Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Ahsaan Rizvi


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3999 Post No. : 15096 Movie Count :

4144

Today’s song is from an obscure film – ‘Jeb Katra’ aka ‘Pick Pocket’ aka ‘Girahkat’. The film may be obscure, but the song is extremely melodious and it is a pleasure to listen to such a song. I have liked it very much. The film was produced by actress-singer Brijmala’s home production Brij Prakash Productions. Looking at the cast of film and its director, it seems to be a stunt film. It was advertised as a Social Stunt film – whatever that means. To me it was like saying ‘a religious murder mystery film’ !

I have seen this film’s advertisements in the Jan and Feb 1946 issues of magazine Film India. In the Jan issue the lyricist is given as Shams Lucknowi and the composer as Bashir Khan Dehalvi. Next month – Feb – the ad says the lyricist is Ahsan Rizvi and MD is Nisar Bazmi.

The cast of the film was Navin Yagnik, Raj Rani, Samson, Ali, Radha, Habib, Sandow etc. The role of the ‘Pick Pocket’ was done by Samson, as mentioned on a photo of the film. The film was directed by Nari Ghadiyali- a veteran of C grade stunt films. Nari (Nariman) was a Parsee.

From the silent film era, Parsee community has been involved in film industry in different ways. In about every department of film making, there has been a Parsee, sometime somewhere. Parsee community is a very small entity. They never, even at their best times, exceeded a population of 3 lakhs in entire India. This is the only community which is truly a Minority community with just about 70000 people in entire India now. They have never ever asked for any reservation from the government. Parsees have significantly contributed to India’s industrial growth. Parsee greats like Tata, Godrej and Wadias have been extremely philanthropic too.

Parsees are mainly seen in Bombay and so it was no wonder that they joined the film industry, but a Parsee in Bengal has been a Pioneer in Cinema in the eastern India. JF Madon (1856 to 1923) had a roaring Parsee Theatre business in Bombay, but he shifted to Calcutta in 1902 and built an empire of Theatres and Cinema making. At one time the Madons had control on 127 Theatres in India. They made silent and talkie films in Bangla and Hindi. After his death, his third son JJ Madon took over. However, they closed their film business in 1937 and concentrated on their other interests like, imports, foods, pharma, insurance and real estate.

In Bombay, who can forget the contribution of Ardeshir Irani in starting the Talkie era with his ‘Alam Ara’ in 1931 ? In the early era, many Parsees contributed to Hindi cinema like Homi Master, Sohrab Modi, Sarswati Devi, JBH and Homi Wadia, John Cawas etc. In later period, the Irani sisters (Honey, Daisy and Manaka), Aruna Irani, Shammi, Fali Mistry and many others contributed. Earlier, in the field of direction, there were two well known names- Aspi (Aspinder) Irani and Nari (Nariman) Ghadiyali. Aspy Irani had married actress Husn Banu and Nari Ghadiyali had married actress Pramila. Both worked for stunt films made by another Parsee group – Wadia Brothers. Today’s film is also directed by Nari Ghadiyali. He directed 25 films, starting with ‘Jungle King’ (1939) to ‘Murad’ (1961).

The hero of film ‘Jeb Katra’ was Navin Yagnik, who was frequently seen in  C grade action/stunt films. Such films were made with tight budgets by small producers and hence the actors did not earn much money. To earn more money, their endeavour used to be to get roles in social films or films of other genres, especially made by well known production houses. Their payments were much better and also timely. Thus Navin also worked in some social films made by big banners.

As such stunt films declined in the latter half of the 50s, compared to 30s and 40s, as many producers like the Wadias, Mohan Pictures etc. shifted their focus to social films. Similarly major stunt film actors like Master Vithal, Master Bhagwan, Baburao Pehelwan, Azim Bhai etc. started getting roles in social films. Recently, I found a reference to Navin Yagnik in the autobiography of Hansa Wadkar- ‘Sangte Aika’ (‘सांगते ऐका’)  roughly translated as ‘Listen, I tell you’. In it she said. . . “My hero in this film was one Navin Yagnik, a handsome boy from UP. He was very shy and after the shootings, he would quietly sit in one corner reading something. He never joined our drink parties, nor he participated in any other group activity. I was attracted towards him but he gave no response. He sent me invitation card of his marriage, when it was fixed.’  Navin Yagnik (3-10-1912 to 28-10-1977) worked only in 30 films from film ‘The Mill’ (1934) to ‘Bhagwat Mahima’ (1955).

The MD for film ‘Jeb Katra’ was Nisar Bazmi. He was one of those musicians who migrated to Pakistan much later after the partition. There is a general perception among Indians that all those who migrated to Pakistan had a tough time there and they died in poverty. While this is true in cases of many actors and actresses, the converse is true about music composers.

Music directors who were worthless, unknown and unsuccessful, who gave music to obscure of B and C grade films here, in India, prospered very well in Pakistan. Composers like GA Chishti, Nisar Bazmi, Firoz Nizami, Tufail Faruqui, Rashid Atre, Inaayat Hussain, Fateh Ali Khan, Inaayat Nath, Khursheed Anwar were not very famous or popular in India, but in Pakistan almost every musician from India became famous, popular and successful. For example, Nisar Bazmi gave music to 40 films (only 27 released) in India. They were mostly C grade films and most songs were forgotten here. Same person, in Pakistan gave music to almost 60 films, won several awards and became famous and successful. How this happened ? What is the mystery ?

To understand this we must know what happened in Pakistan after partition and how was their film and music industry. According to an article in Wiki, since 1947, Pakistan film and music industry underwent several changes. It is worth repeating here. The period is divided as following,

‘Due to shortage of composers, all were welcomed with open arms. Those who had talents did extremely well here. Unfortunately the second generation of composers of calibre were not prepared and once these migrants disappeared from the scene, the musical fields of Pakistan dried up. According to  Wiki, there are 7 ages in Pakistan film music –

  1. Independence and growth – 1947-1958
  2. The Golden Age of Pak Film Music –  1959 – 1977
  3. The Age of Disaster – 1977 – 1988 (Onslaught of VCR and brain drain to Bangladesh in 1971)
  4. Politics, Islamisation and Downfall – 1979 – 1987
  5. Collapse – 1988 – 2002
  6. Decline – 2002 – 2009
  7. New Wave and Hope – 2010 onwards’

Anyway, Nisar Bazmi migrated to Pakistan during the Golden Age period and got all the benefits. Let us see what happened to Nisar Bazmi in Pakistan. His last film in India was ‘Mister Toofan’, released in 1963. Nisar migrated to Pakistan in 1962. Producer Sibtain Fazli of Fazli brothers offered him first film ‘Aisa Bhi Hota Hai’. The music of this film became hit and very popular and there was no looking back for Nisar Bazmi. He gave music to 57 Pak films. He won Nigar Awards 7 times and also won ‘Pride of Performance’ award from the President.

His last film was in 1981. He came back to Karachi and started teaching aspiring singers, but only one of them became a famous singer. He regretted that the younger generation looked for quick money and did not put hard work. None of his 8 sons loved music. They all followed different avocations. In his later life he was famous for learning Quran by heart.

Bazmi sahib taught music to up-and-coming youngsters, but only Faisal Latif managed to become somewhat popular. When asked why his students like Shafiq-ur-Rehman, Tanveer Afridi, Shabana and Shazia Kausar are unable to reach the top, he said, “My job was to train them, which I did. Now it is up to the musicians to utilize them as I am sure they have the talent to be the best.” When asked if the youth (of Pakistan) are going in the right direction, Bazmi Sb felt that it was because of our youths’ lack of interest that our music is not what it used to be. “A youngster today doesn’t want to be taught like the legendary singers. His only interest is to become rich and famous in a short time, which is certainly the wrong way.”

Nisar Bazmi died on 22-3-2007 at Karachi.

Today’s song from film ‘Jeb Katra’ is an exceptionally melodious song comparable to any leading composer’s song in India. With such tunes in his repertoire, I wonder why Nisar bazmi could not gain fame here itself. Usually when the film is a failure, the music of that film does not reach more audience and hence does not get exposure to become popular. Of course there are songs which became popular from flop films also. After all, it is a matter of luck only.

Song – Chaandni Raaten Kya Huin (Jeb Katra) (1946) Singer – Zohrabai Ambaalewali, Lyrics – Ahsaan Rizvi, MD – Nisar Bazmi

Lyrics

chaandni raaten
haaye
chaandni raaten kya huin
sukh ke wo din guzar gaye
chaandni raaten
haaye
chaandni raaten
jee bhar ke hum hanse naache
jee bhar ke hum hanse naache
aankhon mein aansoo bhar gaye
chaandni raaten
haaye
chaandni raaten

aisi buri hawa chali
aisi buri hawa chali
murjha gaye chaman ke phool
aisi buri hawa chali
aisi buri hawa chali
murjha gaye chaman ke phool
hasraten dil ki mit gayin
hasraten dil ki mit gayin
armaan saare mar gaye
chaandni raaten
haaye
chaandni raaten

doobhar hui hai zindagi
doobhar hui hai zindagi
marna bhi ho gaya kathin
doobhar hui hai zindagi
doobhar hui hai zindagi
marna bhi ho gaya kathin
doobne hum jahaan gaye
doobne hum jahaan gaye
dariya wahaan utar gaye
chaandni raaten
haaye
chaandni raaten

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

चाँदनी रातें
हाए
चाँदनी रातें क्या हुईं
सुख के वो दिन गुज़र गए
चाँदनी रातें
हाए
चाँदनी रातें
जी भर के हम हँसे नाचे
जी भर के हम हँसे नाचे
आँखों में आँसू भर गए
चाँदनी रातें
हाए
चाँदनी रातें

ऐसी बुरी हवा चली
ऐसी बुरी हवा चली
मुरझा गए चमन के फूल
ऐसी बुरी हवा चली
ऐसी बुरी हवा चली
मुरझा गए चमन के फूल
हसरतें दिल की मिट गईं
हसरतें दिल की मिट गईं
अरमां सारे मर गए
चाँदनी रातें
हाए
चाँदनी रातें

दूभर हुई है ज़िंदगी
दूभर हुई है ज़िंदगी
मरना भी हो गया कठिन
दूभर हुई है ज़िंदगी
दूभर हुई है ज़िंदगी
मरना भी हो गया कठिन
डूबने हम जहां गए
डूबने हम जहां गए
दरिया वहाँ उतर गए
चाँदनी रातें
हाए
चाँदनी रातें


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has more than 15300 song posts by now.

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