Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Hamaari kahi maano baabujee

Posted on: May 20, 2021


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4689 Post No. : 16373 Movie Count :

4447

Imagine you are driving a car and your family is with you. You are about to visit an unknown place for the first time. You are going as per the guidelines given by your friend. Suddenly you come across a board in the middle of the road saying ” ROAD CLOSED”. You look left and right for a diversion – none exists. You turn around, stop near a small roadside shop and enquire. He does not know any other route.

Same feeling comes to me when I come across a film in HFGK, about which there is no information available anywhere. There are 2 types of ” Road Closed ” in HFGK films. The first type is where you find only the Title of the film printed. Nothing else. In every year’s list, one can find at least 8 to 10 such films. For example, for the year 1935, there are 10 such films, on whom no information, except their Title is given.( Today’s song is from a 1935 film)

The second type of ” Road Closed ” film is where the film has information on its director, the cast,songs and the banner . In many cases MD’s or the Lyricist’s name are missing. In the early era films, upto 1938-39, there were many films where song details like singer’s name or the MD/Lyricist’s name is not given, as no Gramophone records were issued in those days, except a few films. Except for the information given in the HFGK, nothing more is known about the films – story, screenplay or dialogue writer or cinematographer etc. are not known. In the case of 1935, for example, a total 152 Hindi films were made in this year. More than 100 films from this fall under the Type 2 of ” Road Closed”. This means that other than what is given in HFGK, nothing else is known about these films.

So what do we do about such films where you can’t write about anything else except the cast or the director/MD/Lyricist ? There are few sources like books, old film magazines, Newspaper cuttings, research papers etc. Stubborn films do not appear even in these too !. But yes, there is one more way to get information. If you catch hold of a cast member of that film, you can expect some information.. Here, the problem is, for films before the 50’s, a cast member is difficult to find. And even if you find, due to age his memory may fail him. Harmandir Singh Hamraz ji wrote in Listeners’ Bulletin that when he used to meet old time actors, singers, MDs etc, in many cases it was Hamraz ji who would provide the information to him about his films ! Many of them did not remember much about their own films, due to old age.

One can get the information about an artiste from his/her living close relatives – like son, daughter or other relatives. This was the way I collected information by interviewing close relatives, like about Bhudo Advani from his son, Parshuram from his daughter, Mirza Musharraf from his Daughter/ Son in law, Latika from her daughter, Indurani from her Son-Salim Shah, Sailesh Mukherjee from his Daughter in law, Shankar Vazre from his Grandson etc etc.

today’s song is from the film Bharat ki Beti-1935. Made by Eastern Arts, Bombay, the film was directed by Premankur Atorthy – a solid pillar of New Theatres, Calcutta, in its early period. His name is not much known to the younger generation. Premankur Atorthy (1 January 1890 – 13 October 1964) was a novelist, journalist, and film director, born in Faridpur. He was involved in Hindi and Bengali cinema.

Atorthy’s initial schooling started at Brahmo School, Kolkata. He then studied variously at Duff School, Keshab Academy, City School and Brahma Boys Boarding and Day School, which were then under the University of Calcutta. His father, Mahesh Chandra Atorthy, was a propagator and writer of the Brahma Samaj.

Atorthy was imaginative and fond of adventure from boyhood. Failing to do well in his studies, he ran away to Bombay. At Bombay he learnt to play the sitar under Ustad Karamatullah. Returning to Kolkata, he started working at a sports goods shop in Chowringee. Subsequently, he worked for the Baikali, Yadughar, Hindustan, bharatvarsha, Sangkalpa, Nachghar and bharati.

He was a noted novelist and playwright, author of many books including compilations of short stories, essays (e.g. on silent film, cf. Atorthy, 1990) and plays. Best- known literary work: Mahasthavir Jatak (1944), a fictional autobiography in four volumes noted for its irreverent portrayal of Calcutta’s early 20th-century élites. Among his other novels are Anarkali (1925), Bajikar (1922), Achalpather Jatri (1923), Chasir Meye (1924), Dui Ratri (1927) and Takht Taus. Associated with literary journal Bharati; edited Nachghar, one of the first performing arts journals to take film seriously, with Hemendra Kumar Roy and film- maker Pashupati Chatterjee.

Founded Betar Jagat, the journal of the AIR, Calcutta (1929). Started as scenarist and actor, using the pseudonym Krishna Haldar, at Indian Kinema Arts (Punarjanma, 1927; Chasher Meye, 1931). Remade Punarjanma in 1932. Joined B.N. Sircar’s International Filmcraft as writer and assistant to Prafulla Roy (Chasher Meye is based on Atorthy’s novel and script). Also scripted Nitin Bose’s Buker Bojha (1930).

Premankur entered the cinema world with a role in the Bangla film Punarjanma. First directed film, Dena Paona, was New Theatres’ first talkie, made in direct competition with Madan Theatres’ Jamai Sasthi (1931). Made several Urdu films as part of New Theatres’ effort to enter the North Indian market, including the classic film of Agha Hashar Kashmiri’s play Misar Kumari to Yahudi Ki Ladki (1933). His film versions of literary classics, e.g. from Saratchandra Chattopadhyay (Dena Paona), Rabindranath Tagore (Chirakumar Sabha) and Bankimchandra Chattopadhyay (Kapal Kundala), established the élite literary film genre intended to distinguish New Theatres’ films from routine stage adaptations and remained important signifiers of high art in Bengali cinema. First Bengali film-maker to work in Western India, e.g. for Kolhapur Cinetone (1935) and for Imperial (1936). Credited with the supervision of H.K. Shivdasani’s Yasmin (1935), made by the Krishna Studio.

As an actor – Punarjanma-27,Chaser Meye-31 and Punarjanma-32. As a Director – Subah ka sitara-32, Punarjanma-32, Zinda Laash-32, Mohabbat ke aansoo-32, Kapal kundala-33, Yahudi ki Ladki-33, Bharat ki Beti-35, Karvaan E Hayaat-35, Bhikaran-35, Sarla-36, Hind Mahila-36, Dhanwaan-37 and Dulhan-38 (only Hindi films.). As a writer, he wrote stories, screenplay and dialogues of the films Bhikaran-35 and Sarla-36.

Music was by Ustad Jhande Khan (9 songs) and Anil Biswas (3 songs), who also looked after the film’s background music. While we know that today’s song is sung by Rattanbai, we do not know who the Lyricist was. The cast of the film was Rattanbai, Gul Hamid, Hari Shivdasani, Dadabhai Sarkari, Yasmin, Amirbai Karnataki, Sarojini, Kamala etc.etc.

Sadanand Kamath ji not only uploaded this song for me, but also expertly identified the singer and then sent me a few advertisements of this film for getting some idea about the film. From these I can surmise that the film was about a spirited young girl (Bharat ki Beti), who stands by truth and protects her father who has refused doing illegal acts as wanted by some criminals and has become their target. She seems to have sacrificed her love and risked her own life to protect the family honour. The Hero of the film was Gul Hamid – a name hardly familiar to our readers because his career span was very short and he died just one year after this film.

Gul Hamid or Gul Hamid Khan (born 25-5- 1905) was a Hindi film actor. He started his acting career in silent films and later played leading roles in talkies. He had many honors to his credit. He acted in Heer Ranjha, the first film produced in Punjabi and in Seeta, a talkie that won an honorary diploma in the 1934 Venice Film Festival and that was also the first Indian film shown at an International film festival. Hamid also wrote the script, acted in, and directed the film Khyber Pass (1936 film). Hamid died of Hodgkin’s Disease in 1936.

Gul Hamid was born in Pirpiai, a village near the Kabul River in the North West Frontier Province of British India (now in Pakistan). His father was Saif Ullah Khan. Gul Hamid Khan had three brothers named Abdul Hameed Khan, Gul Jamal Khan and Sayed Jamal Khan. Gul Hamid Khan was married to Patience Cooper(later Sabira Begum) from 1930–1936, one of the first early silent movie actors.

Gul Hamid, a handsome young man from Peshawar, became an all-India celebrity when A.R.Kardar cast him in his hit movie. It is said that the movie industry never again saw an actor with Gul Hamid’s looks”. He made his film debut with Sarfarosh alias Brave Hearts in 1930, which was a silent movie made in Lahore & directed by A. R. Kardar. In 1931, his films Aatishe Ishq and Wandering Dancer were released.

Gul Hamid also had the honour of working in the first ever Punjabi feature film Heer Ranjha released in 1932. This film was made in Lahore and directed by A.R.Kardar.

In 1933, his film Yahudi Ki Ladki was released based on Agha Hashar Kashmiri’s play Yahudi ki ladki.

Gul Hamid’s film Seeta, produced by East India Film Company & directed by Debaki Bose was the first talkie shown in an international film festival when it was shown in 1934 at the Venice Film Festival, where it won an honorary diploma. His other films released in 1934 were Chandar Gupt, Mumtaz Begum, Sultana and Night Bird.

1935 was the rich year of Gul Hamid’s career as many of his films were released in it. In Karwan-E-Hayat (a 1935 adventure film) and Bharat Ki Beti (1935), his heroine was Rattan Bai. His other notable talkies (films) in 1935 were Soteli Maa, Badruhi, Saleema and Murderer. Yasmin was also released the same year in which his name was Behram.

Only three films are present on the record to be released in 1936 i.e., Sunehra Sansar, Baghi Sipahi and Khyber Pass.

Khyber Pass was the film in which he not only acted but also wrote its script and directed it.

He worked with his wife, Patience Cooper, in three films i.e., Baghi Sipahi, Murderer (1935) and Khyber Pass. After starting his film career from Lahore, he moved to Calcutta where he worked in more than a dozen of silent films and talkies. Some of his films were made in Bombay too. In all, he acted in 17 Talkie films.

He died in 1936 due to cancerous throat ailment.(Hodgekin’s Disease).

Today’s song is quite melodious. This rare song was given to me by my friend shri Abhay Jain (US), whom I thank heartily. With this song, the film Bharat ki Beti-35 makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song- Hamaari kahi maano baabuji (Bharat Ki Beti)(1935) Singer-Ratan Bai, MD-Ustad Jhande Khan

Lyrics

aa haan haan re
haan aa aa aan re
hamaari kahi maano baabujee
hamaari kahi maano baabujee
hamaari kahi maano baabujee
suno baabujee
Dehli se ?? bulaayo
suno baabujee
Dehli se ?? bulaayo
na ??
haan haan na ?? aaiho
?? baabujee
hamaari kahi maano baabujee ee
hamaari kahi maano baabujee

naqaab chehre se khursheed jab uthhaata hai
naqaab chehre se khursheed jab uthhaata hai
?? harek ko ?? kaar se lagaata hai
haan
?? harek ko ?? kaar se lagaata hai
koi haram ko koi maikade ko jaata hai
koi haram ko koi maikade ko jaata hai
koi talaash e maishat mein dil ganwaata hai
koi talaash e maishat mein dil ganwaata hai
jo mai na poochha ke ae dil tu kidhar jaata hai
jo mai na poochha ke ae dil tu kidhar jaata hai
to bhar ke aankhon mein aansoo
ye keh sunaata hai
to bhar ke aankhon mein aansoo
ye keh sunaata hai

suno baabujee
Dehli se ?? wo laayo
suno baabujee
Dehli se ?? wo laayo na
na badri
haan haan
na badri
aaiho na badri se ??
baabujee
hamaari kahi maano baabujee
suno baabujee
kholo na jangla kevadiya
suno baabujee
kholo na jangla kevadiya
chundar mohi
haan haan
chundar mohi
aaiho
chundar mohi bheege
baabujee
hamaari kahi maano baabujee

2 Responses to "Hamaari kahi maano baabujee"

Thanks Arun ji for information about Gul Hamid

Like

Thanks, Prakash ji.

Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 16400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2021) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

16414

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1267
Total Number of movies covered =4460

Total visits so far

  • 14,507,420 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,943 other followers

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share

Category of songs

Current Visitors

Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

Archives

Stumble

visitors whereabouts

blogadda

blogcatalog

Music Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory
%d bloggers like this: