Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

O jag ko basaane waale mere man ki kutiya basaao

Posted on: November 6, 2020


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4494 Post No. : 16022

Today’s song is from the film Shri Rambhakta Hanuman-1948.

Looking back, I find that my last post was on Muslim films in India, in which I had discussed the situation rather in details. And now this post immediately on Hindu Mythology !
May sound somewhat strange, but not to me. From childhood, I developed a religious mindset, but my father ensured to impress on me that Religion is strictly a personal matter and one must decide how much importance one should give to Religion in one’s life. I have followed this principle till today and I treat all religions with the same reverence. Excess or exhibition of Religion publicly – unnecessarily – is anathema to me and I feel it must be avoided. This is my opinion.

Film Shri Rambhakta Hanuman-48 was the first of the Mythological films Homi Wadia’s Basant Pictures had made. Due to the extraordinary success of religious films from Prakash Pictures, suddenly there was a spurt in making Mythological films. Though Prakash Pictures made hit films like Bharat Milap-42 and Ram Rajya-43, in their films, the entire focus was on Shri Ram and Seeta Mai. They did not give any importance to Hanuman in their films. When I checked the credits of these two films yesterday, I found that Hanuman’s name was not there in the credits and we do not know who did that role ! Sensing this as an opportunity, the business minded Wadia made a film on Hanuman as the central character.

From the day films started getting made in India, in the silent film era, the Religious and Mythological stories were used to make films. The simple reason was Indian audience was well versed in such stories from Puranas, Ramayan or Mahabharat, from generations, all over the country. This was a common thread between various states of India. Thus, even when Talkie films started, initially, many such films were made in almost all languages. Actually, such Mythological films were a guarantee to recover the invested money and a handsome profit too !

When the influence of social films increased in the 40’s decade, religious films were made less, but it is worth noting that the most popular Religious Films ever, like Ramrajya, Bharat Milap and Har Har Mahadev etc were made during this period only.

The Best and the Golden period for Religious films was the 50’s decade- 1951 to 1960. In these 10 years, as many as 124 Religious and Mythological films were made. This works out to an average of ONE film EVERY MONTH for 10 continuous years. later on, however, making of such films tapered consistently and nowadays, Religious and Mythological stories can only be seen on the Home Television.

What is the difference between Religious and Mythological films ? Are they the same ? No, there is a difference. Films based on stories from Puranas ( which is a mix of imagination and History in symbolic way) are Mythological Films. Examples are ‘ Ganga Maiyya’ or ” Ram Hanuman Yuddha ” or ” Ram Rajya ” etc. Films based on Bhakti or Upasana , involving Historical stories, persons or happenings are Religious films. Examples are ” Shri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu”, ” Sant Tukaram” or ‘ Mahatma Kabeer’ etc.

Don’t be surprised by seeing the Music Director’s name in the cast. Yes he is the same person. Tripathi was not an occasional actor, but a regular one. As a Music Director, Tripathi gave music to 107 films, composing 863 songs therein. He was an All rounder. He was a story writer, composer, Producer, Director and an Actor. He even sang 13 songs in 7 films, in his early career. Tripathi directed 18 films and acted in as many as 83 films !

Though his music was good, he remained branded as a Mythological, Religious, costume and fantasy film composer. Rarely he got any social film as a MD. Even as a Director he directed only 5 Social films. His role as Hanuman in Mythological films was popular. In films where Mahipal was doing Ram’s role, Tripathi used to be the Hanuman. These were mostly Wadia films. Prakash Pictures also produced Mythological films, their films never gave importance to Hanuman. Some unknown actor was used for that role. Basant Pictures gave importance to Hanuman and Tripathi was fixed for it.

Wadia’s action, costume and fantasy films were very popular in the Middle East and Pakistan. When they made ” Rambhakta Hanuman”- in 1948, they had a problem. Partition had taken place and Pakistan was a New Muslim country. Wadia’s were worried if this Mythological film would be received well there. The major role of Hanuman was done by S N Tripathi. How to export this Hindu religious film in Muslim countries like Pakistan and the Middle East, was a major problem. A simple trick solved this problem. Wadias changed the title of this film copy for Export and it was named ” Udta Bandar ” (उडता बंदर ). With this new title the film became a Hit in that Territory !

Now coming to God Hanuman….Lord Hanuman is a Hindu god and divine vanara companion of the god Rama. Lord Hanuman is one of the central characters of the Hindu epic Ramayana. He is an ardent devotee of Rama and one of the chiranjeevis. He is also mentioned in several other texts, such as the epic Mahabharata and the various Puranas. Lord Hanuman is also the son of the wind-god Vayu, who in several stories played a direct role in Lord Hanuman’s birth.

Evidence of devotional worship to Lord Hanuman is largely absent in these texts, as well as in most archaeological sites. According to Indologists , the theological significance of Lord Hanuman and devotional dedication to him emerged about 1,000 years after the composition of the Ramayana, in the 2nd millennium. After the arrival of Islamic rule in the Indian subcontinent Bhakti movement saints such as Samarth Ramdas have positioned Hanuman as a symbol of nationalism and resistance to persecution. In the modern era, his iconography and temples have been increasingly common. He is viewed as the ideal combination of “strength, heroic initiative and assertive excellence” and “loving, emotional devotion to his personal god Rama”, as Shakti and Bhakti. In later literature, he is sometimes portrayed as the patron god of martial arts such as wrestling and acrobatics, as well as activities such as meditation and diligent scholarship. He symbolizes the human excellence of inner self-control, faith, and service to a cause, hidden behind the first impressions of a being who looks like an Ape-Man Vanara.

The meaning or origin of the word “Hanuman” is unclear. One interpretation of “Hanuman” is “one having a disfigured jaw”. This version is supported by a Puranic legend wherein infant Hanuman mistakes the Sun for a fruit, heroically attempts to reach it, and is wounded in the jaw for his attempt.

Linguistic variations of “Hanuman” include Hanumat, Anuman (Tamil), Hanumantha (Kannada), Hanumanthudu (Telugu). Other names include:Anjaneya, Anjaniputra, Kesari Nandan, Vayuputra, Bajrangbali, Sankat Mochan, Maruti, Kapishwara, Ramdoot etc etc.

In Valmiki’s Ramayana, estimated to have been composed before or in about the 3rd century BCE, Hanuman is an important, creative character as a simian helper and messenger for Rama. The character evolved over time, reflecting regional cultural values. It is, however, in the late medieval era that his profile evolves into more central role and dominance as the exemplary spiritual devotee, particularly with the popular vernacular text Ramcharitmanas by Tulsidas . According to scholars , during a period of religious turmoil and Islamic rule of the Indian subcontinent, the Bhakti movement and devotionalism-oriented Bhakti yoga had emerged as a major trend in Hindu culture by the 16th-century, and the Ramcharit Manas presented Rama as a Vishnu avatar, supreme being and a personal god worthy of devotion, with Hanuman as the ideal loving devotee with legendary courage, strength and powers.

During this era, Hanuman evolved and emerged as the ideal combination of shakti and bhakti. Stories and folk traditions in and after the 17th century, began to reformulate and present Hanuman as a divine being, as a descendant of deities, and as an avatar of Shiva. He emerged as a champion of those religiously persecuted, expressing resistance, a yogi, an inspiration for martial artists and warriors, a character with less fur and increasingly human, symbolizing cherished virtues and internal values, and worthy of devotion in his own right. As Hindu monks morphed into soldiers, they often named their organizations after Hanuman. This evolution of Hanuman’s character, his religious status, and his cultural role as well as his iconography, continued through the colonial era and into post-colonial times.

According to Hindu legends, Hanuman was born to mother Anjana and father Kesari. Hanuman is also called the son of the deity Vayu (Wind god) because of legends associated with Vayu’s role in Hanuman’s birth. One story mentioned in Eknath’s Bhavartha Ramayana states that when Anjana was worshiping Vayu, the King Dasharatha of Ayodhya was also performing the ritual of Putrakameshti yagna in order to have children. As a result, he received some sacred pudding (payasam) to be shared by his three wives, leading to the births of Rama, Lakshmana, Bharata and Shatrughna. By divine ordinance, a kite snatched a fragment of that pudding and dropped it while flying over the forest where Anjana was engaged in worship. Vayu, the Hindu deity of the wind, delivered the falling pudding to the outstretched hands of Anjana, who consumed it, leading to the birth of Hanuman.

The Ramayana locates the birthplace of Hanuman in Kishkindha. Anjaneri Anjanadri (Near Hampi) in Gangavathi Taluk Koppal District, Karnataka is one of a number of places that claim to be the location of Kishkindha. ( Collated from information from the book ” The primer of Hinduism” by Dr. D.S.Sarma, pub.1922 and wiki, with thanks.)

I have seen this film many times. I liked the bhajans in this film. Trick scenes, yes, of course. But one thing…trick scenes in Shri Krishna’s films abound, but in Ram kathas, they are minimal. This is because Ram was depicted and behaved as an ordinary mortal, establishing righteousness, and upholding religion. He was a Model human being and thus called Maryada Purushottam. Whereas Krishna taught us how to act Tit for Tat with wicked persons. His principle was, lying or cheating for the right cause is OK. Krishna’s teachings seem more relevant in today’s times.

Today’s song is the fourth song from this film to feature here. In the 50’s decade Rafi must have sung maximum Bhajans in his career. As per the book ” Rafinama ” by Isak Mujawar, Rafi started singing Bhakti Geet in films from the film “Bhakta Gopal Bhaiya”-1948. Same year he also sang Muslim Bhakti geet in film Rehnuma-48 under the baton of Dhumi Khan. However, how many Bhaktigeets he sang is not recorded anywhere. Anyway, enjoy this Bhajan…


Song-O jag ko basaanewaale mere mann ki kutiya basaao (Shriram Bhakt Hanuman)(1948) Singer-Rafi, MD-S N Tripathi

Lyrics

Ram Ram
ShreeRam Shree Ram
Ram ShreeRam
ShreeRam Ram Ram

o jag ke basaaane waale
o jag ke basaaane waale
mere man ki kutiya basaao
o jyoti jagaane waale
mere man ka deep jalaao
o jag ke basaaane waale
mere man ki kutiya basaao
Ram Ram bhaj Ram Ram
Ram Ram bhaj Ram Ram

Jab chhodi ratan nagariya
Jab chhodi ratan nagariya
kya bhaayegi ye kutiya
Jab chhodi ratan nagariya
kya bhaayegi ye kutiya
ravi shashi chamkaane waale
ravi shashi chamkaane waale
ye jugnu bhi chamkaao
o jag ke basaaane waale
mere man ki kutiya basaao
Ram Ram bhaj Ram Ram
bhaj Ram Ram bhaj Ram Ram

o roop salone shyaamal
tum pawan tumhi ho baadal
tum pawan tumhi ho baadal
o roop salone shyaamal
tum pawan tumhi ho baadal
tum pawan tumhi ho baadal
saagar lahraane waale
saagar lahraane waale
man gaagar mein aa jaao
o jag ke basaaane waale
mere man ki kutiya basaao
Ram Ram bhaj Ram Ram
bhaj Ram Ram

tum raho mere nainan mein
tum raho mere nainan mein
main pada rahoon charanan mein
tum raho mere nainan mein
main pada rahoon charanan mein
maaya phailaane waale
maaya phailaane waale
maaya se mujhe bachaao
o jag ke basaaane waale
mere man ki kutiya basaao
Ram Ram bhaj Ram Ram
bhaj Ram Ram
bhaj Ram Ram
bhaj Ram Ram
bhaj Ram Ram
bhaj Ram Ram
bhaj Ram Ram
bhaj Ram Raaam

5 Responses to "O jag ko basaane waale mere man ki kutiya basaao"

Sir,

Thanks for this informative post and the surprise information about S.N.Tripathi, whom I knew only as music director and singer.

The lyricist for this song is B. D. Mishra.

Liked by 1 person

Mrs.Nahm ji,
Thanks for liking the post.
In Hindi films there were quite a few surprise artistes like S N Tripathi. I try to bring such hidden diamonds to light, through my posts.
-AD

Like

Arun Ji, Thanks for the post touching on SN Tripathi, Hanuman as a character in mythology, making of ‘Dharmic’ movies and so on. I did not know SN Tripathi was multi talented artiste.
Naming of the film ‘Udta Bunder’ in certain territories was amusing ( though the plan could work to bring initial crowds, I wonder how it could manage to pull in the crowds in the long run, considering the plot)
The song by Rafi Ji had a fair appeal

Like

Dear Satish ji,
Thanks for your appreciation.
Like S N Tripathi there were some more hidden gems in Hindi films. Whenever I get an opportunity, I try to bring them in limelight, through my writings.
-AD

Like

Dear Arun ji,

Lovely song! And of course the great info in your posts!

Warm regards,

Umesh

Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 16000 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

16076

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1235
Total Number of movies covered =4389

Total visits so far

  • 14,006,153 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,922 other followers

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share

Category of songs

Current Visitors

Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

Archives

Stumble

visitors whereabouts

blogadda

blogcatalog

Music Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory
%d bloggers like this: