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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Main ek anokhi daali

Posted on: January 5, 2017


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

During the last 15 months or so, I have been concentrating mainly on rare songs from films of 1940s in my articles for the Blog. During this period, I came across some playback singers, music directors and lyricists who were unknown to me. I also got to know about some of the not so famous film production banners. Similarly, I got the opportunity to gather some information on film directors of 1930s and 40s such as Debaki Bose, P C Barua, V Shantaram, A R Kardar, Kishore Sahu, Mehboob Khan, Kidar Sharma etc.

Among the names of the directors which I have listed above, my familiarity with A R Kardar till now was confined only to films like ‘Shahjahan’ (1946), ‘Dard’ (1947), ‘Dillagi’ (1949), ‘Dulari’ (1949), ‘Daastaan’ (1950) and some more films he directed post-1947. The general impression I carried about A R Kardar was that he was a ‘product’ of the 1940s. But in reality, his association with film industry as a producer-director dates back to as early as the silent era. He is regarded as the father of Lahore film industry because he established the first ever film studio in Lahore in 1928 and started producing/directing silent films there. Incidentally, A R Kardar’s step brother, Abdul Hafeez Kardar who played cricket test matches for India before partition and for Pakistan after partition is also regarded as the father figure of the cricket in Pakistan.

Abdur Rashid Kardar (better known as A R Kardar) was born on October 11, 1904 in Lahore in a prosperous family. His father was keen to make him an engineer but the young Kardar, having been bitten by the filmy bug, had different ideas about pursuing a career. After failing in the matriculation examination, Kardar left Lahore and came to Bombay (Mumbai) to pursue a career in the film industry. He met Homi Master of Kohinoor Films who interviewed him and selected him as an actor. However, his stint as an actor lasted just for one day as during his leisure time, he strayed in the studio room probably to know how the film was shot. The cameraman did not like his presence in the studio without his permission. For this breach of discipline, he was dismissed from the employment.

After doing some small acting assignments, Kardar got disillusioned with the way his career was shaping up in Bombay. He returned to Lahore and took up sketching and painting the canvas for the next three years . Kardar got his first real assignment as an actor in a silent film ‘Daughter of Today’ (1928), produced by Pioneering Films, Lahore. Encouraged by the success of this film, he started his own film production company called United Players Corporation. Under his banner, Kardar produced and directed 7 films in the silent era. He directed the first talkie in Punjabi ‘Heer Ranjha’ (1932) which he produced with his partner Hakeem Ram Prasad. But the film failed at the box office.

In 1933, Kardar came to Calcutta (Kolkata) and initially joined East India Film Company as a director. During his Calcutta stint (1933-37), he directed films like ‘Aurat Ka Pyaar’ (1933), ‘Sultana’ (1934), ‘Baghi Sipahi’ (1935), ‘Mandir’ (1937), ‘Milap’ (1937) etc. In 1937, he came back to Bombay and directed ‘Baghbaan’ (1938) for General Film Corporations which became a box office hit. Chandulal Shah took Kardar in Ranjit Movietone as director where he did 3 films – ‘Thokar’ (1939). ‘Holi’ (1940) and ‘Paagal’ (1940). All the three films were box office success.

With success following him films after films, Kardar was hired by National Studios as a director and he did ‘Pooja’ (1940) there which also became a box office hit. Before the expiry of his contract, Kardar left national Studios after the release of ‘Pooja’ (1941) and joined Circo Productions as a director on a monthly salary of Rs.3000/-, a princely sum on those days. However, soon Circo Productions faced financial problems and went into liquidation. Kardar took over the Circo Productions with its studio located in Parel area of Mumbai. During this difficult period, Kardar directed 2 films for Circo – ‘Swami’ (1941) and ‘Nai Duniya’ (1942). The films were stated to be moderately successful at the box office. In the same year, Kardar changed the name of the banner and studios from Circo to Kardar Production and Kardar Studio, respectively.

The first film under the banner of Kardar Productions was ‘Sharda’ (1942). Under this banner, Kardar produced many successful films like ‘Sanjog’ (1943), ‘Kaanoon’ (1943), ‘Pehle Aap’ (1944), ‘Sanyaasi’ (1945), ‘Shahjahan’ (1946), ‘Dard’ (1947), ‘Dulaari’ (1949), ‘Dillagi’ (1949) etc. He also produced films like ‘Daastaan’ (1950), ‘Jaadoo’ (1951) and ‘Yaasmeen’ (1955) in partnership with Naushad under the banner of Musical Pictures Ltd. Most of his films in the 1950s did not fare well on the box office.

In 1958, Kardar announced his ambitious film ‘Dil Diya Dard Liya (1966) with Dilip Kumar and Nutan in lead roles. It appears that the film was beset with problems from the very beginning. Nutan withdrew from the film for some unknown reasons and was replaced by Waheeda Rahman. It is said that Kardar himself was not keeping good health during the making of the film. According to Waheeda Rahman, the film was mostly directed by Dilip Kumar who also did editing work. However, in the film’s credit title, the name of A R Kardar as director was retained. It took about 8 years to complete the film during which time, Kardar was financially ruined. I will not be surprised if one of the reasons for the delay in completing the film may be interference by Dilip Kumar in the film making.

The film did not earn enough money for Kardar to recoup his financial position. With this film, a long and glorious filmy career of A R Kardar virtually came to an end though he did direct one more film ‘Mere Sartaj’ (1975). A R Kardar passed away on November 22, 1989 after a long illness.

SWAAMI (1941) was the first film which A R Kardar directed for Circo Productions. The star cast included Jairaj, Sitara Devi, Yakoob, Jeevan, Radha Rani, Badri Prasad, Rajkumari, Majeed, Ram Autar, S Nazeer etc. The film received a favourable review from ‘Filmindia’, December 1941 issue. The gist of the story of the film is as under:

Binod (Jairaj) and Indira (Sitara Devi) have already married with each other in the childhood. Binod is an adopted child of Seth Moolchand who is still a student in the college. Indira is a spoilt child in the wealthy family of Shanti Sagar who has servants to attend to her whims and fancies.

In the house of Seth Moolchand, a new child is born. The mother of the new born child gives hint to her adopted son Binod that his presence in the house is now superficial. Binod leaves the house to earn his own livelihood and arrives at his wife Indira’ s house to take stock of the situation. Soon he gets disillusioned with his wife’s spoilt notions and goes to a village to earn his livelihood under a local wealthy man.

Indira realises her mistake in sending Binod away from her house. In consultation with her father and the teacher, a plan is made to woo Binod back to her house. She along with her servant visits the village in the guise of beggars and gets themselves installed in Binod’s household. Indira now known as Shanta wins Binod’s love day by day and both fall in love.

In Seth Moolchand’s house, the new born child dies. Once again, Seth Moolchand and his wife are desperate to find Binod. With the help of Shamlal (Yakoob) who was Binod’s classmate in the college, Binod is located and is brought back to the house of Seth Moolchand. Having finished her plan to woo Binod back, Indira also comes back home. All the family members meet at Seth Moolchand’s house and Binod and Indira are reconciled to each other’s goals and aspirations.

As can be observed, there is nothing much in the story. According to the reviewer, it is the director A R Kardar’s smooth handling of his own screen play which made the film entertaining and interesting to watch.

The film had 10 songs written by Shatir Ghaznavi (7), Tanvir Naqvi(1), Pandit Indra (1) and Sahir (1) which were set to music by Rafiq Ghaznavi. I am presenting one of the rare songs from the film, the video of which I have recently uploaded. The song is ‘main ek anokhi daali’ sung by Sitara Devi on the words of Shatir Ghaznavi.

With this song, the film ‘Swami’ (1941) makes its debut in the Blog.

Note: Source of information on A R Kardar is mainly ‘Filmindia magazines, especially September 1940 issue.


Song-Main ek anokhi daali (Swaami)(1941) Singer-Sitara Devi, Lyrics-Shatir Ghaznavi, MD-Rafiq Ghaznavi

Lyrics

main ek anokhi daali
main ek anokhi daali
meri raam kare rakhwaali
meri raam kare rakhwaali
haan
main ek anokhi daali
main ek anokhi daali

mere gesoo kaale kaale
mere gesoo kaale kaale
do naag hain dasne waale
do naag hain dasne waale
meri ankhiyaan mad ki pyaali
meri ankhiyaan mad ki pyaali
haaye
haaye
haaye
main ek anokhi daali
main ek anokhi daali
meri raam kare rakhwaali
meri raam kare rakhwaali
haa
main ek anokhi daali
main ek anokhi daali

mera mukhda pyaara pyaara
mera mukhda pyaara pyaara
meri bindiya ghazab kaa kaara
meri bindiya ghazab kaa kaara
meri rain diwas deewaali
meri rain diwas deewaali
haaye
haaye
haaye
main ek anokhi daali
main ek anokhi daali
meri raam kare rakhwaali
meri raam kare rakhwaali
haa
main ek anokhi daali
main ek anokhi daali ee ee

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1 Response to "Main ek anokhi daali"

Shatir Ghaznavi
Aankh Michauli(1942)
Bhai (1944)
Kaneez (1949)

Rafiq Ghaznavi
Pavitra Ganga(1932)
Prithviraj Sanyogita (1933)
Sikandar (1941)
Society (1942)
Kaljug (1942)
Kiski Biwi (1942)
Najma (1943)
Duhai (1943)
Naukar (1943)
Prithvi Vallabh(1943)
Taqdeer (1943)
Laila Majnu (1945)
Ek Din Ka Sultan(1945)

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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than nine years. This blog has over 13500 song posts by now.

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