar Paar’ (1954), ‘Baadbaan’ (1954), ‘Milap’ (1955), ‘Detective’ (1958), ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966), ‘Sharafat’ (1970), ‘Laal Pathar’ (1971), ‘Abhiman’ (1973), “Pratigya’ (1975), ‘Ganga Ki Saugandh’ (1978), ‘Krodhi’ (1981) etc. He also directed ‘Trishagni’ (1988) which gave him the National Film Award for the best debut director. Sometime in the middle of his filmy career, he had directed ‘Doctor Babu‘ (based on Phanishwarnath Renu’s story, ‘Maila Aanchal’) with Dharmendra and Jaya Bahaduri in the lead roles and RD Burman as the music director. When 70% of the film was canned, the producer of the film died leaving the film unfinished.

In 1995, he directed a television serial for Doordarshan, ‘Anmol Moti’ on Ashok Kumar. He directed Children Film Society’s ‘Netraheen Sakshi’ and for Ministry of Health, the film ‘Ladkiyaan’ (1997). He was a visiting faculty at FTII and conducted workshops on screenplay writing during 1967 to 1980. During his life time, Nabendu wrote 26 Bengali novels, 18 collections of Bengali short stories and his only English book – ‘Ashok Kumar – His Life and Times’.

Nabendu Ghosh passed away in Kolkata on December 15, 2007 at a ripe age of 91. Nabendu Ghosh’s last novel, ‘Kadam Kadam’ based on the experiences of character actor, Nazir Hussain in INA, was released during his birth centenary year 2016.

If we go through the list of the films for which Nabendu Ghosh wrote screenplays, it would be observed that most of the films were based on stories from literature. His screenplay writings were so powerful that even in respect of women displayed in the films as fallen from the grace from the eyes of the society, the cine audience loved those characters like Chandramukhi in ‘Devdas’ (1955), Kalyani in ‘Bandini’ (1963), Bijli in ‘Chanda Aur Bijli’ (1965), Hirabai in ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) and Chandni in ‘Sharafat’ (1970). Raj Kapoor had said after the release of ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) that Nabendu Ghosh’s screenplay brought in him the character of  ‘Hiraman’ more than that of Raj Kapoor.

Ratnottama Sengupta, the daughter of Nabendu Ghosh directed one-hour documentary film, ‘And They Made Classic Films’ on the bonding between Bimal Roy and her father based on his interviews. The film was shown at 23rd Kolkata International Film Festival, 2017. One of the interesting anecdotes which Ratnottama Sengupta narrated from the documentary film is –

“On the first day of shoot of ‘Devdas’ (1955), Dilip Kumar was in a tense mood walking up and down on the studio floor. When Nabendu Ghosh asked the reason, Dilip Kumar said that all three are sitting on his shoulders, referring to Pramathesh Barua who directed ‘Devdas’ (1935), KL Saigal who acted in it and Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay who wrote the novel. She said that Nabendu Ghosh buried all three ghosts and painted a fresh picture of Devdas in his screen-play in such a way that even today when we talk of Devads, we think of Dilip Kumar.” [Quoted in an article by Anuj Kumar in ‘The Hindu’, January 5, 2018).

There were some pitfalls in Nabendu Ghosh’s filmy career also. He never got credit for writing screenplay for the film ‘Madhumati’ (1958). In fact, there is no mention of screenplay writer in the credit title of the film. When Guru Dutt selected one of his stories and wanted him to write screenplay for ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’ (1959) on his story, Nabendu Ghosh declined by saying that he was busy with the screenplay of ‘Sujata’. He gave his story to Guru Dutt requesting him to get the screenplay written by someone else. When the film was released, Nabendu Ghosh was surprised to note that he was not credited in the film as a story writer while Abrar Alvi was duly credited as screenplay and dialogue writer.

‘Baadbaan’ (1954) for which Nabendu Ghosh wrote the screen-play, is regarded as a classic film though the film did not fare well at the box office. Vijay Anand who claimed in an interview at Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute, Kolkata in 2003 that he had seen this film 10 times. He regards it as a piece of literature appearing on the screen. It was more of a screenplay writer’s triumph than the director.

I am presenting a song “Thukra Ke Teri Duniya Ko” from ‘Baadbaan’ (1954) which is rendered by Asha Bhosle. The song is written by Indeevar which is set to music by Timir Baran-S K Pal. In this song, Asha Bhosle seems to be trying to sing like Lata Mangeshkar, that too the way Lata has sung in ‘Anarkali’ (1953). Of course, this is my hunch.

Song – Thukra Ke Teri Duniya Ko (Baadbaan) (1954) Singer – Asha Bhosle, Lyrics – Indeewar, MD – Timir Baran, SK Pal

Lyrics

thukra ke teri duniya ko
chaahoon to kar doon choor
magar tere pyaar se hoon majboor
thukra ke teri duniya ko
chaahoon to kar doon choor
magar tere pyaar se hoon majboor
piya teri preet se hoon majboor
 
beh jaaye na teri duniya
aansoo na bahaaungi main
beh jaaye na teri duniya
aansoo na bahaaungi main
meri haaye na tujhko jalaa de
tere paas na aaungi main
mujhe dekhe na teri nazren
dekhe na teri nazren
ho jaaun itni door
magar tere pyaar se hoon majboor
piya teri preet se hoon majboor
 
baddua na dil de baithe
tujh ko na dosh doongi main
baddua na dil de baithe
tujh ko na dosh doongi main
taqdeer ke bair kiya hai
taqdeer se lad loongi main
main tod chalun
main tod chalun ek pal mein
tod chalun ek pal mein
duniya ka har dastoor
magar tere pyar se hoon majboor
piya teri preet se hoom majboor

thukra ke teri duniya ko
chaahun to kar doon choor
magar tere pyaar se hoon majboor
piya teri preet se hoon majboor

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

ठुकरा के तेरी दुनिया को
चाहूँ तो कर दूँ चूर
मगर तेरे प्यार से हूँ मजबूर
ठुकरा के तेरी दुनिया को
चाहूँ तो कर दूँ चूर
मगर तेरे प्यार से हूँ मजबूर
पिया तेरी प्रीत से हूँ मजबूर

बह जाये ना तेरी दुनिया
आंसूँ ना बहाऊँगी मैं
बह जाये ना तेरी दुनिया
आंसूँ ना बहाऊँगी मैं
मेरी हाए ना तुझको जला दे
तेरे पास ना आऊँगी मैं’
मुझे देखें ना तेरी नज़रें
देखें ना तेरी नज़रें
हो जाऊँ इतनी दूर
मगर तेरे प्यार से हूँ मजबूर
पिया तेरी प्रीत से हूँ मजबूर

बद्दुआ ना दिल दे बैठे
तुझको ना दोष दूँगी मैं
बद्दुआ ना दिल दे बैठे
तुझको ना दोष दूँगी मैं
तक़दीर ने बैर किया है
तक़दीर से लड़ लूँगी मैं’
मैं तोड़ चलूँ
मैं तोड़ चलूँ इक पल में
तोड़ चलूँ इक पल में
दुनिया का हर दस्तूर
मगर तेरे प्यार से हूँ मजबूर
पिया तेरी प्रीत से हूँ मजबूर

ठुकरा के तेरी दुनिया को
चाहूँ तो कर दूँ चूर
मगर तेरे प्यार से हूँ मजबूर
पिया तेरी प्रीत से हूँ मजबूर

2 Responses to "Thukra Ke Teri Duniya Ko"

Sadanand Ji, Thanks for writing on less written about crew(s) in film making. I knew Nabendu Ghosh as the writer of many films I liked. But this is the fist write up that I have com across, entirely dedicated to him. I salute his contribution.

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Satish ji,

Thanks for recognising the contributions of Nabendu Ghosh in HIndi film industry.

What I have written about him is not even 25% of his contributions to Hindi film industry, Bangla literature, as a ‘man friday’ of Bimal Roy etc. One can write a long article exclusively about his conviction to contribute to ‘Quit India Movement’ of 1942 by sacrificing his own Government job, the hardship he faced thereafter, getting caught in the crossfire of communal riots in Kolkata etc. In fact, one can write an article each on his classic films based on his contributions.

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