Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Pankaj Mullick


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4804 Post No. : 16571

Today’s song is from a Saigal film- Zindagi-1940. The film was made by New Theatres, Calcutta.

At one time New Theatres (NT) was the most successful film production company in India. It was not only prestigious,but it also shaped up and discovered many artistes who made their marks in the Hindi film industry. New Theatres, Calcutta was one of the top 5 film companies in India – the others being Imperial, Prabhat, Ranjit and Bombay Talkies.

The rise and fall of the giant company was a glorious yet a sad chapter. Besides other factors, I feel the ego-conflicts and the obstinate and adamant behaviour of the people coupled with false prestige led the artistes to desert the company leading it to its end. Of course other reasons were equally responsible.

New Theatres operated from 1931 to 1955 and made 177 films, slightly more than Ranjit film co.-with 175 films. B.N.Sircar established New Theatres in Tollygunge, Calcutta on 10-2-1931, as a family concern, where all shares were held by the family members and He was the managing Director. Same year it built its studios in the same area. It had 3 fully equipped units for shooting, with the best technicians and musicians. Like other studios they had salaried staff in all departments, on a monthly basis. In this period there were other studios also in Calcutta, like Bharat Laxmi pictures, Devdutt films, East India Film company, Kali Films and Radha Film co.

Their first talkie film was in Bangla-Chandidas-32. For the North Indian market Hindi film Puran Bhagat-32 was made. NT had markets in East India, North, North west and South, but none in Bombay or western India. Sircar, along with I.A. Hafis ji, toured the unrepresented areas himself and appointed distributors in Madras, Madurai,Trichannapally,Erode, Bangalore, Poona, Bombay, Ahmedabad, Kanpur, Lucknow, Kangra Valley and Lahore. Puran Bhagat-32 and Yahudi ki ladli-33 were distributed here.

NT became popular in Non Bangla areas due to its Music, which became their main strength. They popularised Robindra Sangeet, with songs by Pankaj Mullick. Miss Panna Rai ji, the first ever woman to do Ph.D in Indian Cinema, wrote on NT films without knowing Bangla language. WB, EB, Burma and Eastern states were their strongholds.

1940 was the Best year for the company with films Doctor, Zindagi and Nartaki. It was an year of beginning of the end also. The first to leave was director P.C.Barua. The Second World war gave a big jolt with the quota system for Raw film. NT was allowed only 6 films per year. Income reduced. Their monthly salary bill was 45000 rupees. Communal riots in 1946 and Partition in 1947 were great setbacks. Due to Partition, NT’s markets were shrunk and due to curfew, huge losses incurred. In the early 40’s many artistes left for Bombay.

By 1951, son Dilip Sircar said,” people left, finance lost, court cases. My father virtually closed the shop.” Liquidation of Calcutta National Bank, NT’s chief financer, was the last shock. The company was handed over to Arora Film company between June to December-1954. From Jan 55 to Aug 55, it was managed by Deluxe Film company. Then a Court Receiver was appointed. In Jan-56, NT was closed down. In Mar-62 NT went into liquidation. The Liquidation was revoked and NT revived by Dilip Sircar on 8-8-1991. However, no activity was seen except that a 5 part serial on NT was made.

B.N.SIRCAR-Birendranath Sircar( 5-7-1901 to 28-11-1980 ), was the son of Shri Nripendranath Sircar-a well known Jurist and a member of the Viceroy’s committee. B.N.Sircar was a Civil Engineer from U.K. who developed an interest in film making. He left his very lucrative job at Martin Burn and Co. in 1928-29 and made 2 silent films,under the banner of International Film Craft.These were Directed by his First colleague Premankur Atorthy. After testing the film market this way, he founded New Theatres.

NEW THEATRES ( NT ) was established by B.N. Sircar, on 10-2-1931,in Tollygunge, Calcutta. It had 3 studio floors for shooting. It had the best Technicians, the best actors and the best Musicians. He acquired the Tanar equipment and services of Wilfred Denis,imported from Hollywood by Ardeshir Irani. New Theatres attracted major Technical and creative talents from silent studios,which were on collapse now. Thus,”Indian Kinema” provided Directors Nitin Bose and Premankur Atorthy and stars Durgadas Bannerjee,Amar Mullick,Jiban Ganguly etc,” Barua Pics ” gave P.C.Barua and Sushil Mujumdar,” British Dominion Films ‘ gave Dhiren Ganguly etc.

B.N.Sircar was a firm believer that Cinema is a medium between a Novel and a Drama,so he depended upon Bangla famous literature for his films. The first Talkie of new Theatres, “Dena Paona”-31,was based on Sharat babu’s works. Though this film was a flop,he continued to depend upon novels by Sharat babu and Tagore to make his films.His first seven films were flops in a row. Their first big film was Chandidas-1934. New Theatres had many Directors on its payroll and used technological advances with recordist Mukul Bose.

From 1931 to 1955,NT produced 177 films, a Record unlikely to be broken in future by any single production house. The nearest rival was Ranjit studios, with 175 films produced. It is not that there was no competition in Bengal. In 1935,there were 14 production houses in Calcutta and in 1938, there were 18 of them, though some , like Madon Theatres, closed down sooner.

NT was mammoth, peopled by giants. Through the 30s and early 40s,NT had the biggest names in Indian cinema, on their payrolls. K L Saigal, Pahadi Sanyal, Jamuna Devi and Leela Desai were ‘discovered’ by NT. Others like P C Barua, Kanan Devi, Umashashi, Molina and Chandrabati emerged as stars at NT. Some like Durgadas Bandopadyaya and Prithviraj Kapoor had been stars before coming to NT. They had directors like Premankur Attorthy, Debaki Bose, Madhu Bose, D N Ganguly, Nitin Bose, Hiren Bose, R C Boral (only Bangla), Profulla Roy, Phani Mujumdar, Bimal Roy, Hemchandra Chunder, sound recordist Mukul Bose and Musical giants like R C Boral, Pankaj Mullick, Timir Baran and K C Dey.

B N Sircar was the Patriarch, the disciplinarian, who held them together like in a big family. NT had a veritable galaxy and clashes between the Titans were inevitable. NT had its own share of fallouts, peer rivalries, squabbles and scandals. Due to the stern and uncompromising nature of B N Sircar, the first to leave was Pramathesh Barua, then Nitin Bose, and Kanan Devi. There was that famous spat between Debki Bose and Nitin Bose on the sets of Meerabai-1933 itself and they stopped talking to each other. Add to this the heavy drinking of Saigal and Umashashi’s elopement with the heir of Shova bazar palace. Each of these has an independent story.

The political situation in Bengal after the WWII, i.e. 1945 also caused the journey of NT towards its downfall and eventual closure in 1956. If only B N Sircar had changed his attitude, NT would not have died so soon, at least not without a fight and not so tamely, in the face of the competition. The biggest bank of Bengal, which financed NT- The National bank also went into liquidation at the same time to add to their woes further.

Personally, I would not hold B N Sircar alone responsible for the decline of NT, which was Hindi cinema from Bengal itself in reality. Another very important factor was,while many stalwarts like Saigal, Prithviraj Kapoor, Kidar Sharma, R C Boral, etc made a beeline for Bombay, Hindi cinema music in Calcutta remained the same, where it was in 1931,without any change. On the other hand, Bombay had enriched its music by adapting to the changing times with a mix of music from Goa, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Rajasthan, UP, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Lahore and the south. The music of the 40s in Bombay had become Vibrant, whereas there was no change whatsoever in Bengal Hindi music. It kept on hankering on Robindra Sangeet and Nazrul Geeti. Maybe, the extreme variety of Regional pride of Bengal came in the way of adopting and adapting to the changes. (This Pride has, even Today, kept Bengal much behind the rest of India.) Thus Bombay became the undisputed capital of Hindi Cinema and Music.

New Theatres was established in 1931,as a family business, with B.N. Sircar as the Managing Director. Once NT started growing, the local regional pride almost forced Madan Theatres-belonging to a Parsee family from the western India-to pack up. By 1938,Madan Theatres had produced over 154 films-silent and Talkie. They made their last Talkie, ” Khatarnak Aurat”-1938 and the company closed down.

New Theatres had the Best actors, best Directors, Best composers and the very best Technical staff in India. They had 4 distinct strengths….

1. Right from the beginning, Bengal had an edge over Bombay and Lahore etc in that the Educated and Respectable family members did not hesitate to join the Film Industry in Bengal. In fact, over 90% of its people were educated-some of them even Foreign educated too. In this ,Bengal was very Progressive. On the contrary, the western centres of film making were confined to Courtesans, Tawayafs and uneducated run-aways in its film industry.

2. NT or the Bengali film industry had a very wide market spread out over the entire West and East Bengal, Bihar, orissa, Assam, the N-E states and Burma. Their Distribution network included Madras,Madurai,Erode,Trichannapally,Bangalore,Mysore,Poona,Bombay,Cawnpore(Kanpur),Kangra valley and Lahore circuits.

3.People who worked for NT were like a united family. Feelings of Goodwill and Happiness permeated the studio. Workers came in the morning and worked till it was finished. Discipline and adherence to deadlines and principles regulated their lives. projects were, therefore, completed always as planned and in time.
( Only Madras of the 40s and 50s came near this. Bombay and Lahore were exactly the opposite, where discipline and punctuality were never a Virtue (Tradition continues…)

4. Almost all films made in Bengal by NT or any other company, were based on either stories or dramas or Novels, by renowned authors from the East(read Bengal). Thus, the film’s story content was so solid that they did not need appendages of comedians or a CSP (comic side plot) or too many songs.
( IN other parts like Bombay and Lahore, studios had what was called “The Story Departments”, consisting of 4-5 writers, the owners, directors, who would work up a story in unison !)

NT popularised a new brand of Music.i.e. Rabindra Sangeet, which was hitherto confined to only Shantiniketan. With all this in place,NT was on its peak in 1940,when their slide started. One of their pillars P.C.Barua left NT. This was the beginning. Debki Bose left. Nitin Bose left after completing ‘Kashinath’ in 1943. Kanan Devi left to join Barua and Uma Shashi eloped with her lover.
Pankaj Mallick, though unhappy over the treatment meted out to him in NT, did not leave till the end. He did Bombay film music at Calcutta-like Kasturi or Zalzala etc. He always considered NT as his Alma Mater.
The ongoing II world war, the communal riots of 1946.the Partition of 1947 and the deteriorating civil conditions of Bengal (specially Calcutta),due to the influx of Refugees, broke NT completely. The Govt. had regulated supply of Raw Film, East Bengal market was lost totally, artistes left for Dhaka or Bombay…all this took NT to its end rapidly.

In such worsening conditions in 1944/45,Sircar tried to mend things by replacing the II and III level artistes to fill up gaps left by departed people. Thus, Bimal Roy, who was a Cinematographer and an Editor, got an opportunity to sit in the Director’s Chair. They made an ambitious film ” Udayer Pathe” -44. A Hindi version was made as ‘ Hamraahi”-45. It was Bimal Roy’s First brush with a Hindi Film Direction. Both versions were successful. But with major things remaining the same for years, without any changes, the house of New Theatres became a dilapidated, colourless, tattered big empty Palace. It’s sad to write about the fall of an Empire- a Giant !
(Article is based on information from “The glory that was New Theatres” by Sharmishtha Gooptu, ” सुंदर ती दुसरी दुनिया ” a Marathi book by Ambarish Mishra, The Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, with thanks, along with my old writings and my notes.)

Today we will know for the first time more about an artiste who was with NT from almost the beginning. The name is strange and uncommon-NEMO.

Nemo (Mirza Muhammad Begg) was born on 27th December 1903 at Calcutta. He passed his Senior Cambridge. One day he, along with some friends, visited New Theatres to see a film shooting. Mirza Muhammad Begg merely wanted to watch the shooting of ‘Yahoodi Ki Larki’ (1933) but, as luck would have it, his visit to the New Theatres studio in Calcutta led to a small role in the same film. The part was that of a Roman king and little did Begg know back then that he’d soon be turning to Latin to fish out a lasting identity.

A year later, he was invited by New Theatres’ founder B.N. Sircar to work as the production manager of ‘Karwan-e-Hayat’ (1935) and another chance role beckoned. A female actor who was supposed to play an old witch in the film failed to turn up for the shooting and Begg volunteered for the part. The make-up department stepped up to the challenge and Begg, unrecognisable in the get-up, did the job (and always considered it his best effort). What happened next is even more interesting. Once the film was ready, the makers felt apprehensive about revealing to the public that a man had played the witch’s role. Begg came up with a solution – a gender-ambiguous screen name for himself. And in a delightfully wacky move, he picked a name that means ‘nobody/nothing’ in Latin – ‘Nemo’.

The name stuck on and this was the beginning of Nemo’s steadfast association with New Theatres – one that resulted in a string of features like ‘Karodpati’, ‘Dushman’, ‘Doctor’ and ‘Zindagi’. He was Vidushak, the royal jester, in ‘Vidyapati’, a rigid but caring father in ‘Jawani Ki Reet’ and the devoted caretaker Dharamdas in P.C. Barua’s ‘Devdas’. These diverse characters earned him appreciation from audiences and critics alike. Further, the story of the Saigal hit ‘The President’ (1937) was based on his idea and he was duly credited for the same. Alongside his work in films, he also edited and published ‘Akkas’ – a very popular Urdu (and later, Urdu-English bilingual) film magazine in those days. Its surviving copies now serve as an important archive of the early talkies. His last film with New Theatres was Kashinath. When Calcutta was bombed by Japan in late 1942, Nemo migrated with his family to his ancestral hometown, Lucknow. He later went over to Bombay for a short while to work in Mazhar Khan’s ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945), and then returned to Lucknow to settle into a life far removed from the studio lights.

In the middle of it all lies an extraordinary fact – at the time he entered the movies, M.M. Begg was a national billiards champion! He won the inaugural Indian Open Billiards Championship in 1931 and never left the game thereon, despite a busy and flourishing film career. He won the trophy again in 1937, and between the 2 wins, he was the runner-up thrice. Not to mention, he represented the country at international tournaments and also headed various administrative organisations related to the game. His contributions towards establishing and popularising billiards and snooker in India are widely mentioned, and always in glowing terms. He was also obsessed with Racing.

It was nearly a decade after ‘Pehli Nazar’ that Raj Kapoor managed to pull Nemo out of his sabbatical for 2 memorable final acts in ‘Shree 420’ and ‘Jagte Raho’. In both, Nemo played similar roles of manipulative, corrupt seths who hide their sinister designs behind a facade of respectability. If he was jittery about facing the camera after a long gap, it doesn’t show (unless Seth Sonachand’s trembling chin is not a mannerism 😄). He was particularly effective in ‘Shree 420’, where he puts on the most evil smile possible and hisses to Raj Kapoor, “Aap se mulaqaat ho gayi, is mein fayda hi fayda hai.” He also did 2 more films- Raja Vikram-57 and Naag Champa-58.

Nemo worked for 19 films of New Theatres and 4 others totalling 23 films in all. His Filmography – Yahudi ki ladki-33, Karwaan E Hayat-35, Devdas-35, Karodpati-36, Manzil-36, Vidyapati-37, Anath Ashram-37, President-37, Dushman-38, Dharati Mata-38, Abhagin-38, Jawani ki reet-39, Badi Didi-39, Zindagi-40, Haar Jeet-40, Doctor-40, Aandhi-40, Lagan-41, Saugandh-42, Shri 420-55, Jaagte Raho-56, Raja Vikram-57 and Naag Champa-55. It is believed that he died in Bombay on 18-8-1960.

Cinema, publishing, sports – Mirza Muhammad Begg distinguished himself in everything he touched. And chose to call himself NEMO – a nobody. ( based on information from Filmdom-1946, HFGK, muVyz and mainly an article by Yasir Abbasi, with thanks.)

Today’s song is sung by Aruna.


Song- Aaj mila hai bichhada saajan(Zindagi)(1940) Singer- Aruna, Lyricist- Kidar Sharma, MD- Pankaj Mullick

Lyrics

Aaj mila hai
Aaj mila hai ae
Aaj mila hai
bichhda saajan
aaj mila hai ae
Aaj mila hai
mre man ka
mere man ka
phool khila hai
Aaj mila hai
Aaj mila hai

jaag uthhi hai
aaj jawaani
yaad aayi hai
apni kahaani
jaag uthhi hai
aaj jawaani
yaad aayi hai
apni kahaani
apni kahaani
Aaj mila hai
Aaj mila hai

Aaj mila hai ae
Aaj mila hai
kaise koi dil mein aaya
kaise kuchh khoya
kuchh paaya
kaise koi dil mein aaya
kaise kuchh khoya
kuchh paaya
hamne
hamne jee ko khud banaaya
hamne jee ko khud banaaya
dil se dil ko ?? samjhaaya
Aaj mila hai ae
Aaj mila hai
mere man ka aa
mere man ka phool khila hai
bichhda saajan
bichhda saajan
aaj mila hai ae
aaj mila hai


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4713 Post No. : 16419

Today’s song is from the film Adhikar-1938. Made at Calcutta by New Theatres, the film was directed by P C Barua, who also acted in the film’s both versions-Bangla and Hindi. The film title was the same in both. While the Bangla version released on 12-1-1939, the Hindi version was delayed and released on 21-10-1939.

In the early era of film making, right from the Silent films, Bombay was the most active and important film centre. Two local communities in Bombay were predominantly engaged in filmmaking. One was the Gujarati – who were shrewd businessmen who had an eye on the profits. The other local community was Marathis. Marathi people were poor in finance, bereft of business acumen, they were very good performers. So, they were inclined to acting, direction,production, Art direction, story writing, Music directions, singing etc. Everything and anything that did not involve finance or business !

This continued till the Talkie arrived. Then one more player joined in and that was Bengali community from Calcutta. They recognised the need to showcase their films on the All India platform to make their film industry viable. So, making Hindi films for the All India market started. The pioneers in Cinema in Bengal – the Madons had their own network of Cinema Theatres and after a while New Theatres too established their film distribution network in North, West and South India.

Bengalis were hardworking and intelligent in those days and so understood the mechanics of successful films.First thing that they did was to use established novels and stories from the Bengali literature to make films. The Madons had bought the rights of all the novels of Bankimchandra Chatterjee and the New Theatres followed suit by using Sharadchandra Chatterji and the rest of the famous writers. This made their film’s base strong. Secondly, they introduced their favourite and revered Rabindra Sangeet in film songs. To the Bombay audience, who was bored with classical and stage drama music, this was a welcome change. Thus, in the early years of Talkie films i.e. 1933 to almost 1945, Calocutta contributed substantially in making films popular and profitable.

Automatically, many Bangla artistes tried their hand at acting and Music making in Hindi films. Have you ever heard of these names ?
Radhacharan Bhattacharya, Motibabu, N R Bhattacharya, Shoolpani Mukherjee, S P Mukherjee, V V Ganguly, Niren Lahiri, Shivrani Ghosh, A C Biswas, Bhishmadev Chatterjee etc etc .

I am sure none of these names ring any bell in your mind. Simply because they are not famous Bangla names. Let me tell you that these are some names of Bangla Music Directors, who gave music to Hindi films in the 30s and 40s. The contribution of Bangla artistes in various fields of film making, especially Music composition and singing has been sizable. Over a period, with the emergence and strengthening of regional centres, the contribution started reducing and in a period of 20 years,it trickled to the minimum.

In the decade of the 30s Music Directors like R C Boral, Pankaj Mullik, K C Dey, Timir Baran, Anupam Ghatak and Anil Biswas contributed heavily by building the base of Hindi Film music. In the 40s it was Pannalal Ghosh, Kamal Dasgupta, Pt.Ravishankar and Ram Ganguly. In the 50s it was S D Burman, Salil Chaudhary and Hemant Kumar. In the 60s it was Robin Banerjee, in the 70s it was only R D Burman and in the 80s it was only Bappi Lahiri.

Similarly, among Singers too the initial high number came down over a period. To start with it was K C Dey, Anil Biswas, Ashok Kumar, Asit baran, Harimati Dua, Kalyani Das(real name Zareena), Kanan Devi, Pahadi Sanyal, Pankaj Mullik, Parul Ghosh, Maya Banerjee etc. Then came Ashima Banerjee, Geeta Dutt, Hemant Kumar, Jagmohan, Juthika Roy, Manna Dey, Ranu Mukherjee, Sandhya Mukherjee, Sailesh Mukherjee, Shankar Dasgupta, Subir Sen, Utpala Sen etc. In the 70 to 85 period it was mainly Kishore Kumar, Amit kumar, Aarti Mukherjee, Bappi Lahiri, Runa Laila, Kalyani Mitra, Pankaj Mitra, Sapan Chakravarty etc. After 85 the number was reduced to Shreya Ghoshal, Abhijeet, Babul Supriyo etc.
(All names are only indicative and not exhaustive).

Amongst the singers from Bengal, possibly Pahadi Sanyal acted in the maximum number of Hindi films-36. He sang 70 songs in 20 Hindi films, the rest were for only acting. His songs with Uma Shashi, Kanan Devi, Molina Devi and Sehgal were famous. Luku Sanyal-the English news Reader of early Doordarshan News was his daughter. Today’s film Adhikar-38 had music by Timir baran bhattacharya. The cast of the film was P C Barua, Jamuna, Menaka, Pahadi Sanyal, Pankaj Mullik, Jagdish Sethi, Bikram Kapooretc.etc. From the cast, Menaka Devi was a member of Same Name Confusion, as there was another Menaka-actress and singer- from Bombay in the same time period.

Menaka Devi (Calcutta Wali) was born in Varanasi on 23-1-1921. Her mother was a resident of the holy city although her father was from Bengal. She studied upto Matriculation. She could speak fluent English and Hindi, but not much of Bangla, having been raised in Varanasi. Her interest in music and dance took her to Bombay where she starred in a couple of films like Prince Thaksen (1929), Uttara Abhimanyu, Ishwar Ki Maut and others as a child artiste. When the Talkie started she acted and sang in Bhedi Rajkumar-34, Pyara Dushman-35 and Krishna Shishtai – 35.

Reportedly, she met the legendary film director Debaki Bose of Bengal during a train journey and he was so impressed by her that he decided to cast her in the lead role of his next venture in the Hindi version of the bilingual Sonar Sansar (1936 in Bangla and Sunehra Sansar-36 in Hindi) and thus began the illustrious career of Menaka Devi.

Her devotion to work was such that she learnt Bengali, her mother tongue although she was anything but fluent in it having spent all her life till then outside Bengal, so that she could play the same role (that of Alka) in the Bengali version also. Dhiraj Bhattacharya was her first hero on the screen. P.C.Barua, who was on the lookout for a young and fresh face to play Jharna in his forthcoming production Mukti (1937) selected her for both the versions ( Bangla and Hindi) and a flow started whereby she starred in films like Adhikar (1939), Abhigyan (1938), Bardidi (1939 in Bangla and Badi Didi in Hindi), Rajat Jayanti (1940) and others.

She decided to try her luck in Bombay around 1944 and starred in a few films there and definitely made her presence felt although playing the second lead most of the time. Kishore Sahu procured her services for Hamari Duniya (1952). She was married to Pannalal Shrivastav and had 1 daughter ( Jaya Ganguly). She turned producer also and this proved her undoing. Both her films as producer, Apna na Huye Apne (No information of this film,probably incomplete) and Jeene Do-48, both starring herself with prominent Bombay stars flopped.

She returned to Calcutta a broken woman and found to her dismay that roles were not coming to her. She joined the MG Enterprise, a drama group of Molina Devi and performed on the stage to continue to live as an actress. She even arranged magic shows along with husband Pannalal Srivastava while small roles came pouring in films like Ekti Raat (1956) and others. The feature that strikes even today while seeing her performance is the spontaneous nature of her acting. Why good roles eluded her is a mystery. She was last seen on the screen in Bhombal Sardar (1983). In all, she acted in 60 films-Bangla and Hindi together. She was in 19 Hindi films and sang 8 songs in 4 Hindi films.

Her end came on 22-1- 2004 after a prolonged fight not only against poor health but also poverty. Her death was reported only in one Bengali daily although news of her death received good coverage on television.

Here is a small note on Jagdish Sethi.

Jagdish Sethi was born on 15-1-1903 at Pind Dandan Khan (Campbellpore) in Punjab.

After matriculation in 1920, he graduated from Lahore. He was known as a fighter in college due to his dominating nature. He joined the film line as assitant cameraman in Punjab film company in 1928.

He went to Calcutta to work as an extra in New Theatres, came back to Bombay and worked in Alam Ara-31. He went back to New Theatres in 1933 and worked in films like President,Anath Ashram,Mukti, jawani ki reet,Ghar ki laaj etc.

He worked in about 85 films in his career. In Bombay he was famous as a person with changing moods. He did not have many friends. He worked in films made by Imperial, Amar Movietone, Maiden Films, New Theatres, Laxmi Productions (belonging to L V Prasad), Janak Productions, Filmistan etc etc. He started his own J.S.Productions and produced and directed films like Do Dil-47, Raat ki Rani-49, Jaggu-52 and Pensioner-54.

He amassed huge wealth. He was fond of Racing, Cards and Tennis. He was also a writer and published a book “Hichkiyan”-short stories on Film world.

He died on 12-6-1969.

Today’s song is sung by Pankaj Mullik, Pahadi Sanyal and Pratap Mukherji. The tune of today’s song is similar to one used in film Forty Days-1959 song of Asha-Manna Dey “Naseeb hoga mera meherbaan kabhi na kabhi”….MD-Bipin-Babul. Enjoy….


Song- Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho (Adhikaar)(1938) Singers- Pankaj Mullik, Pahadi Sanyal, Pratap Mukherjee, Lyricist-Arzoo Lucknavi, MD- Timir Baran Bhattacharya

Lyrics

Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho
zakhm ki tarah hanso
haan zakhm ki tarah hanso
dard ki haalat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

sukh mein jo hain
unhen kya kadr (??)
paraaye jo thhaken
haan aan aan
sukh mein jo hain
unhen kya kadr (??)
paraaye jo thhaken
haan aan aan
haan haan
haan aan
?? se achcha hai ke haajat(??) na kaho
?? se achcha hai ke haajat(??) na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

sabr kadva hai magar
haan aan aan
sabr kadva hai magar
sabr ka phal meethha aa hai ae
haan aan aan
haan
bhes badli hui ??aahat ko
??yat na kaho
bhes badli hui ??aahat ko
??yat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

Bhed khulta hai
bharam jaataa hai
hoti hai hansi
?? aane se hi ?? na kaho
?? aane se hi ?? na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

aa aa aa
apne hi munh se
haaye ye apni hi tauheen
haan aan tauheen
aa aa aa aa
apne hi munh se
haaye ye apni hi tauheen
haan aan tauheen
sharm izzat ki agar hai
to museebat na kaho
gar museebat ki agar hai
to museebat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4686 Post No. : 16369

I do not like getting bored. Do you ? I am sure, no one wants to get bored, forget liking it. Have you ever thought about what is ” Liking ” ? Psychology says, you like a thing when it is in line with your thinking, your values and your beliefs. For example – an old man does not ” Like ” the behaviour of ” Youngsters “, because they do not think on his lines, their values are adapted to current times and they believe only in practical ways and not emotional ways !

Most old systems, behavioural ways and values have changed drastically -due to the needs of the times, due to no visible benefits, and due to not believing conventions. For example, my Grandmother ( and ladies of her age) never took my grandfather’s name. She never came in front of outsiders without a Ghunghat on her head. My Mother had no objection to taking my Father’s name, if needed. She came to the Drawing room – not with a Ghunghat, but only if needed. Almost the same was the case with my wife but with an improved version. She moved about the home freely and also sat with guests in the drawing room. Now my daughter in law calls my son by his first name, wears whatever dress she wants and goes out alone with her friends. Now, will my Grandfather like the behaviour of my Daughter in Law ? NEVER !

The principle is the same in liking Films and Film Music. If I am used to from my childhood to listen to melodious music and enjoy it, at the age of 80+ years, will I like today’s music, films and songs ? It is not a question of adapting to new ways – that would be compromise for peaceful life. At the same time, I have no right to criticise today’s films or music- simply because it is not meant for me, it is meant for today’s youngsters. The best policy would be ” To each his own ” or ” पसंद अपनी अपनी , खयाल अपना अपना “.

Therefore when I find people criticising new films, songs and music, I tell them ‘ let them listen and enjoy. It is made for them, not for you. And don’t forget, like you, the new generation too can criticise and ridicule old films and songs/music.”

Ever noticed how the old film duets differ from new film duets ? In old films, even without Corona, the Hero- Heroines maintained social distance, in spite of being the only two of them in the scene. Today, duets are with about 60 extras doing Yogic exercises in uniformity or when they are only two in the scene, they look like one due to extreme closeness !

Old or new, films are not a part of the Curriculum Textbooks, their purpose is to entertain in the way the audience understands, accepts and enjoys. They are like reflections of the audience in the mirror. So, you love your time films and allow them to enjoy theirs. No question of ” Liking” any film !

Film Chhota Bhai-1949 was a film made by New Theatres, when it was counting its days. Most of its sheen was lost, popular artistes gone elsewhere and public taste had changed drastically. The company was under stress of huge debts and no respite was in sight. By the early 50s ,it closed down. The Elephant in their Logo fell silent after its last film ‘ Bakul’ in 1955….after making a solid beginning on 10-2-1931….just a life of 24 years. But what a Life !!! No film lover ever can forget what New Theatres gave to indian audiences while it was shining !

I am not sure if the film Chhota bhai was a remake of a Bangla film. Must be so, looking at its cast. All bengali actors and film made in Calcutta. The Bengali names are an enigma to me personally – Chhabi Biswas is a Male actor but Chhabi Roy is an actress ! Asit Sen is an actor but Asita Bose is an actress. Make a mistake in spelling and you change male to female effortlessly.

The film was directed by Kartik Chatterjee, who also directed the film ‘Yatrik’-52 (the songs of Yatrik are evergreen). However, in the film Garib ki ladki-41, he was a Music Director. I believe he was an actor also. The film had music by Pankaj Mullik, who was very loyal to New Theatres. Despite many important artistes like actors, Music Directors, Directors and Cinematographers leaving New Theatres, Pankaj mullick stuck to it till last (though he was not very happy). The cast included Molina Devi, Rajlaxmi, Maya Bose (Chouranghi-42, Saugandh-42, Samapti-49, Yatrik-52 etc.), Chhabi Roy, Shakoor, Asit sen, khursheed, Tulsi Chakravarti ( a Male actor !) and many others.

Molina being an uncommon name there was no other actress of this name. Molina Devi was born on 3-6- 1917. She received training in acting from Aparesh Mukherjee, and made her debut, at the age of 8, in a silent movie. She was acknowledged as one of the leading actresses of the Bengali stage, with her professional career spanning more than three decades.

In 1924, she debuted in a silent film while at the age of 8 and thereafter worked as dancer mainly in the mythological and historical plays. She performed some memorable roles in Bengali as well as Hindi films. She got a breakthrough in Puran Bhagat and Molina played the title role in the movie, Rani Rasmani. She took various roles, even vamps in her early career such as in Pramathesh Barua’s Rajat Jayanti in 1939. She also directed a Kolkata based theatre troupe, M. G. Enterprises.

Molina worked in Rangana theatre as chief artist. She performed as a singer on radio and contributed to the formation of Mahila Silpi Mahal, a welfare association for female artists of Bengal. Molina Devi’s high creative excellence had found expression in such diverse media as the stage, the film and the radio. As a founder of the M. G. Enterprise, now in its twenty-third year, she had been responsible for the success of such well-known plays as ‘Thakur Sri Sri’, ‘Rani Rasmoni’, ‘Jagatbandhu’ and ‘Bholagiri’.

She had been honoured and decorated by many eminent organisations and learned bodies. For her eminence in the field of Drama and her contribution to its enrichment, Molina Devi received the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award for Acting.

Her first husband was Jolu Boral and the second husband was actor Gurudas Banerjee.

Molina died on 13 August 1977 in Kolkata. She acted in 22 Hindi films. Her first Hindi film was Raaj Rani Meera-33 and last film was Babla-53. She also sang 11 songs in 4 Hindi films.

Today’s song is sung by Utpala Sen. This is the third song from Chhota Bhai-49 to appear on this Blog.


Song-Paar karo dukhiyan ka beda beda paar karo (Chhota Bhai)(1949) Singer-Utpala Sen, Lyricist- Ramesh Pandey, MD- Pankaj Mullick

Lyrics

paar karo
dukhiyan ka beda aa
beda paar karo
paar karo dukhiyan ka beda
beda paar karo
apne sharnaagat ke man ki
apne sharnaagat ke man ki
peeda aan haro o o
beda paar karo

ik din tumne hi duniya mein
ik din tumne hi duniya mein
prem preet ka khel rachaaa aaa
aa aa aa aa
ik din tumne hi duniya mein
prem preet ka khel rachaaa
aa aa aa
tumhi ne birha ki jwaaala mein
bhole man ko tadpaaya
aab aa kar
ab tum hi aa kar
birhan ke sheetal nayan karo o
beda paar karo

kyaa jaane
kyaa jaane
kab bikhar jaayegi
sapnon ki
sapnon ki maaya
kya jaane kab mil jaayegi
mitti mein mitti ki kaaya
kyaa jaane
ab ek jhalak dekar r
ab ek jhalak dekar
bhakton ka jeewan safal karo 0
hey ae bhagwan
hey ae bhagwan
paar karo dukhiyan ka beda
beda paar karo o


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4619 Post No. : 16263

All but one song of “Nartaki”(1940) are already covered in the blog. Here are the details of the songs (in the order in which they are listed in HFGK Vol-I ):-(1931-1940)

Song Posted On
Madbhari rut jawaan hai 21.09.2011
Ye kaun aaj aayaa sawere sawere 15.03.2011
Aankh moond kar dhyaan 10.06.2011
Teri dayaa se ae daayee 12.10.2011
Kaun tujhe samjhaaye 09.04.2020
Prem ka naataa chhootaa 09.04.2010
Rat Shiv naam ki maalaa, is naam se jag ujiyaalaa Being posted today

Kaun tujhe samjhaaye*

(*HFGK mentions this song ‘kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh’ as multiple version song sung by Roopkumari (first version) and Pankaj Mallick and chorus (second version), however as noted in the post for this song above the female version of this song is not there in the movie. However, this song ‘kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh’ appears in two parts and since both the parts of this song are covered, we can conclude that seven songs of this movie are already covered on the blog.

Instead, one song is played in the beginning of the movie i.e. ‘hey chandrachood madanaantak shoolpaney’ , but not included in HFGK in ‘Nartaki-1940’, but this song features in ‘Yatrik-1952’ (refer my comments on this song on the blog).

Yes, this song is played in the movie Nartaki-1940 (at 4:17 to 05:36).
(Sung by Pankaj Mallick and chorus I guess). However, in the list of songs of this movie-‘Nartaki-1940’ in HFGK Vol -1 (1931-40) it is not mentioned.

During the preparation of my post with a song from the movie ‘Nartaki-1940’ I first noted down the list of songs of this movie already posted on the blog. And, after that I watched this movie, so when I came across this song in the movie, I immediately remembered this post by Deshmukh Sir on the blog, so I looked for this song on the blog. (Because I thought if the link of this post was missing, as I had forgotten that this song-post was for the movie ‘Yaatrik-1952’.

Today’s song is the only remaining song from this movie. With this song, all the songs of “Nartaki”(1940) have been covered and this movie thus gets YIPPEED in the blog.

let us enjoy this song titled “rat shiv naam ki maala” today on the occasion of Mahashivtarri.

I have not been able to note correct words at many places. I would request our readers with keener ears to kindly help and provide correct words please.

Audio

Video

Song-Rat Shiv naam ki maala (Nartaki)(1940) Singer-Chorus, Lyrics-Aarzoo Lucknowi, MD-Pankaj Mullick

Lyrics

rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
aa aa aa rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
is naam se jag ujiyaalaa aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
jagat sundartaa(?) baaki leelaa
jagat sundartaa (?) baaki leelaa
wohi soch ?
suraj chamkeelaa aa
wohi rang jo ?
patta bootaa phool rangeelaa
chamak rahaa hariyaala
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa

har har panchhi jag par doley
hari hari daal pe har har boley
har har boley ae
har har boley ae
har har panchhi jag par doley
hari hari daal pe har har boley
?
aa aa aa
?
? amras ras gholey
ras gholey ae
?
?
jhoom chaley ae
jhoom chaley ae
jhoom chaley matwaalaa aa aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
is naam se jag ujiyaalaa aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa

rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa
rat shiv naam ki maala aa …


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4314 Post No. : 15596

The days were when gramophone instruments and radios used to be a luxury. People could (and would) listen to music and songs either at family functions and weddings where a gramophone player was part of the arrangements, or in cinema halls, or maybe at restaurants and corner shops. But then still, the awareness and popularity of the songs and the artists was evidently widespread. The gramophone records of popular songs would sell out briskly, and there are many cases of a 2nd, and a 3rd edition of records being released by the companies. Word of mouth was a strong method of spreading awareness, and people used to hum and lightly sing the popular songs as they went about their work. One reads about this phenomena in anecdotal references in newspapers and magazines – like such and such song being on the lips of ‘everybody’, or such and such song being played in every street and lane – ‘गली गली में बजता था’.

Just put on the imagination cap and visualize – the songs being hummed by the common people as they go about their work, in streets and market place, singing – “Piya Milan Ko Jaana”, or “Ye Kaun Aaj Aaya Savere Savere”, or “Chale Pawan Ki Chaal”, or “Tere Mandir Ka Hoon Deepak Jal Raha”, and other such wonderful creations – in the voice of one of the very first group of singers in this country that started being recognized and loved across the length and breadth of our land.

Remembering Pankaj Babu today, on the 116th anniversary of birth – 10 May, 1905.

A voice that is so uniquely impressive, a voice that appears to be emanating from the depths of a sublime creativity, the deep resonating bass that defies measure and replication. A voice that is so enmeshed with an equally deep understanding and awareness of what music is, and how it becomes a delight for the listeners.
A voice and creativity that was so genuine, so sincere; a voice that expressed itself with a perceivable authority, understanding and proficiency – so much so that Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore was so verily impressed by the composition and expression of this young artist that he immediately granted the requested permission to use Gurudev’s poetry and compositions for commercial cinema. In that accomplishment, Pankaj Babu is eminently instrumental in giving a unique personification to Rabindra Sangeet, and to take it beyond the borders of Bengal and make it a recognized genre across the entire country.

A career that is not defined by numbers, but more by the quality of his creative genius. Working with RC Boral at New Theatres, Calcutta he was instrumental in introducing to the world of cinema, such delightful sounds of singing – KL Saigal, Kanan Devi, Uma Shashi, Pahadi Sanyal, Suprova Sarkar, and more. Defining and establishing the methodology of off-line recording of music and songs, thus becoming the pioneer of playback singing. He was a music director, a singer, an actor, and a teacher – all rolled into one.

Yes, a career that is not defined by numbers. In that, a couple of days ago, I was almost at the verge of despair, being unable to locate a song by him to post today. Most of his songs in films, including the version songs of the film ‘My Sister’ (1944), and many of his non-film Hindi songs are already showcased here. But yes, I am able to locate another very beautiful non-film Hindi song to present today.

Lyrics of this song are from the pen of Pandit Bhushan. The music composition is by Pankaj Babu himself. Anecdotal information available tells that the orchestration arrangement was done by a musician named Francisco Casanova, who used to lead the band at the Grand Hotel in Calcutta. Here is a brief information about this gentleman, which I am able to locate from an article on Pankaj Babu, written by Shri N Venkatraman on the blog ‘Songs of Yore’. Regulars will know this as AK ji’s blog.

Francisco Casanova was a Spanish musician, conductor and composer. He could play the saxophone, flute and clarinet with equal deftness. He was a well-known performer, and on the occasion of the Olympic Games in 1924, he performed with his orchestra at the Champs-Elysées Theatre in Paris. In 1930 he came to India with his orchestra and performed in many cities. He chose to stay at Calcutta and was appointed the Principal of the Calcutta School of Music. He stayed in India till 1956. He was closely associated with Mehli Mehta, father of Zubin Mehta. In 1952, Casonova and Mehta assisted Yehudi Menuhin, when he came to India to perform. He was also a leading conductor of Calcutta Symphony Orchestra and the conductor of a Spanish band at one of Calcutta’s foremost hotels. Manohari Singh learnt the nuances of playing the key flute from him. It is also said that the orchestration to our National Anthem was by him!

Listen and enjoy this vintage voice, in a recording that surely is 70+ years young. 🙂

 

Song – Yaad Aaye Ke Na Aaye Tunhaari  (NFS – Pankaj Mullick) (1940s) Singer – Pankaj Mullick, Lyrics – Pandit Bhushan, MD – Pankaj Mullick

Lyrics

yaad aaye ke na aaye tumhaari
main tum ko bhool na jaaun
yaad aaye ke na aaye tumhaari
chhin chhin aawat waar tumhare
bin kaaran gaane gaaun
yaad aaye ke na aaye tumhaari

din jaaye chale jab tak jeeta hoon
raah chalte kabhi main aaj to aa pahunchun
din jaaye chale jab tak jeeta hoon
raah chalte kabhi main aaj to aa pahunchun
mukh pe tumhaare sukh ki pyaari
meethi hansi hi paaun
main isi liye bin kaaran gaane gaaun
yaad aaye ke na aaye tumhaari

jhadte hain phool phagun ke
phagun ke mahine mein
main tum se bida hota hoon
ik dard liye seene mein
jhadte hain phool phagun ke
phagun ke mahine mein
main tum se bida hota hoon
ik dard liye seene mein
din beetega aur hoga andhera
geet nahin goonjega
tham jaayegi beena
din beetega aur hoga andhera
geet nahin goonjega
tham jaayegi beena
jab tak tum raho aankhon mein
jam jam jee behlaaun
main isiliye bin kaaran gaane gaaun
yaad aaye ke na aaye tumhaari

——————————————–
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————

याद आए के ना आए तुम्हारी
मैं तुमको भूल ना जाऊँ
याद आए के ना आए तुम्हारी
छिन छिन आवत वार तुम्हारी
बिन कारण गाने गाउँ
याद आए के ना आए तुम्हारी

दिन जाये चले जब तक जीता हूँ
राह चलते कभी मैं आज तो आ पहुंचूँ
दिन जाये चले जब तक जीता हूँ
राह चलते कभी मैं आज तो आ पहुंचूँ
मुख पे तुम्हारे सुख की प्यारी
मीठी हंसी ही पाऊँ
मैं इसी लिए बिन कारण गाने गाउँ
याद आए के ना आए तुम्हारी

झड़ते हैं फूल फागुन के
फागुन के महीने में
मैं तुमसे बिदा होता हूँ
इक दर्द लिए सीने में
झड़ते हैं फूल फागुन के
फागुन के महीने में
मैं तुमसे बिदा होता हूँ
इक दर्द लिए सीने में
दिन बीतेगा और होगा अंधेरा
गीत नहीं गूंजेगा
थम जाएगी बीना
दिन बीतेगा और होगा अंधेरा
गीत नहीं गूंजेगा
थम जाएगी बीना
जब तक तुम रहो आँखों में
जम जम जी बहलाऊँ
मैं इसी लिए बिन कारण गाने गाउँ
याद आए के ना आए तुम्हारी


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4283 Post No. : 15530

—————————————————————————
Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No. 19
—————————————————————————

Regulars on the blog would be surprised to see my post covering a song from the forties or rather from the decade of ‘thirties’-1931-40.

My forte is the movies from the ‘seventies’. But, yes, I have from time to time shared songs from movies before the years of ‘seventies’ too.
As a music lover, I love the songs from the ‘golden period’ or ‘pre-golden period’ of Hindi cinema. I have a great admiration for the stalwarts of that era and a great fascination of the movies and songs of that era.

During my childhood days, I got to watch many movies of the ‘black & white’ era e.g. ‘Dillagi-1949’, ‘Dard-1947’, ‘Dulaari-1949’ etc. during the regular weekly screening of movies at our colony recreation club.

I don’t think I have ever watched a movie from the decade of 1931-1940. So, when I noticed this movie ‘Nartaki-1940’ falling under ‘blog ten year challenge’ of today 09.04.2020 I browsed its pending songs, and when I found that a song from the great Pankaj Mallick is pending to be posted, it was enough reason for me to share this song.

A few years back I got to watch a documentary on ‘New Theatres’ on ‘Doordarshan’ and I got to watch it more than once. The great Pankaj Mallick and songs sung by him have special place in my heart so I am more than happy to share this song here today.

HFGK Vol 1 1931-1940 mentioned this song in two versions (i.e. Male version and Female Version by Roop Kumari). The audio/video links of the song available were only for the male version sung by Pankaj Mallick or some mentioned them as Pankaj Mallick and chorus.

As the movie was available online, I decided to watch this movie. For me this is the oldest movie I have watched till date. And, for me, the current ‘situation’ makes it a special occasion and a very ‘special movie’ to watch and to remember as a ‘memory of these days’.

(Imagine what record I have created for me :). I have watched a movie released twenty-eight before I was born and I have watched a movie seventy-nine years after it was released. 🙂 (This movie was passed by the then Bengal Board of Censors on 18.12.1940).

After watching this movie, I can say that there is no female version sung by Roop Kumari for today’s song as mentioned in HFGK. (And I think this needs to be corrected in HFGK).

Coming back to the movies represented ten years back on this day we have the following songs represented on the blog on 09.04.2010 including a song from this movie ‘Nartaki-1940’;

Song Movie title-Year Remarks
Dene waala jab bhi detaa … Funtoosh-1956 All songs covered (08)
Dil mein hamaare kaun samaayaa… Adhikaar-1954 All songs covered (08)
Beqaraar hai koi Shama Parwaana-1954 All songs covered (11)
Prem ka naataa chhootaa Nartaki-1940 05 of 08 songs covered

So far, following songs from “Nartaki-1940” have been covered on the blog;

Song Posted On
Prem ka naataa chhootaa 09.04.2010
Madbhari rut jawaan hai 21.09.2011
Ye kaun aaj aayaa sawere sawere 15.03.2011
Aankh moond kar dhyaan 10.06.2011
Teri dayaa se ae daayee 12.10.2011

let us now enjoy this song for today …

(video) (Part-1)

Video (Part II)


Audio (Record version)

Song-Kaun tujhe samjhaaye (Nartaki)(1940) Singer-Pankaj Mullick, Lyrics-AArzoo Lucknow, MD-Pankaj Mullick

Lyrics
——————————-
Video (Part I)
——————————-

kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye
kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye

prem parikshaa(?)
ulte seedhe donon baan chalaaye
ae ae
bhed chhipaaye
marey ghut ghut ke
kahe to maaraa jaaye ae
bhed chhipaaye
marey ghut ghut ke
kahe to maaraa jaaye ae
moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye
kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye

(conversation between the actor & actress, not included)

kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye
kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye

prem juaa aur laabh ki aasha
jo hai ye bhi jaaye ae ae ae
prem juaa aur laabh ki aasha
jo hai ye bhi jaaye ae ae ae
man maujan ki ulti Gangaa
jeeta daanv haraaye
moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye ae

(song continues in the background as the actor & actress are shown walking together)

kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye
apni chaal badalnaa maanjhi
ee ee ee ee
apni chaal badalnaa maanjhi
mauj bhanwar naa sataaye
swarg ghaat ko jaati naiyya
narak pahunch na jaaye ae
swarg ghaat ko jaati naiyya
narak pahunch na jaaye
moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye ae

———————————
Video (Part II)
———————————-

kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye ae
kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye ae
prem juaa aur laabh ki aasha aa
jo hai ye bhi jaaye ae ae ae
prem juaa aur laabh ki aasha
jo hai ye bhi jaaye ae
man maujan ki ulti Gangaa
jeeta daanv haraaye
moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye ae

(dialogues, not included)

apni chaal badalnaa maanjhi
ee ee ee ee
apni chaal badalnaa maanjhi
mauj bhanwar naa sataaye ae
swarg ghaat ko jaati naiyya
narak pahunch na jaaye ae ae …

—————————————————-
(chorus) (record version)
—————————————————–
kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye
kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye
prem juaa aur laabh ki aasha
jo hai ye bhi jaaye ae ae ae
prem juaa aur laabh ki aasha
jo hai ye bhi jaaye ae ae ae
man maujan ki ulti Gangaa
jeeta daanv haraaye
moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye ae

prem parikshaa (?)
ulte seedhe donon baan chalaaye
ae ae
prem parikshaa(?)
ulte seedhe donon baan chalaaye
ae ae
bhed chhipaaye
marey ghut ghut ke
kahe to maaraa jaaye ae
bhed chhipaaye
marey ghut ghut ke
kahe to maaraa jaaye ae
moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye

apni chaal badalnaa maanjhi
ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee
apni chaal badalnaa maanjhe
mauj(?) bhanwar naa sataaye
swarg ghaat ko jaati naiyya
narak pahunch na jaaye ae
swarg ghaat ko jaati naiyya
narak pahunch na jaaye ae
moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye ae
kaun tujhe samjhaaye moorakh
kaun tujhe samjhaaye


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4200 Post No. : 15384

Today’s song is from the first decade of the talkie era and from one of the very popular Saigal films coming from New Theatres, Calcutta, ‘President’ (1937).

Ardeshir Irani of Imperial Film Co. won the race with Calcutta’s Madon Theatres and released the first talkie film of India – ‘Alam Ara’ (1931) and a revolution took place in the Indian Film Industry ! With just one shot, scores of Anglo-Indian actresses of the silent era became jobless, because they could not speak Hindi or sing a song. Smaller producers of silent films just shut their shops, because now, a single talkie film needed 4 times more investment compared to cheaper varieties of silent films produced earlier. The financial wizards understood the new opportunity of making money by investing in talkie film production. The number of staff of film companies increased and the big players with sound finances, became ready to grow bigger.

By 1934, the production of silent films ceased completely. Some of the noted film makers like V Shantaram, for example, who had shunned the talkie films initially as a temporary aberration, now took keen interest in making talkie films. They realised that talkie films could be an excellent vehicle for giving out social reform messages to the society. Initially, though the talkie films were made on folk tales, Parsi dramas and mythological stories, after 4-5 years the trend changed in its content and we can see a variety of genres in films then.

The playback was introduced in 1935 at Calcutta and in 1937 at Bombay – both by Bengali MDs. So, in 1937 films became mature. The other major highlights of 1937 were. . .
1.The first songless film – ‘Naujawan’ – was made by the Wadias
2. First English poem was used as a song in a Hindi film – which is available even today.
3. Younger MDs like Gobind Ram, Gyan Dutt, Ram Gopal Pande etc started their film careers.
4. Prabhat Films brought out their first film on social reforms – ‘Duniya Na Maane’. Same time New Theatres gave ‘Mukti’, ‘Ánath Ashram’ and ‘President’, on social issues.
5. First colour film – ‘Kisan Kanya’, indegenously shot and processed by Imperial, was released.

In 1937, a total of 176 films were made in India, out of which 102 were Hindi films. 14 films were made in Calcutta, 2 in Poona, 1 each in Kolhapur and Lahore and 83 films were made in Bombay alone, establishing itself as the undisputed Capital of Film Industry. In Bombay, the major players (film companies) made films in 1937 alone, thus – Prabhat-2, Ranjit-8, Sagar-6, Bombay Talkies-4, Minerva-2, Huns Pictures-3, Wadias-4, Prakash-3 and the maximum films were made by Imperial-9. The rest films were made by dozens of smaller production houses and individual producers under their banners. The major companies made 41 films, which was a major chunk of the 83 Bombay made films, in 1937.

Out of this, some notable films were – ‘Khwab Ki Duniya’ made by Prakash, was based on the famous novel and a subsequent Hollywood film ‘The Invisible Man’ (1933). The trick scenes were lapped up by the audiences. ‘Mahageet’ made by Sagar, heralded the playback singing in Bombay. ‘Savitri’ made by Bombay Talkies, was Ashok kumar’s first mythological film (he acted in another film ‘Úttara Abhimanyu’ (1946) later on). ‘Naujawan’ was Wadia’s first songless talkie film of India.

By 1937, the film music had also undergone total change. From stage drama style music, now MDs tried various other original melodies. Thus music became one of the major attractions of a film. Particularly some film songs are such that they occupy a special place in our heart. Many such songs of Hindi films are known to all of us and at some point of time we all had also got carried away with such songs. The other day, I was reading the book- “Golden period of film music 1931-1960” by film historian and writer Isak Mujawar ( चित्रपट संगीताचा सुवर्णकाळ १९३१-१९६०), in which he has related an anecdote…

When Producer Director Raj Khosla was a small boy, his father used to love Saigal songs. They had an ancient type of gramophone and his father would always play Saigal’s song “Ik Bungala Bane Nyaara” from film ‘President’-1937. It was his favourite song. Even Raj used to like this song. As he grew older he always used to remember his father and this song. In 1969, when he made film “Do Raaste”, he created a scene in it, in which Balraj Sahani – the eldest  of the three brothers in the film, always listens to this song on his gramophone. The same song is played in the film many times. In fact,the entire film story is built around that song.”
(free translation from Marathi).

When I read this, out of curiosity I opened my laptop and went to You Tube. I searched for the film ‘Do Raaste’ and watched it. Lo and behold ! The song indeed is played by Balraj Sahani and I too – along with Balraj Sahani – enjoyed the song again. Nowadays, we find in many films, old songs are played. Our own Sudhir ji is also running a series of such songs on this blog.

About a month back, I came across 2 song snippets, from film President-37, which I found were not covered in the Blog so far. The problem was, one song was of only 40 seconds and the other was of 50 seconds. Next day, I had urgent engagements till next 10 days, so I left the matter at that. However, when I became free, I sent those snippets to Atul ji and Sudhir ji. Sudhir ji informed me that the shorter song was opening part of the famous song “Ek Bangala Bane Nyaara” and was already covered in the blog. However the other 50 second snippet needed some work on it. Sudhir ji restored it by editing, cutting, joining and adding the missing song lines to it, etc. to make it a song of respectable duration of 2+ minutes. It included some dialogues also. He even uploaded it. I thank Sudhir ji for mending, amending and sending the song to me for presentation.

As per HFGK, there are 8 songs in film President. 6 songs are already discussed. In these posts, lot of information about the film and related matters has already been given , so there is nothing left to write about these matters. However, I have found that the synopsis of the film given by the Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema takes a different angle of the story than what is already given in the blog. So I am reproducing it here to know what it means. . .

A famous Saigal musical narrating a strange love story set against 1930s industrialisation and worker-management relations. The 16-year-old Prabhavati (Chandrabati Devi/Kamlesh Kumari) inherits a mill and turns it into an extremely profitable enterprise.

Prakash (Saigal) is a worker who designs a more efficient machine for the factory for which he first gets sacked and then is re-employed. He falls in love with Prabhavati’s sister Sheila (Leela Desai), who later makes way for Prabhavati who is also in love with Prakash.

Her withdrawal distresses Prakash, causing him to bully the workers who then go on strike. Prabhavati realises the problem and presumably commits suicide (she disappears into an office and locks the door) for the good of her sister and of the business. The hint is about her death.

The unmistakable thrust of the story is that the ‘personal’ (i.e. relations with women) should not be allowed to interfere in male pursuits like business or management, equated with social good. The film has Saigal’s classic number Ek bangla bane nyara. The plot echoes the Guru Dutt script for the unfinished Baharain Phir Bhi Ayengi.

Let us now listen to this reborn 7th song. Some dialogues come free with the song…


Song – Door. . . Bahut Door (President) (1937) Singer – Bikram Nahar, Lyricist – [Unattributed], MD – Pankaj Mullick
Leela Desai
Jagdish Sethi

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

[jeejee
ae ree jeejee
toone jo kiya thheek kiya
tujhe ye sab kuchh chhod kar chala jaana hoga
door
bahut door
bahut door
]

door
bahut door
phir bhi tum itne nahin door
jitna aankhon se noor
phir bhi tum itne nahin door
jitna aankhon se noor

[damn it
daam aankhen
damn noor
]

ras bhari vaani se to
man ki kali
khil gayi
khil gayi
hic
theeeeeeee
kathor vachan
hic
sunte hi
murjhaayi
hic

[Vikram
ye bakwaas band karoge ya nahin]

[. . .]
[..clipped dialogues..]
[. . .]

[apne us rascal se keh dena ki
uski daal ab yahaan nahin galegi

Sheela darling us’se nafrat karti hai

Sheela dear. . .]

[tum isi laayak ho

raat khatm hone waali hai
jee bhar ke ro sako to ro lo
savere tak dil ki bhadaas nikal jaayegi
ghabraane ko koi baat nahin
]

mere nainan ke tat pe shnaan
birha ki kaali raat
karti hai jis bhaant(?)
ho jaati hai parbhaat
mere nainan ke tat pe shnaan
birha ki kaali raat
karti hai jis bhaant(?)
ho jaati hai parbhaat

haar mein hoti hai jeet
yahi ee
hai
preeet ki reeeet

————————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
————————————————————

[जीजी
ए री जीजी
तूने जो किया ठीक किया
तुझे ये सब छोड़ कर चला जाना होगा
दूर
बहुत दूर
बहुत दूर]

दूर
बहुत दूर
फिर भी तुम इतने नहीं दूर
जितना आँखों से नूर
फिर भी तुम इतने नहीं दूर
जितना आँखों से नूर

[डैम इट
डैम आँखें
डैम नूर]

रस भरी वाणी से तो
मन की काली
खिल गई
खिल गई
हिक
थी॰॰॰
कठोर वचन
हिक
सुनते ही
मुरझाई

[विक्रम
ये बकवास बंद करोगे या नहीं]

[. . .]
[..संवाद कट..]
[. . .}

[अपने उस रास्कल से कह देना कि
उसकी दाल अब यहाँ नहीं गलेगी

शीला डार्लिंग उससे नफरत करती है

शीला डियर ॰ ॰ ॰]

[तुम इसी लायक हो

रात खत्म होने वाली है
जी भर कर रो सको तो रो लो
सवेरे तक दिल कि भड़ास निकाल जाएगी
घबराने कि कोई बात नहीं]

मेरे नैनन के तट पे श्नान
बिरहा  कि काली रात
करती है जिस भाँत(?)
हो जाती है परभात
मेरे नैनन के तट पे श्नान
बिरहा  कि काली रात
करती है जिस भाँत(?)
हो जाती है परभात

हार में होती है जीत
यही॰॰॰
है
प्रीत कि रीत


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4171 Post No. : 15345 Movie Count :

4230

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 13
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

‘Monihar’ (‘Jeweled Neckless’, 1966, Bangla film) was directed by Salil Sen. The main cast included Soumitra Chatterjee, Biswajeet, Sandhya Roy, Kamal Mitra, Pahadi Sanyal, Chhaya Devi etc. The film is available on a video sharing site with English sub-titles. The film belongs to the genre of the musical family drama and is about two brothers who share a cordial relationship yet there are misunderstandings regarding the financial matters as well as their likings for the same girl. Yet there is no villainous attitude towards each other. And this is the highlight of the film. This is one more among Bangla films which has got the theme of declining influence of aristocracy in Bengal during the British rule. The gist of the story of the film is as under:

Ajay (Soumitra Chatterjee) and Arun (Biswajeet) are two brothers belonging to an aristocratic family who stay with their widowed mother. The family’s financial position is not good. Except for a huge palace and some business ventures which are running at losses, they have almost nothing to indulge in aristocratic life style. Ajay being the elder, looks after the family business. He is also a good trained singer under the tutelage of an Ustad (Pahadi Sanyal). Arun, the younger one has gone to Calcutta (Kolkata) for higher study to become a doctor.

The mother, before her death, had taken an assurance from Ajay the he would look after Arun in the same way as she would have looked after him. She also hands over a ‘monihar’ (jeweled necklace) to Ajay for her prospective wife whenever he gets married as this has been passed over three generation to the eldest daughter-in-law in the family.

Due to losses in business, Ajay finds it difficult to meet the expenses of Arun. He takes loans from a moneylender who eyes his palace in case he fails to repay the loan. Over a period of time, he had to sell his investments in losses and also the family jewelries to repay the loan to the moneylender. Arun is aware of the financial conditions of the family but Ajay tells him to concentrate on his studies and leave the financial matters to him.

As a part of improving his financial position, Ajay takes to teaching music with a pseudo name, Kumar and one of the students is Bandana (Sandhya Roy) whom he likes for her good singing. But before that Bandana has met Arun in a picnic and both fall in love. All the three – Ajay, Arun and Bandana are unaware of these developments. In the meanwhile, due to his popularity as a singer and the music teacher, Ajay’s financial position improves.

During one of his occasional visits, Arun comes to know that Ajay has sold family assets without consulting him. But he is not aware that Ajay has sold them mainly to take care of Arun’s education. This create some misunderstanding between the two brothers. Also, during his musical training to Bandana, Kumar ( who in reality is Ajay) had given to her monihar as a token of his blessing. When Arun see Bandana with monihar, he thinks that Ajay has sold monihar to Kumar for raising money. The monihar also creates misunderstanding between Arun and Bandana as he thinks that Bandana loves Kumar.

In the meanwhile, Ajay is sick and also to avoid further misunderstanding with his younger brother, he transfers all his assets in the name of Arun and decides to leave the house forever. However, the call of his mother for the responsibility of Arun brings him back to his house. The explanations from Ajay and also from Bandana’s parents about the monihar, clear all misunderstandings and Arun gets married to Bandana.

‘Monihar’ (1966) had 9 songs of which one song was in Hindi. The highlight of remaining 8 Bengali songs was that Lata Mangeshkar sang for Sandhya Roy, Hemant Kumar sang for both Soumitra Chatterjee and Biswajeet. One dance song was sung by Suman Kalyanpur.

I am presenting the only Hindi song from the film ‘piya bin nis din roun saheli’. I was pleasantly surprised to find that this song was rendered by the great maestro Pankaj Mullick who lent his voice for Pahadi Sanyal in the film. In fact, the film starts with this song. I was under the impression that Pankaj Mullick had no occasion to sing filmy songs in Hindi after ‘Kasturi’ (1954). Probably, this song may be his last filmy song in Hindi. The song is available only on sound track and no gramophone record of the song seems to have been issued. Mp3 clip of the sound track of the song is now available on SAREGAMA for sale. The song was penned by Kaifi Azmi which was set to music by Hemant Kumar.

It is a lovely song. Pankaj Mullick sings in almost the same resonance as he used to sings in the 1940s.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Piya bin nis din roun saheli (Monihar)(Bangla)(1966) Singer-Pankaj Mullick, Lyrics-Kaifi Azmi, MD-Hemant Kumar

Lyrics

aa aa aa aa aa
piya bin nis din roun saheli
piya bin nis din roun saheli
piya bin nis din roun saheli
piya bin nis din roun saheli

o o o
mann ki paheli sab jag boojhe
mann ki paheli sab jag boojhe
kisko bujhhaaun tan ki paheli
piya bin nis din roun saheli

o o o
kajara ko tarase kaare naina
kajara ko tarase kaare naina
mehndi ko tarase gori hatheli
piya bin nis bin roun saheli

o o o
pi ko bulaaun dhoondhan jaaun
pi ko bulaaun dhoondhan jaaun
kaise bitaaye roun akeli
piya bin nis din roun saheli
piya bin nis din roun saheli ee ee ee


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3867 Post No. : 14884

———————————————–
Blog 10-Year Challenge (2009-19) – Song No. 6
————————————————
When Atul ji introduced a new series, ‘Blog 10-Year Challenge (2009-19) on February 2, 2019 with a song intaha ho gayi intzaar ki, I was a bit skeptical about the availability of the songs for the series on a sustainable basis. After all, 10 year was a long period. I felt that most of the films for which the first song appeared 10 years back may have been already ‘yippied’. Also in respect of songs from the films released in the 1930s and 40s, most of the remaining songs of such films may not be available on-line. Nonetheless, the advantage of the new series is that the films and songs which have inadvertently gone out of our attention for a long time would come into our focus once again on a regular basis.

I had a quick browse through the songs covered in the Blog since its inception i.e., July 19, 2008 till March 31, 2009 with random checks for the rest of the months in 2009. The results gave me some hope that the captioned series can have songs for posting at least some days of the months. The reason is that during the early years of the Blog, most of the songs covered pertained to the films released in 1960s and 70s. There are some films of these years for which songs are available for posting in the Blog

I found that during July 19, 2008 to December 31, 2008, an overwhelming number of songs covered were of the films released in the 1960s and 70s with few songs from the 1950s and 1980s. However, the representation of songs from the films released in the 1930s and 40s were negligible. For instance, out of 475 songs covered during the period under reference, only 5 songs pertained to the films released in the 1940s – that too the late 1940s. Not a single songs of films released in the 1930s were covered during the period under reference.

These trends were, however, on the expected lines for two reasons. First, Atul ji, considering his age profile at the time of starting of the Blog, has virtually grown up in the midst of popular songs of the films of 1960s and 70s. Obviously, as a ‘start-up venture’ of his Blog, he would have been influenced by such songs. Secondly, and most importantly, even if he intended to cover the songs of the 1930s and 40s, I doubt whether these songs were available in good numbers on the video sharing platforms in 2008. Youtube was set up in 2005 as a video sharing platform. A random browsing of videos on YT gives me an impression that videos of Hindi film songs were uploaded in good numbers only from 2007 onward and the videos of old film songs (1930s and 40s) were getting uploaded mainly from 2009 onward. This trend has reflected in the Blog also. I have noted some of the popular singers of the 1930s and 40s who made debut in the Blog in 2009:

Singer Date of Debut on the Blog Song
K L Saigal 16/02/2009 Baalam aaye baso more mann mein
Zohrabai Ambalewaali 26/02/2009 Akhiyaan mila ke jiyaa bharmaa ke
Khursheed Bano 04/03/2009 morey baalpan ke saathi
Ameerbai Karnataki 08/04/2009 Gore gore o banke chhore
G M Durrani 25/04/2009 laara lappa laara lappa laai rakhdaa
Rajkumari Dubey 31/05/2009 Rasm e ulfat kisi soorat se
Kanan Devi 09/06/2009 duniya ye duniya toofaan mail
Pankaj Mullick 07/11/2009 Guzar gaya wo zamaaana kaisa kaisa

The songs covered in the Blog during the month of February 2009 continued to be on the expected lines. i.e., from the films released during 1960s and 70s. However, some significant additions were made during the month. On February 16, 2009, K L Saigal made a debut on the Blog with the song as mentioned in the table. With this song, for the first time since the inception of the Blog, a song from the film released in the 1930s – ‘Devdas’ (1935) also made the debut on the Blog. Thereafter, during the rest of the month with some spill-over to the succeeding month, one song of K L Saigal was covered almost on a daily basis for the next few days.

10 years ago on this date (Febraury 18, 2009), the Blog had covered 6 songs from films ‘Suraj’ (1966), ‘Hamraahi’ (1963), ‘Anaadi’ (1959), ‘Sangam’ (1964), ‘Sweekar Kiya Maine’ (1983) and ‘President’ (1937). Of these, the first four listed films have already been ‘yippied’. 3 songs of ‘Sweekar Kiya Maine’ (1983) are yet to be covered. In regard to ‘President’ (1937), 4 songs out of 7 songs have been covered in the Blog. One song ‘door bahut door phir bhi tum itne nahin door’ is a short song of about 40 seconds. Of the remaining two songs, ‘Maya rani ki nagri hai’ is not available on line to the best of my efforts. So that leaves only one song, which I intend to present today in this series.

‘President’ aka ‘Badi Bahen’ (1937) was produced under the banner of New Theatres (NT) and was directed by the Cinematographer and screen-play writer, Nitin Bose. The star cast included K L Saigal, Leela Desai, Kamlesh Kumari, Jagdish Sethi, Nawab Kashmiri, Bikram Kapoor, Dev Bala, Bikram Nahar etc. Probably, it was NT’s first attempt to make a film on the subject of industrialisation and the conflict between the management and the workers.

The gist of the story of the film based on the publicity material (song book) is as under:

A young Prabhavati (Kamlesh Kumari) becomes the President of the Prabhavati Cotton Mill Ltd due to the sudden and untimely death of her father. She is known to be strict disciplinarian with good workers rewarded and inefficient workers punished. With her hard work, she converts a small and modest organisation to a bigger establishment.

One day, Prakash (K L Saigal), an ordinary worker in the organisation points out to the President the faults in a machine which if not corrected can be dangerous to the workers. He takes liberty in advising the President that the machine designed by him takes care of faulty design. This is not liked by the President and Prakash is dismissed from the service.

Prakash needs to get some employment to take care of his widowed sister (Dev Bala) and her son. During one of his searches for employment, Prakash takes some rest near the Girls’ Hostel where he accidentally meets a beautiful girl, Sheila (Leela Desai) who is none other than the younger sister of Prabhavati, the President of the Mill. Both of them like each other.

In the meanwhile, a worker who has been employed in place of Prakash meets with an accident due to faulty machine. For the first time, Prabhavati, the President was thinking about Prakash and was wondering whether she had dismissed him wrongly. Dr Sethi (Jagdish Sethi), a friend, who secretly has a tender feeling for Prabhavati, advises her to approach Prakash for re-instatement. The President visits Prakash and appoints him as a Head of the Design Department.

Slowly, a love triangle is developing around Prakash. Sheila is already in love with Prakash and Prabhavati also develops a soft corner for Prakash. The sisters are unaware of this developments. What will be the outcome of the love triangle? The synopsis of the story ends as usual with suspense.

On the basis of the some snippets of the film available on-line and some guess work on my part, Sheila comes to know that Prabhavati also loves Prakash. Sheila respects her elder sister who has taken care not only of her but also of the Cotton Mill. Sheila’s attitude towards Prakash changes which he is not able to understand. He gets frustrated and this affects his relationship with co-workers. I have seen a film’s snippet in which the agitated workers revolts against Prakash and the work in the Mill has been affected. Prabhavati gets to know as to what is troubling Prakash. Probably, when she comes to know of the love triangle, Prabhavati locks herself in her office and collapses. Obviously, Prabhavati sacrifices her love in favour of her younger sister, Sheila.

Nitin Bose (26/04/1897 – 14/04/1986), the director of the film has been associated with NT since its inception in February 1931 as Chief Technical Adviser and the Head of Camera Department. His younger brother, Mukul Bose too joined NT as the Chief of Sound Recordings and was principally involved in introducing the playback singing system in both the Bengali and Hindi versions of ‘Bhagya Chakra/Dhoop Chaaon’ (1935). The box office successes of his directorial ventures like ‘Chandidas’ (1934), ‘Dhhop Chhaaon’ (1935), ‘President’ (1937), ‘Dhartimata’ (1938), ‘Dushman’ (1939) – all under NT banner made him one of the top directors of Hindi films.

Nitin Bose’s innings with NT ended when he had differences with B N Sircar, the boss of NT while shooting for ‘Kashinath’ (1943). He completed the film but did not return to NT thereafter but shifted Bombay (Mumbai). ‘Mujrim’ (1944) was his first film in Mumbai which he produced jointly with Vishnu Cinetone and directed it. The film did not fare well at the box office. Thereafter, he directed Filmistan’s ‘Mazdoor’ (1945), Bombay Talkies’s ‘ Milan’ (1946) in which he worked with Dilip Kumar for the first time. Some of the well known films which he directed included ‘Mashaal’ (1950). ‘Deedar’ (1951), ‘Waaris’ (1954) ‘Ganga-Jamuna’ (1961), ‘Nartaki’ (1963), ‘Dooj Ka Chaand’ (1964), ‘Hum Kahaan Jaa Rahen Hain’ (1966). ‘Saamanta’ (1972) was his last Hindi film as a director. In all, Nitin Bose directed 27 Hindi films between 1934 and 1972.

Although Nitin Bose spent nearly 3 decades in Mumbai as against about a decade in Calcutta (Kolkata), I personally feel that he received a much greater appreciation of his work as a Cinematographer, Writer and Director for films in NT than in Mumbai. The reason could be that in NT, directors had full freedom. If I go by what is stated in Kidar Sharma’s autobiography, B N Sircar did not interfere in the making of the film. As against this, ‘Ganga Jamuna’ (1961), which was one of his most successful films in Mumbai both in terms of critics’ reviews and the box office collections, it is alleged that Dilip Kumar, the producer of the film interfered in the direction of Nitin Bose. In his autobiography, Diip Kumar acknowledged that it was Nitin Bose in ‘Milan’ (1946) who thought him that emotions can be expressed by silence. Later, his style of dialogue delivery with pauses in between became his trade mark style.

Khwaja Ahmed Abbas, in his article, ‘Three Great Directors of India’ which appeared in June 1940 issue of ‘Filmindia’, had rated P C Barua, V Shantaram and Nitin Bose in that order as the greatest directors. Let us read below as to what K A Abbas had said about Nitin Bose and how effectively he used camera angles in ‘President’ (1937).

Nitin Bose is essentially a cameraman and his interest in a photo play is primarily pictorial. He also possesses a strong sense of drama and he can construct a vigorous scenario out of the slenderest story material. He rarely touches stories from well known classics and novels. He picks up an idea and a detailed script is written by him or some one else under his supervision. To him, the story of the author or the plot situations of the story is of no value unless they can be effectively expressed in photographic sense.

In the film ‘President’ (1937), the crazy camera angles in the opening scene create suspense. A meeting of the Board of Directors of the Mills is to start at 9.30 a.m. to be presided over by the President (who is the President?). The camera hitherto focused on the clock is suddenly swung to the door which opens and a woman (Kamlesh Kumari) walks in. If the director had tried any other way to shoot this scene, the realism would have been lost. But Nitin Bose, with the magic of his camera, makes the scene intensely dramatic. Towards the end of the film, in a climax situation wherein Kamlesh Kumari confines herself in a empty room (when she comes to know that her sister, Sheila is also in love with Prakash). In this situation, Nitin Bose created a terrific suspense by giving some crazy camera angles in quick succession of the empty room.

Nitin Bose received Dadasaheb Phalke Award in 1977 for his outstanding contributions to the film industry. Seven years later, his nephew, Satyajit Ray received the same award in 1984. It is said that during the making of Bombay Talkies’ ‘Mashaal’ (1950) and its Bengali version ‘Samar’ (1950) which were directed by Nitin Bose, Satyajit Ray was present on the sets assisting Nitin Bose (Source: ‘Satyajit’s Sansar’ by Partha Chatterjee). However, he had not been officially accredited in these films.

I now present the song ‘Chandramukhi ki shaadi ke gagan ne deep jalaaye’ from ‘President’ (1937). I have made the video out of mp3 clip of the song. It is basically a chorus song. The lyricist of the song is unattributed. There were two music directors for the film – R C Boral and Pankaj Mullick. This song is composed by Pankaj Mullick.

I liked this song for the interlude orchestrations. Probably, such orchestrations which sound like a symphony in Western classical music, have been used for the first time in Hindi film music. I will not be surprised if Francisco Casanovas, the Spanish musician who used to play western musical instruments and conduct the musical band in the Grand Hotel, Calcutta those days, had assisted Pankaj Mullick in the composition of interlude orchestrations. My guess is based on a non-filmy song, praan chaahe nain na chahe composed and sung by Pankaj Mullick around the same time for which Francisco Casanovas has been accredited for the orchestration of the song.

Enjoy this choir like song with unique orchestration.

Audio Clip:

Song-Chandramukhi ki shaadi mein (President)(1937)Singers- Unknown female voice-1, Unknown female voice-2, MD-Pankaj Mullick
Chorus

Lyrics

chandarmukhi ki shaadi mein
gagan ne deep jalaaye
charankamal waale mukh ki hansi
shaadi dikhti(?) jaaye
charankamal waale mukh ki hansi
shaadhi dikhti(?) jaaye”

kaali aaj (??) ban mein saji
bin phoolon ki maala pade
kaali aaj (??) ban mein saji
bin phoolon ki maala pade
basant ritu mein kahat chale
khilat phool sunhare
basant ritu mein kahat chale
khilat phool sunhare
jahaan jharnon ke chhalchhal kal par
jal pariyaan naachen gaayen
jahaan jharnon ke chhalchhal kal par
jal pariyaan naachen gaayen
jal pariyaan naachen gaayen

phool wahaan se laayen
tanik door sajaayen
phool wahaan se laayen
tanik door sajaayen
taaron ki duniya se
hum phool chun ke laayen
taaron ki duniya se
hum phool chun ke laayen
tan k?? komal haathhon mein
un phool ko chadhaayen
chandarmukhi ki shaadi mein
gagan ne deep jalaaye
charankamal waale mukh ki hansi
??nikhri jaaye

aaj nayi ek baat suno
mann naache
aaj nayi ek baat suno
mann naache
raja rani to ek singhaasan baithenge kaise
raja rani to ek singhaasan baithenge kaise

sinhaasan par raani
charnon mein raja baithe


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Blog Day : 3824 Post No. : 14827

“Manzoor”(1949) was directed by Subodh Mitra for New Theatres, Bombay. The movie had Asit Baran, Bharati, Chhabi Biswas, Chandrawati, Bhupendra Kapoor, Latika, Aditya Ghosh, Asita Bose, Tulsi Chakravarty, Manorama, Jharna, Master Khurshid, Ram Pyari, RP Kapoor, Prem Kumari, Shaukat Shah etc in it.

The movie had six songs in it. Three of them have been covered in the past.

Here is the fourth song from “Manzoor”(1949) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Ila Ghosh. Pt Bhushan is the lyricist. Music is composed by Pankaj Mullick.

Only the audio of the song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of the song.

I have not been able to get one (may be more than one ) word right in the lyrics. I request our readers with keener ears to help fill in the blanks/ suggest corrections as applicable.


Song-Wo din na rahe raaten na rahin (Manzoor)(1949) Singer-Ila Ghosh, Lyrics-Pt Bhushan, MD-Pankaj Mullick

Lyrics

Wo din na rahe ae ae
raaten na rahin
apne bigde begaane
sab sukh ke saathi chhoot gaye
dukh aaya hamen manaane ae ae
armaanon ki ik bagiya thhi ee
armaanon ki ik bagiya thhi
har daal pe sukh ka jhoola thha
har kali madhur muskaati thhi
har phool khushi se phoola thha
ik halki ee ee ee
ik aisi ulti hawa chali
toote sab sapne suhaane
apne bhi huye begaane

aasha thhi
aasha thhi jeewaan saagar se
munh maange moti paayenge
dil dil ii bhaasha samjhega
nainon ko nain lubhaayenge
ab dil ki ee ee
ab dil ki ye dukh bhari kahaani gaaun
?? jise sunaaun
apne bhi huye begaane


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16500 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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Total number of songs posts discussed

16587

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Movies with all their songs covered =1280
Total Number of movies covered=4520

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