Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil

Posted on: March 27, 2020


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4270 Post No. : 15500 Movie Count :

4271

Ok, so Atul approached me a few days ago requesting me for a post for a special occasion.

My posts have become very infrequent here – in fact, before my latest post on Sahir’s birth anniversary (8th March), my previous post was on his death anniversary last year (25th October). So a gap of more than 4 months.

But then, like often happens in Test cricket, you wait and wait for a wicket to fall – and when one falls, another quickly follows.

Same has happened here. Following quickly on the heels of the 8th March post, here is another one.

And on such an occasion that I just could not refuse. Let’s just call it the perfect yorker. 🙂

Friends, I am SO honoured here to present Rafisaab’s 3000th song on this blog.

Please allow me now to take a deep breath to let this sink in.

I don’t remember now when we got to Rafisaab’s 1000th and 2000th songs, but as we scale new heights, it feels like we’re entering rarified space.

3000 songs of one artiste on our blog is quite an astonishing achievement. Of course, we’ve already got there with Lata Mangeshkar (she’s going strong with 3500+ right now) but Rafisaab is only the second artiste to hit this milestone here.

Even as I write this post, I feel extremely humbled – and undeserving of this honour. This post is supposed to be a tribute not just to Rafisaab, but to this blog itself.

And there have been so many more here, starting with Atul himself, who deserve to write this. My contributions have dramatically reduced – while there are at least a dozen others (actually many more), who contribute much more, and far more regularly.

But since I am a big Rafisaab fan, I think Atul approached me for this. (In fact there are even bigger Rafisaab fans here – but let’s not start comparing. :-))

Having said all that, let’s talk a bit about Rafisaab here – and our love for him.
I say “our”, because I know I speak for everyone here when I say, we all love Rafisaab here. Only the degree might differ.

Speaking for me personally (and maybe for others too), it has never been about just Rafisaab’s voice.

Sure, for his voice alone, he would easily have had a special place in my heart. That divinity in his voice, his ability to transport me into a different realm altogether, the intonations, the “thehraav” – all of these put him on a level that’s stratospheric for me.

I have spent hours listening to Rafisaab, often intending to listen to just one song. 🙂 I’d listen to one, then get tempted to listen to another, then another, and so on. And before I’d realize it, the minutes would turn into hours. I’ve even spent all night listening to him (ok, that was a few years ago, when I coul stay awake all night). 🙂

It has been said many times before, and by many, but I will say it again – at least in HFM, I haven’t seen any singer with the versatility of Rafisaab. He could deliver every single song in exactly the mood and range required for it. Which is why he could do rock and pop singing just as comfortably as he could do bhajans and ghazals.

Rafisaab could totally get you into any mood the song demanded. He could just mesmerize you into it.

One moment he’s singing the breezy “pukaarta chala hoon main” or the sensuous “aaja re aa zaraa”, the next he’s singing the bhajan “sukh ke sab saathi”. 🙂

One moment, you’re imagining yourself as Shammi Kapoor with “aaja aaja main hoon pyaar tera”, the next you’re Bharat Bhushan lamenting “o duniya ke rakhwaale”. 🙂

They said of Rafisaab that he was an extremely shy and quiet person outside the recording room. You could barely hear his voice.

But once, in the room, recording?

He was a totally different person.

He would be so totally immersed in the song, giving it the very best he could, that you couldn’t believe it was the same person who, outside the room, hardly ever spoke.

In this sense, Rafisaab was a thorough professional. He always sought to give his very best, regardless of who the composer was.

In stature, he was often far higher than most of the composers he sang for. So it is only normal that composers might have hesitated to ask him for a retake, and could have just gone with whatever had been recorded, even if they were not fully satisfied.

But such was Rafisaab’s humility, such was his professionalism, such was his lack of ego, that he would ask the composer if it was ok – and if the composer had any suggestions for improvement, Rafisaab would redo it to the composer’s satisfaction.

That is truly the sign of greatness of an artiste.
And, considering how many successful artistes end up with ego too to match, Rafisaab stands out as an exception.

There are so many other things about Rafisaab that speak of the greatness of him as a human being.

There are other examples of Rafisaab’s nature that are also endearing.

For example, the fact that he sang for composers for a nominal fee, even just a token one rupee, because he knew they could not afford to pay him fees compatible with his stature.

Even in the royalty issue, which resulted in his fallout with Lata, his stand was typical. I don’t want to play judge here, and talk about whether his/Lata’s action was right or wrong, but it was typical of Rafisaab to feel that he had been adequately compensated for the work he had done, and shouldn’t ask for more.

Rafisaab’s generosity went beyond the industry. He provided financial support to people who did not even know who their benefactor was.

All of this, without the slightest arrogance. When someone would praise one of his songs, Rafisaab would just smile and point upwards , as if to say “sab ooparwaale ki kripa hai”.

There’s SO much one could learn from Rafisaab and his values. Ever-polite, ever-professional, ever-helpful, ever-smiling, ever-humble. And ever the family man too, because he always enjoyed spending time with his family.

I’ve written many times about him here – and much of what I’m saying here is repetitive (and possibly boring), but it always gives me great joy to write about Rafisaab, whatever the occasion.

I invariably then write about his character and not just his songs, because his character amazes me just as much as his amazing voice.

So the fact that we have now got 3000 songs of Rafisaab on this blog is a hugely satisfying achievement. My hearty congratulations to Atul, and to everyone else who has been part of this process.

Oh, and in all the discussion about Rafisaab and his 3000th song, I almost forgot.

There’s another milestone to celebrate today – today’s song also happens to be the 15500th song on the blog.

Yes, 15,500.

There was a time, in the early years of the blog, when every century was a major milestone. Then, as the centuries began getting clocked with regularity, the celebration around them decreased. We had entered the chiliad league, so our major milestones became 1000, 2000, 3000 and so on….now past 15000.
The 100s became minor milestones.
While this is understandable to some extent after 155 centuries, I still think every century deserves to be celebrated.

Let us NEVER forget that EVERY song involves a fair amount of effort, and though contributors (*cough*, *cough*) do their bit, every song still requires time & effort from Atul/Sudhirji. And they’ve put this effort 100 times, since 15400. So, I definitely think they deserve appreciation and a round of applause for this.

Now onto the song for today.

You can always trust Atul to unearth songs that have long faded from people’s memory. Or maybe they never got attention when they were released.

The same applies to films too. After all, the Hindi film industry is prolific, with hundreds of films being released every year, and thousands of songs.

As a result, many songs and films never get attention.

This blog has always tried to unearth such songs and films, and to give them their share in the limelight, even if it is several years after their release. After all, every song involves a lot of effort from many artistes. And for a film? The effort is several times more – involving so many more people, in various capacities, each one playing his/her role hoping to see the film succeed at the box-office.

I don’t know the success rate of films, but I’d say there are far more films that don’t click at the box-office, than those which do. Let’s not get into reasons here – I’m no pundit – but I do always like to acknowledge the effort that has gone into making a film anyway.

Why so much of a build-up in this post?

Because the song for today has as much to do with the film as with the song itself.

Prima facie, the song looks like a routine song. It’s a qawwali, with its usual nok-jhok, and, as isn’t uncommon in movies, with disguises. 🙂

Now I’m a sucker for qawwalis, so even though this probably isn’t in the same league as many more illustrious ones, I’m happy to just listen to it, and enjoy it.
Besides, this was 1982 – and by then, qawwalis were slowly on the decline. The times had changed, and naturally films had to reflect the changed times.
So I wouldn’t judge this qawwali, keeping other classics in mind. 🙂

When Atul sent me an e-mail requesting me for a write-up, he explained why he picked this song. It has to do with not just the song, but the film as well.

This is what he said:

The song that I have chosen for the occasion is a special song. It is a rare song. It is composed by an obscure music director called B T Singh. It is the only song of B T Singh with Rafi in his career. HFGK mentions that music was arranged and composed by Uttam Singh. He could be assistant to B T Singh.

The movie is an obscure movie called “Chambal Ke Daaku”(1982). This movie was Produced by R S Sandhu , written and directed by S Azhar for S L Cheema films, Bombay.
The USP of the movie was “Real dacoits pesented first time on screen.”
The movie had real dacoits viz Mohar Singh, Madho Singh, Fateh Singh, Lakhan Singh, Kalyan Singh and hundred of ex dacoits, and actors like Nazneen, Javed Khan, Madhumalini, Sulochana, Malti Joshi, Yasmeen, Birbal, Dushyant, Deep, Ashok, S S Khan, Nirmal Singh, Shamsher Singh, Jeewan Singh, Joginder Singh, Amreek Singh, Joginder Singh Laddhar, Mahendra Singh, Chandrakala, Ramesh Deo, Sohel Khan, Joga Singh, Sayyad Khan, Praveen Lakhad, Gajendra Gadge, Rajkumar, Baw Brar, Shabbir Khan, Guest apppearances by Padma Khanna, Hina Kausar, Mahendra, Raza Murad etc.”

Wow!
So now we have a film here where real-life dacoits just decided to act in a film. Maybe there are other examples too (what about “Jis Desh Mein Ganga Behti Hai”)?

In any case, it is a rather fascinating scenario. And of course, when I learnt about this, my mind began working overtime, imagining all sorts of things.

– Were they active dacoits, wanted by the police? If so, how did they get to act? Or had they served their sentence, and reformed? In which case, they shouldn’t be judged on their past, of course.
– How much were they paid?
– Was it maybe just a smart move for the producer to co-opt real-life dacoits so that not only does he have a USP, but he also has access to their expertise, and could film in locations he wouldn’t otherwise dare to?
– How did co-stars, and the rest of the crew feel? Imagine having chai with a real-life dacoit. You’d probably not want to upset him, or even crack a joke about him, for fear of him taking offence at it
– In the shooting scenes, was anyone worried that the dacoits might just get excited and take it all too literally?

Such thoughts, and more, came to my mind, because this was reel life and real life potentially getting mixed up. The key word here is “potentially”. 🙂

Chambal itself was a common film theme in those days – especially in the 70s and early 80s. Films mirror real-life events, and dacoity used to be in the news off and on in those days. There were plenty of dacoit films made in that time, the most famous being Sholay, of course. 🙂

I remember VP Singh, CM of UP (1980-82) came down hard on dacoity in his time, and even got a lot of praise for it. But soon after, there was a major dacoity, as if to spite him – and he offered to resign as CM.

I myself used to travel a lot by train from Orissa to Delhi in the early 80s, and go through Gwalior-Morena (I think Dholpur in Rajasthan also), which I think is the Chambal area. The landscape would be “interesting”, and would trigger my imagination. 🙂

Anyway, enough of digression.

Back to the song, it is sung by Rafisaab (of course), together with Asha Bhosle and Manna Dey. Rafisaab passed away in 1980, so it’s possible this is one of his last few songs – unless the film took a while to get released.

I must admit I couldn’t recognise many faces – but Ramesh Deo is, of course, unmistakeable.

Hope you enjoy the song, and imagine yourself singing it with real-life dacoits in Chambal Valley. 🙂

And once again, congratulations to the blog for clocking Rafisaab’s 3000th, and the blog’s 15500th.

Audio

Video


Song-Uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil (Chambal Ke Daaku)(1982) Singers-Rafi, Asha Bhonsle, Manna Dey, Lyrics-Gauhar Kanpuri, MD-B T Singh
Male chorus
Female chorus

Lyrics

banaayenge bhanwar mein raasta
aur lahron pe saahil
bhanwar kehte hain uljhan ko o
lahar ka naam hai ae ae mushqil

uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
mil ke rahegi yahin apni manzil
mil ke rahegi yahin apni manzil
kehta hai aaj yehi mera dil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil

kahaan se aaye ho
bolo ji kya iraada hai

Ji kya iraada hai
hamaari baat hai
ya doosron se waada hai

ye dil ka raaz hai
dil mein hi rehne do dilbar
haan rehne do dilbar
banega baat ka afsaana honthon pe aa kar
dilon ke raaz ko
o o o o o o
dilon ke raaz ko
nazron se ham to
kehte hain
kehte hain
kehte hain
ham si haseenon ko samjho na gaafil
gaafil
ham si haseenon ko samjho na gaafil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil

haaye
haseen adaaon ka rangeen nazaara dekhenge
nazaara dekhenge
ham apni aankh se kismat ka taara dekhenge
haaye ae ae ae
ae ae ae
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
nazar nawaaz
nazaaron mein jee nahin lagta
haaye ae ae
haseen chaand sitaaron mein aen
jee nahin lagta
sa ni ma dha pa ni
dhi ma pa ni sa
sa ni sa dha ni
pa dha
ma pa
ma ga ma
ga re ga sa re
sa re ga ma pa
nigaah e naaz ka hamko ishaara mil jaaye

ishaara mil jaaye
hamen bhi jeene ka
koi sahaara mil jaaye

isharaa paaoge ae ae ae
isharaa paaoge
jhaanko hamaari aankhon mein
aankhon mein
aankhon mein
chaand se chehre pe
taaron ki jhilmil
jhilmil

chaand se chehre pe taaron ki jhilmil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil

samajh gaya hoon main
dil aur nazar ke afsaane

nazar ke afsaane
anaar ek hai
aur uske do hain deewaane

deewaana kaun hai
duniya ko ye bataana hai
yahi bataana hai
nazar ke teer se taqdeer aazmaana hai
jo hoshiyaar hai
ae ae ae ae ae
jo hoshiyaar hai
duniya usi ke kaabil hai
kaabil hai
kaabil hai
mehfil se baahar bhi hai ek mehfil
mehfil

mehfil se baahar bhi hai ek mehfil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
kahin uljhan hai
kahin mushqil hai

kahin mehfil kahin manzil
ye lo mera fasaana
ye kissa hai puraana
oho
hamaara dil na todo
oho
ye dil ki bat chhodo
oho
mere nazdeek aao
oho
qayaamat na uthhaao
oho
tumhaara dil hai patthar
aha
magar tum ho sitamgar
oho
mujhe tarpaaya tumne
oho
mujhe uljhaaya tumne
oho
tujhe hamne pooja
oho
mere dil mein hai dooja

oho
kahaan hai wo kidhar hai
oho
idhar hai ye udhar hai

4 Responses to "Uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil"

Many many thanks Raja Saab for this post !!!

Congratulations Atul ji, Sudhir ji and all on this 155th Century on the blog …!!!
I was expecting this century post but it come with a pleasant surprise as a post from Raja Saab and Rafi Saab’s 3000.
( Though I checked for others missed to check Rafi Saab’s numbers 🙂
Thanks again !!!
Regards,

Like

main actors lip syncing for the song are
HINA KAUSER, RAZA MURAD, & JAVED KHAN(not to be confused with another Javed Khan->who was there in Saath Saath,Prem Rog,Ram teri Ganga Maili-who was a character artiste).
Javed khan(chamabl ke daku artiste) appeared in many c grade horro movies like Apradhi Kuan,Raat ke andhere mein etc

and other actors I can identify are BIRBAL, MURAD

Congratulations Atul ji on the centuries

Like

One more milestone for ASAD. ( Applause)
Thank you Rajaj ji for the post featuring 3000 th song of Rafi saab.
It is always a pleasure to hear Rafi saab ‘s ‘Guna Gaan’

Like

does anybody the dancer other than Padma Khanna in song Idhar Aa Sitamgar from Sawaal

Like

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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