Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Na dir na dim de de na

Posted on: July 8, 2015


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Basics of classical music-part V
—————————————————-
(Genres of classical compositions and gharanas)
—————————————————-

Several regular contributors of this blog have their own series of songs going on in the blog. Some of these series are like express trains that appear at fixed intervals. On the other hand, there are some series that are more like special trains that have no fixed schedules and they run at irregular intervals. Readers may or may not follow these series, but these series mean something to their authors themselves.

It turns out that I too have one such series of articles that appears irregularly. This series is called “Series on Basics of music”. Four articles have so far appeared in the series. Part I appeared on 21 may 2015 and the fourth part was on 17 june 2015.

I was under the impression that three or more articles in the series would be sufficient to introduce the basics of music and then we could move on to the really serious matter of discussing the basics of individual songs. But I find that we still have lots of ground to cover and quite a few more articles will be required to cover many more topics related to the basics of music. This is a vast topic (much vaster than the topic of HFM) and one keeps coming across new and interesting information on the subject matter.

In this episode (the fifth episode of the series), let us have a look at some more terms that one frequently comes across while discussing Hindustani classical music.

Suppose we have read the first four articles in the series and let us assume that we have mastered all the contents of the articles. Armed with that information, we go and attend a classical recital. We are able to understand what is the raag being the composition being sung, and we are also able to understand the taal being played in the composition. We then come back and proudly tell your friend that we had gone and attended a classical music recital. We also tell him that it was a performance in raag Chandrakauns and that the composition was in teentaal. Our friend then asks us this question- “what genre of classical recital was that ?”. “What genre ?”-We are totally unprepared for this question. So there is something called “genre” too in Hindustani classical song, we wonder.

Let us look at various genres of Hindustani classical songs.

Raag and taal are common to all kinds of classical music. And there are several kinds of classical music, that can be called genre. For instance, there are genres of classical music viz. Dhrupad, Khayal, Tarana, etc. The above are considered genre of “pucca” classical singing. Then there are other genre that are considered lighter or semi classical genres. Some of such light classical genre are Thumri, Dadra, Tappa, Kajri, Chaiti, Hori, Sawani, Bhajan, Abhang, Natyageet, Qawwali, Ghazal etc.

All the above genre of classical music have their own characteristics ways of singing. One may take the same lyrics, same raag and same taal and they can be sung in various genre in their own characteristic ways. A listener well versed and knowledgeable in these matters will be able to tell the genre of the classical composition by listening to the rendition of the song.

It goes without saying that it takes considerable exposure and interest before one can become an expert in identifying the genre of songs. Some of us in fact may already have been experts in identifying some of these genres, especially the light classical singing genres. For instance, people who are exposed to HFM can identify a qawwali, a ghazal, a bhajan etc. It is another matter that we may not be able to tell the raag and taal, unless we are trained to do that.

In Hindustani classical music, there is another important concept, namely the concept of “Gharana”. A “gharana” has been described in wikipedia as “a system of social organization linking musicians or dancers by lineage or apprenticeship, and by adherence to a particular musical style.A gharana also indicates a comprehensive musicological ideology. This ideology sometimes changes substantially from one gharana to another. It directly affects the thinking, teaching, performance and appreciation of music.

The word gharana comes from the Urdu/Hindi word ‘ghar’, which means ‘family’ or ‘house’. It typically refers to the place where the musical ideology originated.”

It must be kept in mind that a gharana typically refers to one genre of classical singing. It is unlikely that a typical gharana will cover lots of genres of music. Thus there are gharanas dealing with Dhrupad only and gharanas dealing with Khayal only,

There are four gharanas dealing with Dhrupad singing namely Dagar gharana (Rajasthan), Darbhanga gharana (Bihar), Bettia gharana (Bihar), and Talwandi Gharana (Punjab).

There are ten gharanas for Khayal, and these gharanas have nothing in common with the above mentioned gharanas of dhrupad. These Khayal gharanas are Gwalior Gharana, Agra Gharana, Kirana Gharana, Jaipur Gharana, Rampur Sahaswan Gharana, Patiala Gharana , Delhi Gharana, Bhendi Bazar Gharana , Banaras Gharana and Mewati Gharana.

Just like there are gharanas for vocal singing, there are gharanas for intrumental music, dance as well as for tabla.

Here is a summary of some classical music related art forms alongwith gharanas associated with them.

Music related genre/ art forms Type of music/ art form Gharanas Remarks
Dhrupad classical vocal Dagar gharana (Rajasthan), Darbhanga gharana (Bihar), Bettia gharana (Bihar), and Talwandi Gharana (Punjab) Dagar gharana is the most well known. Talwandi Gharana practitioners are only a few in Pakistan
Khayal classical vocal Gwalior Gharana, Agra Gharana, Kirana Gharana, Jaipur Gharana, Rampur Sahaswan Gharana, Patiala Gharana , Delhi Gharana, Bhendi Bazar Gharana , Banaras Gharana and
Mewati Gharana
Sitar and other stringed intruments Classical instrumental Imdadkhani gharana (Etawah gharana)- For Sitar and Surbahar

Maihar Gharana- for Sitar and Sarod

Katthak dance Classical dance Lucknow Gharana, Jaipur Gharana, Benares Gharana, Raigarh (Chhattisgarh) Gharana Likewise there are dance gharanas for other classical dance forms
Tabla playing taal accompanying music Delhi gharana, Ajrara gharana, Lucknow gharana, Benares gharana, Punjab gharana, Farukhabad gharana

While discussing “pucca” classical singing genres, we mentioned the name “Tarana”. In Hindi movie music, tarana is a term used synonymously with a song, but that is not so in classical singing. A Tarana is an interesting form of classical vocal music. The lyrics in this genre of song consist of seemingly meaningless terms viz. tum,dir, ta, na, de, re, dim etc. Amir Khusrau (1253- 1325), a key historical figure in medieval India, is supposed to have invented Tarana. Qawwali was also invented by him, incidentally.

Tarana does not seem to have gharanas, unlike say Khayal or Dhrupad genre of singing. Since Tarana consists of words like tum, ta, na, de re etc. even a layman can identify a tarana correctly, even if he may not be able to tell its raag, taal, etc. 🙂

Listening to a well sung tarana is a divine experience. Hindi movie songs have had very few taranas in them. Off late, I have discovered a few fantastic taranas from Hindi movies which will be discussed at appropriate times in the blog.

To round up this episode on the basics of music, here is a hidden gem from a Hindi movie called “Ladki”(1953). This is a divine tarana, which has wrongly and unjustifiably been considered as a part of another song in the movie. As far as I am concerned, this is a full fledged song on its own and it should be treated as such.

This taraana is sung by Lata. The song is picturised as a dance song on Vyjyanti Mala. Listen to this song, and watch the dance performance. Both are divine and they are treats for the senses.

Rajinder Krishan should be credited for the lyrics (as he is the lyricist for this movie). Sudarsan-Dhaniram and C Ramchandra were the amusic directors in this movie. I am not sure who has composed the music for this tarana.

Here is this tarana from Ladki(1953). It is in Raag Chandrkauns and the taal is teentaal.

Audio (full)

Video (Partial)

Song-Na dir na dim de de na ta nana na (Ladki)(1953) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Rajinder Krishan, MD-C Ramchandra

Lyrics(Based on audio version)

na dir na dim de de na
tananana
na dir na dim de de na
tananana
na dir na dim de de na
de de na
de de na
na dir na dim de de na
tananana
na dir na dim de de na
de de na
de de na
de de na
tananana
na dir na dim de de na

na dir dir dir
tum dar dir dir
tum dar dir dir ta dani
na dir dir dir
tum dar dir dir
dir dir dir dir ta dani
na dir daani tum dar daani
ta dim dim ta dani
na dir na dim
de de na
na dir na dim
de de na
na dir na dim
de de na
tananana
na dir na dim
tananaan
na dir na dim
tananana
na dir na dim de de na
tananana
na dir na dim de de na

na dir na dim de de na
tananana
na dir na dim de de na
tananana
na dir na dim de de na
de de na
de de na
na dir na dim de de na
tananana
na dir na dim de de na
de de na
de de na
de de na
tananana
na dir na dim de de na

na dir dir dir
tum dar dir dir
tum dar dir dir
ta dani
na dir dir dir
tum dar dir dir
did dir dir dir
ta dani
na dir daani tum dar daani
ta dim dim ta dani
nadir na dim de de na
nadir na dim de de na
nadir na dim de de na
tananana
nadir na dim
tananana
nadir na dim
tananana
nadir na dim
de de na
tananana
na dir na dim
de de na

3 Responses to "Na dir na dim de de na"

Atul ji,

As usual, a well research article on this series.

You have said that listening to a tarana composition is a divine experience. It has to be so as tarana was started as a form of Sufi prayer by Amir Khusrau and later revived by Ustad Amir Khan who brought to the notice the meanings of meaningless looking words in taranas. Some of the words used in taranas are Persian in origin. For example :

dar=inside
tom= I am you.
na di dani= you know more than any one else.
tan dar dani= one who knows what is inside the body.

These are some of the meanings which I got from an article written by Dr Suresh Chandvankar of SIRC. The link of the article in which a separate paragraph about tarana is written, is given below:

https://courses.nus.edu.sg/course/ellpatke/Miscellany/amir%20khan.htm

Those interested in experiencing a divine feeling may listen to a tarana sung by Ustad Amir Khan in Raag Hamsadhwani. In this tarana, Amir Khan has used a Persian couplet as well :

Like

Atul ji,

I hope you did receive also the ‘tarana’ song I had sent some days back (it was a 7mb file).

Rgds

Sudhir

Like

I have received that. In fact it was that song that prompted this writeup and then I discoverd this song. That song will also be used at a suitable occasion.

Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2019) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has more than 15300 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15333

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1180
Total Number of movies covered =4224

Total visits so far

  • 12,711,298 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,804 other followers

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share

Category of songs

Current Visitors

Archives

Stumble

visitors whereabouts

blogcatalog

Music Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory

blogadda

Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

%d bloggers like this: