Advertisements

Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Diya jalaao jagmag jagmag

Posted on: June 28, 2011


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

The legend of Deepak Raag is inseparable from the story and life of Miyaan Tansen. The entire life of Tansen is the stuff that legend and folk tales are made of.

Born into a Brahmin Gaur family in Satna area, Tansen is reputed to have received his first education in music from the legendary Swami Haridas. After Tansen’s father passed away, he returned home, and spent a phase of his life singing at the Shiv temples in Varanasi. He then moved to Gwalior, where Muhammad Ghaus became his spiritual mentor. After his education at the feet of Muhammad Ghaus, he became the royal musician in the court of the Kings of Gawalior. When his fame reached the Mughal capital, and Akbar heard about him, he desired to have Tansen join his court. There was hesitation on part of the king of Gawalior, but eventually Akbar’s writ prevailed and Tansen moved to the court of the Mughal emperor in Agra. In the detailed form, this history has many interesting episodes, about the prowess and accomplishments of Tansen as a musician and a musicologist. Most of the major gharanas of music in India trace back their lineage to this legendary artist in the court of Akbar. His contribution to the music, and the teaching of music, is stuff that many others would take many lifetimes to accomplish.

This raag and this song is linked to an episode in the history of Akbar’s court. Akbar’s daughter, Mehru’nissa was keeping ill health and no amount of care or cure was bringing any relief to her. At one point, the hakims and the maulavis gave up hope. Mehru’nissa expressed desire to hear the fabled Deepak raag from Tansen. Akbar first ordered and then requested Tansen to sing this raag. Tansen was hesitant, for he knew the consequences of singing this raag, on the singer. But he later acquiesced, and sang this raag in the court. The tradition has it that all the unlit lamps in the palace were lit by themselves. It is also fabled that the princess regained strength and health as a result of this performance. However, the effect on Tansen was devastating, as his body became hot and dry, and no amount of water or liquids could bring relief to him. The cure, as suggested by those who knew music, was that someone who knew the correct rendition of raag Megh Malhaar, and could sing it perfectly, would bring relief to Tansen. As per the legend and the movie, this raag is eventually sung by Taani (the childhood mate of Tansen, played by Khursheed, and the song is ‘Baraso re’). The singing brings relief to Tansen and his health is rejuvenated.

The lyrics of this song are a creation of Pt. Indra, and the composition is by Khemchand Prakash. And there are no words to describe the rendition by the maestro himself. It is to be seen and heard to be believed. As the singing progresses, one can clearly see the amount of concentration and intensity in the face of Tansen (or KL Saigal in reality). And as the crescendo picks up through the song, one can clearly feel a tension rising which is relieved when the lamps get lit by themselves. What a concept, and what a superlative performance, both in the voice and in the presence of the personality. The beauty of KL Saigal’s rendition is that you may hear it many times, and still you want to hear it yet once again. That is the wonder and the depth of his voice.

Enjoy this masterpiece performance by the undisputed monarch of music.


Song-Diyaa jalaao jagmag jagmag (Tansen) (1943) Singer-K L Saigal, Lyrics-Pt Indra Chandra, MD-Khemchand Prakash

Lyrics

din soona sooraj bina
aur chanda bina rain
ghar soona deepak bina
jyoti bina jyoon nain

diyaa jalaao jagmag jagmag
diyaa jalaao jagmag jagmag
diya jalaao
diya jalaao
diya jalaao
diya jalaao
diyaa jalaao jagmag jagmag
diyaa jalaao jagmag jagmag
diya jalaao

saras suhaagan sun reee
saras suhaagan sun reee
eeeee eeee eeeeee
saras suhaagan sun reee

saras suhaagan sun reee
tere mandir mein dekh andheraa
tere mandir mein dekh andheraa
roothh na jaaye piya teraa
roothh na jaaye piya teraa
aaaaa
diya jalaao
diya jalaao
diya jalaao
diya jalaao
piya manaao
diya jalaao
piya manaawo manaawo
jalaao jag mag jag mag
jag mag jag mag
jag mag jag mag
diya jalaao jag mag jag mag
diya jalaao

Advertisements

2 Responses to "Diya jalaao jagmag jagmag"

It is an excellent effort for those who would enjoy the old songs which are ever green

Thanks a lot

There are two versions of this song – one that we hear Saigal singing in the film, and the other that was recorded by him under ideal conditions in a recording studio and released commercially on gramophone records. Of course, the latter is far better than the previous one. In those days, a singer-actor had to sing and act at the same time under garish studio lights. Of course, it told upon the quality of voice of the singer. The same song when recorded in a sound-proof studio under ideal conditions was far better than the one the singer-actor sang while acting in the film.
Technology in those days was still at an elementary stage. It is therefore not difficult to imagine what wonders Saigal could have worked with his golden voice if he had lived today and sung for films.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Advertisements

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2019) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 14900 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3900 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

14994

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1167
Total Number of movies covered =4103

Total visits so far

  • 11,567,397 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,707 other followers

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share

Category of songs

Current Visitors

Archives

Stumble

visitors whereabouts

blogcatalog

Music Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory

blogadda

Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: