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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Master Krishna Rao


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3719 Post No. : 14653

When ‘Bawarchi ‘ was released in 1972, I had seen it on the big screen in the theatre with family. In this film, Hrishikesh Mukherji has woven a remarkable story of a joint family and their interesting interactions. The head of the family (a widower), his three sons, two daughters in law, third son still a bachelor, and three children. The roles of the two daughters in law were played by Durga Khote and Usha Kiran. Being quite un-exposed to cinema otherwise (it was school years for me) I was quite unfamiliar with these two ladies when I saw this film for the first time.

I was later to recall these two senior actresses, when I would get to see their earlier, older films. The first such re-introduction was when I saw ‘Mughal-e-Azam’ (1960) on TV for the first time. Then I came to recognize Durga Khote in her role as Jodha Bai, and connected her with her role in ‘Baawarchi’. The two films had a difference of 12 years, and decidedly, she is looking much younger and sweeter in her role as Badi Maa in ‘Baawarchi’, compared to her royal appearance as the empress of India and wife of Emperor Akbar. One scene (from ‘Baawarchi’) that really amazed me and mesmerized me, is the family song situation from an early morning impromptu get together of the family members – “Bhor Aayee Gaya Andhiyaara”. During the course of this song, the two supposedly middle aged daughters in law perform the rapid pace thaap steps dance to the rapid taal – “dhiga tum naa naa naa naa naa” being rendered by the family help Raghu (role played by Rajesh Khanna). It was a real wonder to see the two ladies perform that sequence. A quick check reminded me that Durga Khote was, goodness, 67 years of age, when she performed in ‘Bawarchi’.

Remembering Durga Khote on the anniversary of her passing away (22nd September).

The first and the top most lady luminary of the Hindi cinema, Durga Khote was born on 14th January, 1905, in a well­ known family of Bombay. The family hailed from Goa and spoke Konkani at home. Her mother’s name was Manjulabai. Her father, Pandurang Shamrao Laud, was a famous lawyer and her brother was also a well known barrister. The young Vita Laud (her maiden before marriage) was educated, like her siblings, at Cathedral High School and St. Xavier’s College from where she did her B.A. While still in college, she was married into the Khote family, graduated and settled down with her husband. By the age of 26, she was a widowed mother of two sons – Bakul and Harin.

Into this scenario, and a life of a very traditional family, plopped in something utterly new – the world of cinema. Durga Khote wanted to work to support her children. In doing so, she became a pioneer of sorts. It was a time when the film industry was regarded as the preserve of the base and the bawdy. Also, most of the female characters were played by men at the time.

It all came about through her sister Shalini, also married and having amongst her circle of friends, a gentleman by the name JBH Wadia. At the time JBH was working with Mohan Bhavnani as the latter’s assistant. The talkies had just made their appearance on the silver screen. Bhavnani who had just made a picture, wanted to give it the box office appeal of a “talkie” ending. The picture starred Mrs. Bhavnani and her husband was  looking out for a girl who would feature with his wife in the climax scenes of the film. Approached by JBH, Shalini refused. But knowing Durga as a person who would try anything once, she recommended her. Durga was ready to have a go at the part, accepted the role and went off to the studios the same day. Mr. Bhavnani’s heterogeneous production was soon completed, printed and made ready for release.

The film flopped. And for the beautiful young housewife and mother there followed a period of embarrassment at being connected with a filmy disaster. The film was ‘Farebi Jaal’ (also titled as ‘Trapped’ in English). “That is just how I felt when I saw it. It was a terrible film,” Durga Khote recalls in an earlier interview. She goes on to say that, “. . . my position was more than awkward. I had suddenly achieved a fair measure of notoriety. I just couldn’t walk around in Girgaum without people pointing at me.”

Looking back on it she laughed at the by-gone crisis. Through all this turmoil and unease there was one solid consolation: both the Laud and the Khote families were far too intelligent and sophisticated to be worried by the affair. On the contrary “My families stood up for me” declared Durga Khote with a proud smile of affection.

Amongst those who saw the film ‘Trapped’, was the then up and coming producer and director V Shantaram. After seeing her performance, he offered her the female lead role of Taramati in the bilingual film ‘Ayodhyache Raaja’ – ‘Ayodhya Ka Raja’ (1932). Durga Khote saw in it an opportunity to vindicate herself. Once again encouraged by the families, she accepted the role and played it beautifully. The film was not only good but a big hit, in both the Hindi and Marathi versions.

V Shantaram simultaneously cast her also in ‘Maya Machhindra’ (again 1932). This was a also a smash hit. These two top successful films established her straight off as a top star. Following came a number of films that won her acclaim from the public and from the film industry. After the two fabulous successes in 1932, what followed is no less dazzling a repertoire of well known films and famous roles.

In 1933, she appeared opposite to Prithviraj Kapoor in the New Theatres Production from Calcutta – ‘Raajrani Meera’. This year also saw her play the lead role opposite to a very young and handsome new entrant into the industry – P Jairaj, in the film ‘Patit Paavan’ (Pratima Phototone, Bombay).

1934, and she is paired opposite to Prithviraj once again in ‘Seeta’, from East India Film Company in Calcutta.

1935, another production from New Theatres – ‘After The Earthquake’, as the female lead opposite to Syed Mohammed Nawab. And once again, paired with Jairaj in ‘Jeevan Natak’ – a Debaki Bose Production in Bombay.

In 1936 came one of her many superlative roles on the screen – ‘Amar Jyoti’ from the production house of Prabhat, with co stars Chandramohan, Vasanti and B Nandrekar.

She played the lead role in ‘Pratibha’ in 1937, opposite to Master Shyam; film by Shalini Cinetone.

1938, and she appeared in two films – ‘Nand Kumar’ (Jaishree Films), working with Govindrao Tembe and ‘Saathi’ from Natraj Films, paired with Mubarak – another popular hero of that era.

1939 saw her appearing with Prithviraj once again in the Ranjeet Studios production – ‘Adhoori Kahaani’.

In 1940 it is Chandramohan and the film is ‘Geeta’ from Circo Productions. Also in 1940 came the famous and popular hit film, ‘Narsi Bhagat’ working with Vishnupant Pagnis.

1941 and it is ‘Charnon Ki Daasi’ from Atre Pictures, paired with Gajanan Jagirdar.

In 1942, she appeared in 2 films, ‘Bharat Milap’ of Prakash Pictures, with co stars Prem Adeeb, Shahu Modak and Shobhana Samarth; and in ‘Vijay’ from National Studios, opposite to Harish.

1943 turned out to be a blockbuster year for her, appearing in the lead role in six films. She was seen in ‘Qurbani’ opposite to Ishwar Lal, ‘Mahasati Anusuya’ with Shahu Modak, E Billimoria and Shobhana Samarth; ‘Mahatama Vidur’ with Vishnupant Pagnis; ‘Tasveer’ – paired with the young newcomer Motilal; and ‘Zameen’, paired with Biswas. The listing for 1943 is complete only when we talk about the mega film from Minerva Movietone – ‘Prithvi Vallabh’ in which she is paired with Sohrab Modi.

In 1944, it is ‘Maharathi Karn’ paired with Prithviraj Kapoor once again, and ‘Dil Ki Baat’ a romantic social, working opposite to Ishwar Lal.

In 1945, it is ‘Lakahrani’ from Prabhat, working opposite to Sapru; ‘Panna Dai’ working with Chandramohan and Mubarak; and ‘Veer Kunal’ with Mubarak, Kishore Sahu and Shobhana Samarth.

In 1945, we also see a major qualitative shift in her career. She stepped away from lead roles and very gracefully migrated towards support roles as a character artist. ‘Village Girl’ was probably the first such film, in which she does not play the lead role. But her films and her roles continue to be significant and powerful.  She had already stated to play non-romantic lead roles in films like ‘Charnon Ki Daasi’ (1941) and ‘Bharat Milap’ (1942). Her filmography beyond 1945 speaks volumes of her prowess as an actress, and her ability to command the scenes, and the films. Moving to character roles, her assignments continue to increase, and she continued to be a busy and an in demand artist for another almost four decades. During her career, she has appeared in more than 200 films.

A special mentions needs to be made of the 1953 film ‘Chacha Chaudhry’ – a comedienne performance which took the industry and the public by storm. The brilliant timing of her expression, gestures, movement and dialogue combined to make that role such a scintillating comedy portrayal that she all but stole the picture from the consummate actor Raja Paranjpe – who doubled as director and lead player – and Dhumal. The three of them made it a slick, hilarious romp.

Durga Khote’s portrayals have been sensitive and consummate. Notable mentions must be made of some of her performances;

as Queen Kaikeyi in the 1942 film ‘Bharat Milap, jealously coveting the throne for her own son – her personification of the grasping queen made one understand if not quite condone the old king’s doting weakness;

as Shachi Devi, mother of Chaitanuya Mahaprabu in the 1953 biopic ‘Shri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu’ – a heart-rending performance of a mother torn between her love for her son and the gratification she feels in his single-minded devotion to God, and her heartbreak for his bewildered, forsaken girl-bride, and her gradual resignation, made for a portrayal which was a gem of histrionic art;

as Jodha Bai, the empress of India, wife of Akbar – once again called upon to make a dreadful choice of loyalties, torn between the warring father and son – at first unable to invoke the blessings for her husband leaving for the battlefield, with the certainty of the fear that her son will be killed, and then when Akbar challenges her by attempting to erase the sindoor from her forehead, very sternly and studiously she performs the pooja giving the due honor to her suhaag even in the face of an eventuality of possibly losing her only child.

These and many other such power packed performances have made Durga Khote the dame thespian of the Indian cinema. She was honored with the Padam Shri award in 1968 and the coveted Dada Saheb Phalke Award in 1983.

In 1950, Durga Khote naturally gravitated towards the stage and she joined the Marathi Sahitya Sangh, starting her long association with the theatre also. She kept busy acting in, producing and directing plays. She also founded Durga Khote Productions which produced short films – advertising, documentary, educational and industrial.

She continued to be active both in films and in theatre till the mid 1980s. After that, she moved into semi-retirement. She passed away this day, in 1991, in Bombay.

The film ‘Amar Jyoti’ has been acclaimed as a film much, much ahead of its time, both in terms of handling of the subject matter as well as in terms of technical finesse and special effects. The film represented India in the Venice film festival in 1937 and won praises and accolades as one of the best three films at the festival.

The film deals with the theme of suppression and negation of the role of the woman in the society, and one lady’s rebellion against it. As a subject, this was a daring endeavor by V Shantaram, given the prevalent sentiments in the society of that era. Nevertheless, this film was much acclaimed and became very popular at the box office too. Since the story revolves around pirates, scenes related to sailing ships and ships in conflict, it was a major accomplishment for the director, to be able to create the necessary environment within the studio, and film all the naval scenes using advanced special effects techniques, within the confines of the studio itself.

The film pertains to an undefined historical period. A queen (role played by Karuna Devi) and her cruel minister Durjay (role played by Chandramohan) are challenged by a woman turning a pirate and terrorizing the coastal provinces of the kingdom. This woman, Saudamini (role played by Durga Khote), has been much wronged by her husband. But when she pleads for justice from the royal court, Durjay decrees that a husband was the complete master of his wife, whom he could ill-treat, use as a chattel or dispose of as a slave. She is denied custody of her son by the queen, after she refuses to return to her matrimonial home. This greatly enrages Saudamini and drives her to revolt and seek revenge. She takes on the mantle of a male role and gets into a commanding position, as the captain of a pirate ship. She is assisted by her associate, Rekha (role played by Vasanti).

Durjay is captured and is kept as a prisoner with one of his legs cut off, to make him realize the eternally enslaved condition of women. Her next big catch is the princess Nandini (role played by Shanta Apte), the queen’s daughter. In her relationship with the princess, Saudamini plays an even bigger game by converting the princess to her creed of female emancipation, which considers love and marriage as a bondage. The princess suppresses her feelings for a shepherd boy, Sudhir (role played by B Nandrekar), whom she had met during her days in the pirate’s den. Unknown to even Saudamini, this shepherd boy is actually her own son, who was separated from her years ago.

In the continued sequence of events, Durjaya escapes with the help of Sudhir and returns to arrest Saudamini. Saudamini is captured, but the others, along with Nandini and Rekha, escape. It is finally revealed that Sudhir is Saudamini’s long-lost son. Nandini and Sudhir are married and Rekha carries forward Saudamini’s legacy.

Shantaram has used the symbol of the lamp and the flame very effectively. He deployed many other techniques that were considered path-breaking at that time. The film’s real success is in bringing out the inner conflicts of women, who may become male-like rebels, at the cost of suppressing their natural urges as wife or mother. In one of the most moving scenes in the film, we see Saudamini secretly fondling the tiny garments of her son, who has been separated from her.

In this song, we see this brief interlude, as Saudamini is remembering her child. The brief song is written by Pt Narottam Vyas, and the music is composed by Master Krishna Rao Phumblikar. The playback singing voice is that of Vasanti.

Remembering and honoring the enduring legacy of this fine actress – Durga Khote.

[Author’s Note: Acknowledgements – This article has adapted material from online sources viz., Cineplot and Wikipedia. Filmography details have been prepared using the Geet Kosh voumes 1 and 2.]

Song – Ankhiyan Ke Tum Taare Pyaare (Amar Jyoti) (1936) Singer – Vasanti, Lyrics – Pt Narottam Vyas, MD – Master Krishna Rao
Durga Khote

Lyrics

akhiyan ke tum taare pyaare
chhod mohey mat jaa re
ab mat jaa re

akhiyan ke tum taare pyaare
chhod mohey mat jaa re
ab mat jaa re

[sudhir. . .]
[main teri maa. . .]

akhiyan ke tum taare pyaare
chhod mohey mat jaa re
ab mat jaa re

aansoo nainan mein se

aansoo nainan mein se
aansoo nainan mein se
kaahu tohey pukaarun
kaahu tohey pukaarun
waaroon sukh dukh saare
waaroon sukh dukh saare
waaroon sukh dukh saare

akhiyan ke tum taare pyaare
chhod mohey mat jaa re
ab mat jaa re

[ab mat jaa re]

———————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–

अखियन के तुम तारे प्यारे
छोड़ मोहे मत जा रे
अब मत जा रे

अखियन के तुम तारे प्यारे
छोड़ मोहे मत जा रे
अब मत जा रे

[सुधीर॰ ॰ ॰]
[मैं तेरी माँ॰ ॰ ॰]

अखियन के तुम तारे प्यारे
छोड़ मोहे मत जा रे
अब मत जा रे

आँसू नैनन में से

आँसू नैनन में से
आँसू नैनन में से
काहू तोहे पुकारूँ
काहू तोहे पुकारूँ
वारूँ सुख दुख सारे
वारूँ सुख दुख सारे
वारूँ सुख दुख सारे

अखियन के तुम तारे प्यारे
छोड़ मोहे मत जा रे
अब मत जा रे

[अब मत जा रे]

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This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing law.

Today’s song is from a rare and less known film ‘Lakharani’ from 1945.

Although this was a film made by the great Prabhat Film Company of Poona, unlike earlier Prabhat films this movie never became famous or a landmark film. The reasons were many. The main reason was that it was was made in the period when the company had become very weak after V Shantaram left Prabhat Studios along with some of his chosen people from various departments. Secondly, the storyline of this film was far away from the type of films Prabhat had made in the past. True to its tradition, however, the film had a central theme of “open entry for all castes into Hindu temples“. But it was told through a story of tribal folks and allied jungle people, with whom probably, the audience could not  identify themselves.

Thirdly, the songs and music of this film was below average. The music director, Master Krishnarao Phulambrikar (1891-1974) had a reputation of being an Orthodox Sangeet Natak classicist. His songs never became popular except perhaps the multi-language song of Shanta Hublikar in the film ‘Aadmi’ (1939) (‘Manoos’ in Marathi). Even his contemporary Keshvrao Bhole gave more popular songs. His only film giving good music was Rajkamal’s ‘Mali’ (1944), wherein he himself was the hero opposite Ameerbai Karnataki.

The film was directed by Vishram Bedekar – more famous as a playwright and a script writer. His scripts used to be quite complex. He wrote the story of ‘Lakharani’, in addition to directing it. Vishram Bedekar (b. 1906), Marathi and Hindi film director, best known as a writer, was born in Amravati, Eastern Maharashtra. He started his career with the Sangeet Natak company Balwant Sangeet Mandali as a playwright-lyricist. From there, he moved to film-making when the theatre group expanded its box-office draw by producing ‘Krishnarjun Yuddha’, starring the group’s writer-actor Chintamanrao Kolhatkar. Unlike other films produced by Sangeet Natak companies (e.g. Lalitkaladarsh), the film succeeded commercially and he co-directed three more with the group’s owner-producer Vamanrao N Bhatt. He scripted the mythological ‘Pundalik’ (1936) and, according to his autobiography, he also co-directed the film with VN Bhatt.

He briefly studied film-making in the UK in 1938. In that same year, he published his first novel, ‘Ranangan’  on his return to India. He joined Prabhat Studios briefly to write Shantaram’s ‘Shejari’ / ‘Padosi’ (1941). In 1944, he returned to the studio to script ‘Ramshastri’, a re-edited version of which, credited to him, was later released as a children’s film entitled ‘Ramshastri Ka Nyay’. In 1945, he directed ‘Lakharani’ which incidentally is Guru Dutt’s début film. He went on to make classic melodramas for Baburao Pendharkar’s New Huns, Baburao Pai’s Famous Pics and Minerva Movietone. He wrote the script for Shantaram’s ‘Amar Bhoopali’ (1951). Later he directed the early productions of Ramsay Brothers, viz. ‘Rustom Sohrab’ (1963) and ‘Ek Nannhi Munni Ladki Thi’ (1970).

Vishram Bedekar worked in modernist frame defined by K Narayan Kale’s generation and GB Shaw. Most of his literary and film works recast stereotypes of pre-WW I Marathi social reform novels into the declamatory style of prose melodrama with increasingly complex storylines. As a playwright, his works include ‘Brahmakumari’, ‘Vaje Paool Apule’ and ‘Tilak Ani Agarkar’ (1980). In 1985, he published his autobiography – ‘Ek Jhaad Ani Don Pakshi’.
(Note: The above bio sketch of Vishram Bedekar is adapted from Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema.)

‘Lakharani’ is important for one reason – Guru Dutt made his acting debut with this film. Guru Dutt (9-7-1925 to 10-10-1964) did the role of Lachman, brother of the heroine Lakharani, in this film. After doing a basic course in dancing from the dance academy of the famous dancer Uday Shanker, in Almora, he joined Prabhat Studios as a choreographer. However, in his first film he was only an actor and an assistant director to Vishram Bedekar. In his second film ‘ Hum Ek Hain’ (1946), he worked as the choreographer and as an assistant to PL Santoshi, the debutant director of the film. Later he was assistant director to Anadinath Bannerjee for the film ‘Mohan’ (1947), to Amiya Chakravarty for the film ‘Girls School’ (1949) and to Gyan Mukherjee for the film ‘Sangram’ (1950). His first stint as an independent director came with iconic film ‘Baazi’ (1951).

Another actor Ramsingh had a major role in the film ‘Lakharani’. Earlier he had done a small role in the film ‘Ramshastri’ (1944). Ramsingh’s name is not very famous or well known, but in his times, he appeared as a hero and also in villain’s role in many films. Information about him was not available anywhere on the internet till today. For the first time, this information is appearing here today. His entry in films and his life story makes a very interesting read.

During the 1942 ‘Quit India’ movement, there was a riot in Allahabad. Police opened fire and along with several other people, Secretary of All University Students Union also was killed. Fearing a backlash from college students, the Government closed down all colleges and vacated the hostels. As a result of this, two persons became homeless. One was Ramchandra Thakur – later to become famous as Kavi Pradeep; and the other was Ramsingh – who became an actor.

After the riots, instead of informing his family about his welfare, Ramsingh left for Bombay and then went on to Poona, to become an actor. He was tall, fair and handsome. V Shantaram hired him as an assistant in the studio. Because he never returned home, his family thought that he must have been killed in the riots and grieved.

One day one of the villagers came to their house and told excitedly, that he had seen a Hindi film and in that film, an actor looked exactly like Ramsingh. The family went to the town and saw the film. Lo and behold ! there he was. Looking just like Ramsingh. Anxiously a group of elders reached Prabhat Studio in Poona and enquired. The officials brought them face to face with their own son – Ramsingh !! Everyone was happy. It seems he did not contact his household just to avoid the police investigations, as he too was an active participant in the agitation.

Ramsingh was born into a rich zamindar family of village Ishanpur in Pratapgarh (UP), in 1920. After graduating, while still doing his MA, he joined films. His first film was ‘Ramshastri’ (1944), then came ‘Chand’ (1944), ‘Lakhrani’ (1945) and ‘Hum Ek Hain (1946) – all Prabhat films. While with Prabhat Studios, he became friendly with Dev Anand and Guru Dutt. In his later years, they would give him a role in almost every film they made.

In his other films, Ramsingh worked with heroine Ranjit Kumari (real name Ranjit Kaur), to whom he got married later on. He was already married while in school and also had 3 children from his first wife. From the second marriage he got 4 children.

Ramsingh played hero, villain and character roles in 69 films. Some of his notable films, besides the four films from Prabhat Studios are, ‘Gaon’ (1947), ‘Shaheed’ (1948), ‘Khidki’ (1949), ‘Aparadhi’ (1950) – he was the hero, opposite to Madhubala, ‘Sargam’ (1950), ‘Sangram’ (1950), ‘Shrimati ji’ (1952),  ‘Jaal’ (1952), ‘Baaz’ (1953) etc. In the latter part of his career, he only got insignificant roles in B and C grade films and mythologicals. His last films were ‘Sati Sulochana’ (1969), ‘Veer Chhatrasaal’ (1971) and ‘Mere Bhaiya’ (1972); the last two being released after he retired from films.

When film ‘Jaal’ (1952) was imported into West Pakistan (on the East Pakistan quota), the Pak film industry started an agitation against Indian films, demanding a total ban on Indian films in Pakistan, as they believed the Indian films were killing their business. Leader of this agitation was WZ Ahmed, once a successful director/producer in India (from the erstwhile Shalimar Films of Poona and the mentor and husband of actress Neena). Consequently, Indian films were banned in Pakistan, at a later stage.

Ramsingh returned to his native place with Ranjit Kumari and children in 1970 and started doing agriculture. The then UP Chief Minister HN Bahuguna was his classmate and a very good friend. Ramsingh approached him. To help him, Bahuguna established the UP Film Corporation and made Ramsingh its chairman. However, due to political turmoil in the country, Bahuguna left congress and joined the off shoot party Congress For Democracy, against Indira Gandhi. As a result the film corporation was wound up and Ramsingh returned to the agriculture business again. He started drinking heavily, against medical advise and died in 1984, in his village.
(Note: The above bio sketch of Ramsingh is adapted with thanks, from Javed Hamid’s forthcoming book ‘हिन्दी सिनेमा के कुछ जाने अंजाने फनकार’.)

The spelling of film title – ‘Lakharani’, was an enigma. In many places, including the Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, the film is spelt as LAKHRANI, while the HFGK says LAKHARANI. To get the correct information, I wrote to Shri Harmandir Singh ji. He promptly sent me a copy of the film booklet and confirmed that the correct name is LAKHARANI only. Thanks, Hamraz ji. The cast of the film is Durga Khote, Monica Desai, Azuri, Sapru, Ramsingh, Guru Dutt, etc. The story of this film is,

Bichwa (Durga Khote) is the queen of a devout untouchable community, which is not permitted to enter any temple. Her daughter Lakharani marries the prince from a community of atheists and hence is excommunicated by her own tribe.The devout group has their devotion tested by economic setbacks and a major conflict erupts between them and the atheists’ community. But God materialises on earth, thus solving the problems of belief and its attendant conflicts. Untouchability is abolished and they all can enter temples and worship also.

The film has 6 songs. Though the record numbers are given by HFGK, the name of singers is not mentioned for any song. The lyricist is Qamar Jalaalabaadi and the composer is Master Krishnarao Phulambrikar. No songs were found on the net or the You Tube, so I turned to our in-house collector, Sudhir ji. He promptly informed me that he has 4 songs of this film. On my request he not only sent me 2 songs, but also uploaded today’s song on my request. Thank you Sudhir ji, you are a great help indeed.

Lakharani makes her debut on this Blog today. Enjoy its first ever song. . .

(Ed Note: The title line of this song is modified, after listening to the song. In the Geet Kosh, this song corresponds to the song at sl. no. 6, which is listed as “Ab Moti Giraane Lagi Saawan Ki Ghataayen”. After listening to the song, it is observed that the refrain “Ik Gori Ki Aankhon Se. . .” is repeated after each antaraa, and is the more appropriate title line for the song.)


Song – Ik Gori Ki Aankhon Se Mujhe Pyaar Hua Hai (Lakharani) (1945) Singer -Unidentified Male Voice, Unidentified Female Voice, Lyrics – Qamar Jalaalabaadi, MD – Master Krishna Rao
Unidentified Male + Female Voices
Female Chorus

Lyrics 

ab moti giraane lagi saawan ki ghataayen
bagiya mein bikharne lagi bulbul ki sadaayen

ha ha ha haha

khilne ke liye phool bhi taiyaar hua hai
khilne ke liye phool bhi taiyaar hua hai
mujhe pyaar hua hai
mujhe pyaar hua hai

ik gori ki aankhon se mujhe pyaar hua hai
mujhe pyaar hua hai
sunder meri aashaon ka sansaar hua hai
mujhe pyaar hua hai

o koel duniya ko sunaao ye fasaana
o panchhio gaao meri duniya ko jagaana
o panchhio gaao meri duniya ko jagaana
ab haath pakad haath se iqraar hua hai
mujhe pyaar hua hai
ik gori ki aankhon se mujhe pyaar hua hai
mujhe pyaar hua hai

o gori ki paayal zara jhankaar suna de
ye bhed mere dil ka zamaane ko bataa de..ey..ey
abaad mere phoolon ka sansaar hua hai
mujhe pyaar hua hai
ik gori ki aankhon se mujhe pyaar hua hai
mujhe pyaar hua hai

o nadiya ke lehro ye kinaare ko bata do
toofaan ki maujon ko mera haal suna do..oo..oo
do lehron mein mil jaane ka iqraar hua hai
mujhe pyaar hua hai
ik gori ki aankhon se mujhe pyaar hua hai
mujhe pyaar hua hai

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

अब मोती गिराने लगीं सावन की घटाएँ
बगिया में बिखरने लगीं बुलबुल की सदाएं

हा हा हाहा

खिलने के लिए फूल भी तैयार हुआ है
खिलने के लिए फूल भी तैयार हुआ है
मुझे प्यार हुआ है
मुझे प्यार हुआ है

इक गोरी की आँखों से मुझे प्यार हुआ है
मुझे प्यार हुआ है
सुंदर मेरी आशाओं का संसार हुआ है
मुझे प्यार हुआ है

ओ कोयल दुनिया को सुनाओ ये फसाना
ओ पंछीओ गाओ मेरी दुनिया को जगाना
ओ पंछीओ गाओ मेरी दुनिया को जगाना
अब हाथ पकड़ हाथ से इक़रार हुआ है
मुझे प्यार हुआ है
इक गोरी की आँखों से मुझे प्यार हुआ है
मुझे प्यार हुआ है

ओ गोरी की पायल ज़रा झंकार सुना दे
ये भेद मेरे दिल का ज़माने को सुना दे॰॰ए॰॰ए
आबाद मेरे फूलों का संसार हुआ है
मुझे प्यार हुआ है
इक गोरी की आँखों से मुझे प्यार हुआ है
मुझे प्यार हुआ है

ओ नदिया की लहरों ये किनारे को बता दो
तूफान की मौजों को मेरा हाल सुना दो॰॰ओ॰॰ओ
दो लहरों में मिल जाने का इक़रार हुआ है
मुझे प्यार हुआ है
इक गोरी की आँखों से मुझे प्यार हुआ है
मुझे प्यार हुआ है


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today’s song is from the landmark film ‘Amar Jyoti’ (1936), made by the Prabhat Film company, Poona. It was directed by V Shantaram. It was photographed by his elder brother V Avadhoot and the music was by Master Krishnarao Phulambrikar. All the songs were written by Pandit Narottam Vyas. Today’s song is sung by Vasanti and chorus. The song is also used as a background song few times in the movie since it conveys the essence of the film’s theme- fight against injustice.
Read more on this topic…


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has over 15100 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15175

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Movies with all their songs covered =1176
Total Number of movies covered =4169

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Active for more than 4000 days.

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