Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Raja Jaani Na Maaro Nainanvaa Ke Teer Re

Posted on: March 18, 2015


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The Wonderful Sounds of 1930s – 1
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

The decade of 1930s will continue to remain a shaded mystery for the lovers of Hindi film music.  In the decade when the Hindi film song was born and took its first fledgling steps, the creators and the keepers of this art probably did not envision the significance of this new medium and expansive influence it would go on to exercise on an entire culture, generation after generation.  When the films, and more so, the talking films came into being, their predecessor was the various forms of folk theatre and formal stage drama.  From time immemorial, since these art forms have existed, these have simply been live performances, with no thought or effort applied to somehow catalog and preserve them.  The play was written, and its script was the primary record of its existence.

With the coming of films, two things happened.  A powerful medium of communication was born, whose reach and repeatability was enormous, rather, beyond the imagination of even the pioneers who invoked and nurtured it.  At first, the celluloid seemed to be a timeless, everlasting entity.  And it would only be time that would tell the real story of the reel – that this strip of nitrate chemicals is actually perishable, if not cared for.

The second thing was the business and economics of this industry.  Realizing the immense monetary potential of this medium, it turned into big ticket business – both from aspect of creating it, and the from aspect of making money from it.  Sizeable investments were made.  And as the economics unfolded, besides being a money spinner, it turned out also to be a one way ticket to financial disasters.  The cinematic landscape is strewn with unknown incomplete project, canned projects and of course, movies that were box office flops, that vastly outnumber the successes that resulted in profits for their makers.

And in the grist of these two grindstones, a very large number of actual reel projects have been lost, permanently lost.  And very sadly so.  Classic creations that could not be cared for, as the creators and keepers had no resources for effective preservation.  Besides, the industry lacked an organized structure that would help to gather and catalog information about itself, a situation that sadly continues to be the same even today, more than a century after first excitement of moving images projected on a screen.  Further convoluted by the issues of ownership and copyright, it seems that the destiny of this industry is to stagger bedraggled across time, continuing to lose more and more of itself, like the decaying raiment of a mendicant, falling in shreds to the ground and being blown away, never to be seen again.  And the raiment itself remaining incomplete and formless, simply for the lack of a caring benefactor.

The music of the films has suffered and equally dismal fate.  The convention of recording and releasing songs of the films on gramophone records, caught on within the first couple of years itself. Even then, there are really very scanty records – both the info and the discs themselves – available now.  No individuals, or production houses, or record companies ever took it upon themselves to catalog and preserve information, and neither the creations themselves.

Let me put in some data to provide a perspective.  I base these numbers on the information contained in the Hindi Film Geet Kosh, the one and only monumental assay that has compiled and cataloged the available information about this art form.  It is a life’s worth of work that has been put in by Harmandir Singh ji ‘Hamraaz’ (of Kanpur, India), who, along with Harish Raghuvanshi ji and a set of close knit, like minded friends, has been applying all his life’s “tan, mann, dhan” (literally – physical effort, mental focus, and financial resources), to this task.  And he continues to do so.  In my books, if any one individual deserves any kind of a lifetime achievement award related to Hindi cinema and it’s history, it is this gentleman from Kanpur, who has devoted a whole lifetime and everything in it, to this cause.

This industry has been so intensely musically minded right from its birth.  The 1st volume of HFGK lists 931 films, both released and some known unreleased.  Based on the available information – specifically the song books so painstakingly gathered by Harmandir ji, and some partial details available from the recording companies, this decade saw the appearance of a little less than 9,300 songs.  The actual number can be, and will be higher, since there still are gaps in the details available in the Geet Kosh, for the lack of any data and details for some of the films.  The first decade generated about ten thousand songs, at an average of approximately a dozen songs per film.  Quite a staggering number, given the infancy of this medium in its first ten years.

Now, in terms of availability, it is a sad state of affairs that just a little more than one tenth of this vast treasure is physically traceable and available with the lovers of this music worldwide.  I am in ongoing communication with the stalwarts in this field, like Surjeet Singh ji (of San Diego, USA), Girdharilal ji (from Jodhpur, India), Zafar Bhai, Shalin Bhatt ji, Bakhshish Singh ji and many other friends around the globe, many of whom are available online.  A combined and optimistic estimate based on inputs from all friends is that the number of songs available from the 1930s numbers around 1100 to 1200 only.  As can be expected, the availability number increase as we progress through the years.  The number of films and songs available progressively increases as we go past 1936 and 1937.

Some of the more successful production houses and discerning producers have taken the pains to preserve their works.  Entities like Prabahat Studios, Rajkamal Studios, Bombay Talkies, Basant Pictures, New Theatres to some extent, have preserved and have made available, fully or partially, their portfolios.  Remaining treasures from Sagar Movietone, Ranjit Studios, Maadan Theatres (Calcutta), and a huge number of smaller production houses are simply not traceable so far.  I keep using this phrase “not traceable so far”, with the optimistic hope that somewhere, someone has got some of this material sitting in some storage, and it will appear some day.  As we all know, the Bengali version of the film ‘Devdas’ (1935), which was thought to have been lost, finally surfaced in the 1980s, in Bangladesh.

The number may look very small in comparison to the total, but even then we should count our blessings that these are available.  One reason is that not all films in this era had their songs released on gramophone records.  And secondly, most of the films of this era are themselves not available.  Sometimes when such a discovery is made, that a film from that period has surfaced, it is a reason to celebrate, because the availability of the film means that it’s songs are immediately available.  And it is thanks to luminaries like Surjeet Singh ji and Shalin Bhatt ji, who are bringing out more and more of this treasure and making it available online.

On our blog, we have already showcased in the neighborhood of 270 songs from this period.  This number is of film songs only.  We also have posted on our blog, about 60 or so non film songs which are attributed to this decade.  So we are slowly progressing to get to represent all the treasure of the 1930s on our blog.  In the process, we hope to discuss many rarities, and many a wonderful but obscure and unknown musical gems.  For today’s post, I present a very rare song from the film ‘Watan Parast’ from 1934.

The film ‘Watan Parast’ is produced under the banner of Kailash Syndicate, Bombay.  It is a period costume drama which has been directed by the now legendary lyricist DN Madhok.  My expectation is the songs of this film are probably also written by him, since that is his first specialty.  However, the Geet Kosh does not list a name for the lyricist, and in absence of any other confirmation, I would not document just my guesswork.  The music is by Harishchandra Bali, a name that is not new for the readers of this blog.  One of his songs is already represented here.  The cast of actors is listed as Ismail, Dar Kashmiri, Miss Moti, Roshanara, Ramanand Sharma, Rajkumari, Mansoor and Hanumant Rao.  A glance at this list raises some interesting possibilities, and I request other knowledgeable readers to comment.  Is ‘Dar Kashmiri’ the same persona as the latter day actor we are more familiar as Jeevan?  And the name Rajkumari – is there any connect with the singer Rajkumari who became one of the top singers from late 1930s and in 1940s?  There is a comment in the Geet Kosh that informs, based on information received from Sh. Ramanand Sharma himself, that he possibly had sung two or three songs and had also possibly written one or two song in this film.

There are 12 songs in this film.  At this point, only one song of this film has been physically traced so far.  It is the one listed at no. 10 in the Geet Kosh list of this film’s songs.  No information about the singer is available in the book.  However, based on information received from Girdhari Lal ji and Surjeet Singh ji, the singer’s name is Ratna Bai.  Now, once again, this information may need to be checked.  The name Ratna Bai does not appear in the list of actors, and of course playback singing in 1934 was not yet there.  On the other hand, this song sounds like a Mujra song.  It is possible that the persona named Ratna Bai sang this song and performed just this one song on screen in this film, and the producer may not have included her name in the list of actors.  Other possibility is that Ratna Bai is the name of the character in the film who performs this song, and as per the convention followed (not uniformly) in those days, the name of the character appears on the gramophone record, as the singer.  And that character could have been played by one of the lady actors listed.  So we do not know for sure.  Once again, I invite readers to comment.

Now, coming to the song itself.  Online, this has been posted by Shalin Bhatt ji.  The link shows pictures of actor Motilal and singer Rajkumari, which I am not sure are related to this song.  Maybe a mis-connect on the names ‘Miss Moti’ and ‘Rajkumari’ in the list of actors.  I would request other readers and friends to add any more information related to this song and this film.  That it is a mujra song, I am guessing from the sound of it.  The song has been composed so, and it has been sung with more than just touch of naughtiness.  The ‘oye’s and ‘haaye’s add a very playful touch to the rendering.  The lady singer is pleading with her admirer and courter, to keep his eyes off her.  She feels pierced by his glances, and feels pangs of ache in her heart.  A simple and a lovely song so endearingly rendered for the situation.

Listen and enjoy.

 

Song – Raja Jaani Na Maaro Nainanwaa Ke Teer Re (Watan Parast) (1934) Singer – [Unattributed], Lyrics – [Unattributed], MD – Harishchandra Bali

Lyrics

raja jaani na maaro nainanwaa ke teer re
raja jaani na maaro nainanwaa ke teer re
raja jaani na maaro nainanwaa ke teer re
teer re
teer re
raja jaani
teer re
teer re
teer re
raja jaani
haan aaan
raja jaani
haan aaa. . . .aaan
raja jaani na ma. . . . . . . . . . . . .teer re
raja jaani

rokat tokat
haar gayi main
haan
rokat tokat
haar gayi main
tak tak maarat baan najariya
ae ji saanwariyaa
raakhoon kaise dheer re
dheer re
dheer re
raja jaani
tak tak maarat baan najariya
ae ji saanwariyaa
raakhoon kaise dheer re
dheer re
dheer re
raja jaani
oye
o raja jaani
haaye
ae raja jaani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .teer re
raja jaani
aaa aaa aaaa aaa aaaaaa
haaaan aaan aaaaan aaan
teer re
aaa aaa aaaa aaa aaaaaa
haaaan aaan aaaaan aaan
teer re
raja jaani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .teer re
raja jaani

baala joban mori
baali umariyaa
baala joban mori
baali umariyaa
naa maaro re zulmi saanwariyaa
nain katariya
utthat karejwaa peer re. . .
peer re. . .
peer re. . .
raja jaani
naa maaro re zulmi saanwariyaa
nain katariya
utthat karejwaa peer re. . .
peer re. . .
peer re. . .
raja jaani
hoon
o raja jaani
hoon
o raja jaani na. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
raja jaani na maaro nainanwaa ke teer
aaaa aaaaaaaa aaaaaaa aaaaa
aaaaaaaa aaaa aaaaa
teer re
raja jaani na maaro nainanvaa ke teer
aaaa aaaaaaaa aaaaaaa aaaaa
aaaaaaaa aaaa aaaaa
teer re
raja jaani na maaro nainanwaa ke teer re
raja jaani na maaro nainanwaa ke teer re

——————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
——————————————

राजा जानी ना मारो नैनन्वा के तीर रे
राजा जानी ना मारो नैनन्वा के तीर रे
राजा जानी ना मारो नैनन्वा के तीर रे
तीर रे
तीर रे
राजा जानी
तीर रे
तीर रे
तीर रे
राजा जानी
हाँ आss॰ ॰आं
राजा जानी ना मा॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ तीर रे
राजा जानी

रोकत टोकत
हार गई मैं
रोकत टोकत
हार गई मैं
टक टक मारत बान नजरिया
ए जी साँवरिया
राखूँ कैसे धीर रे
धीर रे
धीर रे
राजा जानी
रोकत टोकत
हार गई मैं
रोकत टोकत
हार गई मैं
टक टक मारत बान नजरिया
ए जी साँवरिया
राखूँ कैसे धीर रे
धीर रे
धीर रे
राजा जानीओsए
राजा जानी
हाsये
ए॰॰ राजा जानी॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ तीर रे
राजा जानी
आ आss आsss आss आssss
हाँss आंs आंsss आंss
तीर रे
आ आss आsss आss आssss
हाँss आंs आंsss आंss
तीर रे
राजा जानी॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ तीर रे
राजा जानी

बाला जोबन मेरा
बाली उमरीया
बाला जोबन मेरा
बाली उमरीया
ना मारो रे ज़ुल्मी साँवरिया
नैन कटरिया
उठत करेजवा पीर रे॰॰
पीर रे॰॰
पीर रे॰॰
राजा जानी
ना मारो रे ज़ुल्मी साँवरिया
नैन कटरिया
उठत करेजवा पीर रे॰॰
पीर रे॰॰
पीर रे॰॰
राजा जानी
हूँ
ओ राजा जानी
हूँ
ओ राजा जानी
ओ राजा जानी ना॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰ ॰
राजा जानी ना मारो नैनन्वा के तीर
आ आssssss आssss आ
आsssss आss आsss
तीर रे
राजा जानी ना मारो नैनन्वा के तीर
आ आssssss आssss आ
आsssss आss आsss
तीर रे
राजा जानी ना मारो नैनन्वा के तीर रे
राजा जानी ना मारो नैनन्वा के तीर रे

6 Responses to "Raja Jaani Na Maaro Nainanvaa Ke Teer Re"

Here is a song with similar mukhda tune and lyrics:

https://atulsongaday.me/2014/12/05/raaja-jaani-laaga-mohe-nainwa-ka-baan-re/

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Sir, please wait, there will be one more 🙂 ( have already drafted the post earlier, only final touch to be given) 🙂

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@ Sudhir Sir – great post Sir !!
– So far I have gone only through one copy of the HFGK and can
understand what efforts Shri.Harminder ji & others must have put in. I
t is because of these monumental efforts by people like Shri.Harminder ji,Shri.Raghuvanshi ji,Shri.Surjeet Singh ji,Shri.Girdharilal ji, Shri.Zafar Bhai, Shri.Shalin Bhatt ji, Shri.Bakhshish Singh ji, and many others that this treasure trove has been preserved and passed on to our younger generations.
Also,(I feel that) had there been serious efforts, say in the seventies to search and preserve the old gems, I think most of them could have been recovered or at least many films could have been prevented from being obscure.
Thanks for this interesting post and this rare song Sir !!!

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Sudhir ji,
Thanks for an informative and carefully worded article on the music of the 30’s-one of my weaknesses in music.
First point is Dar Kashmiri is the same as Omkarnath Dhar from Shrinagar,kashmir,who later became Jeevan-doing two contrasting role types,one of the pious Narad muni in more that 60 films and the other of the cunning and cruel villain in the films of 70s and 80s.
Secondly, Rajkumari must be the same singer Rajkumari,as she had made her debut as an adult in Nai Duniya-1934. My guess is,this song also must be sung by her in the role of Ratna Bai in the film.
Thirdly,in the 9th paragraph of the article the names of Rajkamal and Basant Pictures are misfits. Rajkamal was established by V.Shantaram only in 1942,after he left Prabhat for good. Basant Pictures too was established in 1942,by Homi Wadia after separating from elder brother J.B.H.Wadia,on the issue of future themes of films for Wadia movietone. So,both these production houses can not be connected with music of the 30s.
You have rightly mentioned about the gentlemen who have preserved the heritage and made it open for the lovers of vintage music. The efforts of Shri.Dr. Surjit Singh ji are to be lauded loudly for devoting an exclusive site for this purpose.
-AD

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The voice does not sound like Rajkumari. It is some other singer.

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Harishchandra Bali>>>
Apna Ghar Apna Ghar Apna Desh Hai Apna Ghar
Shanta Apte Narottam Vyas Apna Ghar (1942)
Aaya Hai Aaj Mere Pyar Ka Din
Rajinder Krishan Janta (1947)
Aaya Re Pawan Jharoka
Her Highness (1946)
Ae Sipahi Desh Ke Ae Watan Ke Paasban
Prashant Pande Janta (1947)
Ankhiya Prabhu Darshan Ki Pyasi
Narottam Vyas Mahatma Vidur (1943)
Baat Takai Tumhari Manmohan
Narottam Vyas Mahatma Vidur (1943)
Badhaiya Ae Ji Badhaiya
Pandit Phani Tulsi (1941)
Bambai Ko Chalo Bambai Ko
Pandit Phani Kirti (1942)
Beet Gayi Andhiyari Rain
Her Highness (1946)
Bhaiya Mere Aisi Bhabhi Laana
Basheer Jamali, Pandit Phani Nari (1942)
Chupke Keh Du Chupke Sun Lo
Narendranath Tuli Seedha Raasta (1941)
Kaun Hai Wo Kaun Bataaye
Lalita Parulkar Basheer Jamali, Pandit Phani Nari (1942)
Phagun Ke Din Chaar Holi Ke Khel Mana Re
Meera Bai Janta (1947)
Ankhiya Me Neend Samayi
Vishnupant Pagnis Narottam Vyas Mahatma Vidur (1943)
Aaj Maine Pyara Sa Preetam Paya
Lalita, Rangraj Narottam Vyas Mamaji (1942)
Aaj Mere Jeevan Ka Pyar Ho
Narottam Vyas Mamaji (1942)
Aankho Me Chhalke Sharab
Her Highness (1946)
Aao Saajan Aaj
Mohantara Talpade Narottam Vyas Mamaji (1942)
Aarti Aarti Sab Milkar Gaao Aarti
Maruti Rao, Pehalwan Narottam Vyas Mamaji (1942)
Aate Dekhe Jabhi Giridhari
Lalita, Rangraj Narottam Vyas Mamaji (1942)

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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