Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Logon Ke Ghar Mein Rehta Hoon

Posted on: September 20, 2016


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

An out and out theatre person who seemed to have stepped on to the silver screen by accident. My first introduction to Dinesh Thakur was when I went to see a stage play in Delhi. I was in school, and the book-reading bug had bit me big time. I was devouring books by the dozen almost on a weekly basis. I got introduced to a wide variety of written genres and authors. In the midst of this, one stream was reading stage plays. Of course, started with the Shakespeare’s ‘Midsummer’s Night Dream’ which was part of our English curriculum. I picked up books of plays written by western authors, and then also got interested in reading plays by Indian authors.

Reading of plays, also prompted my mind to go and watch live stage dramas. For a good length of time, this remained a regular preoccupation with me. One of the key stage drama groups in Delhi those days was Dishantar. This group was founded and headed by Om Shivpuri, later on to become more famous as a senior character artist on the Hindi cinema screen. Sometimes around the end of 1960s – could have been 1969 / 1970. One of the plays I saw during that period ‘Aadhe Adhure’, considered by many as the most significant play in the modern Hindi theatre revival.

The play is a view into the inside of a middle class family’s daily tribulations, with focus on the interpersonal relationships between the members of the family. A tale of half fulfilled promises, half accomplished lives, half incomplete everything. The parents (roles played by Om Shivpuri and Sudha Shivpuri, also husband-wife in real life) relationship was a mess – man out of work, frustrated at his inabilities and envious of a tired and overworked wife who tries her best to keep everything together. The eldest daughter – her marriage on the rocks already (role played by Anuradha Kapoor, currently the director of National School of Drama (NSD), in Delhi). One son – just out of college, unemployed, and indulgent in all things young men would indulge in, in that era of late 60s, early 70s (role played by Dinesh Thakur). The youngest daughter – in senior school, spoilt brat and a rebel, ready to break every rule (role played by Richa Vyas). The manifestation of the play had a very unique presentation – there were five male roles, one a kind of sootradhar (सूत्रधार) or the narrator, and four different men in the life of lady of the household. All five characters are role played by the same lead actor. Back then when this play was staged for the first time, this was a revolutionary stagecraft presentation.

This play, very topical and very powerful, had a significant impact on me, and got to see it multiple times. That was my first introduction to the abrasive and disrespectful young man with an unkempt beard. The persona – in terms of the character, and the actor got into my mind, as did the other personalities in the play.

Fast forward a couple of years. Came the year 1971, and I went to watch the movie ‘Anubhav’ – a neo classical avant garde cinema from the stewardship of a new director Basu Bhattacharya. Five years earlier, Basu Da had directed ‘Teesri Kasam’ for Shailendra. Next one hears about is ‘Anubhav’. A while into the film, a door bell rings, Tanuja opens the door, and in walks an old flame, from Tanuja’s college days. I did recognize Dinesh Thakur, and was surprised to see him on screen. Apparently, it seems that Om Shivpuri moved to Bombay, primarily to make a film of the play ‘Aadhe Adhure’. That film version did never get created. But it did bring Dinesh Thakur to Bombay, and into the film ‘Anubhav’. The same year, I also got to see ‘Mere Apne’, Gulzar’s debut film as a director. Dinesh stars in this film also a one of the ruffian members of a street gang of young men. The two roles were quite different in more than one ways. But more about that later.

Dinesh was born in Jaipur, in 1947. His primary and senior education happened in Delhi. He did his major in Hindi Literature from Kirori Mal College (KMC) of Delhi University. Being interested in drama and theatre, he had been actively involved with drama activities at school. Joining KMC gave him the opportunity – he came in touch with the legendary Frank Thakurdas, one of the professors in the college, and the guiding spirit behind ‘Players’, the drama society of the college. ‘Players’ was and continues to be one of most successful amateur dramatics society, and boasts of star alumni of the likes of Kulbhushan Kharbanda, Ravi Baswani, Banwari Taneja, and yes, Amitabh Bachchan. It turns out that my own brother-in-law is a contemporary of Dinesh Thakur at KMC, and he has some memories of his encounters with this theatre thespian in the making.

In the second half of 1960s, Dinesh got associated with Om Shivpuri and Dishantar, and stepped into the role of Ashok, the wayward son in ‘Aadhe Adhure’. From there on, Basu Bhattacharya sees him on stage, and casts him in the role of the ex-flame of the leading lady in ‘Anubhav’, who returns to her life many years later, when she is already married to another. On the sets of ‘Anubhav’, Gulzar sees him and casts him in his first directorial venture – ‘Mere Apne’. More stage activities in Bombay, and this time, director Basu Chatterji brings him into the endearing, young, common place love story – ‘Rajnigandha’ (1974), a film that went on to be both a commercial and a critical success story, winning the national award for best film of the year.

Thereafter, we continue to see Dinesh in films, albeit mostly in small  bit roles, that was never satisfying. It is a strange thing, but he never did enter the new-wave cinema movement, which was populated by the likes of Naseerudin Shah, Om Puri, Smita Patil, Kulbhushan Kharbanda, Girish Karnad, Anant Nag, KK Raina, Pankaj Kapoor etc. Apparently, this query was never put to him and we do not find any explanation for his apparent disdain for the new-wave cinema. He stuck to theatre, and appeared in bit roles in commercial cinema.

In 1976, he set up he own theatre group in Bombay. Called ‘Ank’, he worked very closely with Prithvi Theatres and Jennifer Kapoor, Shashi Kapoor, Feroze Khan, Naseerudin Shah, Om Puri, Benjamin Gilani, Om Katare, Shafi Inaamdar and others, to set a baseline platform for Hindi theatre in Bombay. Before this spearhead movement by Prithvi theatres and this group of ‘pioneers’, theatre in Bombay was primarily English, Gujarati and Marathi. With Prithvi, and associated groups such as Dinesh’s ‘Ank’, the Hindi theatre got established in Bombay as a popular entertainment stream. Dinesh’s contribution to that is significant. He and his team would hand make the banners, sell tickets at traffic intersections, and provide free refreshments to the audience, from their own pockets.

In terms of success, the most notable accomplishment for him and his group is the everlasting play ‘Hai Mera Dil’, which has had a run of thousand plus shows in Bombay, a record that is unheard of in the annals of mainstream theatre in India. (Regulars will recall the Amol Palekar – Ranjeeta film from 1979 ‘Meri Biwi Ki Shaadi’ – the storyline is the same). The play is based on a hugely successful Broadway play of 1950s and later 1964 Hollywood film ‘Send Me No Flowers’. Anyway, the key thing is the enduring popularity of this play, and the lead role played by Dinesh himself, till poor health forbade him to perform.

Dinesh passed away this day (20th September) in 2012, after a prolonged battle with kidney failure. 65 years, all dedicated to theatre. A lifetime devoted to stage and dramatics. In an interview, he once responded to a question about his preference for stage rather than screen; he said that with every show, there is a new person in audience who measures and interprets afresh, the performing artists. Being on stage, he has the opportunity to reach out and relate to such new audience in every show. He can’t do this being on the cinema screen.

This post has been in the making for four years now, since the time I read the news of his passing away in 2012. Locating a song for him was the hurdle. Finally, I am able to locate a song, and so this post comes on. The film is ‘Grih Pravesh’ from 1979. This is the third film in Basu Chatterji’s trilogy on marital affairs, the first two being ‘Anubhav’ (1971), ‘Aavishkaar’ (1973). Interesting note on the lead characters – Tanuja and Sanjeev Kumar in ‘Anubhav’, Sharmila and Rajesh Khanna in ‘Aavishkaar’ and Sharmila and Sanjeev Kumar in ‘Grih Pravesh’. The name of the male protagonist in all three is Amar. The name of the female protagonist in ‘Anubhav’ is Meeta, and then it is Mansi in the subsequent two films.

On screen, we see Dinesh with a guitar, presenting this poetical song at a small family gathering. Per the storyline, Dinesh is friend of Sanjeev. He and his wife, Sharmila are at the home of Dinesh and Priyadarshini. We get to see another guest, who is very very familiar. Yes, it is Gulzar, in literally a guest appearance, and appearing as himself. Besides these players, we also see the smiling face of Sarika in very short appearances. She is not in the room. It is the imagination of Sanjeev Kumar that brings her into the sequence. She is an office colleague of Sanjeev, and the two are covertly having an affair.

The words are written by Gulzar. Music is by Kanu Roy. The singing voice is that of Bhupinder Singh. From HFGK listings, it comes out that this song is also sung by Yesudas, as a version song. This version is not in the film. Some fan has uploaded on YT, the same video clip overlaid with the song in the voice of Yesudas. The variance in the sound and the lip movement is clearly evident. I felt that Bhupinder’s version is the more suitable one, and so I am not providing the link for the Yesudas version.

And so, I bring to close this tribute to one of my most favorite stage artists, who sometimes strayed on the screen, and did leave some indelible impressions, in some of the roles that he played. Rest of the time, it is this Dinesh Thakur, making his attempts to connect with newer audiences in each performance on stage.

 

(Video)

(Audio)

Song – Logon Ke Ghar Mein Rehta Hoon (Grih Pravesh) (1979) Singer – Bhupinder, Lyrics – Gulzar, MD – Kanu Roy

Lyrics

logon ke ghar mein rehta hoon
kab apna koi ghar hoga
logon ke ghar mein rehta hoon
kab apna koi ghar hoga
deewaaron ki chinta rehti hai
deewaar mein kab koi dar hoga
logon ke ghar mein rehta hoon

subzi mandi baap ka ghar hai
pul bangash pe mama ka
shyam nagar mein chacha ka ghar
chowk pe apni shyama ka
maike aur sasural ke aage
arre maike aur sasural ke aage
aur bhi koi ghar hoga
maike aur sasural ke aage
aur bhi koi ghar hoga
deewaaron ki chinta rehti hai
deewaar mein kab koi dar hoga
logon ke ghar mein rehta hoon

oo ooo oooooo
ichhaaon ke bheege chaabuk
chupke chupke sehta hoon
ichhaaon ke bheege chaabuk
chupke chupke sehta hoon
dooje ke ghar yoon lagta hai
mozey pehne rehta hoon
nange paaon aangan mein
arre nange paaon aangan mein
kab baithunga kab ghar hoga
nange paaon aangan mein
kab baithunga kab ghar hoga
logon ke ghar mein rehta hoon
kab apna koi ghar hoga
deewaaron ki chinta rehti hai
deewaar mein kab koi dar hoga
logon ke ghar mein rehta hoon
———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

लोगों के घर में रहता हूँ
कब अपना कोई घर होगा
लोगों के घर में रहता हूँ
कब अपना कोई घर होगा
दीवारों की चिंता रहती है
दीवार में कब कोई दर होगा
लोगों के घर में रहता हूँ

सब्जी मंडी बाप का घर है
पुल बंगश पर मामा का
श्याम नगर में चाचा का घर
चौक पे अपनी श्यामा का
मैके और ससुराल के आगे
अरे मैके और ससुराल के आगे
और भी कोई घर होगा
मैके और ससुराल के आगे
और भी कोई घर होगा
दीवारों की चिंता रहती है
दीवार में कब कोई दर होगा
लोगों के घर में रहता हूँ

ओs ओsss ओsssss
इच्छाओं के भीगे चाबुक
चुपके चुपके सहता हूँ
इच्छाओं के भीगे चाबुक
चुपके चुपके सहता हूँ
दूजे के घर यूं लगता है
मोज़े पहने रहता हूँ
नंगे पाँओ आँगन में
अरे नंगे पाँओ आँगन में
कब बैठूँगा कब घर होगा
नंगे पाँओ आँगन में
कब बैठूँगा कब घर होगा
लोगों के घर में रहता हूँ
कब अपना कोई घर होगा
दीवारों की चिंता रहती है
दीवार में कब कोई दर होगा
लोगों के घर में रहता हूँ

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4 Responses to "Logon Ke Ghar Mein Rehta Hoon"

What a well deserved tribute to this fine actor! Rajnigandha was the first movie I saw of him and next one was Meera, directed by Gulzar saab.
Thanks for the informative article on his life, his association with the theater and then finally with the Hindi cinemas.

Congrats for a very well written article of love for Dinesh Thakur. This venture has taken us on a nostalgic tour of years, names and movies!

Dinesh may have had a dislike for the new wave movement in Mumbai but I would think he watched movies in that genre closely. I remember seeing him at the New Talkies in Bandra, Mumbai at a viewing of one such movie.

ichhaaon ke bheege chaabuk
chupke chupke sehta hoon
dooje ke ghar yoon lagta hai
mozey pehne rehta hoon
nange paaon aangan mein
kab baithunga kab ghar hoga
main kab aisa likh paaunga
sirf gulzar hi likh sakte hai

Dinesh Thakur came to prominence with Rajnigandha. Theatre was his first love, so he drifted from Hindi cinema. A very well deserved tribute to a very fine actor.

Two days ago, I was playing a CD of Gulzar compositions (bought it several years ago but opened just now!!!).That disk has another number from the same film: “Pehchan to Thi Pehchana Nahin”. That too is a very fine number.

And what about Sanjeev Kumar!

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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