Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Ham tum jise kehta hai shaadi

Posted on: July 31, 2012


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

Of the several signs that I am losing it now, one of the surest signs has got to be when I forget the anniversaries of people or events close to my heart.

I normally pride myself on remembering dates – in fact I surprise my friends sometimes when I mention dates of events or anniversaries that they don’t expect me to remember. These are dates that have just stuck in my mind when I first came across them, e.g. 18th May 1974 being the famous date of the Pokhran nuclear explosion . Or, 24th October 1945 being the date the United Nations (U.N) came into existence. (18th May also happens to be the birthday of one of the favourite cricketers from my childhood days – B.S. Chandrasekhar. And 24th October also happens to be the birthday of our dear memsaab (of memsaabstory.com). So see, it isn’t all that difficult to remember dates! 🙂

I don’t keep dates in a diary or a PDA or anything of the sort. “I’ll just remember them when I need to” has always been my attitude.

Maybe I need to re-think that now.

When Atul sent me an e-mail requesting me to write up a song for Rafi saab’s death anniversary on 31st July, I must admit I felt like kicking myself for a moment. How did it COMPLETELY slip my mind? Rafi saab’s death anniversary . Rafi saab!!! How could I POSSIBLY not remember? I’ve never forgotten that date ONCE in the last 32 years!

Yes, that’s the surest sign yet that I’m losing it. 🙂

Anyway, it’s a good thing that Atul reminded me – and I naturally IMMEDIATELY agreed to write up a song for Rafi saab. For all that he has given me in my life, this is the very least I can do for him.

And this is really the way I feel about Rafi saab.

Sometimes I think of what it is that is important in life. Most of us go through a routine life. We grow up, we do all sorts of things in life, primarily directed towards bringing some value to ourselves and to our families. And then, one fine day, we die.

That’s it, in a nutshell.

Nothing particularly wrong or bad about this – after all, we have hopefully ensured that our time on earth has been of value to at least our immediate family and friends. And if we have contributed a bit to society at large, great.

But how many of us have left, or are leaving a lasting legacy? A legacy that goes beyond just our small circle of family and friends?

Sorry if I’m getting all philosophical – but I cannot help occasionally having these thoughts cross my mind. And it is Rafi saab’s death anniversary after all, so it is but natural to think about him and his legacy.

I doubt Rafi saab ever thought along these lines but one thing’s for sure – HE need have no concerns whatsoever about whether he has left a legacy for future generations or not. Unless something goes terribly wrong with the world, there should be no reason why Rafi saab’s contribution to the music world should not be appreciated and enjoyed for generations and generations to come.

Speaking for just myself (and I am a later generation than Rafi saab of course), I consider myself tremendously fortunate to have had the opportunity to listen to songs sung by Rafi saab. And I know I speak for millions when I say this.

I’ve discussed before about how I became a Rafi saab fan. When I was growing up in the 70s, it was all Kishore Kumar around me. The latest songs would be playing everywhere (just like they do today). And most of them, if in the male voice, would be Kishore songs. And I loved them (I still do). I had heard of Rafi saab – I knew he had been a famous singer “of the past” – but I had no special fondness for him. To me, he was a singer who “used to be good” but Kishore came and “took over”.

Then one day (it was the 1.00 p.m afternoon songs programme on Vividh Bharti – I don’t remember the name), I heard “O duniya ke rakhwaale”. It knocked me out. Completely. I wanted to hear it again and again – but it had come on radio. Come and gone. And those were the days before the internet. And even cassettes were not easy to come by, where I lived.

All I knew was that this voice was divine. Just that “Bhagwan…bhagwan…bhagwan” gave me goose pimples from the awe I felt when I heard it.

Soon after I heard “suhaani raat dhal chuki”. And “caravan guzar gaya”. And “ye parbaton ke daayre”. And “ye teri saadgi”. And “dil mein chhupaake pyar ka toofan le chale”. And “jeevan mein piya tera saath rahe”.

Each of these songs found me marveling at the voice. There was something about the voice – something divine. And each time when the announcer said “awaaz Muhammad Rafi ki”, I felt I had been oh-so-wrong in being dismissive about him.

Of course there were many, many more songs that I heard. These are just a sample of the songs I clearly remember from the first time I heard them.

I began making up for lost time. I realized I needed to listen to the “old songs” programmes more – that is where Rafi saab’s songs often figured. I learnt countless number of songs (not just Rafi saab but also others like Hemant Kumar and Geeta Dutt) from listening to Chhaya Geet, Bhoole Bisre Geet and such programmes.

There would occasionally be an article about Rafi saab in the papers or magazines. I remember one by Raju Bharatan in the Illustrated Weekly of India – he was not particularly appreciative of Rafi saab in that article, if I remember right.

Anyway, that was one person’s opinion – and I wasn’t going to allow my enjoyment of Rafi saab songs to be spoilt by his opinion.

Meanwhile Rafi saab came back – with a bang!

I’d already heard his songs in Laila Majnu songs – and totally loved them. I used to sing “tere dar pe aaya hoon” ALL the time. And even “jholiyaan bhar gayin”.

But he really came back with a bang with “parda hai parda”. And “kya hua tera waada”.

Suddenly people were talking about his comeback. Since I’d not known him from pre-Aradhana days (effectively when Kishore “took over”), I had no prior reference.

He began having a few hit songs. I remember “maine poochha chand se” and “dard e dil”.

And then Rafi saab died.

I must admit at that time I did not realize what a big loss it was for the music world. Only later I read that millions and millions mourned – he was only in his mid-50s when he died.

Anyway, after that I continued to listen to a lot of Rafi saab songs. In any case, the songs of the mid-late 70s and the 80s (with some notable exceptions) were no patch on songs of the golden era. So I would listen to the “golden era” songs again and again.

By then, I had cassettes too. And I had Rafi saab songs on cassette. Solos and duets. I don’t know how many times I’ve listened to songs like “khoya khoya chand” , tujhe jeevan ke dor se bandh diya hai” and “aankhon hi aankhon mein ishara ho gaya”.

By then I had become a total Rafi saab fan. I realized that he had a tremendous range. He could sing sad songs like “ek dil ke tukde hazaar hue”, “keh do koi na kare yahaan pyar”, “toote hue khwabon ne”. And also sing “aasmaan se aaya farishta” and “badan pe sitaare”. And classical songs, qawwalis, bhajans, you name it. Nothing surprised me anymore – he could sing them all.

I had also read that Rafi saab could sing in a voice that would make you feel the hero was singing it. For Dilip Kumar, he had a “Dilip Kumar” voice, for Johnny Walker, he had a “Johnny Walker” voice – and so on. When I heard the songs, I too felt that way.

If you listen to “sar jo tera chakraaye” from Pyaasa, you feel it is Johnny Walker singing it. And then, you listen to “ye mehlon ye takhton” – it is SO Guru Dutt! And for Rafi saab to sing two such extreme-mood songs for the same film is nothing but a testimony to his variety.

Talking about Pyaasa brings me quite nicely to the song for today. I can go on and on about Rafi saab but I do think I need to get on to the song that I’m posting here as a tribute to him today.

Pyaasa is well-known for a whole lot of reasons – including its music. It has the two extremes of Rafi saab, as mentioned above.

Soon after Pyaasa, Guru Dutt made Kaagaz Ke Phool. It turned out to be a commercial flop – and it is said, affected Guru Dutt very badly. After that, he did not put his name as director on films even if the films clearly had his stamp on them. Sahib Bibi Aur Ghulam (another classic) is a good example of this.

When one things of Kaagaz Ke Phool songs, the first song that comes to mind (at least mine) is Geeta Dutt’s “waqt ne kiya”. The next song that comes to mind is another classic Rafi saab song “bichhde sabhi baari baari”.

But there is another, somewhat less known song in the film, that I find very delightful. It is Rafi saab for Johnny Walker – and THAT is my song for today. And to think that this song is in the same film as “bichhde sabhi baari baari” once again says a lot about Rafi saab.

“Hum tum jise kehta hai shaadi” is quintessentially Rafi saab for Johnny Walker. It has all those typical Johnny Walker attributes – and Rafi saab is on a roll here. You almost feel like it is Johnny Walker singing – and that is a tribute to Rafi saab.

It is a light, funny song where Johnny Walker talks about how much fun life is for a man who is single, and how marriage makes a man lose his azaadi (freedom). The lyrics are by Shailendra (the other songs in the movie are by Kaifi Azmi, this one seems to be by Shailendra).

This song most certainly deserves to be much better known. And that is why, when I was thinking of which song to pick for Rafi saab today, I decided I’d go with this one. I hope you like my choice. 🙂

Thank you SO much, Rafi saab. We will never EVER forget you for all you’ve given us.

Audio

Video

Song-Ham tum jise kehta hai shaadi (Kaaghaz Ke Phool)(1959) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Shailendra, MD-S D Burman

Lyrics

O Peter O brother Harry
O Valla O Mister Berry
Mr. Iyer, are you there?

hum tum jise kehta hai shaadi
you know hai poora barbaadi
jo tum lalchaaoge
peechhe pachhtaaoge
mind you
mind you jaayegi azaadi

hum tum jise kehta hai shaadi
you know hai poora barbaadi
jo tum lalchaaoge
peechhe pachhtaaoge
mind you jaayegi azaadi

jab marzi aao
jab marzi jaao
daalo kahin pe bhi deraa
jab marzi aao
jab marzi jaao
daalo kahin pe bhi deraa
sadkon pe gaao
seeti bajaao
kar do kahin bhi saveraa
waah waah waah waah

hum tum jise kehta hai shaadi
you know hai poora barbaadi
jo tum lalchaaoge
peechhe pachhtaaoge
mind you jaayegi azaadi

jis ghar mein hum
rakh den kadam
hoti hai kya khatirdaari
jis ghar mein hum
rakh den kadam
hoti hai kya khatirdaari
shaadi jo ki
chhutti hui
soorat na dekhegi kunwaari
oh no no no

hum tum jise kehta hai shaadi
you know hai poora barbaadi
jo tum lalchaaoge
peechhe pachhtaaoge
mind you jaayegi azaadi

rangeeniyaan
ye mastiyaan
sab kuchh hai yaaron ke dum se
rangeeniyaan
ye mastiyaan
sab kuchh hai yaaron ke dum se
kismat ki baat
khushiyaan hain saath
duniya kyun jalti hai hum se
waah waah waah waah
hum tum jise kehta hai shaadi
you know hai poora barbaadi
jo tum lalchaaoge
peechhe pachhtaaoge
mind you
mind you jaayegi azaadi

13 Responses to "Ham tum jise kehta hai shaadi"

In Aradhana, SD had recorded the first 2 Rafi songs. Then he fell sick. Then the onus of recording remaining songs fell on RD lap. He chose KK. If SD had postponed falling sick….. Really iffy. History would have changed

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The first line of this song itself gave me a lead that I had watched the video clip month’s back. One can not fully enjoy Rafi-Johny Walker combo without watching the video clip. So here it is :

Thanks for the write up which I was sure you would not miss to post today 🙂

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Rajaji,
Thanks for the memorable write up for this immortal singer/human being. Last year I watched Anandjibhai’s (Kalyanji Anandji duo) interview and when the host asked him about Rafi saab, Anandjibhai said, “bahut kam log jaante the ki Rafi saab naabhi se gaate the. Is ke kaaran woh aasani se koi bhi sur mein gaa sakte the”. Wish he was alive not only for us, but also for this new generations, who would hardly believe that such a singer ever existed.

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Raja ji

Thanks for the excellent post. I enjoyed your writing and the song very much.

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Raja ji,

I envy you, for the ability to translate your feelings into words and keep track of them, till it is transferred on paper.

Nice eclectic mix of songs have appeared today in the blog to mark 32nd death anniversary of Mohammed Rafi. Let me add one song today :

This song also is in oblivion still like so many other songs. I did not know it, till i heard the other day.

Regards.

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Raja ji,
One of the conditions for good writing is that it should be flowing and should carry the feelings of the writer blended with his aim.
Your writing is cent percent as per this condition.Its smooth flow takes us exactly where you want us,that is,understand and agree to what you intend conveying.just superb!
The coordination of mind ,hand and the purpose are fully evident in your writing.That is why,even your blog writings are highly readable.
Thanks for sharing your views about Rafi saab.
In the last about 30 years or so,so much has been written about Rafi saab by so many people,but still everytime someone writes there is always something new to read about him.
-AD

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Deshmukh Sir,

I have missed your comments and informed inputs for sometime. Hope you are doing fine healthwise.

I wish to draw your attention to the post : https://atulsongaday.me/2012/07/10/likh-kar-tera-naam-zameen-par/

In the song, there is a matter of doubt regarding the final alaap. You are the person to give correct information whether it is sung by Rafi saab or not.

I am happy to see finally, there is a category for “Johnny Walker song”. Scores of Rafi-JW songs are already posted. This should also be tagged “Hinglish song” too.

Thanx and regards.

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Nahm ji,
Thanks for your kind words.I am much better now-healthwise.
Please see my comment about the aalaap,posted just now.
-AD

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That was an interesting post, Raja!
I envy you for your memory and way with dates. I often forget my own birthday and also my house number. Soon I’ll forget the name of the street where I live.
In my childhood, I was surrounded by people who loved Rafi, thus I grew up over-exposed to Rafi (you’ll say there is no such thing as over-exposure to Rafi). Kishore was the in thing at that time, thus was first a KK fan and then (re-)discovered Rafi post-puberty. What I hated always were the Rafi and KK-clans. I preferred to like both and still do.
Johnny and RAfi is a unique love-story! Love their songs!
Thanks for this beautiful insight in your relationship with Rafi!
Thank you Rafi for the great legacy you have left behind for us!

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Great post, Papa! I started with Kishore Kumar’s songs too. Though I had heard quite a lot of songs of other singers, it was my maths teacher singing Pal pal dil ke paas, Chhoo kar mere mann ko, Mera jeevan kora kaagaz, Mere naina saawan etc that actually made me listen to old songs with interest.
I started watching Hindi movies after that and you know by now the affect Rajesh Khanna has had on me after Amar Prem. Dad had a cassette “Favourites of Rajesh Khanna” which I was almost addicted to. Initially it was Mere sapno ki raani, Mere naina saawan bhado, Parbat ke peeche, Yeh kya hua that I liked in it but slowly I started liking Yeh jo chilman hai, Yeh reshmi zulfen, Gulabi aankhen, Yunhi tum mujh se baat karti ho, Akele hai chale aao….and I happened to watch all these movies and started appreciating the songs even better. Then I saw Kashmir Ki Kali and I was totally floored by Ishaaron ishaaron mein, Deewana hua baadal, Yeh chaand sa roshan chehra. I started looking out for Rafi’s cassettes in Dad’s collection after that and there was one which had songs of Mere Sanam, Piya Ka Ghar, An Evening in Paris, Ek sapera Ek Lutera which I would be forever tuned to. The tape-recorder would be wherever I am – in Kitchen, in the backyard, in the garden. I still remember the songs and their sequence in both the sides.

Today, the moment I hear Rafi’s voice, I feel an instant connection to the song, as though I have known it all my life even if I am hearing it for the first time. I could go on and on about Rafi and his songs.

I’m forever tuned into Vividh Bharati, even at work. Even my Boss knows that I cant function without music. Hardly a day passes when I dont listen to his songs – my day remains incomplete until I hear his voice 🙂

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Thanks for sharing your bachpan ki “sunheriyaadein” 🙂 All growing up in 70’s and listening to KK’s songs and then realizing the magic of Rafi sahab……Feels like sailing in the same boat. I would rather say cruise. Kyun ki Rafi sahab ke deewane to koi boat ya ek cruise ship mein fit nahin ho sakte na.

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Atul, I just stumbled across your blog. Uncanny! Because my story is exactly the same as yours. I too grew up in the 70s. And yes, it was Kishore Kumar all the way, and I too loved him (and still do). Then I discovered the magic of Rafi saab voice and my perspective changed 🙂

Thank you for this brilliant article – and for reminding me about my past.

Warm regards
Jagat

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What a wonderful write up Raja Ji. Took me back down memory lane. For me, Rafi saab is GOD! If there ever lived a dream singer who was just perfect whether it was his singing, or his character, no one but Rafi saab’s name would come up. When one thinks of Dev Anand, the top of the mind recall of his songs is Kishore Kumar, but my favourite song even today is “Mera Mann Tera Pyaasa”, from Gambler, what a beautiful song sung by Rafi saab. Thanks for the lovely write up again Raja Ji, I am going to read it again to listen to the long list of songs listed on this article and the comments section :).

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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