Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya

Posted on: October 20, 2019


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4111 Post No. : 15262 Movie Count :

4193

The troika of Satyajit Ray, Ritwik Ghatak and Mrinal Sen had taken Indian cinema to a great height from the 1950s onward. They were regarded as the harbinger of the new wave cinema, also called the parallel cinema. They were all from Bengal and made the films mostly in Bengali. But they had not only had the pan India reach but also, they were globally famous through their films. They won many awards – both National and International.

Tapan Sinha was one more film-maker from Bengal who was a contemporary of Satyajit-Ghatak-Mrinal. He also made mostly Bengali films and had won National and International awards. But the general impression carried in the film circle was that he was not in league with the the troika. The reason was that he was regarded as ‘the middle of the road’ film maker whose films would have some mild doses of commercial ingredients. It is only after Tapan Sinha’s death in January 2009 that some film writers feel that he should have been a part of quartet, Satyajit-Ghatak-Mrinal-Tapan for the realism depicted in his films.

Tapan Sinha made his first film ‘Ankush’ (1954) in Bengali. Since then until 2000, he made 37 films which included some films in Hindi like ‘Zindagi Zindagi (1972), ‘Sagina’ (1974), ‘Ek Doctor Ki Maut’ (1991) etc. He also made some children’s films like ‘Safed Haathi’(1978), ‘Aaj Ka Robinhood’ (1987). Most of his films were based on the stories written by well-known Bengali writers like Gurudev Rabiindranath Tagore, Tarashankar Bandopadhyay, Ramapada Chowdhury, Samresh Basu etc.

Some of Tapan Sinha’s successful Bengali films were remade in Hindi. These include ‘Mere Apne’ (1971) by Gulzar adapted from ‘Apanjan’ (1968), ‘Baawarchi’ (1972) by Hrishikesh Mukherjee from ‘Gulpo Holeo Satti’ (1966), ’Zindagi Zindagi’ (1972) from ‘Khoniker Atithi’ (1959), ‘Sagina’ (1974) from ‘Sagina Mahato’ (1970) and ‘Ijaazat’ (1987) from ‘Jatugriha’ (1964).

‘Haate Baazare’ (Market Place, 1967) was one of the successful films in Bengali directed by Tapan Sinha. Ashok Kumar and Vyjayantimala were in the lead roles with Rudraprasad Sengupta, Ajitesh Bandopadhyay, Bhanu Bandopadhyay, Chinmoy Roy, Chhaya Devi, Samit Bhanja, Partho Mukherjee etc in the supporting roles. It was the first Bengali film for Vyjayantimala. Probably, it was also for the first time, Vyjayantimala sang for herself a Bengali song, cheye thaki cheye thaki along with Mrinal Chakraborty in this film. Vyjayantimala did not know Bengali. But Tapan Sinha did not dub her dialogues in the film with borrowed voice, Instead he made her to rehearse her dialogues after listening to the pre-recorded dialogues on the cassette.

The film was based on a novel of the same name by Banaphul (real name: Balai Chand Mukhopadhyay). The film is available for watching on video sharing platform but there are no English subtitles for those who do not understand Bengali. Still, one can get a feel of the story of the film.

Dr. Mukherjee (Ashok Kumar) is a doctor in a tribal town in Birbhum. He is well respected by the tribal folks as well as others which include Chhipli (Vyjayantimala), a young widow. In his jest to serve the people, Dr Mukherjee has no much time to attend to his wife’s illness of a chronic heart ailment. After the death of his wife, Dr Mukherjee leaves his job and starts a mobile clinic for the poor. Lachhman Lal (Ajitesh Bandopadhyay), the spoilt son of a local landlord is at a loggerhead with him as he protects Chhipli from his lustful eyes. This is resented by Lachhman Lal and as a vengeance, he spreads the rumour about Dr Mukherjee’s relationship with Chhipli who has been working with him as his assistant.

In a night of a tribal get-together where Chhipli also participates in songs and dances, Lachhman Lal hoodwinks Chhipli by sending a message through Nani (Chhaya Devi) that she has been called by Dr Mukherjee. On her way back, he tries to molest Chhipli. In the nick of time, Dr Mukherjee saves her but, in the fight, Dr Mukherjee strangulates Lachhman to death and in the process, he is also seriously injured. Dr Mukherjee dies the next day. But Chhipli continues to carry forward the work of the mobile clinic in the village with the help of a young doctor.

The film was not only a commercial success, it also won the National Film Award for the Best Feature Film.

By the way, there is a train named as ‘Haate Bazare Express’ which runs from Sealdah (Kolkatta) to Saharsa Junction/Purnia.

‘Haate Baazare’ (1967) had 3 songs, one of which I am presenting here because it is in Hindi. The song is ‘aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaya’ sung by Chinmoy Roy, Mrinal Chakraborty and Aarati Mukherjee. The song is set to music by Tapan Sinha. The name of the lyricist for Hindi song is not mentioned. But the wordings of the song seem to indicate that it is a traditional song. Incidentally, Majrooh Sultanpuri also used some lines from this song in pyaare nanadaya sarota kahaan bhool aaye for Hindi film, ‘Zamaana’ (1985), strengthening my guess that it is based on a traditional folk song. Most importantly, this song has the quality of captivating the listeners and the folk song has that quality even with the meaningless lyrics.

In the song, while Chinmoy Roy sings for himself, Mrinal Chakraborty sings for an actor whom I guess to be Partho Mukherjee. He sings in a mix of Bengali and Hindi words, probably that is the dialect spoken in Birbhum, a border district with Bihar. Aarati Mukherjee sings for Vyjayantimala.

Enjoy this fun filled teasing song.

Video


Audio

Song-Aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya (Haatey Baazaarey)(Bangla)(1967) Singers-Chinmoy Roy, Mrinal Chakraborty, Aarti Mukherjee, MD-Tapan Sinha
Chorus

Lyrics(Based on Audio Clip)

aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya
aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya
aur uske peechhe main bechaari
mere peechhe sainyyaa
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

aage aage nanodi chole peechhe nanodini
aage aage nanodi chole peechhe nanodini
aur taar peechhone aami choli
aamaar peechhe shojni
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

nat mori nanadi khaayi peda nanadaiyya
nat mori nanadi khaayi peda nanadaiyya
main bechaari rabdi khaaye
main bechaari rabdi khaaye
joothha chaate sainyyaa
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

nanadi mori thhaali dikhaaye chaate nanadaiyya
nanadi mori thhaali dikhaaye chaate nanadaiyya
main bechaari paan khaaun
main bechaari paan khaaun
choona chaate sainyyan
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

aage aage nanodi chole peechhe nanodini
aar taar peechhone aami chaale
aamaar peechhe sojni
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya
aur uske peechhe main bechaari
mere peechhe sainyyaa
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya
aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya
aur uske peechhe main bechaari
mere peechhe sainyyaa
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

6 Responses to "Aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya"

The ‘Sarauta kahan–‘ lines are from traditional teasing songs sung at weddings etc. I recall another use of these in a 1962 film ‘Sautela bhai’ towards the end of a song, as you say, meaningless but serving to add to the festivities. The was ‘paisa hi maalik’, link
https://atulsongaday.me/2011/05/05/paisaa-hi-maalik-paisaa-hi-daataa-2/

Like

Pratap ji,
Thanks for the additional information.

Like

Sadanandji,
This is a fascinating song. The tune seems to be Punjabi/UP folk. It was used very effectively by OP Nayyar in ‘Naya Andaaz’ (1956) in the Part 3 of ‘Chana jor garam babu main laya mazedaar’. Part 3 went as ‘Sainya raja la de gale ka mohe haar re’. The instrumental prelude in the Hindi Bengali song is a carbon copy of this song. Kishore Kumar-Meena Kumari dance reminds me of Mumtaz Ali who had several such dance songs in the Bombay Talikes movies.

‘Pyare nanadaiya sarota kahan bhool ayi’ is a funky folk lyric. Some of the folk songs were completely whacky, the purpose was pure fun. It is interesting to see its Bengalification. The additional two references from Hindi films given in the comment section was new information for me.

Thanks a lot.

Liked by 1 person

Thanks AK ji for making my life easy by pointing out the song of similar tune.

When I first heard the song covered in the article, I felt that I had heard the similar tune in the song of a Hindi film. But my memory failed me to get to the song I had in my mind. Even after submitting the article, I was still scratching my head to recall the song but failed.

Like

Dear Sadanand ji,

An extremely well written piece in the limited space available. In “Sagina Mahato” also there was a similar song in the Hindi-Bangla mix.

There was a time when Bengal Province was a sum total of what is today Bangla Desh, West Bengal, Assam and ALL the North Eastern States (including present day Arunachal Pradesh) and not excluding present day Bihar, Jharkhand, Orissa and Chhatisgarh. It was natural for Bangla to get mixed up with the local languages since under British Rule most of the Administrators were Bangla speaking, more so as Calcutta was the Capital.

Even after the sub-division of Bengal Province, the border Districts maintained their contact with Bangla language eg Birbhum in West Bengal and Manbhum in the then Bihar.

You will be in a better position to confirm this, but in our boyhood in Dhanbad (in then Manbhum District) in the early ’50s, we would often hear this song sung by the local tribals who were known as the “Bundelkhandis”. Does this song originate from Bundelkhand? It is not only the words, but also the tune which is traditional.

Yes, that is Partho Mukherjee who is in the dance. He was the hero of the Bangla Original “BALIKA BADHU”, made by Tarun Majumdar.

Another powerful film made by Tapan Sinha was “JHINDER BONDI” (based on PRISONER OF ZENDA), which also had a beautiful Thumri sung by Pratima Bannerjee. Most of Sinha’s films had at least one song in Hindi, eg the famous Khayal by Aamir Khan in “KHUDITO PASHAN”.

It is always a delight to read your Posts.

With warm regards

PARTHA CHANDA

Liked by 1 person

Partha Chanda ji,

Thanks a lot for your thought-provoking comments.

For the last few days, I have watched some films of Tapan Sinha like ‘Khudiito Pashan’ (1960 ), ‘Jhinder Bondi’ ( 1961), ‘Haate Bazare’, (1967) ‘Harmonium’ (1976) etc. I have noted that in all these films, he makes his village characters speak a mix of HIndi-Bangla , probably a part of local dialect. Also as you have already mentioned, there will be at least one Hindi song which would be folk/classical based songs.

I have already noted the Hindi songs of these films which I propose to cover in the Blog shortly.

Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2019) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has more than 15300 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15301

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1180
Total Number of movies covered =4215

Total visits so far

  • 12,605,420 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,798 other followers

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share

Category of songs

Current Visitors

Archives

Stumble

visitors whereabouts

blogcatalog

Music Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory

blogadda

Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

%d bloggers like this: