Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Gulzar


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day: 4335 Post No.: 15631

The connoisseurs of Hindi film music of the 1960s and 1970s would recall the four melodious songs sung by Geeta Dutt in ‘Uski Kahaani’ (1966) and ‘Anubhav’ (1971). Fans of Gulzar would know that all these four songs have come from his pen. But I will not be surprised if only few of them would remember that all these four songs had been set to music by Kanu Roy. Among these few persons, most of them would not have known his real identity. In his case, it was not only of the confusion of same name but also the confusion with a wrong family tree.

Most of the websites including Wikipedia says that Kanu Roy was an actor and music director who started his acting career in 1940s and switched over to music direction from 1960 onwards. His filmography in IMDb shows him both as an actor and the music director. In some websites, Kanu Roy as a music director has been discussed with the photograph of the actor, Kanu Roy. He is also been wrongly associated with the family of Geeta Dutt as one of her brothers. The facts are:

1. Kanu Roy, the actor and Kanu Roy, the music director were different persons. Kanu Roy, the actor came to Bombay (Mumbai) in early 1940s to join Bombay Talkies. On the basis of Gulzar’s interview which appeared in a ‘Filmfare’ issue of 2012, Kanu Roy, the music director came to Bombay sometime in mid-1950s. (My guess is that he may have come with Basu Bhattacharya who was his close friend).

2. Kanu Roy, the actor was never a music director. Kanu Roy, the music director never acted in films.

3. Kanu Roy, the music director was not a brother of Geeta Dutt. I have seen a photograph of Geeta Dutt’s full family before her marriage. In this photograph, there is no Kanu Roy. The names of Geeta Dutt’s four brothers are Mihir Roy, Ranjit Roy, Mukul Roy and Milan Roy.

With multiple confusion about his name, even the basic profile of the music director, Kanu Roy is difficult to get. I could get some information from Gulzar’s interview published in one of the Filmfare issues of 2012 which is available on http://www.tanqeed.com . In this interview, Gulzar talked about his association as a lyricist with Kanu Roy which I have summarized below with my marginal inputs.

Kanu Roy had picked up the musical notes from Bengal. He began his career by assisting music director, Salil Choudhury who also had Kanu Ghosh as his Assistant Music Director. It seems Kanu Roy was a Welder by profession and had worked on the upkeeping of the Howrah Bridge. He was an introvert by nature and had in him a mix of timid and humble nature.

Basu Bhattacharya and Kanu Roy were great friends. It was Basu Bhattacharya who gave Kanu Roy his first break as a music director in ‘Uski Kahaani’ (1966) which he produced and directed at shoestring budget. Subsequently, he worked in another five films of Basu Bhattacharya. Because of the low budget films, Basu Bhattacharya would never allow Kanu Roy to have more than 6-8 musicians (as against 50-100 musicians the music directors like Shankar-Jaikishan, Naushad, O P Nayyar etc would have in their orchestra). Also, Kanu Roy would not get the regular shifts in the recording studios for rehearsals of the songs. He had to manage in the early morning hours of the recording studio. He did not have a bargaining power with Basu Bhattacharya to ask for more musicians. (Probably for the same reason, he may not have got the playback singers of his choice). It is remarkable that with these constraints, Kanu Roy could composed melodious songs in Basu Bhattacharya’s films.

Kanu Roy’s career ended with his life on 20/12/1981. He lived in poverty and died in poverty.

During his musical journey from 1966-80, Kanu Roy composed 28 songs in 8 films, of which 6 films were of Basu Bhattacharya. Of the remaining two films, one film ‘Mayuri’ (1970s) remained unreleased. Though his contributions to Hindi film music in terms of numbers were low, many of his melodious songs still linger on. Unfortunately, his name may not ring bell for many who may still enjoy those melodious songs.

Although most of Kanu Roy’s melodious songs have been covered in the Blog, I found one song which I liked for its all-round excellence – lyrics, rendition, melody, composition and the picturization. The song is ‘pahchaan to thhi pahchaana nahi’ from ’Griha Pravesh’ (1979). The song is rendered by Chandrani Mukherjee on the words of Gulzar. Having watched the film, I feel that this song summarises the theme of the film.

Amar (Sanjeev Kumar) and Mansi (Sharmila Tagore) has been married for 10 years with 8-year old boy. During this period, some staleness in their relationship develops. Both are under the illusion that they are in love but in practice, they are just being together under one roof. Now their marriage is in the verge of collapse when Amar develops affairs with his office typist Sapna (Sarika). He is caught in a bind in that while he loves Sapna, in the back of his mind, he is also emotionally attached to his family.

Finally, Amar tells Mansi of his intention to divorce her to marry Sapna. After the initial shock, Mansi agrees for divorce on the condition that he should bring Sapna to the house to meet her. The reason is that Sapna has seen Amar in the office as an Accountant and develop the liking for him in an office environment. But she has not seen him in his house where the environment is different.

Before Sapna visit to her house, Mansi gets her house painted. She undergoes herself to a new make-over. While doing this, the song under discussion plays in the background. Sapna visits her house with Amar. After a brief meeting, Mansi takes Amar aside and tell him that she is ready to leave him for Sapna. After the meeting, Mansi tells Amar to drop Sapna to her house. However, when crossing the road, Sapna walks over to the other side of the road while Amar gets stranded on the opposite side because of a marriage procession on the road. In the midst of the orchestra in the marriage procession playing ‘tu Ganga ki mauj mein Jamuna ki dhara’, both Amar and Sapna take leave by waving hands at each other. The scene is symbolic of conveying the message that Amar has a change of heart. The film ends with Amar returning home having coffee with Mansi and his son with the replaying of the film’s song ‘zindagi phoolon ki nahi, phoolon ki tarah mehkti rahe’.

The lyrics of the song under discussion are simple and convey retrospection on the part of a housewife who forgets to give attention to herself. Instead, much of her time is spent in the kitchen, looking after husband and the child and upkeep of the house. In this milieu, she forgets her own identity.

In keeping with the low budget of the film, Kanu Roy has used only three main musical instruments in this song – Sarod, Sitar and what I believe to be Khol (Bangla Dholak) which one can hear in a low rhythm as the song is rendered. The song starts with a prelude of Sarod and Sitar and the same instruments are used in the interludes of the song. Chandrani Mukherjee, who is the sister-in-law of Bappi Lahiri, has rendered the song with poignant feeling in keeping with the mood of the situation. The Audio clip is longer with the same lyrics because it has the longer prelude music than in the video clip.

This song sums up the story of a housewife in a middle-class society.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin(Grih Pravesh)(1979) Singer-Chandrani Mukherjee, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Kanu Roy

Lyrics

pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin
maine apne aap ko jaana nahin
pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin
maine apne aap ko jaana nahin
pehchaan to thhi

jab dhoop barasti hai sar pe to
paanv mein chhaanv khilti hai
main bhool gayi thhi chhaanv agar
milti hai to dhoop mein milti hai
is dhoop aur chhaanv ke khel mein kyun
jeene ka ishaara samjha nahin
pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin
maine apne aap ko jaana nahin
pehchaan to thhi

main jaagi rahi kuchh sapnon mein
aur jaagi huyi bhi soyi rahi
jaane kin bhool bhulaiyya mein kuchh
bhatki rahi kuchh khoyi rahi
jeene ke liye main marti rahi
jeene ka ishaara samjha nahin
pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin
maine apne aap ko jaana nahin
pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin
maine apne aap ko jaana nahin
pehchaan to thhi


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4314 Post No. : 15593 Movie Count :

4293

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Hindi songs in Bangla Films: 27
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One of the many Bangla films in which Uttam Kumar paired with Supriya Devi was ‘Bilambita Loy’ (1970). The film was directed by Agragami. The star cast included Uttam Kumar, Supriya Devi, Nirmal Kumar, Deepa Chatterjee, Asit Baran, Tarun Kumar, Bimal Mitra etc. I have watched the film with English sub-titles on an OTT platform.  The film’s English sub-titles are not as good as they ought to be. They are also not properly synchronized with the scenes. Within these limitations, I could make out the story of the film as under:

Mriganka (Uttam Kumar), an upcoming painter, falls in love with Aditi (Supriya Devi), the singer during their college days. After the completion of college, they decide to get married. Aditi belongs to Christian family with a good financial status in the society whereas Mriganka belongs to an orthodox Hindu middle class family. There is opposition from both the families due to different religious and social status. Both of them get married against the wishes of their respective family. However, Aditi’s father gives some initial financial support to set up the house and also send with them Judith (Deepa Chatterjee), an orphan who has been staying with Aditi’s family since childhood, to support the newly married couple in household work.

With the help of the initial financial support from Aditi’s father, Mriganka gets a large house at a very high rent. He also furnishes the house by buying costly furniture and fixtures. In a short period of their marriage, Mriganka has spent all the money his father-in-law has given to his daughter. He has no income as he is yet to establish himself as a painter of repute. Hence his paintings remain unsold in the exhibitions. Soon, there is a financial crisis for the newly married couple.

Both Mriganka and Aditi meet their common friend Subroto (Nirmal Kumar) to get his guidance as to how to come out of their financial mess. Based on his advice, they move to a smaller house to reduce the rent outgo. Aditi who has been trained in Hindustani classical music decides to take singing as a career and becomes the radio singer. She earns her fees but not enough to run the house. Mriganka is not able to sell his paintings. So, Subroto helps him getting a job in the office. However, being a painter at heart, office work does not interest him. Within short time, he leaves the office job.

In the meanwhile, Aditi has become a famous singer. The gramophone records of her songs are sold like hot cake. She becomes very busy in her singing assignments. She has now become a celebrity. Both are now comfortable on their financial front. However, Mriganka is not able to sell any of his paintings despite getting favourable critical reviews of his paintings. He is not prepared to compromise on the subject of his paintings by which the art lovers can be enticed. Out of frustration, there is constant frictions between Mriganka and Aditi on trivial issues. Mriganka who has been a teetotaler and a non-smoker becomes an alcoholic.  The matter reaches a stage when Aditi misunderstands Mriganka in the company of a female model in her house as a muse for his painting. In the background of intense arguments, Mriganka decides to leave the house. Eventually, Mriganka and Aditi get divorce.

While Aditi’s singing career is on the upper trajectory, Mriganka’s luck is not in his favour. He decides to try his luck out of India by participating in the painting exhibitions in Europe. Despite having differences with his father, Mariganka was fortunate that at the time of the death, his father has left him   his share of savings which has come handy now to finance his trip to Europe. However, Mriganka returns to India without any success in Europe. His health has already started deteriorating forcing him to give up painting.

One day, while coming out of the church, Judith sees Mriganka walking on the road looking very sick. She takes him to her house and nurses him for few days until he recovers from his ill health. Even after that Judith visits Mriganka’s house daily to take care of his food and other daily routine. This information gets passed on to Aditi when Subroto meets her. She gets upset over the ‘scandalous’ relations between Judith and Mriganka but dismisses this information as of no concern to her.

Mriganka gets married to Judith and he is back to painting due to her encouragement. But at the back of her mind, Judith feels that she is indirectly responsible for the separation of Aditi and Mriganka as she had given a false testimony to the divorce court that she had affairs with Mriganka in order to hasten the divorce proceedings under instructions from him. Judith suffers a miscarriage and she dies in the hospital. Aditi attends the burial of Judith where Mriganka and his friend Subroto are present.

The film ends with a scene in which Aditi and Mriganka come out of the burial ground. He is about to go his way when Aditi stops him. Mriganka crosses the road with the support of Aditi holding his hand.

This film is one more example in Bangla films of ending scene being indeterminate leaving it to the audience to interpret in their own way. The first interpretation could be that it was a mere courtesy to help Mriganka to cross the road and drop him in his house in her car. Another interpretation could be that by supporting him to cross the road by holding his hand, they are united as a couple. The third interpretation which looks more probable to me is that Aditi has decided to extend her emotional support to Mriganka after the death of Judith and they remain friends.

At the outset, I thought that the story of the film is akin to Hindi film ‘Abhimaan’ (1973) in which the husband and wife who are professional singers get separated because of ego clashes. But at the end, there is an emotional reunion between the two.

In my view, in ‘Bilambita Loy’ (1970), there are no explicit ego clashes between their respective professions or between man and woman.  Even if it is there, the director has kept that at the low key. The friction points between Mriganka and Aditi arise because the former is not able to spend much time with the latter as she is quite busy in her professional work. Aditi has problem with Mriganka because he spends money on things which are not priorities like alcohol when his own earnings are not enough to get two meals a day. Neither Mriganka has problem with Aditi’s professional pursuit nor Aditi is concerned about Mriganka not able to earn income.

In the height of their frictions, it is Mriganka who decides to go for divorce to give Aditi the space in her professional pursuit. He also knows that she will not divorce him. So, he creates an impression that he has affairs with Judith to get the divorce faster. In sums, I feel that the director has handled the subject with delicate balance, avoiding the label of a feminist to Aditi and a male chauvinist to Mriganka.

‘Bilambita Loy’ (1970) has 5 songs of which one is in Hindi. The song which I am presenting is “Mann Kahaan Laago Mora Chain Ganwaayi Diyo Re’ which is a duet sung by Manna Dey and Aarti Mukherjee. The song is written by Gulzar which is set to music by Nachiketa Ghosh.

The situation of the song is that after becoming popular singer in Bangla songs, a new music director has taken Aditi for the first time to sing a Hindi song to test it in the market. His idea is that if successful, he wants her to accompany him to Mumbai to make her popular in Hindi songs which will also benefit the music director in pursuing his career in Mumbai. However, with so much happening with her in personal front, Aditi finally declines to move out of Kolkata. In real life also, Supriya Devi, after working in Mumbai for 3 films – Begaana’ (1963), ‘Aap Ki Parchhaayian’ (1964) and ‘Door Gagan Ki Chhaaon Mein’ (1964), she bid farewell to Bollywood. It is said that she refused Raj Kapoor’s offer to her of a role in ‘Mera Naam Joker’ (1970) which eventually went to Simi.

(Video)

(Audio)

Song – Mann Kahaan Laago Mora Chain Gawaai Diyo Re (Bilambita Loy)(Bangla) (1970) Singer – Manna Dey, Aarti Mukherji, Lyrics – Gulzar, MD – Nachiketa Ghosh
Manna Dey + Aarti Mukherji

Lyrics

taap chadhe to
baid bulaayi ke. . .
tan ke rog utaare
arre mann ka rog na jaaye raama
laakh jatan kar haare

 
mann kahaan laago
aiyyo. . .
arre mann kahaan laago
mora chain ganwaayi diyo re
mann kahaan laago
mora chain ganwaayi diyo re
nain laage
bairi naina
nain laage
bairi naina
raat jagaayi diyo re ae
mann kahaan laago
ho o
arre mann kahaan laago  
mora chain ganwaayi diyo re. . .

kehte naina
sunte naina
preet ki andhi do batiyaan
haan
jhooth si kaari
laagi raama
veham se lambi
ye ratiyaan
kaisa rog lagaayi diyo re. . .
o mann kahaan laago
uyi ammaa
arre mann kahaan laago
mora chain ganwaayi diyo re. . .
ae ae ae ae
man kahaan laago
mora chain ganwaayi diyo re
 
kaahe chhalken
bheegi phalken
rote hanste sapanon mein
rog lage hai
jogan jaisi
do sansaari akhiyon mein
kaun ye paath padhaayi gayo re..
mann kahaan laago
haaye
arre mann kahaan laago
mora chain ganwaayi diyo re. . .
ae ae ae ae ae

mann kahaan laago
mora chain ganwaayi diyo re
nain laage
bairi naina
nain laage
bairi naina
raat jagaayi diyo re ae
man kahaan laago
mora chain ganwaayi diyo re
hey ae ae ae ae
man kahaan laago
mora chain ganwaayi diyo re

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

ताप चढ़े तो
बैद बुलाइ के॰ ॰ ॰
तन के रोग उतारे
अरे मन का रोग ना जाये रामा
लाख जतन कर हारे

मन कहाँ लागो
अइओ॰ ॰ ॰
अरे मन कहाँ लागो
मोरा चैन गँवाई दियो रे
मन कहाँ लागो
मोरा चैन गँवाई दियो रे
नैन लागे
बैरी नैना
नैन लागे
बैरी नैना
रात जगाई दियो रे
हो ओ
अरे मन कहाँ लागो
मोरा चैन गँवाई दियो रे॰ ॰ ॰

कहते नैना
सुनते नैना
प्रीत की अंधी दो बतियाँ
हाँ
झूठ सी कारी
लागि रामा
वहम से लंबी
ये रतियाँ
कैसा रोग लगाई दियो रे॰ ॰ ॰
ओ मन कहाँ लागो
ऊई अम्मा
अरे मन कहाँ लागो
मोरा चैन गँवाई दियो रे॰ ॰ ॰
ए ए ए ए
मन कहाँ लागो
मोरा चैन गँवाई दियो रे

काहे छलकें
भीगी पलकें
रोते हँसते सपनों में
रोग लगे है
जोगन जैसी
दो संसारी अखियों में
कौन ये पाठ पढ़ाई गयो रे॰ ॰ ॰
मन कहाँ लागो
हाए
अरे मन कहाँ लागो
मोरा चैन गँवाई दियो रे॰ ॰ ॰
ए ए ए ए ए

मन कहाँ लागो
मोरा चैन गँवाई दियो रे
नैन लागे
बैरी नैना
नैन लागे
बैरी नैना
रात जगाई दियो रे
मन कहाँ लागो
मोरा चैन गँवाई दियो रे
हे ए ए ए ए ए
मन कहाँ लागो
मोरा चैन गँवाई दियो रे


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4305 Post No. : 15573 Movie Count :

4287

—————————————–
Hindi songs in Bangla Films: 26
—————————————-

Mumbai has been the leading Hindi film production centre in India ever since Dadasaheb Phalke produced the first silent film ‘Raja Harishchandra’ in 1913. After the release of India’s first talkie ‘Alam Ara’ in 1931, many more film production companies were set up in Mumbai, some of them owning the studios. The outdoor shootings, if any, in the initial stages of talkie films were done mostly in around Mumbai. It was quite natural that stories of some Hindi films would have Mumbai as the background portraying the many facets of the city. Obviously, in such films, there would be scenes from Mumbai and possibly one ‘Bombay-centric’ song.

The earliest Hindi film in which I found a song with Bombay (now Mumbai) as the theme is Bambai Ko Chalo Bambai Ko from ‘Kirti’ (1942) written by Pandit Phani. The song talks about Boribunder station (now Chatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus), dhuen waali ghaadi (steam engine train), Bambai Ki Sethani, Kalkate ke babu, Marwaad ki rani, Kashi ke sadhu etc. In short, the song gives a glimpse of cosmopolitan character of Mumbai.

In the 1950s, there were two songs which, I feel, are quintessential of Mumbai even now. The first is, Ae Dil Hai Mushkil Jeena Yahaan Ye Hai Bombay Meri Jaan from ‘CID’ (1956) written by Majrooh Sultanpuri. At the outset, song would appear to be a fun song. But a closer look at the lyrics of the song would reveal that behind the fun, there is sarcasm. For example:

kahin building kahin traame, kahin motor, kahin mill
miltaa hai yahaan sab kuchh ik miltaa nahin dil
insaan kaa nahin kahin naam-o-nishaan

[Everything is available in Mumbai except love and humanity.]

Another example of sarcasm in the song:

kahin satta, kahin patta, kahin chori kahin race
kahin daaka, kahin faaka, kahin thokar, kahin thes
bekaaron ke hain kayi kaam yahaan

[There are many works available like gambling, pick-pocketing, burglary, horse racing etc. There is no dearth of employment for unemployed.]

But at the end, the song turns from the sarcasm to the theory of ‘karma’:

buraa duniyaa jo hai kahtaa aisaa bholaa tu na ban
jo hai kartaa wo hai bhartaa ye yahaan kaa hai chalan
dadagiri nahin milne ki yahaan

[By telling that the world is bad, one does not become good. Here, the motto is that one who works get the fruits of his work. Bullying will not fetch anything.]

The second song of 1950s I am referring to is about the flight of the homeless in Mumbai. The song does not have specific reference to Mumbai in its lyrics but the word ‘Boribunder’ in the lyrics is the indication as to which city the song is referring to. It is an iconic song, Cheen O Arab Hamaara Hindustan Hamaara from ‘Phir Subah Hogi’ (1958) which was written by Sahir Ludhianvi. Just three lines from the song sums of the problems of homeless in Mumbai in a sarcastic way:

rehne ko ghar nahin hai
saaraa jahaan hamaara
Hindustan hamaara

There are also songs like Jiska Joota Usi Ka Sar, Dil Hai Chhota Bada Shahar, Wah Re Wah Re Teri Bambai from ‘Guest House’ (1959) written by Prem Dhawan and Ye Bambai Shahar Ka Bada Naam Hai from ‘Kya Ye Bombay Hai’ (1959) written by Noor Devasi. Both the songs describe the life in Mumbai from different perspectives. Then there is a fun song, Ye Haseen Bambai Apne Ko To Jam Gayi from ‘Holiday in Bombay’ (1963) written by Anjaan and “Bambai Hamaari Bambai Ye Rajdulaari Bambai” from ‘Street Singer’ (1966) written by Hasrat Jaipuri.

As we come to 1970s, with the exponential growth of Mumbai as a business and commercial hub of India, Mumbai became one of the major preferred cities for migrant workers. The problems faced by migrants in Mumbai has been beautifully expressed in the song Seene Mein Jalan Aankhon Mein Toofaan Sa Kyon Hai from ‘Gaman’ (1978) written by Shahryar. The problem of finding homes for the middle class people in Mumbai who spent their bachelorhood in staying as paying guests is depicted in the song Do Deewaane Shahar Mein, Raat Mein Ya Dophar Mein, Aab O Daana Dhoondhte Hain Ek Aashiyaanaa Dhoondhte Hain from ‘Gharoanda’ (1977), written by Gulzar.

There are other ‘Bombay-centric’ songs in Hindi films which are mostly fun songs. One of the popular songs under this category is Ee Hai Bambai Nagariya Tu Dekh Babuaa from ‘Don’ (1978) written by Anjaan. I have not checked much about the songs on Mumbai in the 1980s and thereafter. But one song whose lyrics stand true to most of the migrants to Mumbai including those who came here to fulfil their dream of becoming artist in Hindi films is from an ‘off the mainstream’ film ‘Sankat City’ (2009). The apt song is “Mumbai One-Way Nagari Hai”.

All the ‘Bombay-centric’ songs I have enumerated above are from Hindi films. It was a pleasant surprise for me when I found one such Hindi song in Bangla film ‘Dui Bechaara’ (1960). The ‘Bombay’ song is “Karo Na Phere Gali Ke Mere Hanso Na Bolo Ji” sung by Geeta Dutt and Manna Dey. The song is written by Gulzar which is set to music by Bhupen Hazarika.

The film is not available for viewing. So it is difficult to visualise the situation of the song in the film. Probably, it could well be a stage song.

Audio Clip:

Song – Karo Na Phere Gali Ke Mere Hato Na Bolo Jee (Dui Bechaare) (Bangla) (1960) Singers – Geeta Dutt, Manna Dey, Lyrics – Gulzar, MD – Bhupen Hazarika
Both

Lyrics

karo na phere gali ke mere
hato na bolo ji
haay
jigar jalaa ke nazar churaa ke
kahaan chale ho ji

arre karo na phere gali ke mere
hato na bolo ji
aji jigar jalaa ke nazar churaa ke
kahaan chale ho ji

bahaane lagaaye toone
dekhi na Bambai teri
bahaane lagaaye toone
dekhi na Bambai teri
bura hai bigadna hamse
chalo aise roothho na
chalo dikhaa doon tumhen ghumaa doon
badaa shahar Bambai

puraana hai Boribunder
adda chor uchakkon kaa
puraana hai Boribundar
adda chor uchakkon kaa

badaa naam chori chakkar
rela dhool aur dhakkon kaa
badaa naam chori chakkar
rela dhool aur dhakkon kaa
aji chalo dikhaa doon
tumhen ghumaa doon
badaa shahar Bambai

o o o
anokhe tamaashe iske
kaisi ye Bambai teri
chalo dikhaa doon
tumhen ghumaa doon
badaa shahar Bambai

kinaare pe chaupati ke filmy pariyaan ghoomen
kinaare pe chaupati ke filmy pariyaan ghoomen
kahaan ko chale tum itni pahan ke oonchi patloonen
kahaan ko chale tum itni pahan ke oonchi patloonen
aji chalo dikhaa doon
tumhen ghumaa doon
badaa shahar Bambai

o o o o
anokhe tamaashe iske
kaisi ye Bambai teri
chalo dikhaa doon
tumhen ghumaa doon
badaa shahar Bambai

sharam bhi yahaan sharmaaye phere maari maari
sharam bhi yahaan sharmaaye phere maari maari

samundar mein dooben jaake maari baari baari
samundar mein dooben jaake maari baari baari
chalo main haari nakal hai saari
ajab shahar Bambai
ajji kaha thhaa hamne suna na tumne
chalo chhodo Bambai

chalo chalo chhodo Bambai
chalo chalo chhodo Bambai
chalo chalo chhodo Bambai


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4136 Post No. : 15295 Movie Count :

4213

Happy Children’s Day to Atuldom

“Makdee” means spider. This was also the title of a movie in 2002 which was directed by Vishal Bharadwaj who was also the music director. This was one of the movies in recent times that portrayed children the way they actually should be – as bright, intelligent, naughty and playful. I am put-off when children are portrayed as miniature adults and made to mouth huge sentimental dialogues which I am 100% sure kids from normal upbringing would not even dream of. My definition of kids from a normal upbringing is where the only thing that a child has to do is finish their school, come home -play in the ground or backyard, do their studies for the next day, help around the family as per necessity, play mischief and be active through the day so that they sleep peacefully and wake up fresh to have their routines all over again. In between all this they should have time to read comics, novels, have memorable time with their grandparents and friends which will stay with them for their life as pleasant memories. ‘Makdee’ was one such movie.

It had Shweta Prasad play 10-year-old twin sisters – Chunni and Munni. Chunni who was a prankster and Munni the timid, studious kind. Chunni keeps fooling around the village and constantly gets into trouble with the local butcher Kallu along with her friend ‘Mughal-e-azam’ and on one occasion Kallu chases them around the village and in the melee Munni runs into a mansion which is famous around the village as to being haunted. Then what follows is Chunni’s struggle to find her sister, save her from the clutches of the witch who resides in the haunted mansion, and in the process solve the case of all the persons from the village, who went missing, when they ventured into the mansion. She also is felicitated by the collector of the district as she finds the reason for the witch (Shabana Azmi) making the mansion her home- a hidden treasure.

‘Makdee’ had all the elements that would was needed in a children’s film- fun/ fantasy and a moral – which is the essential of any story telling session with kids. The moral being that “you cannot cry wolf always, as a time will come when people will stop believing you.”

14th November is celebrated as children’s day in India in memory of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. He was fondly called chacha Nehru and it is said that he was fond of children. I remember my father used to tell me about his school trip to Delhi when he was in class 8 or 9 and they were fortunate to have an audience with the then Prime Minister Pandit Nehru and what an experience it was – today’s youngsters would use the word AWESOME. My father was also proud about nearly sharing birth dates- his birthdate was 15th November. In fact, he used to say that it was not difficult to remember chacha Nehru’s death anniversary as that was the date he landed in Mumbai from Ahmedabad for his job and found all available forms of transport had stopped as a mark of respect to the departed leader. But that is not the purpose of this post.

Let us move on and enjoy this lively song which shows the exact emotion a child will have when it is a holiday from school or vacation or there is an unexpected holiday declared due to rains, bharat bandh, or death of some trustee or anyone remotely important. Here I will confess that I see myself as Chunni, Munni, Mughal-e-azam and all the kids in this movie. I identified with them.


Song-Kukdoo koon chhutti hai (Makdee)(2002) Singer-Upagna Pandya, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Vishal Bhardwaj
Chorus

Lyrics

kukdu koon oo
kukdu koon oo
chhutti hai
he chhutti hai
he chhutti hai
kukdu koon oo

ghanti bajaao paape
ghanti bajaao re
bastaa uthhaao paape
bastaa uthhaao bhaago re
hai kitaabon se kutti
chhutti hai
arre chhutti hai chhutti
chhutti hai
hai kitaabon se kutti
kutti hai
arre chhutti hai chhutti
chhutti hai
he chhutti hai
he chhutti hai
kukdu koon oo

jhum tanakum tanakum
jhum tanakum tanakum
tara tara tara
la la la lala

somwaar susti mein katataa hai
mangal ko mood kahaan banta hai
arre somwaar susti mein katataa hai
mangal ko mood kahaan banta hai

budh ki chintaa mein veer ki fikar
shukkar ka tambu shani ke ghar
monday ko sunday ki chhutti hai
hai kitaabon se kutti
chhutti hai
are chhutti hai chhutti
chhutti hai

arre monday ko sunday ki
arre chhutti hai chhutti
chhutti hai
he chhutti hai
kukdu koon oo

ghanti bajaao paape
ghanti bajaao re (he he he he)
bastaa uthaao paape
bastaa uthaao bhaago re
da da daa da da
pom pom pom
da da daa da da
pom pom pom
da da daa da da
pom pom pom
da da daa da da
pom pom pom
master jee
bhaago


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4131 Post No. : 15290 Movie Count :

4210

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 6
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

A couple of months’ back, I had come across a Hindi song ‘ruke ruke se kadam’ from a Bangla film, ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) sung by Mubarak Begum under the music direction of Salil Chowdhury. I could not locate the picturised version of the song. The tune of the song gives me an impression that it is picturised as a mujra song. While it was a new song for me, the ‘mukhda’ of the song sounded familiar to me. Oh! Yes. It was the more famous song, ruke ruke se kadam from ‘Mausam’ (1975) sung by Lata Mangeshkar under the music direction of Madan Mohan. Both the songs have almost the same lyrics which are accredited to Gulzar. So, it is one song, composed in two tunes by two different music directors, depicting two different emotions.

There is a section of the Hindi film music lovers who feels that credit for both the songs should go to Mirza Ghalib as he had originally written this ghazal which Gulzar has merely changed a few words to give an easy understanding of the original words. So, I decided to make a reality check by comparing the original ghazal written by Mirza Gahlib and the versions written by Gulzar for both the films mentioned above.

The original ghazal written by Mirza Ghalib has five she’rs. The ghazal written by Gulzar for the Bangla film ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) has four she’rs and that for ‘Mausam’ (1975) has three she’rs. Let us compare the she’rs of all the three versions of the ghazal in a tabular form for easy verification as to whether the ‘allegation’ on Gulzar has substance or not.

Original ghazal by Mirza Ghalib Gulzar’s version of the ghazal – ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) Gulzar’s version of the ghazal – ‘Mausam’ (1975)
Ruke ruke se kadam
ruk ke baar baar chale.Qaraar de ke tere dar se beqaraar chale.
Ruke ruke se kadam
mud ke baar baar chale.Qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale.
Ruke ruke se kadam
ruk ke baar baar chale.Qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale
Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan jism kaa jaan par.

Chale jahaan se to
ye pairahan uttaar chale.

Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par.

Tumhaare kadmon mein
ye karz bhi
utaar chale

Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par.

Le tere kadmon mein
ye karz bhi
utaar chale

Na jaane kaun si mitti watan ki mitti thhi.

Nazar mein dhool jigar mein liye ghubaar chale.

[Not used] [Not used]
Sahar naa aayi kayi baar neend se jaage.

Thhi raat raat ki ye zindagi guzaar chale.

Sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya.

Ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale.

Subah naa aayi kayi baar neend se jaage.

ki ek raat ki ye zindagi guzaar chale

Mili hai shama se ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamko.

Gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale.

Shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne.

Gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale.

[Not used]

Note: Bold words indicate changes from the original she’rs.

It will be observed from the above table that Gulzar has made only some cosmetic changes in the original ghazal written by Mirza Ghalib which has been used in the two films mentioned above. Hence, the credit for the two ghazals used in the films should have rightly gone to Mirza Ghalib. I am aware that Gulzar is a great fan of Mirza Ghalib and he had used Mirza Ghalib’s she’rs in a couple of his other songs including dil dhoondhta hai phir wahi fursat ke raat din. So, I thought that he may have given due credit to Mirza Ghalib in his film ‘Mausam’ (1975) for his inspirations. But in the credit title of the film in DVD version, there is no acknowledgement to Mirza Ghalib.

Coming back to the song ‘ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale’ from the Bangla film, ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964), as mentioned earlier, this song is not available in the DVD version of the film. I feel that this mujra song may have been partially used in the film. But the full song is available on the record version which was issued by Saregama (then HMV). There is another Hindi song in the film, ‘saans ke zakhm bhar raha hai koi’ written by Gulzar and sung by Manna Dey which is partially used in the film.

‘Laal Pathore’ (1964, Bangla) in which Uttam Kumar, Supriya Devi (Chaudhury) and Srabani Basu acted in main roles was later made in Hindi as ‘Laal Pathar’ (1971) with corresponding roles for Rajkumar, Hema Malini and Rakhi. Both the versions were directed by Sushil Majumdar. While Salil Chowdhury composed the music for Bangla version, Shankar-Jaikishan composed the music for Hindi version.

I was enthralled with the Ghazal King Madan Mohan’s version of the ghazal, ‘ruke ruke se kadam’ from ‘Mausam’ (1975)’ Let us now enjoy Salil Chowdhury’s version of the same ghazal in a different setting.

Lastly, let us also give credit to Mirza Ghalib for the lyrics of both the version of the ghazal along with Gulzar.

Audio link:

Song-Ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale (Laal Pathore)(Bangla)(1964) Singer-Mubarak Begam, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Salil Chaudhary

Lyrics

ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale
ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale
ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale
gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
tumhaare kadmon mein ye karz bhi utaar chale
tumhaare kadmon mein ye karz bhi utaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale
ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4069 Post No. : 15206

Today (8 september 2019) is the birth anniversary of Bhupen Hazarika (8 September 1926 – 5 November 2011).

It is appropriate that we honour him in the blog with a song. Lyrics of the song (sent by Avinash Scrapwala) is there with me. When I listened to the song, I wanted to listen to the original Assamese song. That opened a Pandora’s box. I discovered such a goldmine of information about Bhupen Hazarika, Assam, Assamese culture and History etc that it became a case of information overload for me. Now I have so much information to discuss that I do not known where to begin.

The thought that immediately came to my mind is whether Bhupen Hazarika has got his due recognition. The answer is, yes, belatedly, but his contribution has been recognised and he received Bharat Ratna this year in 2019. A posthumous recognition, and a richly deserved one.

The contribution of Bhupen Hazarika in putting North East part of India in general and Assam in particular and bringing its rich culture to the notice of outsiders is immense.

He began very young and visited all over the world and became a truly cosmopolitan Indian. And he never forgot his roots !

Assam and North East is a remote part of India, and it was considered a “punishment” post for Indians living in other parts of the country. That was mainly because this part of the country was neglected and underdeveloped. The aspirations and feelings of this part of the country were not properly addressed. This led to feeling of alienation and led to separatist movements and militancy.

I had the experience of being posted in this “punishment” posting area from 2000 to 2003. These three years helped me understand Assam and North East first hand by interacting with the natives of the region. And I realised how their hopes, aspirations, demands etc were falling into deaf ears for decades.

Now, for the last few years, attempts has been made to make the people of north East region feel like every one else. The infrastructure works that were languishing for decades have been fast tracked. In 2000, I was posted in Lumding division. The MG line from Lumding to Badarpur and beyond in South Assam was planned for BG conversion but the progress was abysmally slow. During the last few years, this project was fast tracked and now we finally have BG line between Lumding and South Assam. A travel between Silchar to Lumding, which took 12 hours now takes five hours. This remote area now feels more mainstream with rest of Assam. Assam itself now feels more mainstream in India than ever before.

In the past, roads and bridges would not be constructed in border areas because China used to object. Now the government ignores such Chinese protests and goes ahead with the construction work. That is how the long pending demands of Assam and North East were met. Bogibeel Bridge, which was a demand since 1985, in the agreement signed between AASU and Indian Government was gathering dust for decades before this bridge finally got constructed and inaugurated in 2019. One year ago, another bridge (which too was not getting constructed in the past because of Chinese protests) got finished and was inaugurated. This bridge over river Lohit, connecting Dhola and Sadia ( the longest road bridge in India), was very appropriately named as Bhupen Hazarika Bridge.

At a time when North East felt alienated from rest of India, it was people like Bhupen Hazarika who kept their morale high and kept their hopes alive, and kept their faith in India intact.

Not just India, even the neighboring Bangladesh regards him highly. His iconic Assamese folk song Manush Manusher Jonno (Humans are for humanity) was chosen to be the second most favourite number after the National anthem of Bangladesh, in a Bangladeshi opinion poll.

Many of his Assamese songs became known all over India after their Hindi versions were made. One such album of his songs was “Main aur Mera Saaya”(1993). Here, Gulzar translated some of Bhupen Hazarika’s iconic Assamese songs into Hindi.

These Hindi songs became so popular that they are sung all over India by artists and they are performed by school children in their cultural programmes.

Here is the song “Ek Kali Do Pattiyaan” from this album. Bhupen Hazarika had sung this song originally in Assamese as “Eti Kuhi Duti Paat”. This song has subseuently been sung by many other artists, in Assamese as well as Hindi, and I guess in other languages as well.

Here is this goose bump inducing folk song from Assam, beautifully translated into Hindi by Gulzar. The song is sung and composed by Bhupen Hazarika.

As mentioned above, the lyrics of this song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala.


Song-Ek kali do pattiyaan (Bhupen Hazarika NFS)(1993) Singer-Bhupen Hazarika, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Bhupen Hazarika

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Ek kali do pattiyaan
Naazuk naazuk ungliyaan
Tod rahi hai kaun ye
Ek kali do pattiyaan
Ratanpur baageeche mein
ho oEk kali do pattiyaan
Naazuk naazuk ungliyaan
Tod rahi hai kaun ye
Ek kali do pattiyaan
Ratanpur baageeche mein

Khul ke khilkhilaati
Saawan barsaati
Hans rahi hai kaun ye
Mogre jagaati
Ho mogre jagaati
Khul ke khilkhilaati
Saawan barsaati
Hans rahi hai kaun ye
Mogre jagaati
Ho mogre jagaati
Ek kali do pattiyaan
Naazuk naazuk ungliyaan
Tod rahi hai kaun ye
Ek kali do pattiyaan
Ratanpur baageeche mein ae

Jugnu aur Lachhmi ki
Lagan aisi aayee
Daali daali jhoomi leke angdaayee
O Leke angdaayee
Jugnu aur Lachhmi ki
Lagan aisi aayee
Daali daali jhoomi leke angdaayee
O Leke angdaayee
O o
Ek kali do pattiyaan
Naazuk naazuk ungliyaan
Tod rahi hai kaun ye
Ek kali do pattiyaan
Ratanpur baageeche mein ae

Jugnu aur Lachhmi ki
Preet rang laayee
Nanhi si ek munni si
Chuppi jagmagaaee
O Chuppi jagmagaaee
Jugnu aur Lachhmi ki
Preet rang layee
Nanhi si ek munni si
Chuppi jagmagaaee
O Chuppi jagmagaaee
Ek kali do pattiyaan
Naazuk naazuk ungliyaan
Tod rahi hai kaun ye
Ek kali do pattiyaan
Ratanpur baageeche mein ae

Ek kali do pattiyaan aa aan
Khilne bhi naa paayee thhi ee ee
Todne us baageeche mein
Daanav aaya re
Ho o daanav aaya re
Daanav ki parchhaayee mein
Kaanp rahi thhi pattiyaan
Bujhne lagi maasoom kali
Daanav ki parchhaayee mein
Daanav ki parchhaayee mein

Saaye se bedaar huye
Tambaran si baahon ke
Saaye se bedaar huye
Tambaran si baahon ke

Dhol maadal bajne lage
Maadal aise baaje re
Lakhon milke naache re
Aaya ek toofaan naya
Daanav dar ke bhaag gaya
Maadal aise garja re
Daanav dar ke bhaga re
Daanav dar ke bhaga

Ek kali do pattiyaan
Naazuk naazuk ungliyaan
Tod rahi hai kaun ye
Ek kali do pattiyaan
Ratanpur baageeche mein
Ratanpur baageeche mein
Ho Ratanpur baageeche mein

————————————
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————

एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
नाज़ुक नाज़ुक उंगलियाँ
तोड़ रही है कौन ये
एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
रतनपुर बागीचे में
हो एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
नाज़ुक नाज़ुक उंगलियाँ
तोड़ रही है कौन ये
एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
रतनपुर बागीचे में

खुल के खिलखिलाती
सावन बरसाती
हंस रही है कौन ये
मोगरे जगाती
हो मोगरे जगाती
खुल के खिलखिलाती
सावन बरसाती
हंस रही है कौन ये
मोगरे जगाती
हो मोगरे जगाती
एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
नाज़ुक नाज़ुक उंगलियाँ
तोड़ रही है कौन ये
एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
रतनपुर बागीचे में ए

जुगनू और लछमी की
लगन ऐसी आयी
डाली डाली झूमी ले के अंगडाई
ओ ले के अंगडाई
जुगनू और लछमी की
लगन ऐसी आयी
डाली डाली झूमी ले के अंगडाई
ओ ले के अंगडाई
हो ओ ओ
एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
नाज़ुक नाज़ुक उंगलियाँ
तोड़ रही है कौन ये
एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
रतनपुर बागीचे में ए

जुगनू और लछमी की
प्रीत रंग लाई
नन्ही सी एक मुन्नी सी
चुप्पी जगमगाई
ओ चुप्पी जगमगाई
जुगनू और लछमी की
प्रीत रंग लाई
नन्ही सी एक मुन्नी सी
चुप्पी जगमगाई
ओ चुप्पी जगमगाई
एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
नाज़ुक नाज़ुक उंगलियाँ
तोड़ रही है कौन ये
एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
रतनपुर बागीचे में

एक कली दो पत्तियाँ आ आँ
खिलने भी ना पायी थी ई
तोड़ने उस बागीचे में
दानव आया रे
हो ओ दानव आया रे
दानव की परछाई में
काँप रही थी पत्तियाँ आँ
बुझने लगी मासूम कली
दानव की परछाई में ए
दानव की परछाई में

साए से बेदार हुए
ताम्बरन सी बाहों के
साए से बेदार हुए
ताम्बरन सी बाहों के

ढोल मादल बजने लगे
मादल ऐसे बाजे रे
लाखों मिलके नाचे रे
आया एक तूफान नया
दानव डर के भाग गया
मादल ऐसे गरजा रे
दानव डर के भागा
रे दानव डर के भागा

एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
नाज़ुक नाज़ुक उंगलियाँ
तोड़ रही है कौन ये
एक कली दो पत्तियाँ
रतनपुर बागीचे में ए
रतनपुर बागीचे में
हो ओ रतनपुर बागीचे में


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4069 Post No. : 15205 Movie Count :

4179

Hullo to Atuldom

Today I have a very difficult task. The task of selecting one song from a possible 5251 (7874-2623 as per the stats page of the blog) is almost like needle in a hay stack. And there will be at least a few thousand popular songs in this 5k of which many will fall in the category of “How come…?”. Some may lead to their movies getting Yyippeeeed and some may introduce a new movie onto the blog.

I never added any criteria for the song selection as I had so many songs of this singer, running through my head. Over the last few days I had heard many songs of this artist and found that most of them are yet to appear on the blog. It doesn’t help matters that she has been around since 1948 – just about 71 years of work to choose from. 71 years of work means singing for all the females who have ever graced the Bollywood firmament, of course excluding the ladies of the silent era. I thought I will take the easy way out and try and find the first ever Bollywood song recorded by her for Hansraj Behl in 1948. But, if only, life was that easy!!!! 🙂

Just then, as if Godsend, my daughter called me for getting some clarification and as soon as we finished her work with me, I told her what I was up to, and we went into overdrive about the song selection. She on her part suggested a few songs which both of us love and have music cassettes of, but I shot them down as they were non-filmy. I had my reasons for shooting them down- when there are so many movie songs left why go for non- film songs. We still have years to go before we run out of film songs. Then, after a lot of brain-storming with my dear Peevesie, I zeroed in on a song written by Gulzar.

What is unusual about this song? For one, it is one of the rare occasions where Anu Malik has given music for an album with songs written by Gulzar. This album has songs sung by Asha Bhonsle, K.S. Chitra, Jaspinder Narula, Roop Kumar Rathod, Palash Sen and KK. All the songs of the movie were well received. But the track by our birthday girl was a huge hit. I am talking of the songs from Meghna Gulzar’s directorial debut “Filhaal” of 2002. Meghna, as is well known, is the daughter of Rakhee and Gulzar. She started out her career as a free-lance writer, going on to assist Saeed Akhtar Mirza and her father before going on to direct “Filhaal”. It was not an unusual story but was handled differently.

The movie had Sushmita Sen and Tabu – as stars of commercial value and Dr. Palash Sen and Sanjay Suri as the male actors. The ladies are long-time friends but differ in their dreams and aspiration. They are different where settling into family is concerned but when one of them (Sushmita) has a problem in her family life, as she cannot conceive, the other (Tabu) steps in to be a surrogate mother to her friend’s child. Then differences crop up between the friends as the pregnancy progresses and how they resolve all the confusion forms the gist of the movie. It was critically appreciated but I am unaware of its commercial status.

Today’s song is sung by Asha Bhonsle. I hope all the readers had guessed that I want to wish our Ashaji a lot of health and good times and hope to hear more of her songs.

P.S.: Hope people have noted that I have exercised restraint and not mentioned about her lineage, family, her most popular songs and my favourite Asha Bhonsle song. Only I know how difficult it was not to mention songs. 🙂


Song-Ae zindagi ye lamha jee lene de (Filhaal)(2002) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Anu Malik

Lyrics

ae zindagi
yeh lamha jee lene de
ho o o o
pehle se likha
kuchh bhee nahin
roz naya kuchh
likhti hai tu
jo bhee likha hai
dil se jiya hai
ye lamha filhaal jee lene de
ye lamha filhaal jee lene de

maasoom si haseen bewajah hee kabhi
honthon pe khil jaati hai
anjaan si khushi
behti huyi kabhi
saahil pe mil jaati hai
ye anjaana sa darr
ajnabi hai magar
khoobsoorat hai jee lene de
ye lamha filhaal jee lene de
ye lamha filhaal jee lene de

dil hi mein rehta hai
aankhon mein behta hai
kachcha sa ik khwaab hai
lagta sawaal hai
shaayad jawaab hai
dil phir bhi betaab hai
ye sukoon hai toh hai
ye junoon hai toh hai
khoobsoorat hai jee lene de
ye lamha filhaal jee lene de
ye lamha filhaal jee lene de

ho o o pehle se likha kuchh bhi nahin
roz naya kuchh
ho o o likhti hai tu
jo bhi likha hai
dil se jiya hai
ye lamha filhaal jee lene de
ye lamha filhaal jee lene de


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4056 Post No. : 15188

I am an ardent admirer of Ruskin Bond’s short stories. I do not remember as to when I started bonding with Ruskin Bond’s books. It could be sometime early 1990s when I read his first book titled ‘Beautiful Garhwal – Heaven in Himalayas’ (1988). Surprisingly, this book is not listed under the list of his published books. It is a ‘coffee-table book’ with 15 of his articles on the Garhwal Himalayas – from the village life, rivers, valleys, pilgrimage to trees and flowers, etc. It is an excellent and lavishly printed book in art paper with a lot of illustrations and beautiful pictures. This book was printed for Garhwal Mandal Vikas Nigam (GMVL) as a part of promotion of tourism in the Garhwal Himalayas.

Since then, I had ready many of his short stories which are in my collections of books like ‘Rain in the Mountains – Notes from the Himalaya’ (1993), ‘The Lamp is Lit’ (1998), The Room on the Roof’, ‘The Night Train to Deoli & Other Stories’ etc. Very recently, I have read his latest book ‘The Beauty of All My Days’ – A Memoir ( 2018). A few of his books of short story collections which I have read, seems to have been missing from my collections. Probably, I may have given to some ones to read but they did not return.

Ruskin Bond has spent much of his life at the foothills of the Garhwal Himalayas. His last 5 decades have been spent in Landour, a cantonment area of Mussoorie. He has widely travelled in Garhwal Himalayas. Hence, much of his writings is the reflections of the hills and the village life of the Garhwal Himalayas and his nostalgic experiences. His lucid writing style takes the readers to the virtual trip to the Himalayas.

I have been very much influenced by the writings of Ruskin Bond and his nostalgia of the Garhwal Himalayas. Of all the Himalaya treks I have undertaken during the last 35 years, I have done the maximum number of treks in the Garhwal Himalaya. His description of the village life prompted me to prefer home stays in village houses for the overnight stays rather than in the tents whenever I trekked in the Himalayas. I could, therefore, get the first hand experiences of Ruskin Bond’s descriptions of the Garhwal villages and the psyche of the simple villagers.

Recently, I have written an article in the Blog on Gulzar saab on the occasion of his 85th Birthday. When I was going through the profile of Ruskin Bond, I found it interesting to note that there were many similarities in the events in the lives of Ruskin Bond and Gulzar saab. Both were born in 1934, with Gulzar saab being younger by exactly 3 months. Both had a lonely childhood. Gulzar saab lost his mother when he was a child. Ruskin Bond had grown up without the support of his mother as his parents had divorced when he was a child. His mother got remarried and he lived with his father. Circumstances deprived both of them of their fathers’ company when it was most needed. Gulzar saab was sent to Mumbai to stay with his elder step brother, while Ruskin Bond missed his father most of the time because he was in the Royal Air Force and later died from Malaria at an early age.

Both Ruskin Bond and Gulzar Saab developed their writing skills and got their poems/short story published when they were teens. Both got associated with Hindi films albeit with a gap – Gulzar saab in ‘Bandini’ (1963) as a lyricist and Ruskin Bond as a story writer in ‘Junoon’ (1978) based on his novel, ‘A Flight of Pigeons’ (1970s). Both wrote and published a good number of books of children’s literature. Ruskin Bond and Gulzar saab were conferred with Sahitya Akademy Awards in 1992 and 2002 respectively and with Padma Bhushan in 2014 and 2004 respectively.

While the lives of Ruskin Bond and Gulzar saab was moving parallelly, they got merged for the first time when Vishal Bhardwaj decided to make a children’s film in Hindi, ‘The Blue Umbrella’ (Neeli Chhatri, 2005) based on the novella of the same title written by Ruskin Bond. He also wrote screen-play for the film jointly with Vishal Bhardwaj. Gulzar saab got associated with this film as a lyricist.

After a gap of about 5 years, Ruskin Bond and Gulzar saab worked together in Vishal Bhardwaj’s film ‘7 Khoon Maaf’ (2011) which was based on his novel ‘Sussanna’s Seven Husbands’. Ruskin Bond wrote screen-play along with Vishal Bhardwaj and also played a cameo role of a priest in the film. Gulzar saab wrote the lyrics. Collaboration between them for the third film is in the offing. Incidentally, Vishal Bhardwaj has become a neighbour of Ruskin Bond in Landour as revealed by the latter.

As I mentioned earlier, ‘The Blue Umbrella’ (2005) was a children’s film based on Ruskin Bond’s novella by the same name. The film was directed by Vishal Bhardwaj. Except for Pankaj Kapoor and Deepak Dobriyal, rest of the actors in the film are unfamiliar to me. The lead actors in the film is Pankaj Kapoor and 10-year girl, Shreya Sharma. The film was critically acclaimed and it got the National Film Award for the best children’s film in 2008. But the film was a box office disaster.

The film is not available for viewing in any video uploading platforms like YT. I saw the movie on Netflix. There are some minor differences in the story outlined in the film from the story in the book. The story in the book is based in some remote village in Garhwal whereas in the film, the story is based on a remote village in Himachal Pradesh. The end in the film also differ from the book which I will discuss later. The story in the film is as under:

In a remote Himalayan village, 10-year old girl, Biniya (Shreya Sharma) stays with her widowed mother and elder brother. The family has a small terraced field and a couple of cows sufficient to take care of their sustenance.

One day when Biniya goes to graze the cows, she comes across a group of Japanese tourists. Biniya’s eyes fall on a beautiful blue umbrella which is lying open on the meadow. She likes the umbrella and wants to have it but she has no means to get it. The lady tourist sees a necklace with a pedant of bear’s claws in Biniya’s neck and she likes it. Despite the bear’s claws being regarded as a lucky charm, Biniya exchanges for the blue umbrella. From now onward, Biniya and her blue umbrella are inseparable.

Most of the people in her village are envious of her blue umbrella as no one in the village possessed such a beautiful umbrella. The village teacher’s wife pesters her husband to get a similar umbrella for her. But the children in the village are full of praise for Biniya’s blue umbrella.

In the village, Nandkishore (Pankaj Kapoor), the owner of the village’s only tea shop, also becomes envious of Biniya’s blue umbrella as she has become the centre of attention in the village. Even tourists coming in buses for going towards a hill station nearby take a tea break for photographing her with blue umbrella.

Nandkishore tries all tricks of attractive offers to make her sell to him the blue umbrella but she refuses to sell. The blue umbrella causes restlessness in the mind of Nandkishore. He must have that blue umbrella. He tries to get one from the nearby town but it is not available. A similar type of umbrella which may be available in Delhi would cost him a lot. He feels that his attraction to the blue umbrella may have to do with his last birth.

One day, Biniya while grazing the cows on a meadow, finds her umbrella missing. She suspects Nandkishore to be the one who stole her blue umbrella. Police searches the Nadkishore’s shop but does not find the umbrella. Humiliated by the police investigation, Nandkishore buys a colourful red umbrella which, he says, he got from Delhi. He now becomes the centre of attraction in the village.

Biniya’s own investigation on her missing blue umbrella continues which takes her to a nearby town where one umbrella was recently dyed. In the meanwhile, with his status in the village gone up due to owning a red umbrella, Nandkishore is invited as a chief guest for a wrestling competition in the village. During the competition, it starts raining and his red umbrella turns blue as red colour on the umbrella get washed out. It becomes clear that Nandkishore had stolen Biniya’s blue umbrella and got it dyed with red colour. The village panchayat held him guilty and pass a judgement that that the entire village should boycott Nandkishore and his shop.

With the boycott, Nandkishore business is almost stopped. He is not even invited for the marriage of the village chief’s son. Barber’s shop refuses him as a customer. Biniya watches all the happenings to Nandkishore. She feels sorry for him. One day, she visits his shop after a long gap to buy biscuits and forgets her umbrella in his shop. When Nandkishore notices this, he runs after her with the umbrella in snowy conditions and returns to her the umbrella. Biniya refuses to accept the umbrella by telling him that it is not her umbrella and walks away. The village boycott of Nandkishore is lifted and his business in the shop returns to normal.

I found the ending in Ruskin Bond’s book more touching than in the film. In the book, after few days of boycott of Nandkishore’s shop, Biniya feels that she is the cause for all the problems Nandkishore has been facing due to boycott. After many days of boycott, she visits his shop to buy toffees. Nandkishore thinks that Biniya has come to his shop to make fun of his situation or she has come with a counterfeit coin to buy toffees. But none of his presumptions comes out true. She buys the toffee but forget her blue umbrella in the shop. Nandkishore runs after her to give her back the umbrella. However, she tells him that she left the umbrella for him.

After few days of this event, Nandkishore calls Biniya while she is passing by his shop. He shows her his newly made locket of bear’s claws with silver chain. She likes it but she says she has no money to buy. Nandkishore says that it does not matter as she has given him her umbrella and he is giving her a locket of bear’s claws. He places the pedant on her and says that it looks very beautiful on her. She is very much pleased as bear’s claws are regarded luckier than leopard’s claws. For Nandkishore, the smile that she gave him upon receiving the pendant was more rewarding than owning the pendant.

Vishal Bhardwaj, the producer-director of the film had said at the time of the release of the film that it was a children’s film with a message to adults. How true it is! Firstly, how an alien thing like an attractive blue umbrella can disturb the peaceful life of a village. Second, the intense desire to possess something can lead to irrational behaviour and its resultant adverse consequences. Third, forgiveness is the key to normalisation of a relationship. In ‘The Blue Umbrella’ Ruskin Bond has shown that there is always a soft corner in the hearts of individuals. In the end, Biniya gives up her possessiveness and Nandkishore shades his greediness. And the village comes back to its peaceful life.

The film has 3 beautiful songs, all written by Gulzar. One of them has been represented on the Blog.

I have selected for presentation the song ‘neeli aasmaani chhatri’ because this is the only song in which the blue umbrella is on display most of the duration of the song. Like Biniya and Nandkishore in the film, I am also tempted to this beautiful blue umbrella, my temptation being limited to watching it to my heart’s content. The song is sung by Upagna Pandya under the music direction of Vishal Bhardwaj.

It is a lovely song with western symphony music used for interludes.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip :

Song-Neeli Aasmaani chhatri (Blue Umbrella)(2005) Singers-Upagna Pandya, unknown female voice, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Vishal Bhardwaj

Lyrics(Based on the Audio Clip)

ku ku ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
arre he….ey

(ku ku kudi ku ku )
hey hey
(ku ku kudi ku ku)
neeli aasmaani chhatri
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku,
ku ku kudi ku ku

he…..ey
hey ae
neeli aasmaani chhatri
chhatri ka udan khatola
dole to laage hindola
chhatri ka udan khatola..aa aa
dole to laage hindola
ude kabhi bhaage kabhi
bhaage kabhi daude kabhi
samajh na maane chhatri..ee
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku ku ku
ku ku ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku

ambar ka tukda toda
lakdi ka hattha joda
haath mein apna asmaan hai re
chhatri le ke chalti ho
memon jaisi lagti ho
goron ka dil beimaan hai re
khunti kabhi laathi kabhi
laathi kabhi chhadi kabhi
khunti kabhi laathi kabhi
laathi kabhi chhadi kabhi
paaji shaitaani chhatri..ee

baarish se jo rishta hai
paani pe mann khinchta hai
bijli ko ye pehchaan hai re
shaayad phir ud na jaaye
ambar se jud na chaahe
bholi hai anjaan hai
hai re
doobe kabhi taire kabhi
gote khaati jaaye kabhi
doobe kabhi taire kabhi
gote khaati jaaye kabhi
karein naadaani chhatri..ee
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku

hey ae hey ae
(ku ku kudi ku ku)
hey re
(ku ku kudi ku ku)
neeli asmaani chhatri
chhatri ka udan khatola..aa
dole to laage hindola aa aa
chhatri ka udan khatola..aa aa
dole to laage hindola
ude kabhi bhaage kabhi
bhaage kabhi daude kabhi
samajh na maane chhatri


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4048 Post No. : 15177

Clad in starched white kurta and pyjama with an unshaven face, his appearance gives an impression of a Bengali intellectual. His early association with Bimal Roy, Hrishikesh Mukherjee, Hemant Kumar and Salil Chowdhary supported that impression of mine until one day I came to know that he was born in a Sikh family in pre-partition Punjab.

Yes, he is Sampooran Singh Kalra, better known by his pen name, Gulzar (born on 18/08/1934) who turns 85 today and is still active in pursuit of his first love – writing poems and short stories. He continues to be associated with Hindi films with occasional indulgence as a lyricist. His association with Hindi films started, first as a lyricist followed by screen-play/dialogue writer and finally as a producer/director. He has already spent nearly 6 decades in Hindi film industry and this association is continuing.

Gulzar saab had spent nearly a decade (1950s) in the company of some of the writers/poets of Progressive Writers Association such as Krishan Chandra, Khwaza Ahmed Abbas, Shailendra, Sahir Ludhianvi, Sagar Sarhadi etc, who were associated with Hindi film industry. But he was not attracted towards making a career in Hindi film industry. His interest was to become a poet/writer like Mirza Ghalib and Rabindranath Tagore.

Gulzar saab was destined to be associated with Hindi films and Shailendra became a catalyst in introducing him to the Hindi films. When he advised him to meet Bimal Roy for writing songs for ‘Bandini’ (1963), Gulzar saab’s first reaction was ‘I do not want to be a lyricist’. It was only when Shailendra reprimanded him for losing the opportunity to work with a great film-maker, Bimal Roy and the music director, S D Burman, Gulzar saab relented and wrote his first song mora gora ang lai le mohe shyaam rang dai de for the film.

By the way, this was the only song Gulzar saab wrote for ‘Bandini’ (1963) and for S D Burman. But this song opened up his association with Bimal Roy as Assistant Director in Bimal Roy Productions and became his grooming ground to learn the art of screen-play/dialogue writing and the film direction.

Gulzar saab is one among a few film lyricists of the golden period of Hindi film music about whom much has been documented through articles, memoirs and scores of his interviews both to print as well as electronic medias. I had also covered his journey into the Hindi film industry in my article while covering the song shaam se aankh mein nami si hai. So, I will skip the details about his celluloid journey. Broadly, Gulzar saab’s filmy career can be divided into three main phases.

During the first phase (1960-1970), Gulzar saab mostly worked as lyricist with his music directors like Salil Chowdhury and Hemant Kumar who were his colleagues in Bimal Roy Productions. Out of 16 films he was associated as lyricist in this phase, as many as 10 films were with music directors Salil Chowdhury and Hemant Kumar. He also worked with Hrishikesh Mukherjee as a screen-play/dialogue writer for films like ‘Aashirwad’ (1968), and ‘Anand’ (1970).

In the second phase (1971-1999) Gulzar saab’s career was the most active as a screen-play/dialogue/song writer and producing/directing the films. He was associated with 60 Hindi films of which he directed 19 films. Almost all of his films which he directed come in the definition of ‘middle of the road’ films which included ‘Mere Apne’ (1971), Aandhi’ (1975), ‘Mausam’ (1976), ‘Angoor’ (1982), ‘Lekin’ (1991), ‘Maachis’ (1996). Though none of the films he directed created ripple in the box office front, these films are regarded as classic in the history of Hindi films.

Gulzar saab’s association with Sanjeev Kumar and R D Burman was the highlights of his second phase in Hindi film industry. Sanjeev Kumar acted in Gulzaar saab’s films, ‘Koshish’ (1972), ‘Aandhi’ (1975), ‘Mausam’ (1976), ‘Angoor’(1982),and ‘Namkeen’ (1982). With R D Burman, Gulzar saab worked for 23 films writing 101 songs. The association would have continued but for the untimely death of Sanjeev Kumar in 1985 and of R D Burman in 1993.

The third phase of Gulzar saab’s filmy career started in the new millennium and is continuing. After the release of his film ‘Hu Tu Tu’ (1999), he had taken a decision to give up producing and directing films as he wanted to devote a considerable time in writing. In this phase, he has confined himself mostly as a lyricist and occasionally script/dialogue writing.

During this phase, Gulzar saab has been associated with the third generation of music directors like A R Rahman, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, Vishal Bhardwaj. He has already written lyrics for Vishal Bhardwaj in 19 films so far and perhaps he may break his own record of the highest number of films with R D Burman(23 films). He seems to be as comfortable with the new generation as he was with the older ones.

In the 1960s, he wrote songs like hawaaon pe likh do hawaaon ke naam for Hemant Kumar. Almost 5 decades later, he also wrote a rustic song ‘beedi jalaayi le jigar se piya’ for Vishal Bhardwaj. Both these songs have unusual imageries. The first one is about the nature giving the ‘feel good’ factor. The second song, though sounds rustic, has not prevented Gulzar saab sharing his thought on the real side of the world in two lines:

Dhuaan na nikaari o lab se piya
Je duniya badi dhaank hai

[O beloved, do not exhale smoke from your lips (from beedi)
The realities in this world are already masked].

Once, A R Rahman after getting explanations from Gulzar saab on his song, jiya jale jaan jale commented ‘Gulzar saab, you are a poet of imageries. I will amend his comment to say that Gulzar saab is a poet of unusual imageries. His six songs which I have covered during the last two weeks for the Blog would give the readers the taste of his unusual imageries/metaphors, choice of words and vocabularies.

I have been following Gulzar saab’s songs for many years. For me, he is an extension of what Sahir Ludhianvi did in 1950s to 1970s – to make the song lyrics an important part of Hindi film music. Though Gulzar saab belongs to the old generation of lyricist, he still gels well with the new generation. From the year 2000 until now, Gulzar saab has written lyrics for about 60 films. ‘I am going with the flow, but making sure that my aesthetics are in place,’ he had said in a recent interview.

There is another side of Gulzar saab’s personality. He has been active in writing short stories and poems side by side with his filmy career. Many of his short stories and poems have been published. He has received Sahitya Akademy Award for his Urdu book ‘Dhuaan’ in 2002. He has been associated with the children’s poems -both in films/TV and in prints. His most popular among jingles, ‘jungle jungle pata chala hai’ for ‘Jungle Book’ (1993) in Hindi which was telecast on Doordarshan, has become synonymous more with his name than its creator, Rudyard Kipling. Gulzar saab has done such a vast work of writing short stories and poems that they require a separate article which I intend to write some other time.

Gulzar saab’s association with R D Burman in 23 films has been one of the important segments in the history of Hindi film music. I regard Gulzar saab’s collaboration with A R Rahman, the continuation of that process. In fact, I feel that after the untimely death of R D Burman in 1993, A R Rahman has carried forward ‘Pancham’s legacy’ with refinements as new techniques and new types of musical instruments have emerged.

Hence, on the occasion of Gulzar saab’s 85th Birthday, I have chosen one of the songs born out of Gulzar-Rahman collaboration, ‘ae hairat-e-ashiqui jagaa mat’ from the film ‘Guru’ (2007). The song is mainly a duet sung by Hariharan and Alka Yagnik with Mohammed Aslam singing Sufi chants in the prelude and the first interlude with chorus singing in the second interlude and at the end of the song.

A R Rahman, in an interview published in the book ‘A R Rahman, The Spirit of Music’ (2012) by Nasreen Munni Kabir has revealed that whenever he gets stuck in composing tune for a given situation in the film, he has relied on the melodies of Amir Khusrau, Bulleh Shah and Subramania Bharati. The song under discussion was one of such songs for which A R Rahman relied on the melody of Amir Khusrau’s composition, ‘ae sharbat-e-aashiqui’. Rahman has based the tune on Raag Yaman Kalyan. Gulzar wrote the lyrics to the tune as per the song situation in the film.

I wish Gulzar saab a very happy and a healthy 85th Birthday. I remember his song ‘dil to bachcha hai jee’ from ‘Ishqiya’ (2010). I hope that the ‘bachcha’ (child) in his heart will inspire him to write many more poems of unusual imageries and metaphors in the years to come.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Ae hairat-e-ashiqui jagaa mat (Guru)(2007) Singers-Hariharan, Alka Yagnik, Mohammed Aslam, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-A R Rahman
Chorus,
Alka Yagnik & Chorus

Lyrics(Based on Audio Clip)

dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
sun mere humdum
hamesha ishq mein hi jeena
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
sun mere humdum
hamesha ishq mein hi jeena

ae hairat-e-aashiqui
jagaa mat
pairon se zameen
zameen lagaa mat
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
jagaa mat
pairon se zameen
zameen lagaa mat
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
ae hairat-e-aashiqui

dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
sun mere humdum
hamesha ishq mein hi jeena

kyun Urdu Faarsi bolte ho o o
kyun Urdu Faarsi bolte ho
dus kehte ho do tolte ho
jhoothhon ke shanshahaa bolo na

kabhi jhaankon meri aankh….en
kabhi jhaankon meri aankhen
sunaayen ik daastaan
jo honthhon se ae kholo na
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
jagaa mat
pairon se zameen
zameen lagaa mat
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
o o o
ae hairat-e-aashiqui

dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara

do chaar maheene se lamhon mein
do chaar maheene se lamhon mein
umron ke hisaab bhi hote hain
jinhen dekha nahin kal tak
jinhen dekha nahin kal tak
kahin bhi ab kok mein
woh chehre bote hain

ae hairat-e-ashiqui
jagaa mat
pairon se zameen
zameen lagaa mat
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
jagaa mat
pairon se zameen
zameen lagaa mat
ae hairat-e-aashiqui

ae hairat-e-aashiqui
o o
ae hairat-e-aashiqui

dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
sun mere humdum
hamesha ishq mein hi jeena
o o o

dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
sun mere humdum
hamesha ishq mein hi jeena


This article is written by Peevesie, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4045 Post No. : 15174

What kind of relationship must one have with their country? This is a question I have been pondering lately. There is no doubt one feels a sense of kinship and pride for the perseverance and accomplishments and bravery its people show on a near everyday basis. But then aren’t all these accomplishments a result of someone questioning some kind of status quo that existed in this country.

The world is feeling like a strange place. Ours isn’t the only country in the grips of a wave of nationalism that is based on a sense of othering and homogenizing our culture. But weren’t we taught ‘Unity in Diversity’  as one of our strengths in school? Independence day involved so many symbolic displays of things like ‘One Country, Many Cultures’; “Hindu Muslim Sikh Isaai, sab hai yahan bhai bhai”. One of my favourite lines to do the cringy school dances to was “Koi Punjab Se, Koi Maharashtra Se” one from the song “Ae Watan Ae Watan” (film ‘Shaheed’, 1965) – (though I hated the word Madrasi that was used in such displays, I am not from Madras!). And suddenly we have a country where questioning the status quo is being against the country.

Can’t one love the country and still dislike / disagree with somethings in it? We love our family and friends the same way no? The love is unconditional but there are things like maybe their lateness or forgetfulness that annoys us? Isn’t that what patriotism should be? An unconditional love that pushes us to work hard to improve our country so we are truly the best country in every metric?

Last year I saw a film called ‘Raazi’. It is based on the true story of an Indian spy who married into a Pakistani military family to help the Indian war efforts. Two plot points in the movie left a deep impression on me and on my patriotic sentiments. The first was when the ‘spy’ and her spouse have a conversation about why they both do what they do. And they both realize that they will always choose their birth country over their spouse. It’s just that their birth countries are different. The second point is this song I want to showcase in this post on independence day today. Incidentally this song is also titled “Ae Watan” .

This song in the film is supposed to be an Indian patriotic song being taught to Pakistani school children for a school function. Even though the song contains the opening lines (“Lab Pe Aati Hai Duaa. . .“) which is the national prayer of Pakistan. It was penned in 1902 by the legendary poet, Allama Iqbal. But by its very nature it is country neutral. It is sung in schools in Pakistan, as well as in some states in India. That’s when it hit me. The object of your emotion of patriotism – that is an accident of nature. You have no control over this. But you have control over what you do with it. And how you use the opportunity to leave the place you were born into, better than when you arrived into it.

There is a multitude of amazing things being done by Indians that we can be proud of – from sustainable sanitary solutions, to the moon mission, to Dutee Chand fighting the Olympic committee and her village simultaneously on accepting everything she was born with. Whether it’s is a medical condition or who she loves. This is a beautiful country that gained its independence because people refused to accept the status quo. And I choose to be proud of it without losing sight of how much further we have to go.

There is another reason I love this song, because the video reminds me of the Independence day celebrations we had in school and all the ways we practiced for it. Truly brings a certain nostalgia back

This song is “Ae Watan” from ‘Raazi’ (2018) which is directed by Meghana Gulzar and produced by Junglee Pictures and Dharma Productions. Its based on a book by Harinder Sikka named ‘Calling Sehmat’. The film version of the song has Alia Bhatt, Vicky Kaushal, Amruta Khanvilkar. The song is composed by Shankar Ehsaan and Loy, while its lyrics are written by Gulzar. Its female version, which is the one featured in the film, is sung by Sunidhi Chauhan and the male version which was for promos is by Arijit Singh. Both versions have longer audio versions than video. The lyrics given below are according to the audio versions I have.

Happy Independence day to all readers! Enjoy!

Female Version

Male Version (Chorus Only)

Song – Ae Watan Watan Mere Aabaad Rahe Tu (Raazi) (2018) Singers – Sunidhi Chauhan, Arijit Singh, Lyrics – Gulzar, MD – Shankar Ehsaan Loy
Chorus

Lyrics

lab pe aati hai dua ban ke tammana meri
zindagi shamma ki surat ho khudaaya meri
lab pe aati hai dua ban ke tammana meri
 
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
 
tu hi meri manzil hai pehchaan tujhi se
tu hi meri manzil hai pehchaan tujhi se
pohunchun mein jahaan bhi meri buniyaad rahe tu
pohunchun mein jahaan bhi meri buniyaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan 
 
tujh pe koi gum ki aanch aane nahi doon
tujh pe koi gum ki aanch aane nahi doon
qurbaan meri jaan tujhpe shaad rahe tu
qurbaan meri jaan tujhpe shaad rahe tu
 
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
labh pe aati hai dua banke tammanah meri
zindagi shamma ki surat ho khudaya meri
zindagi shamma ki surat ho khudaya meri
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan

Male Version

ae watan watan mere 
ae watan aabaad rahe tu
aabaad rahe tu
aabaad rahe tu

ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan

tu hi meri manzil hai pehchaan tujhi se
tu hi meri manzil hai pehchaan tujhi se
pohunchun mein jahaan bhi meri buniyaad rahe tu
pohunchun mein jahaan bhi meri buniyaad rahe tu
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan 

tujh pe koi gum ki aanch aane nahi doon
tujh pe koi gum ki aanch aane nahi doon
qurbaan meri jaan tujhpe shaad rahe tu
qurbaan meri jaan tujhpe shaad rahe tu

ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
ae watan
ae watan
mere watan
mere watan
ae watan
ae watan
mere watan
mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
aabaad rahe tu
aabaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
aabaad rahe tu


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has exactly 15700 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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