Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Aa ja badli ke sang mora jiya doley re

Posted on: January 20, 2013


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

I have experienced this many times, and maybe you too could have experienced the same. The music of his songs has the quality to transport the listener to another place, another time. Just close your eyes and relax – and listen to a song like “Parbaton Ke Pedon Par Shaam Ka Baseraa Hai”(film ‘Shagoon’, 1964). The flowing waves of music will transport the listener to a vista of hills and trees with the sun slowly descending the western horizon. Or the song “Bahaaro, Mera Jeevan Bhi Sanwaaro” (film ‘Aakhri Khat’, 1966). Or the song “Apne Aap Raaton Mein Chilmanein Sarakti Hain” (film ‘Shankar Hussain’, 1976). Or the song “Simti Hui Ye Ghadiyaan” film ‘Chambal Ki Kasam’, 1979). Or the song “Aa Jaa Re Aa Jaa Re O Mere Dilbar Aa Jaa”(film ‘Noorie’, 1979). Or the quintessential gem “Shaam-e-Gham Ki Kasam, Aaj Ghamgeen Hain Hum” film ‘Footpath’, 1953).

All these, and many more songs that have come from the compositions of Khayyaam Sb, have this ethereal dreamlike quality that takes the listener, far faraway, probably to the indistinct dimensions where this music, these songs are actually playing. Probably that place is inside the mind of the composer. What we hear normally are simply the emanating sounds. Khayyaam Sb’s music has the power to carry the listener to the place where this music lives and breathes. And with the eyes closed, one can be there, and actually feel and see the ambience, the weather, the time, and get an actual feel of the soft breeze on your skin, or even a few drops of rain or dew. Just listen to the song “Do Boondein Saawan Ki” film ‘Phir Subah Hogi’, 1958), or the lorie “Mere Chanda Mere Nannhe Tujhe Apne Seene Se Kaise Lagaaun” (film ‘Aakhri Khat’,1966), and one can feel the moisture of the pain in your eyes.

Khayyaam Sb, the master composer, whose career in the film industry now spans well over six decades, and whose music I would characterize as the Music of Velvet. This delicate and insubstantial quality of his music has the staying power across centuries. Listening to the music of ‘Razia Sultan’ (1983) or ‘Umraao Jaan’ (1981), and one feels as if one is listening to the sounds that are many a lifetimes old. The sounds of the songs like “Aayee Zanzeer Ki Jhankaar. . .” and “Dil Cheez Kya Hai Aap Meri Jaan Lijiye” simply do not seem to belong to the here and now. And that is the depth of Khayyaam Sb’s music – it takes one away on a journey to the time and to the places where this music is actually playing.

Such a live manifestation of the ambience and emotions is truly a rare quality, and the composers who have been able to do that, can be counted on fingers (of one and). The pace, the rhythms, the pitch, the tonal quality, all need to come together to accomplish this, and that is the stunning accomplishment Khayyaam Sb makes, with one wonderful film score after another. In a conversation with Nalin ji Shah (film journalist and historian), he describes this epitome of expression achieved in the song “Dil Cheez Kya Hai Aap Meri Jaan Lijiye”. Listening carefully to the lines

kahiye to aasmaan ko
kahiye to aasmaan ko zameen par utaar laayen

The singers voice goes to the highest note at the word ‘aasmaan ko’, and immediately drops to the lowest note with the very next word ‘zameen’. A difficult rendering, but the effect caused is magnificent.

In the film ‘Aakhri Khat’ (1966), producer director Chetan Anand placed a challenge for Khayyaam Sb. The film has very long sequences wherein the child star Bunty is wandering in the streets of Bombay. The edited version is almost 10,000 feet of celluloid film consisting of such shots. There was uncertainty in Chetan Anand’s mind as to how to maintain the emotional contact with the viewers during these sequences, as well as the continuity of narration. And the challenge for Khayyaam Sb was to come up with a background score that will keep the viewer attached to the narrative.

Khayyaam Sb took three months to create the background score, but what he created is almost a piece of magic. The child, the heartless city, the dismissive onlookers, the black and white frame, and the viewer sitting in the hall, all meld in together with this score, and never for a moment does one feel a drag of these sequences. And when HMV published the LP for this film, it put all the songs on one side, and put all the background music tracks on the other side. In the history of film music publication in India, this was the first such publication, wherein the background score is accorded the same importance as the songs.

Ah yes, you guessed it right, we are celebrating the century song for this velvet melody maker on our blog today. 🙂 🙂

Mohammad Zahour Khayyaam Hashmi was born on 18th February, 1927 at a town called Rahon, near Jalandhar in Punjab. From a very young age, his fascinations were literature and music. His ears tuned in to the ‘azaan’ from the mosques, the ‘shabads’ from the Gurudwara and the ‘aartis’ in the nearby temple. And his love of literature was whetted by a very good collection of books belonging to his elder brother. Another elder brother had a transport business in Jalandhar, and on Sunday, the younger siblings would get to visit the city, and maybe watch a film. The young Khayyaam developed a fascination for films, and for KL Saigal in particular, and he dreamt of becoming a singer just like his idol. And at a very impressionable age of 11 years, he ran away from his home to Delhi. In his awareness, Delhi was a big city, and that films were made here. He came to his uncle’s home, and was served with severe reprimand and beating, for running away from home. However, at the intervention of his grandmother, he was allowed to stay in Delhi, and was admitted to a school. Very shortly it became apparent that the young lad was least interested in academics. And eventually the family gave in and agreed to allow him to pursue the vocation he loved. His uncle got in touch with Pt. Amarnath, Pt. Husnlal and Pt. Bhagatram, who were associated with the All India Radio in Delhi. Pt. Husnlal took a liking to this young boy, and took him under his wing.

Khayyaam Sb remembers the affection with which Pt. Husnlal taught him classical music for five years, the most important foundation for his life and his career. Impressed with his performance, Pt. Husnlal sent him to Bombay. In this first stint, his struggles did not bear any fruit, as no one was convinced that a boy so young could be given any serious work. Disheartened, the young man left Bombay and travelled to Lahore. Here he met with the famous music director of that time, GA Chishti, and introduced himself giving reference of Pt. Amarnath and Pt. Husnlal. As he was waiting in the music room of Chishti Sb, something happened. Chishti Sb was preparing a tune, and he was not able to recall an interlude piece that he had just played. To his astonishment, the new young boy immediately sang out the missing interlude piece, precisely and note by note. Chishti Sb was impressed and took him in as an unpaid assistant. The stay with Chishti Sb was very enriching for Khayyaam, and to date, he reveres him as his Guru. But then unable to make ends meet, he eventually decided to return home.

The second world war was happening, and the young lad joined the Army. When the war was over, he took voluntary retirement, and returned to Lahore to continue work with Chishti Sb. During this stay with his Guru, he came in touch with people who would become big names in the industry in subsequent years – BR Chopra, RC Talwar, SD Narang, Wali Sahab, Maheshwari brothers. And he also met with Rahman Verma, another new assistant of Chishti Sb. After a brief sojourn to Calcutta, where Khayyaam got to play a small role in SD Narang’s film ‘Yeh Hai Zindagi’, Khayyaam headed to Bombay once again, accompanied by Rahman Verma. The connections from the earlier years were revived, as he met Pt. Husnlal, Wali Sahab and others in Bombay.

Pt. Husnlal gave him a break as a singer in the film ‘Romeo and Juliet’(1947). Wali Sahab was making ‘Heer Ranjha’ (1948), and he offered the music direction responsibility to Khayyaam and Rahman Verma. Under the advice of his mentors and friends, he assumed the name of Sharma ji. The film ‘Heer Ranjha’ was released with the credits of music direction reading as Sharma ji – Verma ji. After this, Rahman Verma migrated to the newly formed Pakistan. Khayyaam Sb continued to work in Bombay. His next assignment was again a film by Wali Sahab – ‘Biwi’ (1950). And for this film, he composed the iconic “Akele Mein Wo Ghabraate To Honge” rendered by Rafi Sb. The popularity of this song established his credentials in the industry.

The assignments were still few and far between. He shared the music composition for the film ‘Parda’ (1949), ‘Pyaar Ki Baaten’ (1951) and ‘Gul Sanobar’ (1953), sharing the honors with Bulo C Rani for the last two. Jaddan Bai (Nargis’ mother) was very impressed with Khayyaam Sb’s work in ‘Pyaar Ki Baaten’ produced by her. She introduced him to Chandulal Shah of Ranjeet Studios, who was looking for a composer for Ranjit’s next big production ‘Footpath’ (1953). After a couple of meetings, CL Shah agreed to take on Khayyaam Sb as the music director. As one anecdote goes, so far in the two meetings CL Shah had not even asked his name. As the second meeting ended, he asked Khayyaam Sb his name. As advised earlier by Zia Sarhady, director of this film, he gave his full name – Mohammad Zahour Khayyaam Hashmi. CL Shah quipped ‘Ye Bhi Koi Naam Hai’ (you call this a name). And then after a moment’s pause, said, ‘Khayyaam theek hain’. And so Khayyaam Sb reverted to his original name, after having worked in the industry under the assumed name of Sharma ji.

The phenomenal success of “Shaam-e-Gham Ki Kasam” needs no recounting. There is a very interesting story behind the composition of this song. After the films ‘Heer Ranjha’ and ‘Biwi’, Wali Sahab had also assigned one more film to Khayyaam Sb. This film is ‘Putli’ (1950). While discussing one of the tunes that Khayyaam Sb had prepared, Wali Sahab objected to the experimentation with orchestral music that Khayyaam Sb had resorted to, and suggested that he should create melodies like Naushad and Ghulam Haider. A peeved Khayyaam walked out of the meeting and out of the relationship too, saying that he would return only when he could compose like Naushad and Ghulam Haider. That particular melody did not get used in ‘Putli’. When CL Shah wanted to hear a sample composition for the words of “Shaam-e-Gham Ki Kasam”, Khayyaam Sb used the very same tune that had been rejected by Wali Sahab. And the rest, of course, is history.

Khayyaam Sb came into his own after this success. Although the music that he created did not seem to interest many producers, he still went on to create memorable music for one film after another – ‘Dhobi Doctor’ (1954),‘Gul Bahar’ (1954), ‘Tataar Ka Chor’ (1956), and ‘Lala Rookh’ (1958). In 1958 came the significant success of his music in the form of ‘Phir Subah Hogi’ – a Raj Kapoor, Mala Sinha starrer. Despite the preference that Raj Kapoor had for Shankar – Jaikishan, Sahir Ludhianvi prevailed and Raj Kapoor agreed to have Khayyaam Sb in the film. The Muhurat (inauguration ceremony) of this film happened with the recording of the iconic Mukesh-Asha duet “Wo Subah Kabhi To Aayegi”.

At the end of the recording, Asha ji congratulated Khayyaam Sb with the words, “. . .aapki subah to ho gayi” (for you, the day has dawned). There were many offers after the success of ‘Phir Subah Hogi’, but Khayyaam Sb was selective in what he took on. It is said that he was offered to score for ‘Chaudhvin Ka Chand’ (1960) and ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’ (1960), but declined. In case of ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’, he declined the contract because he was expected to use the tunes created by Pakistani qawwaals Fateh Ali and Mubarak Ali.

There is so much more to write about, but this write up seems to have become very long already. Besides the phenomenal and continued success of his films from the 60s through the 2000s, a large body of his work is in the non-film arena. Begum Akhtar, who used to compose her own music, for the first time invited Khayyaam Sb to create music for her album ‘Kalaam-e-Asatzaa’ that includes the all time great creations like “Ae Mohabbat Tere Anjaam Pe Ronaa Aaya” and “Wo Jo Hum Mein Tum Mein Qaraar Thaa”. He has composed for many non-film albums including ‘Portrait of a Genius’ – a collection of Ghalib’s ghazals on his centenary celebrations; ‘This is Mohammed Rafi’ – a string of enchanting non film bhajans and ghazals that contains gems like “Tere Bharose Nandlad”, “Shyam Se Neha Lagaaye”, and “Ghazab Kiya Tere Waade Pe Aitbaar Kiyaa”; ‘I Write, I Recite”– ghazals of Meena Kumari, sung by herself, that includes the iconic “Chand Tanhaa Hai Aasmaan Tanhaa”. Over and above the treasure of film music by him, Khayyaam Sb has to his credit almost 200 non film creations from the pens of various poets and in the voices of various singers. This is a fantastic treasure of gems all by itself.

In his 86th year now, Khayyaam Sb continues to be active. And we wait, for more of the best compositions that still are to come. With a lot of Best Wishes for him.

This song is from the 1954 film ‘Dhobi Doctor’. The film was produced under the banner of Ranjit Movietone and was directed by the legendary Phani Majumdaar. The star cast includes Usha Kiran, Kishore Kumar, Kanhaiyalal, Gautam, Nazirabai, Sumati, Roopa, Mehmood, Malik, Kamlakant, Master Jagdeep, Baby Asha Parekh, Master Arun, Shivraj, Krishnakant, Sharavan Kumar, Sailen Bose, Bhardwaj, Kamalraj, Nigam, Jagdish Narula etc. The seven songs of this film are jointly written by Majrooh Sultanpuri and Sardar Jaafri.

This here is such a cute little song, that has such a humm-able melody. The singing voice is that of Asha Bhosle. The words tell of a young lady in love, thinking of her lover, waiting for him, beseeching him to listen to her call, and return to her. The simple words are crafted so beautifully. The melody is so endearing, it has been a real favorite of mine for many years. After having heard it on radio occasionally, this song was not heard for a very long time till I rediscovered it on the YouTube. A lovely song that I am in love with, and I am sure you will love it too.


Song-Aa ja badli ke sang mora jiyaa doley re (Dhobi Doctor)(1954) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Sardar Jaafri, MD-Khayyam

Lyrics

aa ja badli ke sang mora jiyaa doley re
jiyaa doley re piyaa piyaa boley
badli ke sang mora jiyaa doley re
jiyaa doley re piyaa piyaa boley
ho o o
aaya kaliyon pe rang
hoti mein bhi tere sang
ho o o
aaya kaliyon pe rang
hoti mein bhi tere sang
liye mann mein umang
chalun haule haule re
jiyaa doley re piyaa piyaa boley
badli ke sang mora jiyaa doley re
jiyaa doley re piyaa piyaa boley

chali jaaye na bahaar
mohey tera intezaar
taqoon raah nain pat kholey re
chali jaaye na baha. . . aaa.
. .ar
chali jaaye na bahaar
mohey tera intezaar
taqoon raah nain pat kholey re
aa ja re
aa ja re
aa ja re mann doley
aa ja badli ke sang mora jiyaa doley re
jiyaa doley re piyaa piyaa boley
badli ke sang mora jiyaa doley re
jiyaa doley re piyaa piyaa boley

tu hi mera dildaar
sun ja mann ki pukaar
jiyaa gham ke khaaye hichkoley re
tu hi mera dilda. . .aaa. .ar
tu hi mera dildaar
sun ja mann ki pukaar
jiyaa gham ke khaaye hichkoley re
aa ja re
aa ja re
aa ja re mann doley
aa ja badli ke sang mora jiyaa doley re
jiyaa doley re piyaa piyaa boley
ho o o
aaya kaliyon pe rang
hoti mein bhi tere sang
ho o o
aaya kaliyon pe rang
hoti mein bhi tere sang
liye mann mein umang
chaloon haule haule re
jiyaa doley re piyaa piyaa boley
badli ke sang mora jiyaa doley re
jiyaa doley re piyaa piyaa boley

——————————————————–
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
——————————————————-

आ जा बदली के संग मोरा जिया डोले रे
जिया डोले रे पिया पिया बोले
बदली के संग मोरा जिया डोले रे
जिया डोले रे पिया पिया बोले

होssss
आया कलियों पे रंग
होती मैं भी तेरे संग
होssss ओssss
आया कलियों पे रंग
होती मैं भी तेरे संग
लिए मन में उमंग
चलूँ हौले हौले रे
जिया डोले रे पिया पिया बोले
बदली के संग मोरा जिया डोले रे
जिया डोले रे पिया पिया बोले

चली जाये न बहार
मोहे तेरा इंतज़ार
तकूँ राह नैन पट खोले रे
चली जाये न बहाssssर
चली जाये न बहार
मोहे तेरा इंतज़ार
तकूँ राह नैन पट खोले रे
आ जा रे
आ जा रे
आ जा रे मन डोले रे
आ जा बदली के संग मोरा जिया डोले रे
जिया डोले रे पिया पिया बोले
बदली के संग मोरा जिया डोले रे
जिया डोले रे पिया पिया बोले

तू ही मेरा दिलदार
सुन जा मन की पुकार
जिया ग़म के खाये हिचकोले रे
तू ही मेरा दिलदाssssर
तू ही मेरा दिलदार
सुन जा मन की पुकार
जिया ग़म के खाये हिचकोले रे
आ जा रे
आ जा रे
आ जा रे मन डोले रे
आ जा बदली के संग मोरा जिया डोले रे
जिया डोले रे पिया पिया बोले

होsss ओsss
होssss ओsssss
आया कलियों पे रंग
होती मैं भी तेरे संग
होssss ओssss
आया कलियों पे रंग
होती मैं भी तेरे संग
लिए मन में उमंग
चलूँ हौले हौले रे
जिया डोले रे पिया पिया बोले
बदली के संग मोरा जिया डोले रे
जिया डोले रे पिया पिया बोले

7 Responses to "Aa ja badli ke sang mora jiya doley re"

Sudhir ji,
Thank you for writing about my favourite MD Khayyam.You must have really taken lot of efforts to write so much about him.In fact some of the things I have read for the first time.Nowhere did I find such a detailed article about Khayyam.
In one of the interviews Khayyam gave to Abhijit Desai in the 80s he narrated his first meeting with the Ranjit Boss Chandulal Shah,thus-
” When I got ‘ Footpath’,everyone knew that I had taken the name ‘Sharmaji’ for films.I had an appointment with Zia Sarhadi and Chandulal Shah,the owner of Ranjit-producers of ‘Footpath. Zia saab had already heard my tunes and he had liked my work.This was only a formal meeting.
Sethji was sitting on a big chair. ” unke woh safed bal aur trademark white coat bhi tha”. As soon as he saw me,he shouted at me loudly
“Asli nam kaya hai ? ” he had known about my name Sharmaji and he had felt it was not good.I knew this.So,when he shouted at me,I shouted even louder than him,” Mohammed Zahoor Khayyam Hashmi”
he liked Khayyam out of my full name, and he shouted double than me
” aaj se khayyam likho”.
The meeting ended there only and I came out wiping my sweat. ”
-AD

Like

This is new song not heard ,BUT one more song from
same film same ashaji,is very good,words are AANSU,PIYE
TERI BIRHAN,worth listening and keep in collection,for
master pieces of violin.Really a rare song.

Like

Dear Sudhir,

Thanks for a detailed article on one of my favourites music director Khayyam. You are absolutely right in saying that it is difficult to cover his entire career of over 5 decades and personality in one article.

I guess, Khayyam may be the only music director belonging to the golden era of Hindi film music who made a successful come back in Hindi film industry in mid 70s after he went into ‘hibernation’ for nearly 10 years (1966-75). It is an unique and remarkable achievement for him as during his second inning in Hindi film industry, he did not compromise on his style of composition. He did composed music on an average 2-3 films a year during 1975-90 despite the tough competitions from music directors like R D Burman and Laxmikant-Pyarelal.

In Hindi film industry, the maxim ‘out of sight out of mind’ is very relevant. I feel, Khayyam, despite his ‘hibernation’ in 1966-75 could not have been ignored for long by the Hindi film industry as during this period, he composed many popular NFSs with singers like Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhonsle, Talat Mehmood, Mukesh.

I have yet to figure out what made Begum Akhtar to choose Khayyam over Madan Mohan for composing music for her ghazals in early 70s for a LP. It is a known fact that Madan Mohan, the king of ghazals was a very close friend of Begum Akhtar. Whenever she used to stay in Mumbai, Madan Mohan would go to her place with his harmonium to sing his compositions. Whether Begum Akhtar considered the style of compositions of Khayyam better suited to her type of renditions than that of Madan Mohan is anybody’s guess.

Lastly, in my view, the one among many of Khayyam’s immortal songs that sums up his calibre as a music director is https://atulsongaday.me/2008/10/14/ae-dile-nadaan-aarzoo-kya-hai/

.

Like

This passionate writeup adds to the beauty and quality of this forum.
It took a patient reading for me and when digested felt so much satisfied that the writer deserve great compliments…has really a soft heart and genius mind.

Like

This lengthy write-up on Khayyam Saab whetted my appetite for information on him. WorldSpace radio (when it was broadcasting) had broadcast an interview with him where he spoke about his style of composing. He even wanted to know what kind of dress the characters who sang his song on screen were wearing. My God, he is that that kind of prefectionist!!

Like

Lovely and investigative report.
Few more songs of Dhobi Doctor are: Pihu pihu bole re papihara(Asha); Chandani raato mein chand kaha hai(Kishore); Ek Do Teen Chaar(Premlata, Chandabala, Ashima); Jhilmil Taare Neel Gagan mein(Asha); Taaro se ankhiya milau re(Asha)

Like

Very nice write up! Quite informative & from bottom of heart, Thank you Sudhir ji!

Like

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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