Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane

Posted on: September 14, 2013


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

Regular by the calendar now, the century milestones are coming and passing with their fixed regularity. I suppose, this occasion is now taken for granted by the members of the bandwagon, the friend circle and the readers. The curiosity now is not so much, when the century milestone is coming up. Rather the curiosity now is, what is going to be the ‘century’ special that will be served up with the milestone. 🙂

Greetings all, and welcome to the 8700th song that is coming up with this post today. Gaanewaala, Raanchiwaala is doing a great steersman job of driving this bandwagon on its merry journey of musical discovery. And the horizon continues to be where it is. Isn’t that great? A time was when, maybe three or four years ago that such a group, such a pace, and such enthusiasm was not even thought of. And process of evolution and transformation has brought us to a point where the resourcefulness, the depth of information and knowledge, the variety of tastes and flavors, and the splendid team work is simply amazing. We are digging out rare, obscure and hitherto thought of as lost pieces of music and showcasing them here. We are dipping back into the collective memories and notes and foraging around for details and information which is simply not published or in some cases, not even available elsewhere. The circle of contributors is bringing up newer ideas, and presenting songs and information materials in completely fresh and innovative perspectives. The amount of information exchange and the volume of conversation is so regular and alive – never a dull moment on the blog. So much so that the publications here have attracted kinsmen of many an artist from the industry, who have acknowledged this blog and have offered to share more information.

Ah but, let me desist from any further wallowing up in this sunshine of mutual appreciation, and get to the special post for the day. Regulars would have already guessed as I know some folks in the friend circle keep tabs on the songs and artists that are being showcased more regularly. As Atul ji and I exchanged some emails on the preparation for this milestone, it was Atul ji’s comment that this special post is probably going to be the most satisfying of all the artist centuries we have celebrated so far. So without further ado, let me present the century song for the great composer from the 1940s – Khemchand Prakash.

Atul ji’s comment about the satisfaction regarding this post is, that Khemchand Prakash belongs to an era from which a large part of this heritage is either lost or still hidden. Comparative popularity of the artists of this is lesser, because the awareness of the masses grew exponentially, only in the 1950s and 60s. In the 1930s and 40s, the measures of awareness and popularity were definitely lower. To celebrate a century post for an artist from that era is really a special occasion. And being so that the artist is a music director, makes it even more special. Although we have lyricists from that era who have scored centuries here, notably Bharat Vyas and DN Madhok. But some of these stalwarts had singularly extended innings in the industry and their scores are an accumulation of multiple decades of work. However, in the case of Khemchand Prakash, this achievement is even more remarkable, for here we are talking about just one dozen years of active career – that starts with ‘Ghaazi Salaahudin’ in 1939, and the gentleman himself departed from this world by the time the year of 1950 came around. It is this notable accomplishment, based on a body of work that consists of less than 50 films, a duration in the industry that lasted less than 12 years. And so the numbers speak for themselves.

The sublime magic of “Aayega, Aayega, Aayega Aanewaala” is probably never going to be equaled, and more than that, I believe that this magic will never be fully unraveled. As the cinematic heritage progresses to find place within the academia and the universities start working on cinematic studies as formal areas of education, my intuition says that just this one song will become the focus of many research projects that will attempt to understand the inexplicable enchantment of this melody, the voice in the playback and the mesmerizing picturization – that leaves an unnamed longing in the heart. No matter how many times one has enjoyed this song, at the end of each listen, the mind and the heart are trying to reach out to get some more of it. Such is the power of the charismatic mystery that is ensconced in this creation.

With this one song, his name is now immortalized. With this one song, the career of Lata ji was catapulted into an orbit of breathtaking proportions. With this one song, film ‘Mahal’ and the year 1949 are indelibly etched in the memories of music lovers. And the pity is that the creator of this melody did not live enough to witness the popularity of his creation. He passed away a few months short of the release of this film. And wow, what style, what manner of departure. You hit the peak that the world talks about, and then you go, for there is probably no other way to conserve the singularity of this crowning achievement. Brilliant, fabulous, fantastic.

Born into a tradition of music, it is little wonder that Khemchand Prakash carried this passion and the talent right from his cradle. It was 12th December, 1907 that made his appearance in the family of Pt. Goverdhan Prasad in Sujagarh, Rajasthan. His father was an accomplished dhrupad singer and a kathak dancer of repute. He was the royal singer at the court of the Maharaja of Jaipur. Khemchand followed in the footsteps of his father, and learnt both classical music and kathak. It would be his 19th year, that he too was admitted to the court of Jaipur in the capacity of a royal singer.

But destiny had written many re locations and travel into the hands of young Khemchand. In a matter of friendship gesture by the Maharaja of Jaipur, Khemchand came to the court of the King of Nepal as a musician and singer. But of course, the destiny wouldn’t let him rest. After a stint at the royal court of Nepal, he traveled to Calcutta, that was the undisputed leader as a center of arts and culture in India. He found work at the Calcutta radio station. How the things fall in place together is sometimes a wonder. Timir Baran, one of the main music directors with New Theatres company, heard his voice. He searched him out, and brought him to New Theatres. He was contracted to come on board as an assistant music director.

It is the mid 30s time frame. New Theatres is working on the iconic ‘Devdas’ (1935) and the young Khemchand is assigned the assistant-ship for
music. Some writings attribute to him the claim to fame of the famous Saigal Sb renditions “Baalam Aaye Baso Morey Mann Mein” and “Dukh Ke Ab Din Beetat Naahin”, although there are variations to these statements. At New Theatres, Khemchand struck a good friendship with Prithviraj Kapoor, who recommended him to go to
Bombay.

Khemchand Prakash came to Bombay in 1938-39, and with the references he got from his friends in Calcutta, he immediately got a contract with Supreme Pictures as an independent music director. ‘Ghaazi Salaahudin’ (1939) is his debut film. Another film ‘Meri Aankhen’ was also released the same year by the same banner with the same music director. 1940 saw the start of a long association with Ranjeet Movietone. His first film with Ranjeet is ‘Aaj Ka Hindustan’ (1940). But being what Ranjeet Movietone was in those days, an assembly line production house of films, Khemchand Prakash directed music for no less than four films in that same year. Two of the films were with Motilal as the hero – ‘Holi’ and ‘Deewali’, and the other two were with Prithviraj Kapoor as the lead – ‘Paagal’ and ‘Aaj Ka Hindustan’. The music of all these films was noticed and appreciated, especially the two Motilal films. After this, there was no looking back for the young music director.

History tells us now, at the start of his career in 1939 in Bombay, he had less than a dozen years of his life remaining. A search through the Geet Kosh lists 46 films that he directed music for. Of these 20 are from the house of Ranjeet. In the later years, he worked quite a bit with Bombay Talkies, and did almost half a dozen films with them. ‘Mahal’ is a Bombay Talkies production, besides also is ‘Ziddi’ that is the debut film for Kishore Kumar – “Marne Ki Duaaen Kyun Maangoon”. And also, the first duet between Kishore Da and Lata ji – “Ye Kaun Aayaa Re Karke Solah Singaar”.

On the way to ‘Mahal’, Khemchand created iconic music for such fabulous films like ‘Khilona’ (1942), ‘Dukh Sukh’ (1942), ‘Chaandni’ (1942), ‘Iqraar’(1942), ‘Tansen’ (1943), ‘Gauri’ (1943), ‘Qurbaani’ (1943), ‘Bhanwara’(1944), ‘Bharthari’ (1944), ‘Mumtaz Mahal’ (1944), ‘Dhanna Bhagat’ (1945),‘Prabhu Ka Ghar’ (1945), ‘Gaon’ (1947), ‘Sindoor’ (1947) – well, short of pulling in the list of all 46 films, there is no other way to talk about all the wonderful music that he has created in the short span of a dozen years of active career.

An episode from history alludes to the separation of ways between Khemchand and Ranjeet Movietone. Apparently, Lata ji, who was just a fledgling artist at that time, was a voice not preferred by Chandulal Shah, the owner of Ranjeet. Khemchand found her voice most suitable for the melodies he would prepare. There seems to have been a difference of opinion over using the voice of Lata in Ranjeet movies. And Khemchand walked out of the establishment studio and joined Bombay Talkies and Ashok Kumar.

Coming to the iconic ‘Mahal’ and the sublime melody of “Aayega. . . “. It is going to be a surprise to many that while Khemchand was preparing the melody of this song, he was somewhat in doubt whether a song with such a slow paced tune would even be of any interest to the public, to the point that at one stage he wanted to drop this song itself from the film. Aren’t we all thankful that more encouraging feelings about this song prevailed and this was retained. Lata ji remembers that this song was rehearsed for full five days, with multiple refinements and adjustments. So by the time she was ready to step into the recording room for this song, the melody with all its nuances and emphases had become a part of her being. And yes, the outcome of this internalization of music is a source of joy for millions over the decades.

Khemchand was only 42 when he passed away in Bombay, on 10th August 1950. This was two months before the formal release of this film in Bombay. What a sad personal note that he did not live long enough to see the launch of his creation that has been credited by many a writers and musicologists as the song of the century.

For this post, I have selected a song from one of his earliest films, ‘Aaj Ka Hindustan’ (1940). Songs from his early films are rare, obscure and not easily available. And a ton of thanks for the music lovers who have uploaded some of these gems online. This film is a Ranjeet production directed by Jayant Desai. The lyrics are from the pen of DN Madhok. The star cast includes Rose, Prithviraj Kapoor, Ishwar Lal, Charlie, Sitara, Dixit, Lala Yakub, Kalyani, Tara Bai, Charu Bala etc. There are 8 songs in this film. This particular song is a rendition in the voice of Sitara Devi. Being that she is also listed as one of the star cast, in all likelihood, the song is picturized on her.

A song of longing and yearning, as a young belle pines and waits for her beau. She tells of her heart that listens to her no more. She complains why does the papihaa bird keeps calling the name of piya, piya again and again. She tells of the ache in her heart and that her songs of desolation are being sung by the koel. The words are just lovely. As I listened to this song repeatedly to get the lyrics written down, I have fallen in love with this song. Such a beautiful expression of longing this one is.

So listen to this rare sound from more than seven decades ago, just about the time when Khemchand was starting his journey towards ‘Mahal’. Enjoy.


Song-Haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane (Aaj Ka Hindustan)(1940) Singer-Sitara Devi, Lyrics-D N Madhok, MD-Khemchand Prakash

Lyrics

haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane ae ae ae
haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane
nahin maane re
haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane
nahin maane re
peer paraayi koi na jaane
peer paraayi koi na jaane
paapi jiyaa nahin maane
haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane
nahin maane re
haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane
nahin maane re

dekho ji papihaa boley
dekho ji papihaa boley
ambuwaa pe haule haule
dekho ji papihaa boley
ambuwaa pe haule haule
piya piya wo kyun bakhaane
piya piya wo kyun bakhaane
paapi jiyaa nahin maane
haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane
nahin maane re
haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane
nahin maane re

seene mein hook uthhi
koyal bhi kook uthhi
dard bhare mere gaane
haan haan
seene mein hook uthhi
koyal bhi kook uthhi
dard bhare mere gaane
haaye dard bhare mere gaane
mere gaane
haaye dard bhare mere gaane
mere gaane
haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane
haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane
nahin maane re
haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane
nahin maane re

——————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
——————————————–
हाय पापी जिया नहीं माने
हाय पापी जिया नहीं माने
नहीं माने रे
हाय पापी जिया नहीं माने
नहीं माने रे
पीर पराई कोई ना जाने
पीर पराई कोई ना जाने
पापी जिया नहीं माने
हाय पापी जिया नहीं माने
नहीं माने रे
हाय पापी जिया नहीं माने
नहीं माने रे

देखो जी पपीहा बोले
देखो जी पपीहा बोले
अंबुवा पे हौले हौले
देखो जी पपीहा बोले
अंबुवा पे हौले हौले
पिया पिया वो क्यूँ बखाने
पिया पिया वो क्यूँ बखाने
पापी जिया नहीं माने
हाय पापी जिया नहीं माने
नहीं माने रे
हाय पापी जिया नहीं माने
नहीं माने रे

सीने में हूक उठी
कोयल भी कूक उठी
दर्द भरे मेरे गाने
सीने में हूक उठी
कोयल भी कूक उठी
दर्द भरे मेरे गाने
हाय दर्द भरे मेरे गाने
मेरे गाने
हाय दर्द भरे मेरे गाने
मेरे गाने
हाय पापी जिया नहीं माने
हाय पापी जिया नहीं माने
नहीं माने रे
हाय पापी जिया नहीं माने
नहीं माने रे

11 Responses to "Haaye paapi jiyaa nahin maane"

Atul ji, Sudhir ji
and all my friends in Atuldom

Congratulations on 8700th song.

Regards
prakash

Like

Congratulations ! Congratulations !! and Congratulations to all !!!

Like

Befitting tribute to a maestro.
Congrats to All for yet another summit.

Like

Atul ji,Sudhir ji,

Congratulations for 8700 songs and also for 100th song from Khemchand Prakash.

What Sudhir ji has said about this Blog and Atul ji is very true.
Though,it gives us a pleasure when we achieve a century,either for songs or for an artist,we must also be aware of the fact that there is yet plenty,which is to be achieved.
To give you an idea how much is yet to be achieved here is a statistical piece,presently in case of only the composers….

Composer- No. of total songs composed

RDB-1751 Madan Mohan-686
S-J-1281 naushad-648
Chtragupta-1055 Gyan dutt-595
Usha Kh-967 OPNayyar-586
C.Ram-955 B.C Rani-581
S N Tri-857 hans Raj behl-531
Ravi-817 Roshan-458
A.Biswas-783 Husn-Bh-451
SDBurman-716 A.Vyas-437

Khem Prakash-430 H.kumar-428
V.Desai-410 Khayyam-376
N Dutta-368 Salil Ch-326
R C Boral-323 Ghulam mohd.-321

I have only given a selective list,for our guideline. The figures may vary a little in different calculations,but this is enough of a lead for us,I believe.

-AD

Like

Thanks for the details. Such statistics are of great curiosity to me and some others as it gives us an idea of where we stand.

Like

I am glad this is useful. In a day or two I will give some more composers’ details like L-P.K-A etc.
-AD

Like

Thanks for this very useful information.

Like

Atulji,
Congratulations on reaching the double milestones, century song of KP being the special one.
Sudhirji,
Thanks for the song and introducing the real KP. As you have said, I also knew him by composer of Aayega aanewaala…..

Like

Another occasion to celebrate and rejoice. As Arunji pointed out we cannot rest on our laurels; lot of work needs to be done. Thanks

Like

Sudhirji
Prior to Mahal he also music to
Ziddi
Holi
Parwana
Asha
Fariyad
Sawan Aaya re
Rimjhim
Mehman
Pardes
Shahenshah Babar

Like

Really I have found a treasure-trove of information in this blog as well as in the various comments offered by the knowledgeable writers. Thanks.

Like

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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