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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Dil Ko Samjhaaye Huye

Posted on: June 28, 2017


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, I am writing about one of the prominent actors of 1930s and 40s who started his film career in the silent film era and became producer-director during the second half of 1940s. His name – Mazhar Khan, a forgotten name not only for the current generation but also for many in my generation as well.

Let me confess that I was also one of the under ‘many’ category, who was not aware of Mazhar Khan until 2012. I was planning to write an article on one of the songs from Padosi (1941) when I came across Mazhar Khan’s name playing the role of Thakur in the film. But it was during the last two years when I was into 1940s films and songs that I became aware of his status and contributions to the Hindi film industry. I have observed that Mazhar Khan along with Chandra Mohan, Motilal and Jairaj generally escaped the unsavory words from the pen of Baburao Patel, the editor of ‘Filmindia’. This indicate the high respect these actors commanded from the film-goers of that time.
In an interview to a film magazine sometime in 1942, Mazhar Khan had said ‘I doubt whether my life story would be of any interest at all’. But I find from his other interviews with ‘Filmindia’ in June 1941 and November 1942 as also from his subsequent filmy career that his life story is indeed interesting one.

Mazhar Khan (18/10/1905 – 24/09/1950) was born in Dhar (MP). He was sent to Indore for schooling from where he completed his matriculation examination. He was fascinated by the glamour of film industry from the school days and aspired for becoming an actor. His father, a First Class Magistrate, was keen that he joins the law course. Probably, he took a middle path and instead joined the police force as the sub-inspector which has connection with law, a subject close to his father. He was posted in Dhar.
During his service in police force, Mazhar got opportunity to learn horse riding and other athletic activities. He was a polo player, a boxer, a football player and an athlete. But his fascination about the film industry continued. On the other hand, his father was pressurising him to leave the police job and join the law course. He did enroll for the law course but it was short-lived as he ran away to Bombay some time in 1927 to fulfil his ambition of becoming a film actor.

For Mazhar Khan, the situation in the film industry was not as rosy as he thought. It was not like the organised sector where one applies for the job and called for the interview etc. In the film industry, the first obstacle to meet the producer was the studio’s gatekeeper, generally a Pathan who would not allow anyone to enter the studio premises. Again, the studio owners had their own whims and fancies in selecting the actors.

One day, Mazhar Khan somehow managed to gate crash into one of the studios and met Director BP Mishra who gave him a role in Imperial Film Company’s silent film, ‘Fatal Garland’ (1927). This was the beginning of Mazhar Khan’s filmy career after which he never looked back. While the exact number of silent films in which he worked is not known, Wikipedia lists 18 films between 1927-31, mostly under the banner of Imperial Films. The actual number could be higher.

When talkies films came in 1931, Mazhar Khan got the opportunity to work in Imperial Film Company’s ‘Noor Jahan’ (1931). He shifted to Calcutta (Kolkata) in 1932 and worked with New Theatres’ ‘Subah Ka Sitara’ (1932) in which KL Saigal and Ratanbai were in the lead roles. In Calcutta, Mazhar Khan worked mostly in the films produced by East India Film Corporation. During his Calcutta period (1932-37), he worked in around 20 films.

In 1938, Mazhar Khan, returned to Bombay (Mumbai) and joined Ranjit Movietone. He worked in ‘Rickshawala’ (1938), ‘Prof. Waman Msc’ (1938) ‘Ghazi Salauddin’ (1939) and ‘Achhoot’ (1940). He turned free-lancer and worked in Minerva Movietone’s ‘Bharosa’ (1940), CIRCO’s ‘Suhag’ (1940), Fazli Brothers’ ‘Maasoom’ (1941) and Great India Pictures’ ‘Akela’ (1941) among others.

Mazhar Khan got a role of his life time in ‘Padosi’ (1941) when director V Shantaram selected him for the role of Thakur among the many stalwarts who were vying for the role.

In 1942, he turned producer-director with his fist film ‘Meri Duniya’ (1942) under the banner of Mazhar Art Productions. This was followed by ‘Yaad’ (1942), ‘Badi Baat’ (1944), ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945) , ‘Sona’ (1948) and ‘Dil Ki Duniya’ (1949). However, he continued to work as actor in the films of other banners. In all, he worked in about 50 talkies during 1931 to 1950. His last film as an actor was ‘Usha Kiran’ (1953).

I have flipped through many pages of ‘Filmindia’ from 1937 to 1949 and can say that Mazhar Khan was one of the few actors whose name and pictures appeared quite often because of the varieties of roles he played in the films. He was a versatile actor capable of donning any roles. I have seen some of the images of his roles in the films which had no bearing on his real look. Seeing these images, one can say that Mazhar Khan was a master of make-up to portray the roles of diverse nature. I have a feeling that Pran may have got the inspiration from Mazhar Khan to have different set of make-up to create a lasting impression of his roles on the audience.

I had no clue as to how Mazhar Khan looked in real life until I saw a picture of him with his family on ‘Filmindia’ while on a picnic to Matheran. Mazhar Khan did not have a great height – more like the present day Khans – Salman, Amir and Shahrukh except that he was a hefty man. And this may be reason that he rarely got to play the romantic hero’s role though he had lead roles in most of the films.

One of the ambitions of Mazhar Khan was to set up his own studio. But his ambition remained unfulfilled. On September 24, 1950, he suddenly passed away at the age of 45.

Mazhar Khan was a broad-minded person. He married a Hindu girl and gave her freedom to follow her own religion and ceremonies in the house. He had a wish to produce a Muslim social film showing the Muslim home life in true perspective which, according to him, was a Hindu-Muslim cultural mix. But he was afraid of the fundamentalists who often resorted to blackmailing producers of such films. Later he did produced and directed a Muslim social film, ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945) which was a box office success.

Sami, one of the commentators on the blog, had seen the film ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945) on Doordarshan sometime in 1974. He has given a brief story of the film:

It is an excellent movie with a tragic story involving Munawar Sultana, Veena and Motilal. The story is about two Pathan families in which there are two brothers living as neighbours. Their daughters, Munawar Sultana and Veena are so fond of each other that they feel more of sisters than cousins. An engagement gets arranged between Motilal (son of a nawab) and Veena. When Motilal comes to see Veena, by chance, he sees Munawar Sultana in the house. He changes his mind and insists on breaking off the engagement with Veena. He proposes for Munawar Sultan thereby creating a big rift between the two close families.

Towards of end of the film, Munawwar Sultana drinks poison to end her life fearing that her father would kill her for the family honour. Her death unites the warring families and Motilal marries Veena, the original bride.

Out of 10 songs of the film, 6 songs have been covered in the Blog. Today, I am presenting the 7th song ‘Dil Ko Samjhaaye Huye’ written by Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri and set to music by Anil Biswas. As per Sami who had seen the movie, the song is picturised on Praveen Paul for whom this was her debut film along with Munawwar Sultana.

The playback singer of the song is not known. But the mp3 clip of the song which I used for making the video of the song has given the name as Roshan Ara. I do not know whether it is the name of the character Praveen Paul plays in the film or Roshanara Begum, the classical singer who had sung in the films like ‘Humjoli’ (1946) and ‘Jugnu’ (1947).
Whoever has sung the song has got a powerful trained voice.


Song – Dil Ko Samjhaaye Huye (Pehli Nazar) (1945) Singer – Unidentified Female Voice, Lyrics – Safdar ‘Aah’ Sitapuri, MD – Anil Biswas

Lyrics

dil ko samjhaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
laakh machalen armaan
laakh machalen armaan
unko behalaaye huye
dil ko samjhaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye

nadi ke beech mein
nadi ke beech mein
kashti hai bas bedaar ho jaao
nadi ke beech mein
jawaani ban ke toofaan
aayi hain hoshiyaa..aar
hoshiyaar ho jaao
jawaani ban ke toofaan
aayi hain hoshiyaar
hoshiyaar ho jaao
nadi ke beech mein
kashti hai bas bedaar ho jaao
nadi ke beech mein
hosh mein aaye huye ae
hosh mein aaye huye
laakh machalen armaan
laakh machalen armaan
unko behalaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye

samajhte  hain  aen
samjhaten hain mohobbat ka chalan
jaanbaaz parwaane
samajhte hain
balaa se khaak hon jal kar
balaa se khaak hon jal kar
na koi raaz e dil jaane
na koi raaz e dil jaane
sab sharmaaye huye
sab sharmaaye huye
laakh machalen armaan
laakh machalen armaan
unko behalaaye huye
dil ko samjhaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
लाख मचलें अरमां
लाख मचलें अरमां
उनको बहलाए हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये

नदी के बीच में
नदी के बीच में
कश्ती है बस बेदार हो जाओ
नदी के बीच में
जवानी बन के तूफान
आई है होशिया॰॰आर
होशियार हो जाओ
जवानी बन के तूफान
आई है होशियार
होशियार हो जाओ
नदी के बीच में
कश्ती है बस बेदार हो जाओ
नदी के बीच में
होश में आए हुये॰॰ए
होश में आए हुये
लाख मचलें अरमां
लाख मचलें अरमां
उनको बहलाए हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये

समझते हैं॰॰एं
समझते हैं मोहब्बत का चलन
जाँबाज़ परवाने
समझते हैं॰॰एं
बला से खाक हों जल कर
बला से खाक हों जल कर
ना कोई राज़ ए दिल जाने
ना कोई राज़ ए दिल जाने
सब शरमाये हुये
सब शरमाये हुये
लाख मचलें अरमां
लाख मचलें अरमां
उनको बहलाए हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये

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5 Responses to "Dil Ko Samjhaaye Huye"

Sadanand ji,

Thanks for the bio sketch on Mazhar Khan. Your articles, such as the one today, are very enriching.

Yes, the names of singers in some cases are a doubtful discussion. In the absence of specific information even in HFGK, it becomes difficult to identify the artists with certainty.

And then our friend, Sami, informs that the song is sung by Praveen Paul on screen. If i had not read that comment, in my mind I would have thought of Munawwar Sultana as the on screen performer, given the words in the song, and storyline as described.

I will try to explore this further, and give an update if I am able to find some specific information.

Rgds
Sudhir

Sadanandbhai,
The voice and the style seems to be that of Roshan Ara Begum of ‘Jugnu’ fame.
Very melodious song by Roshan Ara and Anil Biswas.

Bharatbhai,

What a co-incidence! For the video of the song, I have given the name of the singer as ‘Roshanara Begum??’ only after listening to her song of Jugnu’ (1947).

But her song in ‘Humjoli’ (1946) did not give me the satisfaction of calling more or less the same voice. So I refrained from naming her the singer for the article.

Sadanand ji,
As per Harish Raghuwanshi ji’s Gujarati book ” Inhe na bhulana ”
Mazhar khan ,in his film Night Bird-34 aka Raat ka Raja aka Nishachar, had done 8 roles in this film.
The multiple roles ( 8) were earlier done by Ruby Myers (Sulochana) in her Silent film ‘ Wild cat of Bombay “-27. This was remade as ” Bombay ki billi”-36 as a Talkie and she did those 8 roles again in this version.
But for Talkie films, Mazhar khan becomes the First actor to do multiple roles ( 8) in one film.
Not many people know these details.
-AD

Thanks Arun ji for the information which I did not know.

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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