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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Main banoongi film star

Posted on: July 26, 2011


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

The melodious strains of ‘Chalo Dildaar Chalo, Chaand Ke Paar Chalo’, composed more than 4 decades ago, sound and feel like a fresh breeze of air, every time one listens to it. The magnum opus of the famously talented Ghulam Mohammed, a string of his best creations – ‘Chalte Chalte Yun Hi Koi Mil Gayaa Thhaa’, ‘Inhi Logon Ne Le Leena Dupatta Mera’, ‘Mausam Hai Aashiqaana’ and more – establish the definition of what Ghulam Mohammed’s body of musical creation is. A pity that this success came somewhat late in the day – a release that marked a watershed in the history of Hindi film music was to happen about three years after the demise of its creator.

Ghulam Mohammed, a force in music that would not be reckoned with. A composer whose interpretation of Ghalib in Sohrab Modi’s epic production Mirza Ghalib (1954) was to stir many a hearts aflutter, and also raise a few eyebrows with the bold rhythms and tempo of ghazals never heard before. Never before had any one ventured to score a ghazal, and that too from Ghalib, to the racy tempo of “Le Aayenge Bazaar Se Jaa Kar Dil o Jaan Aur” (from the ghazal “Hain Bas Ke Har Ik Un Ke Ishaare Mein Nishaan Aur”), a tempo that had to be rendered by Rafi and no one else. Or the rising, straining pitch of “Yaar Se Chhed Chali Jaaye Asad, Gar Nahin Vasl To Hasrat Hi Sahi” (from the ghazal ‘Ishq Mujhko Nahin Vehshat Hi Sahi’) that would demand the extreme from the inveterate king of ghazal singers, Talat Mehmood. Or the heart wrenching persuasions of ‘Ye Khalish Kahaan Se Hoti, Jo Jigar Ke Paar Hota’ (from the ghazal ‘Ye Na Thi Hamaari Kismat Ke Visal e Yaar Hotaa’), a quality of resonance that would take everything that a seasoned artist like Suraiyyaa had to offer.

Mirza Ghalib, a crowning glory that fetched Ghulam Mohammed his only major recognition in his lifetime – the President’s award for best composer in 1954. Then came Shama in 1961, that captured the hearts of a generation with lilting melodies like ‘Mast Aankhon Mein Sharaarat, Kabhi Aisi To Na Thi’, and ‘Dhadakte Dil Ki Tamanna Ho Mera Pyaar Ho Tum’, along with the soulful melancholy sounds like ‘Dil Gam Se Jal Rahaa Hai Jale Par Dhuaan Na Ho’.

And then the music lovers had to wait for another 11 years before Pakeezah was finally liberated from the cans, re-crafted and completed, to establish a benchmark that will remain true and unconquered till there is music at the end of time. The year was 1971. And in an era ruled by Shankar-Jaikishan, Laxmikant-Pyaarelal, and Kalyanji-Anandji, came this fresh smell of the first roses of spring, that made many a listeners wake up and take notice of the memorable tunes created by a soul departed. The listening public at large would still take a few years to warm up to this fresh breeze. That year’s Filmfare award went to Shankar Jaikishan for Mera Naam Joker. The only voice of protest was Pran, who declined the Best Supporting Actor award (for film Adhikaar), reacting strongly to this travesty of natural justice. (For the record, that year’s Best Supporting Award was then given to Amitabh Bachhan for the film Anand; only that he was the second choice of viewers behind Pran).

Ghulam Mohammed was born in Bikaner, Rajasthan, in 1903, into a family of musicians. He inherited music from his forefathers. His father, Nabi Baksh, was an accomplished tabla player. He started his career as a child actor at age six with the Punjab-based New Albert Theatrical Company. Both father and son together gave countless performances in Albert Theatre. He soon became popular and eventually became the dance director of the company. Albert Theatre fell into financial hardships and Ghulam Mohammed lost his job. He joined another orchestra company for a brief time, before eventually moving to Bombay in 1924. The initial years were a struggle and he had to wait a long eight years to get his first break – the tabla player in the film “Raja Bharthari”. His talent was noticed, and he slowly graduated to being an assistant to the luminaries of that period – Naushad Saab, and Anil Biswas. From Sanjog (1943) to Rattan (1944) to Anmol Ghadi (1946) to Shahjehan (1946) to Dard (1947) to Andaaz (1949) to Deedaar (1951) to Aan (1952) – all the tabla and dholak and matka sounds one gets to hear in the songs from these movies, came from the hands of Ghulam Mohammed. On the way, he did a handful of independent assignments (Baanke Sipaahi (1937), Mera Khwaab (1943) and Doli (1947). And then came Tiger Queen (1947) that finally established Ghulam Mohammed as an independent composer. And then followed a string of releases through the 50s that established him as a master craftsman, with movies like Kaajal (1948), Pugree (1948), Paaras (1949), Bikhre Moti (1951), Naazneen (1951), Ajeeb Ladki (1952), Dil e Naadan (1953), Rail Ka Dibba (1953), Laila Majnu (1953), Kundan (1955), Maalik (1958), Do Gunde (1959) and Shama (1961). One still can feel a reverberation in the heart on listening to ‘Chal Diya Carvaan’, ‘Zindagi Dene Waale Sun’, ‘ Aasmaan Waale Teri Duniya Se Jee Ghabraa Gayaa’, ‘Ye Duniya Hai, Yahaan Dil Ka Lagaana Kisko Aata Hai’, ‘Jo Khushi Se Chot Khaaye’ . . . and many more – I could simply go on and on.

After Shama in 1961, came a surprising hiatus and we no longer hear from Ghulam Mohammed after that. Was it the star system, or was it failing health, or maybe a combination. The years of 1953 and 1961 came and went by without a flutter of honor and recognitions. And maybe then the maestro simply settled down to create the enchanting melodies for Pakeezah. The end came in March 1968, with a long list of creations waiting for the editor’s nod to get into a release. A number of melodies equal to the number released, were not accommodated in the release version of the movie. Many years later, HMV came out with the LP, ‘Pakeezah Rang-b-Rang’ that listed another nine melodies created for this movie by the genius called Ghulam Mohammed.

A decade earlier, the pen of Sahir had written an eulogy ‘Ye Basti Hai Murda Paraston Ki Basti’ (Pyaasa, 1957, ‘Ye Duniya Agar Mil Bhi Jaaye To Kyaa Hai’). Throughout his living days the man lives with rejections and unfulfilled desires, till after the day of his passing away, when people would realize his true worth. A fitting tribute to Ghulam Mohammed Saab – a destiny of struggle and thankless ingratitude while living; and a name on the skies after he is gone; his music more loved with every passing year.

As I search for a fitting creation of Ghulam Mohammed for this century post, I am coming across some very obscure and yet novelty songs that are so surprising. This song, which I discovered just a week ago, is from the movie Ajeeb Ladki (1952). It is simply the pick of the lot. Produced by Taj Mahal Pictures and directed by Mohammed Ehsaan, this is a relatively unknown romantic comedy that includes Rehmaan, Naseem Bano, Shashikala, Cuckoo, Agha, Jayant and Shyam Kumar in the star cast. Being completely unaware of this movie, the tone of this song seems to set the expectations of what this movie could be.

This song is about the aspirations of a young lady to become a film star. It is such a fun song, that it was simply love at first hear. And I have played it many times now. The fun lyrics are by Shakeel Badayuni, and the racy and light composition is by Ghulam Mohammed. The singing voice is the inimitable Shamshad Begum, who has sung this song with so much enthusiasm and zest. Since only the audio is available, it is not possible to comment on the picturizaiton on screen. The young lady is dreaming of being more successful than Naseem, Suraiyyaa and Nargis, and that Raj Kapoor and Dilip Kumar (rendered Daleep Kumar in the song) to be after her. The songs that she would sing on screen, would become a rage with the public. And that her films would be bigger hits than Pukaar, Baabul and Sargam. Boy, what an excited and zestful expectation.

A lovely fun song, that exposes another side of this multi faceted expert. And a must listen for all aspirants wanting to make it big in the film world. 😀


Song-Main banoongi film star (Ajeeb Ladki) (1952) Singer-Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-Shakeel Badayuni, MD-Ghulam Mohammad

Lyrics

main banoongi film star film star
aha, ha ha ha haa
mujhse karegi duniya pyaar
mujhse karegi duniya pyaar
main banoongi filmi star filmi star
aha, ha ha ha haa
mujhse karegi duniya pyaar
mujhse karegi duniya pyaar
film star

armaan niklenge jee ke
din aayenge meri khushi ke
hooooo
armaan niklenge jee ke
din aayenge meri khushi ke
dil ki umangen naach utthi
lo aayee
lo aayee aaj bahaar
filmi star filmi star
aha, ha ha ha haa
mujhse karegi duniya pyaar
mujhse karegi duniya pyaar
film star

theatre se jaaungi film mein
kabhi to wo rut aayegi
ho kabhi to wo rut aayegi
theatre se jaaungi film mein
kabhi to wo rut aayegi
ho kabhi to wo rut aayegi
parde pe gaaungi to
duniya mere gaane gaayegi
parde pe gaaungi to
duniya mere gaane gaayegi
ho gaayegi
koi naa dekhega phir
sargam, baabul
oye baabul aur pukaar
film star film star
aha, ha ha ha haa
mujhse karegi duniya pyaar
mujhse karegi duniya pyaar
film star

oooo
dada dada dadada dada
mujhse naseem suraiyyaa nargis
rahengi koson door
mujhse naseem suraiyyaa nargis
rahengi koson door
mere darshan ko tarsegaa
hardam raj kapoor
ho hardam raj kapoor
hooo raaj kapoor
meri shohrat dekh jalegaa
dil mein
aye dil mein daleep kumar
film star film star
aha, ha ha ha haa
mujhse karegi duniya pyaar
mujhse karegi duniya pyaar
film star

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6 Responses to "Main banoongi film star"

wow what a sweet song!!!!
brings a smile on! and what thoughts!!!! gosh truly wonderful discovery!!! thank you Sudhirji and atul

Sudhir ji,
I could not stop myself from writing this note to you.
It is an excellent piece depicting the full picture of the times and tunes of the Unique GM saab.
Very well done,indeed.
-AD

Sudhir Sir,

A very informative excellent write up, as usual. We expect nothing less from your pen. Having long associated Ghulam Mohammed with the songs of “Pakeeza” (personal favourite being “Aaj ham apni duaaon ka asar dekhenge”) and the ghazals of “Mirza Ghalib” i have learned there is more to him then these two benchmarks. These bench marks are qualitatively in a class of their own. The classical grandiose of “pakeeza” and the pathos of ‘Mirza Ghalib” are the summation of life and times of Ghulam mohammed , the musician.

Wow! That’s the only exclamation I had as I read your write up. Well researched, well written.

Arun ji, Peevesie’s Mom, Nahm Bhai, Arif Bhai,

Thanks all for your kind words of appreciation and encouragement.

Ghulam Mohammed Saab has left an inimitable legacy of such wonderful melodies; an all time great music director.

Rgds
Sudhir

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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