Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Jhoome re jhoome re

Posted on: April 18, 2013


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

When Ramanand Sagar released his ‘Aankhen’ in 1968, the film took the box office by storm, and was declared as a blockbuster by the trade journals. Ramanand Sagar bagged the Filmare award for the best director, and the film also got the Filmfare award for color cinematography. The music was hit, with lyrics coming from the pen of Sahir Ludhianvi and the music from the baton on Ravi. A film that truly settled Dharmendra’s career on a strong footing. In many ways, the film became a trendsetter.

But there was one thing about the film that scandalized some people at least. The critics mentioned it in their reviews, and folks in the audience who were not aware or not prepared, let out audible gasps in the theatres – “Oh, is that her”. So strong and set was the motherly, and mother-in-law-ly image of this accomplished character artist, that people were startled to see her in a pant suit, in a villain’s den, in a role that was not just villainous, but rather traitorous. The lady had been in the industry for four decades by then (she started her career in silent films in 1928). The mention of her name would bring on images of Mrs. D’sa of ‘Anari’, (1959), Ganga Mai of ‘Shri 420’ (1955), the strongly feminist Sita Devi of ‘Mr & Mrs 55’ (1955), Bua ji (aunt) of ‘Sujata’ (1959), the distraught and sad mother of ‘Hum Dono’ (1961), the very stern Sita Devi of ‘Professor’ (1962), the tyrannical Shanta Devi of ‘Gharana’ (1961), and many more. Always sari clad, with either a loving smile on her face, or a crooked lip and wicked look in her eyes as she tore down and tormented her opponents on the screen.

The role of a pant clad ‘Madam’ in ‘Aankhen’ was a culture shock for many.

Remembering Lalita Pawar on her birth anniversary today.

I know that her image is that of a stick wielding oppressive mother or mother-in-law, and also that she has been labeled as ‘Mother of all mother-in-laws’ by the media and film writers, and that she somehow was the automatic choice for the role of Mantharaa in Ramanyan films as well as in the tele serial ‘Ramayan’. So much so that her name has got into common everyday language – when one needs to compare a mother-in-law, then it is her name that comes first to the mind – ‘Uski saas to bilkul Lalits Pawar hai’ (her mother in law is just like Lalita Pawar). More than the negative image, it is the fortitude of her talents that she so convincingly conveys this character on screen.

But the most enduring picture of her, for me is a one minute episode from the film ‘Shri 420’ (1955). The song “Ramaiyyaa Wasta Waiyyaa” is in progress. Sheila Vaz, Satya Narayan, and the group dancers are in full flow. Ganga Mai is sitting on a charpoy (cot), with Raj sitting on the ground in front, with his hands in her lap. And the soulful voice of Mukesh so beseechingly is pleading,

meri aankhon mein rahe
kaun jo mujh se kahe
main ne dil tujh ko diyaa. . .

And immediately following in the chorus interlude is one of the most emotional, the most poignant and a most touching exchange to be seen in the Hindi films. Ganga Mai, without saying a word, with her hands and eyes, she gestures to Raj that she will give him her heart. The moment lasts for maybe a minute, but what Ganga Mai is able to convey in the silent gestures of that one minute is worth more than many hours of dialogues. The memories of this one minute scene never fails to fill up my heart and my eyes.

Lalita ji was born in Yewle village near Nasik, this day, in the year 1916. Her entry into this world is probably one of the most dramatic, almost reminiscent of a film story. Her mother, very near to term, went to the local temple of ‘Amba Maa’ for pooja, with other ladies of the family. While at the temple itself, the baby announced her intentions to make her entry. Lalita ji took birth in the temple of ‘Amba Maa’, and her first bath was at the banks of the river nearby. Being born in the temple, she was named Ambika, and her childhood name was Amboo. (Interesting to note that she played the character of a housekeeper in the film ‘Kaali Ghata’ (1980) – the character was named Ambu.)

As per traditions, she did not attend any school. She was a very energetic and naughty child. When she was 12 years old, she once accompanied her father (Laxmanrao Sagun) and brother (Shantaram) to Pune. The kids had a treat, in that they got to see a film, which was silent of course. Young Ambu was very intrigued. She had seen Ramlila in the village, and she could not understand why the moving characters did not speak. Looking around, she found the source of light coming from a small window behind her. Up from her seat, and she was gone in search of where these images were coming from.

She reached the projector room, and was very disappointed to find no people in there. The operator and other staff then explained to her very briefly, about the celluloid film and that she will have to go to a studio to see the real actors.

Now she was more eager to see a live shooting. Incidentally, in the same visit, the kids stumbled on a film shoot happening in a local park. Naughty as she was, she got into a crowd scene, and being a child, she got hurt. Actor Pandurang Varni picked her up, and he and the director Nana Saheb Sarpotdar, tended to her. Nana Saheb jokingly asked her what she was doing in the crowd. She said she had come to see Ramlila. Everyone laughed.

Nana Saheb asked, do you want to be in this Ramlila, and the young Ambu said yes, without a blink. It is another story that her father was totally against her getting involved in films, and it was very grudgingly that he gave her the permission. The film company – Aryan Films, and the film being shot was ‘Patitodhaar’ (1928). Nana Saheb christened her as Lalita, and that became her film name, for the rest of her life.

Nana Saheb Sarpotdar became her guru. The era was of silent films and actions definitely were the only language. He encouraged her to learn horse riding, swimming, sword fighting etc. Lalita Bai became stunt queen. From a child artist at 12 years, she slowly graduated to lead roles, and played the heroine in many silent film. She was in demand, and would be variously working in both Marathi and Hindi films at Kolhapur, Pune, Bangalore etc.

Her portrayals were strong and convincing. In 1930, she acted in the film ‘Chatur Sundari’ (aka ‘Wily Heroine’) in which she played 17 characters. In 1938 she played the role of a cobbler girl in film ‘Amrit’. So impressed were people by her histrionics, that actually, in real life, many in her friend circle started to shun her, convinced that she belonged to lower caste. She had to go to the district office and get a caste certificate to re-establish her antecedents.

She started working in talkie films, and her first talkie film was ‘Himmat e Mardaan’ (1935), produced by Chandra Rao Kadam. Fortune favored her, in that she had a good voice, and was a good singer too, thanks to the initial trainings that Nana Saheb Sarpotdar encouraged her to take, and the tuitions in spoken Urdu that she took when transitioning to talkie films. Her transition from silent films to talkie films was smooth, and actually more successful. In her heydays, she played lead roles opposite to many stars of 1930s like E Billimoria, Trilok Kapoor, Nazir Hussain, Gajanan Jagirdar etc.

Despite all the success in the industry, she remained aloof and a private person. Not that she was in any airs for becoming a star actress in demand, but because she felt herself lacking in education, and more, she believed herself to be not good looking.

Then came 1940, and her life and career was to change forever. A friend introduced her to Bhagwan, and requested to get some work in films for him. She recommended him to Chandra Rao Kadam, and Bhagwan got a small role in the then current production, ‘Jang e Azaadi’. In one scene, Bhagwan was to slap Lalita Bai. That slap was the undoing of her entire career. The impact was too high, and she started bleeding from her ear. To complicate the matters further, the attending doctor administered a wrong injection, which led to a strong allergic reaction. The skin on one side of her face was disfigured and her left eye was permanently damaged.

She did not face the camera for three years. And after that, she would be considered for character roles only. She was barely twenty five years old, when she perforce transitioned into character roles, many times playing mother to actors of her own age. But in this phase, her true grit became apparent, and she took in being a character actress with great determination – that eventually shows through the success of her career for the rest of her life.

In an interview, she once jokingly said that her initials are LP, which also stand for long playing record. The durability of this personality is astounding. Almost seven decades in the industry, and well over seven hundred films, and as many characters assayed on screen. She herself said that she has lost count, or rather, had stopped counting the number of films that she has acted in. for her role of Mrs. D’sa in ‘Anari’ (1959), she got the Filmfare award for the best supporting actress. She was nominated once for the Phalke Award, but lost out to Shivaji Ganesan that year.

The end for her came unexpectedly. On 23rd February, 1998, she passed away suddenly, at her residence in Pune. She was alone at home, as her husband was in Bombay for some medical treatment, staying with their son’s family. Her passing away was discovered two days later only. Her last film, ‘Bhai’ (1998) was released just two months earlier. She has played the role of Om Puri’s mother in this film.

I remember this song from my viewing of this film many years ago on Doordarshan. And thankfully I am able to locate the video clip for this write up. The film is ‘Parvarish’ (1958). Lalita Pawar plays the role of Rukmani, the wife of a wealthy man, Thakur Jaswant Singh, role played by Nazir Hussain – once a lead pair in the 1930s. Rukmani gives birth to a son. At the hospital, there are many mix ups that happen, and the identification of the child in the nursery becomes a problem. The doctors and staff are not able to tell apart Rukmani’s child from another child, born to a dancing woman, who passed away. The ensuing solution is that the Thakur and his wife are forced to take both the children home, not really knowing which one is really their own, and start to bring them up together.

The ensuing storyline and situations are both comical, as well as poignant and heart rendering, as the family grapples with this problem of identification, for years to come.

This song is at the time, when the children have been brought home, and Rukmani is taking care of both together. The song is a lorie that she sings as she is putting her two sons to sleep. In between, we get to see shots of Thakur Jaswant Singh, with worries and uncertainty for the future, writ large on his face.

The lyricist of this song is Hasrat Jaipuri, and the music composition is by Dattaram. The singing voice is that of Asha Bhosle.

A rare appearance of Lalita Pawar, lip syncing a song onscreen.

(NOTE: Acknowledgments are due to Shri Sriram Tamrakar, compiler of the book ‘Beete Kal Ke Sitaare’. This write up includes information adapted from the article on Lalita Pawar from this book.)

Audio

Video

Song-Jhoome re jhoome re (Parvarish)(1958) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Hasrat Jaipuri, MD-Dattaram

Lyrics

hmmmm mmmmm
mmmmmm mmmmm mmmmm
mmmmmm mmmmm mmmmmm

jhoome re
jhoome re
ho meri god mein taare jhoome
jhoome re
jhoome re
ho meri god mein taare jhoome

oooooo
ek to heera
ek hai moti
laage soorat pyaari
ooooo
aaj khile hain phool khushi ke
god bhari hai hamaari
god bhari hai hamaari
jhoome re
jhoome re
ho mere raaj dulaare jhoome
jhoome re
jhoome re
ho meri god mein taare jhoome

hoooo

aaaaaa aaaaa
meri umar bhi
laage lalan ko
dukhde paas na aaye
hooo
chaand aur suraj se badh kar ye
jag mein naam kamaayen
jag mein naam kamaayen
jhoome re
jhoome re
ho mere ghar ke ujaare jhoome
jhoome re
jhoome re
ho meri god mein taare jhoome

aaaaa
aayee milan ki bhor suhaani
gaaye mamtaa loree
hooo
bachpan khele
aaye jawaani
laaye dulhaniyaa gori ee
laaye dulhaniyaa gori
jhoome re
jhoome re
ho dekho lal hamaare jhoome
jhoome re
jhoome re
ho meri god mein taare jhoome

hmmmm hmmmm mmmmm
mmmmm mmmmm mmmmm mmmmm
mmmmm mmmmm mmmmm
mmmmm mmmmm mmmmm mmmmm
mmmmm mmmmm mmmmm

———————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————-

हम्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम

झूमे रे
झूमे रे
हो मेरी गोद में तारे झूमें
झूमे रे
झूमे रे
हो मेरी गोद में तारे झूमें

ओsss
एक तो हीरा
एक है मोती
लागे सूरत प्यारी
ओsss
आज खिले हैं फूल खुशी के
गोद भरी है हमारी
गोद भरी है हमारी
झूमे रे
झूमे रे
हो मेरे राज दुलारे झूमें
झूमे रे
झूमे रे
हो मेरी गोद में तारे झूमें

होssss

आsss आsss
मेरी उमर भी
लागे ललन को
दुखड़े पास न आयें
होss
चाँद सूरज से
बढ़ कर ये
दुनिया में नाम कमाएं
दुनिया में नाम कमाएं
झूमे रे
झूमे रे
हो मेरे घर के उजारे झूमें
झूमे रे
झूमे रे
हो मेरी गोद में तारे झूमें

आsss
आई मिलन की भोर सुहानी
गाये ममता लोरी
होss
बचपन खेले
आए जवानी
लाये दुल्हनिया गोरी
लाये दुल्हनिया गोरी
झूमे रे
झूमे रे
हो देखो लाल हमारे झूमें
झूमे रे
झूमे रे
हो मेरी गोद में तारे झूमें

हम्ममम म्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम

10 Responses to "Jhoome re jhoome re"

Sudhir ji

Thank you for introducing me to a melodious lorie, and thanks for informative post on my favourite Lalita Pawar ji.

Prakash

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Sudhir ji,
A superb article full of new information about Lalita Pawar. you dig up always something different.That is why I like to read your write ups.Really excellent !
However,her first marriage with composer Hanuman prasad sharma and second marriage with G. P. Pawar,from whom she got the name pawar remain unmentioned.
She died in Aundh,near Pune,all alone in the house.
Here is the indian Express news item giving details of her death etc-

26 February 1998
Lalita Pawar dies alone, unnoticed

EXPRESS NEWS SERVICE
PUNE, FEB 25: Veteran film actress Lalita Pawar was found dead at her residence in Aundh this evening. She was 82 and is survived by film producer husband Rajprakash Gupta. She will be cremated tomorrow.
The actress is believed to have died after Tuesday, said Vilas Jadhav, inspector incharge of Chatuhshrungi police station.

Pawar was alone at her residence as her husband had undergone a throat operation and had been admitted to a private hospital in Mumbai since Monday.

Apparently, Gupta had been making frequent calls to their Pune residence for the last two days. When he failed to get any response, he requested an acquaintance, Kanhaiyyalal Baldota, to look into the matter. Pawar was found dead on the bed when Baldota entered Pawar’s residence. According to police, she had not been seen by her neighbours since Tuesday.

Pawar was rushed to a private clinic where she was declared dead. Her body was later taken to the Sassoon General Hospital for post-mortem. The police have registered a case ofaccidental death.

Beginning her acting career at the age of seven in the silent-film era, Pawar went on to become one of the leading ladies of the film industry. She acted in over 700 films in various languages. At the age of 25, she was slapped by film actor Bhagwan Dada for her mistake in a film shooting. Consequently, a nerve near her left eye burst. She received treatment for nearly three years but the damage was permanent. The event forced her to shift to character roles.

Pawar’s first marriage with Ganpatrao Pawar developed a hitch when he took a fancy to her younger sister. Her second marriage with Rajkumar Gupta of Ambika studios, Mumbai, provided her with some much-needed companionship.

She received the Filmfare award for the Best Character Artiste for her role in Anari, which got her a surfeit of offers. Her career was thrown out of gear in 1990 when she contracted cancer in the jaw. She was forced to undergo treatment of intensive radiation leading to weight loss, drain of energy and memorylapses. She then decided to shift to Pune for treatment.

Her last film was the Pooja Batra starrer Bhai.
-AD

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Thanks Arunj ji for the rare information, That means she married thrice(Hanuman Prasad Sharma,Ganpat Rao Pawar,Raj prakash Gupta)

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For further info on her,you can see my post on 6-11-2012 about a song sung by her in film “Duniya kya kahti hai”.
-AD

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Thanks for the information Arun ji
prakash

Like

Thank you Sadanandji and Atulji for all that rare info on Pawarji.Did she have any regret in playing the bad mother-in-law roles?

Like

@Sudhir ji – Thanks for this beautiful and informative post Sir! and regarding that Shree 420 scene- you have given words to my emotions – i do feel the same , it is the best scene – while her hand making gestures,tears rolling her eyes ! thanks for reviving …
@Deshmukh Sir – thanks for the information! i still remember the news of her death, and after two/3 days only another great actor Raja Gosavi left us and within a fortnight of his death Dada Kondke died.

Like

Prakash ji, Arun ji, Avinash ji, Sheshadri ji

Thanks for your words of appreciation.

Avinash ji,
This short episode from ‘Shri 420’, is simply unforgettable – the love of a mother reaching out to an unhappy child. No words to describe.

Rgds
Sudhir

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audio

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video

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