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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Sainyya saanwre bhaye baawre

Posted on: April 12, 2017


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, April 12th 2017 is the 107th birth anniversary of one of the earliest multi-talented film personalities who, despite being a post-graduate in English literature, started his filmy career as a painter and a still photographer in New Theatres, Calcutta in 1933. With sheer hard work and talent, he rose to become the screenplay and dialogue writer and lyricist within a year. In about 5 years from joining the film industry, he became a director. He was Kedar Nath Sharma, better known as Kidar Sharma (12/04/1910 – 29/04/1999).

I have been an admirer of Kidar Sharma ever since I watched his interview on Doordarshan sometime in the late 70s or early 80s. I found that film making was more of his passion than for earning money. My first ever acquisition of a book relating to Hindi films was the anecdotal autobiography ‘The One And Lonely Kidar Sharma’ (2008) written by him. The title of his autobiography itself indicates as to how much he was bitter about he being not recognised at the national level – not even with ‘Padma Shri’ despite his contributions to the Hindi cinema and the children’s films.

I have already covered Kidar Sharma’s journey into the celluloid world in detail in my post ik shab ke musaafir hain ham. Hence, I will not repeat myself here. I propose to confine myself to discussion about his determination to direct a film in the midst of much adversity. The film was CHITRALEKHA (1941).

Due to some creative differences with his Guru, Debaki Bose, who was directing ‘Vidyapati’ (1937) for New Theatres, Kidar Sharma resigned from New Theatres after the completion of his assignment as dialogue writer and lyricist for that film. He decided that henceforth he would work in the film industry only as a director – a tall order at that time. After remaining unemployed for months, he got an opportunity from Film Corporation of India, a Calcutta based film production company to complete the film ‘The Rise/Tumhari Jeet’ (1939) whose director (I guess, he was Ranjit Sen) had left the film half way.

After the completion of the film, Kidar Sharma got the offer from the same banner to direct two films – ‘Aulad/Dil Hi To Hai’ (1939) and ‘Chitralekha’ (1941). After the release of the first film, Kidar Sharma turned his attention to ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) for which the Film Corporation of India had acquired the rights to make a film on Bhagwati Charan Verma’s novel of the same name.

Before, Kidar Sharma started the initial work of script/dialogue writing and finalisation of actors for ‘Chitralekha’ (1941), he was called by his Guru, Debaki Bose to write dialogues and lyrics for the film ‘Nartaki’ (1940) with a very lucrative offer. Since the theme of both ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) and ‘Nartaki’ (1940) was the same – relationship between the court dancer and the saint, he refused the offer. D K Bose was furious and told him that he did not stand a chance in ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) against ‘Nartaki’ (1940) under the banner of New Theatres with good budget, his name as a director, Leela Desai as a heroine and Pankaj Malik as Music Director. Furthermore, Wadia Movietone was also producing ‘Court Dancer/Raj Nartaki’ (1941) both in Hindi and English in same theme with Prithviraj Kapoor and Sadhana Bose, the latter being a well-known danseuse.

It is often said that some people thrive in chaos. In respect of Kidar Sharma, I found him to thrive in accepting challenges. The indirect indication of the threat from Debaki Bose might have worked as a tonic for Kidar Sharma to work for ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) more vigorously than before. With a limited budget at the disposal of the Film Corporation of India, Kidar Sharma had to work with a tight budget. While he took Mehtab and Nandrekar, the known actors of that time in the role of Chitralekha and Samant Beejgupt, respectively, A S Gyani, Kidar Sharma’s colleague during their amateur theatre days in Amritsar, was taken for the role of Kumargiri. Rest of the cast like Ram Dulari, Rajendra Singh, Monica Desai, Nand Kishore, Kalawati etc were his favourites during his New Theatre days.

Since both ‘Nartaki’ (1940) and ‘Raj Nartaki’ (1941) had Pankaj Malik and Timir Baran respectively as music director who were well known for their classical based song composition, Kidar Sharma sprung a surprise by selecting Ustad Jhande Khan who was his father’s close friend known for classical compositions for the stage plays. It was on Kidar Sharma’s suggestion that Jhande Khan composed all the songs for the film in a single raag Bhairavi.

The first problem started before the commencement of the shooting. Kidar Sharma always believed in rehearsals of the entire screen play before actors faced the camera. Probably, the idea was to reduce the retakes thus saving on time and cost of film negative. Mehtab who had been acting in the films since silent film days resented the rehearsals. It was left to the officials of the banner to convince her for whom she finally relented.

There was a bathing scene requiring Mehtab to remove her cloths and enter in the marble tub for a bath in rose water. Mehtab agreed for the shot provided it was done in one take and the Kidar Sharma himself shot the scene without the presence of anyone on the set. Khwaja Ahmed Abbas had said at that time that the scene was aesthetically shot. But the scene became the talk of the tinsel town.

During the making of the film, Ustad Jhande Khan had to leave the assignment for some personal reason. It is believed that he had already composed the tunes of most of the songs and had recorded at least 5 songs. Some songs were later recorded by A S Gyani who had the experience in composing the music during his theatre days in Amritsar.

When the film was nearing completion and required only about half-an-hour’s shooting, the creditor of Film Corporation of India brought court order to seal the studio. With great difficulties, Kidar Sharma completed the shooting before the studio was locked by the court order.

During the trial show of the film, none of the bosses of Film Corporation of India were happy with the outcome. They were disappointed from the start when they heard Bismillah Khan’s shehnai as the credit title background score. With already facing the financial crunch, the bosses felt that the entire efforts of making the film were a waste. So they did not attempt to do any marketing of the film and it was first released in Calcutta’s New Cinema without any fanfare. The theatre belonged to New Theatres. Apparently, the staff of the theatre discouraged the cinegoers from watching the film. A rumour was floated that the film was directed by a person who was not considered even as a third assistant to Debaki Bose. The film was withdrawn after one week as it was regarded as a total flop.

Adding to the problems, Bhagwati Charan Verma, the author of the novel who ran a newspaper wrote an editorial accusing Kidar Sharma of ruining his great novel. There was a large disappointment to all those who were associated with the film. But one person who was still hopeful was the Manager of the Film Corporation of India who got the film released in North and Central India with advertising blitz. The film became a huge success and ran for weeks. I have seen advertisement in one of the Filmindia issue of 1941 in which it was mentioned that the film ran for 16 weeks in Maharaja Talkies in Indore. It is said that the songs of the films – especially those sung by Ram Dulari became very popular.

According to Box Office India, ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) had the second highest box office collection in the year 1941, the first being ‘Khazaanchi’ (1941).

[Note: Some of the information on making of the film ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) has been taken from the book which I have mentioned above. I gratefully acknowledge the same.]

By the way, after 23 years of the release of ‘Chitralekha’ (1941), Kidar Sharma got an opportunity to remake the film, also titled ‘Chitralekha’ (1964) in colour under a good banner, Pushpa Pictures of A A Nadiadwala with Meena Kumari as Chitralekha, Pradeep Kumar as Samant Beejgupt and Ashok Kumar as Kumargiri. Music Director Roshan composed the songs for this film in different raagas such as Pahadi, Yaman Kalyan, Kalawati, Kamod etc on the lyrics of Sahir Ludhianvi.

The film did not fare well at the box office. Kidar Sharma had stated that he himself rates ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) better than ‘Chitralekha’ (1964).

I had seen the film Chitralekha (1964) a couple of times. I feel that there was nothing wrong in any aspects of the film making – acting, direction, sets, photography, songs and musical compositions. Only casting of the main actors did not match with the aspirations of the cinegoers. Perhaps Vyjayantimala or Waheeda Rehman would have suited better as a court dancer in place of Meena Kumari who was past her prime. Her superb acting and expressions could not compensate for the sensual and the delicate looking heroine required for the role. What a pity! Even the great poetry of Sahir Ludhianvi with equally superb compositions of Roshan could not lift the film on the box office front.

On the occasion of the birth anniversary of Kidar Sharma, I have chosen one of the popular songs from his classic film ‘Chitralekha’ (1941). The song is ‘sainya saanwre bhaye baawre vachan karat nit jhoothe’ sung by Ram Dulari. The song was written by Kidar Sharma which was composed by Jhande Khan. Obviously, the song is based on Raag Bhairavi. I heard this song for the first time last week and immediately liked for its simplicity in all respect – lyrics, rendering and composition.

Surprisingly, this popular song of yore was not available in full on YT until I made a video from mp3 clip of the song and uploaded the same a few days back.

Enjoy the song.


Song-Sainyya saanwre bhaye baawre (Chitralekha)(1941) Singer-Ramdulari, Lyrics-Kidar Sharma, MD-Jhande Khan

Lyrics

sainya saanwre bhaye baawre
sainya saanwre bhaye baawre
vachan karat nit
jhoothhe
vachan karat nit
jhoothhe
sainya saanwre bhaye baawre
sainya saanwre bhaye baawre
vachan karat nit
jhoothhe
vachan karat nit
jhoothhe

sola baras ki bhayi sajanwa
sola baras ki bhayi sajanwa
angiya ke bandh toote
bandh toote
sainya saanwre bhaye baawre
sainya saanwre bhaye baawre
vachan karat nit
jhoothhe
vachan karat nit
jhoothhe

sakhi barsaaten aayin
sakhi barsaaten
kaisi
kaisi hai suhaani raaten
tum bin kaun lagaaye gale
tum bin kaun lagaaye gale
joban ki bahaaren loote ae ae
sainya saanwre bhaye baawre
sainya saanwre bhaye baawre
vachan karat nit
jhoothhe
vachan karat nit
jhoothhe

panghat pe mohe
panghat pe mohe
pakde nigodi
apne prem mein
apne prem mein
jakad liyo ri
kaahe piya pardes gaye
ab kaahe humse roothe ae
sainya saanwre bhaye baawre
sainya saanwre bhaye baawre
vachan karat nit
jhoothhe
vachan karat nit
jhoothhe
sainya….aa

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1 Response to "Sainyya saanwre bhaye baawre"

I am a huge fan of Kidar Sharma, especially of his lyrics writing. We have been appreciating Sahir for novel and out of the routine ideas in his lyrics. According to ME Kidar-ji was pioneer in that particular field. I can quote innumerable instances in his lyrics to prove my views. I will reserve those gems from his lyrics, for my future presentation of one of his songs, Hari Ichchha permitting, on this Blog..

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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