Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Sharmila Tagore


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day: 4263 Post No.: 15489

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Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No. 13
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In olden days (even today for that matter) Indians were expected to behave in a particular manner. For instance, when it came to their day to day live, most of them were “gareeb” and they were told that they had the sole right on the resources of the nation in the form of doles aka subsidies. All political parties claimed to be pro poor parties and promised to “hataao” gareebi if voted to power. After repeatedly getting voted to power on the plank of hataaoing gareebi, the same politicians now claim to be for the “gareeb”. These “gareeb” are supposed to be gullible possessing of short memory so the politicians can get away despite failing to fulfill their past promises.

Movie makers were no different. They too made movies for the same segment of society that were treated as “gareeb” by the political classes. This section of society was supposed to like movies with escapist stories that bore little resemblance to real life. Depicting real life was considered no no. Movies depicting real life were considered boring. Why would a “gareeb” audience come to the movie hall to watch movies depicting his real dull life ? This was what the movie makers believed in.

Sometimes, some movie makers would make movies with realistic movies. Ordinary movie goers and even press would describe these movies as boring. Most movies like this flopped.

Top stars acted in such movies for creative satisfaction, but the ordinary fans felt betrayed when they would go to the movie hall and find their star sans his usual mannerisms.

Rajesh Khanna is “Aavishkaar” (1973), and Amitabh Bachchan in “Man Aazaad Hoon” (1990) are two such movies that readily comes to my mind.

“Aavishkaar” (1973) was directed by Basu Bhattacharya Aarohi Film Makers Bombay. This movie had Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila Tagore, Dina Gandhi, Denis Clement, Satyen Kappu, Monika Jasnan (child artist), Devendra Khandelwal, Margaret, new discoveries Mahesh Sharma and Minna Johar etc in it.

The movie dealt with a real life “boring” tale, viz the marital life of a couple, played by Rajesh Khanna and Sharmila Tagore. Fans of superstar Rajesh Khanna, who went to the movie hass expecting a movie like “Aaraadhana”(1969) were disappointed. There was no way juvenile fans (including yours truly) of Rajesh Khanna, who were brought up on stuff like “Haathi Mere Saathi”(1971) and “Apna Desh” (1972) were going to like this movie.

This movie was only for “mature” movie goers. Just like “rich” people were looked down upon by “gareeb” people, “mature” people, with their occasional boring movies were looked down upon by people loving “mainstream” movies.

Please do not believe the review of “Aavishkaar”(1973) that is carried by wikipedia etc. These reviews are written with the benefit of hindsight by people who were not even born when this movie was released. I remember the reviews carried out in mainstream Hindi media during 1973 which bore no resemblance whatsoever with its review that we now find online.

Coming to the songs of the movie, “Aavishkaar” (1973) had five songs in it. Four of these songs are covered in the past as described hereunder:-

Song Posted On
Hansne ki chaah ne kitna mujhe 19.09.2008
Naina hain pyaase mere 20.03.2010
Mahaa shoonya ke mahaan vistaar mein 18.07.2016
Baabul mora, naihar chhuto hi jaaye 27.05.2019

From the table above, we can see that one song from the movie was covered on this day, ten years ago. So, this movie provides us an opportunity to have a blog ten year challenge. At the same time, all the songs of the movie get covered as well.

Ten years ago on this day, two songs were covered in the blog

Song Movie title-Year Remarks
Naina hain pyaase mere Aavishkaar-1973 04 of 05 songs posted
Kaali badariya maare najariya Do Roti-1957 All Songs posted on the blog

Here is the fifth and final song from “Aavishkaar”(1973) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Manna Dey. Gyandev Agnihotri is the lyricist. Music is composed by Kanu Roy.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala.

With this song, “Aavishkaar”(1973) joins the list of movies that have all their songs covered in the blog.

Video

Audio

Song-Maa ko pukaar kar poochha bachche ne (Aavishkaar)(1973) Singer-Manna Dey, Lyrics-Gyandev Agnihotri, MD-Kanu Roy

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

maa ko pukaar kar poochha bachche ne
aaya kahaan se hoon maa
bolo to
padaa kahaan paaya
bolo to
sun kar sawaal ye
maa ke stanon se ufan padaa doodh
aur bah aaya aankhon se
uttar

mere laal
tum to hamesha thhe
mere man ki abhilaasha mein
tan ki paribhaasha mein
bachpan ke gudiyaaghar mein ae
kitni baar tujhe
khelte khelte
toda aa
todte todte ae
jodaa aa

paakar khoya aur
kho kar payaa aa hai
kahaan se bataaun tu aaya hai
padaa tujhe maine kahaan paaya hai
mere ae laal

tu
haan tu hi to hai
meri amar aasha
subah ka sapna
maa aur daadi ki
sunehri khwaahish
prem ki paramparaa aa
aag ki khwaahish
aur prem ki aasha se
bani teri kaaya hai
kahaan se bataaun tu aaya hai
padaa tujhe maine kahaan paaya hai
mere laal

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Devnagri Script lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
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माँ को पुकार कर पूछा बच्चे ने
आया कहाँ से हूँ माँ
बोलो तो
पडा कहाँ पाया
बोलो तो
सुन कर सवाल ये
माँ के स्तनों से उफन पडा दूध
और बह आया आँखों से
उत्तर

मेरे लाल
तुम तो हमेशा थे
मेरे मन की अभिलाषा में
तन की परिभाषा में
बचपन के गुड़ियाघर में ए
कितनी बार तुझे
खेलते खेलते तोड़ा आ
तोड़ते तोड़ते ए
जोड़ा आ

पाकर खोया और
खो कर पाया आ है
कहाँ से बताऊँ तू आया है
पडा तुझे मैंने कहाँ पाया है
मेरे ए लाल

तू
हां तू ही तो है
मेरी अमर आशा
सुबह का सपना
माँ और दादी कि
सुनहरी ख्वाईश
प्रेम की परंपरा आ
आग की ख्वाईश
और प्रेम की आशा से
बनी तेरी काया है
कहाँ से बताऊँ तू आया है
पडा तुझे मैंने कहाँ पाया है
मेरे लाल


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4161 Post No. : 15331

8th December is the 75th birthday of Rinku or Begum Ayesha Sultana Khan who also is known by the name Sharmila Tagore. What was not known is that she was born in Hyderabad. (I didn’t know, the stalwarts of the blog may be aware). She looked so delicate and fragile in “Kashmir Ki Kali” (1964) – her Hindi debut, having debuted in Bengali in 1959 through Satyajit Ray’s “Apur Sansar”; the need to protect her from Pran must have come naturally to Shammi Kapoor. She has a super-sweet smile too with deeeep dimples that form whenever she smiles. It was not as if she excelled only in glamourous baby-doll type of roles; she was comfortable even when she played the roles of mother and daughter – Chanda/ Kajri- in Gulzar’s “Mausam” (1975). 1975 saw her in five movies “Mausam”, “Chupke Chupke”, “Faraar”, “Amanush”, “Ek Mahal Ho Sapno Ka” and the character she played in each of them were completely different from each other.

I started following her from “Chupke Chupke” and then have seen many of her movies from the 60s and 70s on various media- Doordarshan, Satellite Television, YouTube etc. Had been very impressed by her in “Kashmir Ki Kali”, “Anupama”, “Satyakam” and “Viruddh” in the recent times. She was last seen on-screen in 2010 released “Break Ke Baad”. But videos of this elegant lady can be seen on YouTube in interviews etc where she speaks of her life and career and how her sister Oindrila Tagore (Tinku) played Mini, the central child character, in Tapan Sinha’s 1957 “Kabuliwala”.

She speaks of how she was given very short sentences to speak in her first Hindi movie by Shakthi Samanta etc (saw all this on the Zee TV show ‘Jeena Isi ka Naam Hai’).

For the occasion today let us have a song from the 1971 released, K B Tilak directed “Chhoti Bahu” in which she stars with her co-star of several box-office hits – Rajesh Khanna. She paired with him in seven successful movies beginning with “Aradhana” in 1969 and following it up with Amar Prem, Chhoti Bahu, Safar, Daag, Raja Rani, Aavishkaar and Maalik. She had a good pairing with Dharmendra too beginning with Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s Anupama and Devar, Mere Humdam Mere Dost, Satyakam, Chupke Chupke, EK Mahal Ho Sapno ka and the last time we saw the pair together was in Sunny. She also had some good films with Shashi Kapoor- Waqt, Aamne Saamne, New Delhi Times, Suhana Safar etc.

Today’s song reminds me of another song with a similar theme – “Chanda hai tum mera suraj hai tu”. And also “Bada natkhat hai re Krishna Kanhaiya”, she did emote well in these song situations, we could see a lot of love for kids in those expressive eyes
“Chhoti Bahu” had six songs and debuted on the blog with he re Kanhaiyya kisko kahega tu maiyya in Kishore Kumar’s voice. The song is more or less the gist of the movie where we have Nirupa Roy as the equivalent of Devaki and Sharmila as the Yashoda of the young baby Sarika who is called either Kishan or Kanhaiya (have seen the movie ages back, should see again). This was followed by the Mohd Rafi sung ye raat hai pyaasi pyaasi. The third song posted was dulhaniya bata de ree . Today we have the fourth wherein a happy, young girl is seen playing “mother” to her favourite doll. As the movie progresses, we get to know that she cannot beget children of her own so her ‘jethani’ gives her the responsibility of being the mother to baby Sarika.
Wishing our Sharmila ‘dimpled’ Tagore a Happy Birthday.


Song-Koyal bole daali se daali bole maali se (Chhoti Bahu)(1971) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Indeewar, MD-Kalyanji Anandji

Lyrics

koyal bole daali se
daali bole maali se
bolo
kya boli
til ke phool tili ke daane
munne raaja bade sayaane
saari duniya dekh li munne raaja
ho munne raaja
tujhsa koi nahin
saari duniya dekhli munne raaja
tujhsa koi nahin
til ke phool tili ke daane
munne raaja bade sayaane

aa aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa aa aa

tu mere mann ka darpan
saathi hai akelepan ka
jaane ajaane jod liya
tujhse naata jeewan ka
atkan chatkan dahi chatokan
atkan chatkan dahi chatokan
naach dikhaa de chhoom chhana chhan
saari duniya dekhli munne raaja
ho munne raaja
tujhsa koi nahin
til ke phool tili ke daane
munne raja bade sayaane

rooth na jaana tu mujhse
duniya roothe to roothhe
yahi mel yahi khel rahe
kabhi saath na apna chhoote
bal bal jaoon munne raaja
bal bal jaoon munne raaja
thhumak thhumak chal ke aaja
saari duniya dekh li munne raaja
ho munne raaja tujhsa koi nahin
til ke phool tili ke daane
munne raja bade sayaane

aa aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa aa aa

jaan meri rehti hai tujh mein
tu hi jaan hai meri
ek pal tujhe na dekhoon toh
duniya ho jaaye andheri
tujh bin mera jeewan aise
tujh bin mera jeewan aise
bin khushboo ke phool ho jaise
saari duniya dekh li munne raaja
ho munne raaja tujhsa koi nahin
til ke phool tili ke daane
munne raja bade sayaane
hmmm hmmhmm
hmmmm hmmmm
hmmmm hmmhmm


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4123 Post No. : 15276

“Tyaag”(1976) was Produced by N S Kabir and directed by Deendayaal Sharma for Films and Films Interbnational Production, Bombay. The movie had Sharmila Tagore,Rajesh Khanna,Bindu,Dheeraj Kumar, Master Tito, Sulochana Latkar, Prem Chopra, Mukri, Asit Sen,Murad,Amrit Patel, Tuntun, Kamal Kapoor, Chandrima Bhaduri, Mohan Jerry ,Mahendra Zaveri,Om prakash, Nayim, Billimoria, Anand, Lalita Kumari etc with uest appearances by Bindu, Master Satyajit, Dheeraj, Gurnam Singh, Sona, Raza Murad in it.

This movie was apparently produced by Sharmila Tagore seeing that the producer was her secretary. The movie had the same lead pair as that of the blockbuster “Aradhana”(1969).

“Tyaag”(1976) had five songs in it. One song has been covered in the blog. This movie was one of the last movies with music by S D Burman.

Today (31 october 2019) is the 44th remembrance day of S D Burman (1 October 1906 – 31 October 1975). On this occasion, here is a song from “Tyaag”(1976). This song is sung by Kishore Kumar and Asha Bhonsle. Anand Bakshi is the lyricist. Music is composed by S D Burman.

This song, containing the phrase “Kora kaaghaz”, which was there in a song of “Aradhana”(1969) as well, is picturised on Rajesh Khanna and Sharmila Tagore.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Prakashchandra.

Audio (Full)

Video (Partial)

Song-Kore kaaghaz pe likhwaa le (Tyaag)(1976) Singers-Kishore Kumar, Asha Bhosle, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-S D Burman
Both

Lyrics (Audio link)(Provided by Prakashchandra)

hmmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm
hmm hmmm
aaahaa haaa haaa
aa haa
aaa haaa

ohho ho o
hhaa haaa haa
ae hey hey ae ae he ae ae

kore kaaghaz pe likhwa le
kore kaaghaz pe likhwa le
jiya kiya tere hawaaley
ho ho o o
kore kaaghaz pe likhwa le ae ae
jiya kiyaa tere hawaaley

ho ho o o
kore kaaghaz pe likhwa le

kabhi sochta hoon mere sapnon ki raadhaa
kabhi sochta hoon mere sapnon ki raadhaa
kaanha se nain churaa ke
bhulaa de na waadaa
o Radhaa aa aa
bhula de na waadaa
bade be-imaan hain
bade be-imaan hain tere
naina matwaale
kore kaaghaz pe likhwa le
haan aaan jiya kiyaa tere hawaale
ho ho o
kore kagaz pe likhwa le

aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
tera naam mera jeevan
teri preet pooja
tera naam mera jeevan
teri preet pooja
teri yaad bin iss mann mein
nahin koi doojaa rey mitwaa aaa
nahin koi dooja
mujhe bhool jaaye ae
mujhe bhool jaaye ab
ye duniya waale ae
kore kaaghaz pe likhwa le ae ae

jiya kiyaa tere hawaale
ho o o
kore kaaghaz pe

likhwa le
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
(hho ho oo o o o o ae hey hey ae )

badi hi niraali
dil ne likhi ye kahaani
ho o o badi hi niraali
dil ne likhi ye kahaani
galiyon ka raaja
main tu
mehlon ki raani deewaani
mehlon ki raani
ho o o
tere aagey mehlon waaley
tere aagey mehlon waaley
kyaa hain dilwaaley ae

kore kaaghaz pe likhwaa le
jiya kiya tere hawaale
ho o o
kore kaaghaz pe
likhwaa le


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3965 Post No. : 15047

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 2
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

One of the most iconic songs of Saigal Sb. A song that is a definitive representation of Hindi film music of the 1930s. That incomparable rendition by Saigal Sb under the music direction of RC Boral was recorded live for the film ‘Street Singer’ (1938). Recorded more than eight decades ago, this remains a signature piece for time immemorial. The vision of Saigal Sb, leaving his home, just carrying his harmonium with him, walking with a slow measured pace, and singing this thumri – it is one of the lasting images of Hindi cinema. That version of the thumri from the ‘Street Singer’ can be viewed here – “Baabul Mora, Naihar Chhuto Hi Jaaye“.

Anecdotes around that live recording and shooting tell of a microphone hidden in the harmonium, of the slow pace of walking so as to complete the singing and the visual shot keeping within the range of the camera. Playback singing had already been invented (1935) and was in progressive use in the industry. And yet, this song was recorded live. The performance can only be called – unprecedented, incomparable and peerless. Nothing more fascinates the diehard fans of Saigal Sb, than this one song by him. Many singers have sung this, but the Saigal version remains untouched, unsurpassed.

In the film, this song spans an extended sequence of scenes. And small parts of this song are also rendered by Kanan Devi. There is a sequence where Kanan Devi attempts to sing this song in the theatre. Later, Bhola (KLS) departs from their shared home, upset that Manju (Kanan Devi) is enamored by Amar Babu (Jagdish Sethi), and wants to move in with him. But after just one day away from Bhola, Manju returns home searching for him. And finds that he has left. She makes a phone call to Amar Babu, requesting him to bring his car. They start to drive towards the road that leads to Bhola and Manju’s home village. In the meantime, the scene shifts between Manju searching for Bhola, and Bhola walking away with the harmonium. The song is reprised here three or four times, sometimes just the mukhda, sometimes just the antaraa.

Amar Babu is driving the car with dismay in his heart. A windstorm arrives. There is lot of dust in the air, and visibility is not good. Manju alights from the car, and starts following the path on foot – the path that Bhola would have taken returning to his village. Tired and overcome by storm, Bhola falls down by the roadside. Manju sees someone lying on the road and rushes to him. The tryst happens again. Amar Babu watches them from a distance. And then with a wry smile on his face, he returns to his car, to start the lonely journey back to his home. Bhola and Manju start their foot journey back to their village. Once again the song is heard in the voice of Kanan Devi, as the visual shows the two mates, in a silhouette against a darkening sky. The hearts have met, they are returning home, and the lady’s voice is telling – “Le Babul Ghar Aapno, Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

Thirty five years later, in 1973, this classical thumri is now included in the film ‘Aavishkaar’, starring Sharmila Tagore and Rajesh Khanna. This time, the music composition is by Kanu Roy, who transformed it into a duet, with the participating voices of Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh. This time, in the picturization, this is presented as a background song, as the visual action on screen is mostly silent – and yet very expressive.

‘Aavishkaar’ presents a scenario of a brief hiatus in the lives of two people very much in love. In love they are, and they get married, and they start to live together. Maybe, just love is never enough. What love is – it needs to be examined, re examined and re invented often. And then it becomes love, more love and more meaningful. Else, just the drudgery of the consistent proximity, which used to be like heaven to start with, turns into stagnant boredom. Expectations still riding high, the lull now breeds contempt – a contempt that is actually screaming for and seeking a rejuvenated level of understanding and sharing. That is what ‘Aavishkaar’ is about.

The film starts on a day when it is the wedding anniversary of the protagonist couple. Amar (Rajesh Khanna) is aware, but still, broodingly ignores. He works late in office, he goes to see a film with a female co-worker, giving the audience the impression that he is seeking extra marital happiness. On his way back at night, he finally musters enough thought and courage, and buys a bouquet of Rajnigandha flowers. Arriving home, a certain scene transpires before he enters the house, and on an impulse, he places the bouquet in a flower pot next to the door, and enters the house, pretending that he does not remember the anniversary. A long night passes. There are flashbacks, there are arguments, there is even physical violence – highlighting the drift that has occurred in the relationship. Basu Bhattacharya has handled the conflict and the interactions very deftly. In my mind, this is the best handling of the situation of a very loving relationship gone sour. Many other films come to mind – ‘Arth’, ‘Dooriyaan’, ‘Anubhav’, ‘Aandhi’, ‘Grih Pravesh’, ‘Aap Ki Kasam’, the comical ‘Pati, Patni Aur Who’, ‘Abhimaan’ . . . and more. In ‘Aavishkaar’, the director portrays the conflict, the pain, and the reconciliation, at a very psychological level.

So, after a distraught and a tension filled hostile night, mostly sleepless and lot of exchanges and memories, the new day dawns. The rigmarole of the daily routine beckons. Mansi (Sharmila Tagore) gets up early and opens the front door to pick up the milk delivery. And then she sees. . . the bouquet standing in the flower pot. She picks it up. And the voice of Jagjit Singh drifts in from the background. She finds Amar standing behind her. . . and there is an embrace. A lot changed and a lot settled in that night of strife.

The two stanzas play out slowly. The first one as the couple are embracing and then they move back into the home. The second stanza is an external shot, mixing flashback again possibly, as we see the couple on the beach, in a mood of frolic, as the singer croons yet once again to say. . . “Le Babul Ghar Aapno, Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

The two instances that we are so familiar with, of the use of this song in Hindi films, both seem to have happy conclusion. But that was not the original thought when Wajid Ali Shah wrote and composed this thumri, way back in 1856. The British had played a game of deception with the Nawab of Awadh. In a bloodless coup, Wajid Ali Shah was dethroned and sent to Calcutta, and the British annexed Lucknow and the kingdom of Awadh. The Nawab was completely heartbroken, on leaving his beloved city, and his cultural roots. That is the time when this timeless poem was conceived.

Yes, the interpretations works both ways. There is this indication of a newlywed bride, going to her new matrimonial home. There is sadness on leaving the parent’s home, but there is also an eagerness and joyful elation of being with the one, with whom a new bond of love will be explored. And, there is the gloomy and poignant interpretation. Looking at the sad dilemma that was faced by Wajid Ali Shah – he was sentenced to leave behind his beloved city, his happy pastimes, and the people who made up his life that far. The discussions in literature talk about the passing passage of life into afterlife. That too, is a leaving behind of the home that one thinks to be their own, and then embark on a journey to meet the Maker. This jusxtaposition is captured so beautifully and so splendidly in this brief two verse thumri – “Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

In the context of this series, I bring on this song today to highlight another dimension of reuse that we see so often in Hindi films – the reuse of traditional poetry and folk music. This particular thumri is so simply a dear favorite of singers, that gathering the number of different renditions by different artists would be a big exercise in itself. Just to give you an idea, this thumri has been sung by the following singers – the list goes all the way from Bade Ghulam Ali Khan to Alisha Chinoy. The names, in no particular order are – Ustad Faiyaz Khan, Gauhar Jaan, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, Siddheswari Devi, Begum Akhtar, Rasoolan Bai, Naina Devi, Kesarbai Kerkar, Ustad Mushtaq Hussain Khan, Malka Jaan, KL Saigal, Jagmohan Sursagar, Kannan Devi, Ustad Khadim Husain Khan, Girija Devi, Shobha Gurtu, Pandit Bhimsen Joshi, Pandit Jitendra Abhisheki, Kishori Amonkar, Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh, Jagjit Singh (solo), Rajan-Sajan Mishra, Alisha Chinoy, Mahendra Chopra. . . and I am sure, many more artists of repute.

If I talk about Hindi films, then besides the two instances already covered in the write up above, this thumri appears in two more films. In 1954, Manna Dey has sung this for the film ‘Mahatama Kabir’ – a really wonderful rendition. Then later in 1964, Lata Mangeshkar has sung this for the Bhojpuri film ‘Naihar Chhutal Jaaye’.
[Ed Note: Dear Arun ji adds two more instances of this song being used in Hindi films, both from early 1930s. This song has been rendered by Durga Khote in the 1931 film ‘Trapped’ aka ‘Farebi Jaal’. Then again in 1934, this thumri appears in the list of songs for the film ‘Naachwaali’ – no information available regarding singer or music director.]

Such reuse that involves traditional poetry and folk songs, is really very simple, because this material is beyond the intellectual property disputes. For that matter, we have seen many such other creations being used in films across the decades. On the devotional side, the poems of Meerabai, Kabir Das, and Soordas are very popular and are used quite freely by the producers. Then we have the adabi poets, once again a traditional treasure that does not have any copyright issues attached. Ghazals of Ghalib are quite popular and have been used in many films across the decades. As I scanned the songs in HFGK I find that the ghazal “Dil e Nadaan Tujhe Hua Kya Hai” appears in 9 films from 1931 to 1980. The ghazal “Nuktacheen Hai Gham e Dil” appears in four films, “Ye Na Thee Hamaari Qismat” appears three times, “Phir Mujhe Deeda e Tar Yaad Aaya” also appears in three films, and so on.

Checking for Meerabai’s bhajans, one finds the popular ones like “Mere To Girdhar Gopal”, “Main To Gidhar Ke Ghar Jaaun”, “Tum Jo Todo Piya” etc., being used in many films. Not a precise search, but my estimate is that Meerabai’s bhajans appear in Hindi films more than 100 times. The search cannot be precise because there are many instances where the traditional bhajans or ghazals have been used without giving credit to the original poet. Additional note – Amir Khusro’s poetry appears in Hindi films no less than 10 times, of which at least 4 are occurrences of “Kaahe Ko Byaahi Bides. . .”.

The more difficult proposition would be to trace the folk songs reuse across Hindi films. With so much variations, and without acknowledgement to the original folk source, it is difficult to make an estimate of folk music reuse in films. But I will surely add that this segment would be more voluminous than the bhajans and ghazals. The song, or variations thereof, of “Jhumka Gira Re. . .” has been used in no less than four films.

Coming to the film ‘Aavishkaar’. The film is produced under the banner of Aarohi Film Makers and is directed by Basu Bhattacharya. The songs of this film are written by Gyandev Agnihotri and Kapil Kumar. And yes, this traditional thumri originally created by Wajid Ali Shah. The cast of actors is listed as Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila Tagore, Deena Gandhi, Denis Klement, Satyendra Kappu, Monika Jasnani, Devendra Khandelwal, Margaret, Mahesh Sharma, and Minna Johar etc.

Interesting side note – this film is the 2nd in the now famous trilogy by Basu Bhattacharya, on the topic of marital discord, the first one being ‘Anubahv’ (1971) and the 3rd being ‘Grih Pravesh’ (1977).

More interesting side notes. As we talk about reuse, I must mention the other interesting reuse in this film. Probably this is the only film where we can hear Sharmila Tagore singing. At one place in the film, the iconic Manna Dey song “Hansne Ki Chaah Ne. . .” is being sung by Sharmila. Then, at another place in the film, the song from ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) – “Duniya Banaane Waale, Kya Tere Mann Mein Samaai” is playing on the radio, and we can also hear Sharmila singing along with it.

So much for today. In the next episode, we shall explore another very interesting aspect of re-use of songs.

Song – Baabul Mora, Naihar Chhuto Hi Jaaye  (Aavishkaar) (1973) Singers – Jagjit Singh, Chitra Singh, Lyrics – Traditional, MD – Kanu Roy
Jagjit Singh + Chitra Singh

Lyrics

baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

baabul mora. . .
baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

chaar kahaar mil mori
doliyaan sajaaye re
mora apna begaana
chhuto jaaye. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

[dialogue – Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila]

angnaa to parbat bhaya
deori bhai bides
le babul ghar aapno
main chali piya ke des
main chali piya ke des
main chali piya ke des

baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

चार कहार मिल मोरी
डोलियाँ सजाये रे
मोरा अपना बेगाना
छूटो जाये॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

[संवाद – राजेश खन्ना, शर्मिला टागोर]

अंगना तो परबत भया॰ ॰ ॰
डेयोड़ी भई बिदेस
ले बाबुल घर आपनो
मैं चली पिया के देस
मैं चली पिया के देस
मैं चली पिया के देस

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

 


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3827 Post No. : 14832 Movie Count :

4056

#the Decade of Seventies – 1971 – 1980 #
———————————————————–—
# Bhoole-Bisre Geet # 78 # Singer – Mahendra Kapoor #
—————————————————————————-

Today 9th January is the birth anniversary of Singer Mahendra Kapoor (9 January 1934 – 27 September 2008). Had he been alive today he would have been eighty-five years old.

On today’s occasion here is a song from the 1972 movie ‘Maalik’ sung by Mahendra Kapoor and composed by Kalyanji -Anandji. Lyrics are by Rajinder Krishan.

I have vague memories of watching this film on ‘Doordarshan’ and do not remember it now. In my childhood I had been hearing this song ‘Kanhaiyya Kanhaiyya Tujhe Aana Padega’ on loud speakers during the ‘Janmashtami’ festival. This song was very popular in those years. And after watching this movie ‘Maalik’ on ‘Doordarshan’ around 1983-1985, I came to know it was from this movie. However today on the occasion of birth anniversary of Singer Mahendra Kapoor, I am presenting herewith another Krishna song from the same film.

‘Maalik’ was directed by A Bhim Singh for Bharat Movies, Madras. It was produced by Vasu Menon. It had Sharmila Tagore, Rajesh Khanna, Deven Verma, Sonia Sahni, Bipin Gupta, Shivraj, Umesh Sharma, NS Bedi, Prem Kumar, Kabir Kumar, Baby Pinki and Ashok Kumar (in a special appearance). Story for this movie was written by Balamurugan. Dialogues of this movie were written by Rajinder Krishan (who also wrote the lyrics for all songs in this movie). Editing of this movie was done by A Paul Doraisingam. NS Bedi was also the dialogue director of this movie. This movie was passed by the Censor Board on 26.10.1972.

Rajesh Khanna played a different role in this movie from what was expected from him then and that too when he was on the peak of his career. May be because of that the movie didn’t fare well at the box-office, and may be because people might not have like to watch Rajesh Khanna in this type of role.

Our group of friends then who were the fans of Rajesh Khanna, did not like this movie much when we watched it on ‘Doordarshan’ then in 1983-85. And I remember next day we had discussed this movie and Kaka’s role in it at length. (But that is the matter for another article on Rajesh Khanna series. 🙂

The brief about this movie ‘Maalik-1972’ as given on IMDB is as below;

Rajesh and Savitri are in love, and soon they get married. They soon realize that they have a number of differences, the main one being that while Rajesh is a devout Hindu and worships Lord Krishna, Savitri does not believe in God. This leads to a number of arguments, yet both continue on with their married life. Soon a child is born to them. Unfortunately, the child is born without hands and legs. Both are anguished by this, and decide to placate God by visiting various places of worship all over India, little knowing that the truth lies elsewhere.

This movie has total thirteen songs as listed in HFGK Vol-V (1971-1980). Out of these thirteen songs, the singer’s name has not been mentioned for one song. Out of the remaining twelve songs we have one solo sung by Kishore Kumar, one solo by Lata Mangeshkar, three solo songs sung by Mahendra Kapoor and seven duets of Mahendra Kapoor with Lata Mangeshkar. That way, including the multiple version songs we have Mahendra Kapoor’s voice in as many as ten songs in this movie.

There was one movie made with the same title as ‘Maalik’ in ‘1958’. Five songs from this 1958 movie are already posted on our blog.

Today ‘Maalik’ of 1972 makes its debut on the blog. Here is this first song from this movie appearing here which is sung by Mahendra Kapoor and chorus.

Let us now listen to the today’s song in the voice of Mahendra Kapoor and chorus.

Radhe Krishna bol mukh se
tero kya laage re mol

Song – Radhe Krishna Bol Mukh Se (Maalik) (1972) Singer – Mahendra Kapoor, Lyrics – Rajendra Krishna, MD – Kalyanji Anandji

Lyrics

aaaa aa aa aa
radhe krishna bol mukh se ae
radhe krishna
bol mukh se
radhe krishna bol
tero 
kya laage re mol
tero
kya laage re mol
tero
kya laage re mol
ho ho o o o
radhe krishna bol mukh se
radhe krishna bol tero
kya laage re mol
tero
kya laage re mol

(western dance music)

pee le shyam naam ka pyaala
aa aa aa aa
pee le shyam naam ka pyaala
aur ho ja saancha matwaala
aur ho ja saancha matwaala
girdhar ke rang mein rang ja
re rang ja
tero
kya laage re mol
tero
kya laage re mol
tero
kya laage re mol

(western dance music)

natwar se preet lagaa le
ae ae ae ae
natwar se preet lagaa le
chhavi sundar man mein basaa le ae
chhavi sundar man mein basaa le
bansi ki dhun mein kho ja re kho ja        
tero
kya laage re mol
tero
kya laage re mol
ho ho o o
radhe krishna bol mukh se
radhe krishna bol mukh se
radhe krishna bol
mukh se re
radhe krishna bol

(western dance music)

radhe krishna bol
radhe krishna bol
radhe krishna bol
radhe krishna bol

(western dance music)

radhe krishna bol
radhe krishna bol

(western dance music)

radhe krishna bol
radhe krishna bol
radhe krishna bol
radhe krishna bol

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————————————

आ आ आ आ
राधे कृष्ण बोल मुख से ए
राधे कृष्ण
बोल मुख से
राधे कृष्ण बोल
तेरो
क्या लागे रे मोल
तेरो
क्या लागे रे मोल
तेरो
क्या लागे रे मोल
हो ओ ओ ओ
राधे कृष्ण बोल मुख से
राधे कृष्ण बोल
तेरो
क्या लागे रे मोल
तेरो
क्या लागे रे मोल

(पाश्चात्य संगीत)

पी ले श्याम नाम का प्याला
आ आ आ आ
पी ले श्याम नाम का प्याला
और हो जा सांचा मतवाला
और हो जा सांचा मतवाला
गिरधर के रंग में रंग जा
रे रंग जा
तेरो
क्या लागे रे मोल
तेरो
क्या लागे रे मोल
तेरो
क्या लागे रे मोल
 
(पाश्चात्य संगीत)

नटवर से प्रीत लगा ले
ए ए ए ए
नटवर से प्रीत लगा ले
छवि सुन्दर मन में बसा ले ए
छवि सुन्दर मन में बसा ले
बंसी कि धुन में खो जा रे खो जा
तेरो
क्या लागे रे मोल
तेरो
क्या लागे रे मोल
हो हो ओ ओ
राधे कृष्ण बोल मुख से
राधे कृष्ण बोल मुख से
राधे कृष्ण बोल
मुख से रे
राधे कृष्ण बोल

(पाश्चात्य संगीत)

राधे कृष्ण बोल
राधे कृष्ण बोल
राधे कृष्ण बोल
राधे कृष्ण बोल

(पाश्चात्य संगीत)

राधे कृष्ण बोल
राधे कृष्ण बोल

(पाश्चात्य संगीत)

राधे कृष्ण बोल
राधे कृष्ण बोल
राधे कृष्ण बोल
राधे कृष्ण बोल


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3757 Post No. : 14724

Sachin Dev Burman is, beyond doubt, the most sensitive instrument of musical inspiration – his soul is the very soul of music, the very soul of magic. Navketan ….is synonymous with Burman …whose songs are nesting places of whistling birds, tinkling bells and sobbing flutes….. A genius who has breathed music, dreamed music, lived music all his life.

This was a part of a signed note written in his own hand writing by Dev Anand, probably as a tribute to S D Burman. The entire note was reproduced in the book “The Navketan Story – Cinema Modern” by Sidharth Bhatia (2011).

Today, October 31st 2018 is 43rd Remembrance Day of Sachin Dev Burman (01/10/1906 – 31/10/1975), a legendary music director whose song compositions of 1950s through early 70s sound as young today as they did at the time of their creation. On S D Burman’s 112th birth anniversary on October 1st, 2018, I had set out in an article on this Blog, his journey from the Royal Tripura Family to the country side of the then East Bengal, to Calcutta (Kolkata) and finally to Bombay (Mumbai) to become one of the leading music directors of the golden period of Hindi film music.

When S D Burman landed in Mumbai in 1944, he had tough competition from well-established music directors like Anil Biswas, Naushad, Ghulam Haider, Khemchand Prakash and C Ramchandra. There were also emerging music directors in the mid-1940s like Sajjad Hussain, Husnlal-Bhagatram, Shyam Sundar, Hansraj Bahl etc. To some extent, his competition lessened with the migration of Ghulam Haider to Pakistan in 1948 and the sudden death of Khemchand Prakash in 1950. However, he had to face competition from new music directors – Shankar-Jaikishan, O P Nayyar. Madan Mohan, Roshan etc who operated concurrently with him.

There were some other handicaps with which S D Burman commenced his musical career. Apart from his poor knowledge of Hindi, S D Burman was said to have some personality traits which were not conducive for creating a successful filmy career. He gave an impression that he was whimsical, temperamental and stubborn. He lacked tact in handling his prospective customers (producers-directors). On the ‘plus’ side of his personality, as outlined by many who had worked with S D Burman, he was sagacious, humble, unbiased and had child-like innocence. Perhaps these qualities in him more than made up for his negative traits.

In Hindi film industry, in addition to talent, one also requires net-working with those who matters for picking up the music director for their films. He rarely attended filmy parties. He would not meet producer-directors or actors’ to seek work. He had very few friends and almost all of them were associated with Hindustani classical music or from Bengali music circle.

Despite all these handicaps and competitions from fellow music directors, I wonder as how could S D Burman maintain his position as one of the top music directors for as long as 24 years (1951-1975)? Let me analyse it based on 50 odd interviews of personality I have gone through who had closely worked with S D Burman and also of those who had known him.

For S D Burman, music was his world. Pandit Hari Prasad Chaurasia called him ‘Sangeet Sant’ (Saint of Music). Uttam Singh who was a violinist in S D Burman’s team of musicians and later a music director referred to him as ‘Rishi’ (Sage). Those who have closely worked with him had noticed that most of the time, he was in musical trance. Neeraj once observed that when Burman Dada was creating tunes for dance songs, he himself would dance to get a feel as to how a tune will fit on a dance song. Even among his few close friends, music was the only subject of his talk.

He was totally committed to song compositions under whatever the circumstances. Vijay Anand, in an interview taken by Piyush Sharma, had revealed that Burman Dada had composed some of the songs of ‘Guide’ (1965) from his hospital bed. He had personally gone to collect one of the tunes ‘piya tose naina laage re from the hospital bed. That he could conceive and create such a complex tunes ( 4 antaras in the song have different melodic treatments) even during illness speaks volume for his calibre as a music director. Waheeda Rahman had revealed that Burman Dada would tell her that he had conceived the tune with these dance steps in his mind so she should take care to do justice to them during the shooting. For ‘Tere Mere Sapne’ (1971), he had called Hema Malini to his home to explain the dance style of ta thai tat thai that thai ta. His good understanding of almost all aspects of song picturisation with his passion for perfection resulted in a very high percentage of his songs becoming hit.

S D Burman was never part of the rat race in the field of music direction in Bollywood. He would restrict the work of music direction to just 3-4 films a year. He had a phobia that if he took more films on hand, he may sound repetitive in his song composition. His style of composition required sufficient time to work on the songs to his full satisfaction. He would agree to compose songs for a film only after he had gone through the script of the film and the song sequences were fitting well in the story of the film.

There was an instance quoted by Pulak Bandopadhyay, who worked with S D Burman as lyricist for his non-film Bangla songs. He was present when this incidence happened. One day, a gentleman from the South film industry came to Burman Dada’s house and opened his brief case which was full of currency notes. He wanted to sign Burman Dada for his film. Burman Dada told the gentleman that he could show him as many bundles of currency notes as he had but he had no time to take up the new assignment.

After the gentleman had left disappointed, one of the persons in his room told Burman Dada that he should not have refused the film. He replied him by way of an idiomatic expression to make him understand. He compared film music as a draw-well. He said if one draws all the water from the well, it dries up. One needs to give the well sometime to recoup the water. [I have paraphrased here from the instance mentioned in ‘S D Burman – The World of His Music’ by Khagesh Dev Burman (Second Impression, 2016)].

Another important feature of S D Burman’s song compositions was that he was so particular about his melodic creations that he would not allow his singer’s voice and the lyrics to be over-shadowed by heavy orchestration. He used to tell his music arrangers that his melody was like a beautiful bride who did not need much ornamentation and dressing up. Another idiomatic expression he used to give in this regard was that orchestration was like a bindi (dot) on the forehead of a lady. A small bindi (dot) on the forehead of a beautiful lady would enhance her beauty. But a big bindi will spoil her beauty.

S D Burman was a strong believer in experimentation. Probably, this belief stemmed from his phobia that his songs may sound repetitive if he did not do something different. A sample of some non-film Bengali songs which he had composed in the 1930s and 40s itself gives an indication of his experimentation. Once in a conversation with Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma, the Santoor player, Burman Dada said in his broken Hindi “main maar khaayega lekin main kuchh naya karega’’. What he meant was that he would continue to experiment with his songs and the music compositions even though his experiments may sometime fail. Let me list out at least a few of his experimentation:

1. I think, the first successful experimentation S D Burman carried was converting a ghazal into a club song tadbeer se bigdi huyi taqdeer bana le. This song became so famous that the film ‘Baazi’ (1951) became synonymous with this song. In ‘Funtoosh’ (1956), he once again converted a ghazal sounding lyrics into a light fun song, wo dekhen to unki inaayat.

2. In jaane kya toone kahi, a new musical instrument called Chinese Temple Blocks was used which created a mesmerising impact to match the mood in the song. The instrument was played by Kersi Lord, the Drummer and Accordionist in the S D Burman’s team of musicians. Another surprise was that S D Burman experimented by using Khol (a type of percussion) in this song which was essentially a naughty one. In Bengal and other North-Eastern States, the khol is used mainly for devotional and kirtan songs. In hothon mein aisi baat main daba ke chali aayi, S D Burman used a variety of percussion instruments of North-East Indian states and from Nepal and Myanmar numbering around 20.

3. Music Director Chitragupt used to tell his music director sons, Anand-Milind to study the songs composed by S D Burman especially the antara part of the songs where he sometimes experimented by composing in different metres than the mukhda metres. Anand gave an example of the song, choodi nahin ye mera dil hai which has antaras in different metres than mukhda. Even within antara, three out of 5 lines are again in different metres. The expertise of S D Burman in these types of songs is that the tune of antaras in different metres is brought close to the mukhda tune of the song like an aircraft making a smooth landing.

4. Poet Neeraj who started writing for S D Burman from ‘Prem Pujari’ (1970) also said that Burman Dada did a lot of experimentation with his song compositions. For instance, in phoolon ke rang se dil ki kalam se, Burman Dada started the song with antara. It was after 7 lines that the mukhda of 4 lines started. In dil aaj shaayar hai, there was no mukhda at all. For the song, yaaron neelaam karo susti, Burman Dada composed the first two lines based on a folk song, the next two lines were raag based tune, 5th and 6th lines were pop based tune and the last 4 lines which are the mukhda of the song were composed in qawwali style. Neeraj said that Burman Dada did these kinds of experimentation to break the monotony in the songs.

5. S D Burman was a fan of Ustad Faiyaz Khan of Agra Gharana. With his prior approval, he had used his famous bandish, ‘jhan jhan jhan jhan paayal baaje’ in Raag Nat Behag in composing non-film Bengali song ‘jhan jhan jhan jhan manjeera baaje’ (1937) which became very popular. He reused the tune with some improvisation in Hindi film ‘Buzdil’ (1951).

But in ‘Manzil’ (1960), S D Burman went a step ahead. He experimented with using Ustad Faiyaz Khan’s famous Dadra in Raag Bhairavi, ‘banaao batiyaan hato kaahe ko jhooti’ on Mehmood as arre hato kaahe ko jhooti banaao batiyaan in a light comical situation. He got Manna Dey to sing keeping in view the fact that he was singing for Mehmood in the role of Paanwala. When I first heard this song without the picturisation, I really felt that it was sung as a semi-classical song in the film as a part of the stage show. This song became very popular because it had the chord to connect with the masses.

Later, Roshan also adopted this experimentation successfully in laaga chunri mein daag chupaaun kaise and in phool gendwa na maaro. Both these semi-classical songs have been used in comical situations and sung by Manna Dey.

6. According to Uttam Singh, Violinist with S D Burman and R D Burman and later the music director, S D Burman is the only music director in Hindi film industry who has experimented with composing a classical dance song, piya tose naina laage re in Rupak Taal (7 beats) which is regarded as unusual for a dance song. He said that after this dance song, no other music director in Hindi film industry has attempted to compose a classical dance song in Rupak Taal.

I do not know much of the nuances of Hindustani classical music. On-line study material gave me some idea as to why Rupak Taal is unusual. All other Taals like Dadra Taal (6 beats), Kherwah (8 beats), Ek Taal (12 beats), Dhamar (14 beats), Teentaal (16 beats) etc have even number of beats. It is only the Rupak Taal which has uneven number of beats (7).

7. Shekhar Sen, the current Chairman of the Sangeet Natak Akadamy who is also a singer, lyricist, composer, playwright and musicologist, said that Burman Dada had experimented composing a Hindi film song on Merukhand style used in Hindustani classical music. Merukhand is an improvisation style recited in the 3-4 notes in sargam. For example, 4 notes, Sa Re Ga Ma can be sung in various combination in maximum of 24 patterns without repeating any note. Merukhand is used for vocal practice by those who have just completed training in Hindustani classical music.

The song in Merukhand which Shekhar Sen referred to was palkon ke peeche se kya kah daala. Getting a clue from this song, I guess, geet pehle bana thhaa yaa bani thhi ye sargam is also a Merukhand inspired song. Both these songs became popular.

Let me summarise as to how S D Burman could remain as one of the top music directors for as long as 24 years (1951-1975). First, he concentrated on the quality rather than quantity of song compositions by restricting his assignments to not more than 3-4 film in a year. Secondly, he chose mainly those genres of films for which he had a flavour for composing songs. Thirdly, he ensured that he worked with those directors who had been excellent in song picturisation. He was lucky to get directors like Guru Dutt, Raj Khosla, Vijay Anand, Bimal Roy and later Shakti Samanta and Hrishikesh Mukherjee. Fourthly, he did improvisation in his song compositions to make them acceptable to the masses. He also made experimentation in the song compositions to ensure that his songs did not become monotonous.

I will end my longish post on Burman Dada with a quote from Shekhar Sen. “Burman Dada’s song compositions were like lime pickle which became more tasty as years passed”.

On the occasion of 43rd Remembrance Day of S D Burman, I present one of the songs composed by him, ‘o tushima ri tushima..aa gaya toofaan’ from the film ‘Ye Gulistaan Hamaara’ (1972). The song is sung by Lata Mangeshkar on the lyrics of Anand Bakshi.

The tune of the song is based on a Nepali folk song which S D Burman’s Madal player, Ranjit Gazmer had once sang among his other musicians while relaxing during the rehearsal. S D Burman liked the tune and later used in this film with some improvisation.

—————————————————————————————————————————————–

Acknowledgements:

In writing this article, I have relied on interviews which were given by those who had closely worked with/close association with S D Burman. They included producers-directors, actors, music directors, singers, lyricists, music arrangers, lead musicians and his close friends. Most of videos/audio interviews were taken by Moti Lalwani which he has uploaded on YT.

Video Clip:

Song-Ho tushima ri tushima…aa gaya toofaan (Ye Gulistaan Hamaara)(1972) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-S D Burman

Lyrics

ho o o o
tushima aa aa

ho tushima ri tushima
ho tushima ri tushima
aaj jaane kis kaaran
haule haule doley mann
aaj jaane kis kaaran
haule haule doley mann
aa gaya toofaan
haan
aa gaya toofaan
aa gaya toofaan
haan
aa gaya toofaan
ho tushima ri tushima
ho tushima ri tushima

chhaayi masti basti basti
parvat parvat jhoomen
chhaayi masti
chhaayi masti basti-basti
parvat parvat jhoomen
yoon chale purvaai
ang ang leve angdaai
dharti chhuve aasmaan
aa gaya toofaan
aa gaya toofaan
haan
aa gaya toofaan
ho tushima ri tushima
ho tushima ri tushima

thhanda paani chhoone se bhi
aag badan mein laage
thhanda paani
thhanda paani chhoone se bhi
aag badan mein laage
neend se joban jaaga
chupke se dhadkan laaga
mera manwa beimaan
aa gaya toofaan
aa gaya toofaan
haan
aa gaya toofaan
ho tushima ri tushima
ho tushima ri tushima

maine dekha apna mukhda
maujon ke darpan mein
maine dekha
maine dekha apna mukhda
maujon ke darpan mein
mann se maine poochha
yeh hoon main yaa koi dooja
itni sundar main kahaan
aa gaya toofaan
aa gaya toofaan
haan
aa gaya


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3530 Post No. : 14178

First of all, let me wish all of you a Happy Ugadi and Happy Gudi Padwa today (18 march 2018). I hope those celebrating the occasion are enjoying themselves.

Today also happens to be the birthday of Shashi Kapoor (18 march 1938-4 december 2017), one of our best-known and most loved actors.

The thought is inescapable – and burdened with more than a tinge of sorrow. The thought that, had I written this post on just his previous birthday, I would have been talking of Shashi Kapoor in the present tense. I’d have been saying “is”, instead of “was”.

But that’s life – and death. And we have to accept it.

Ah, Shashi Kapoor!

Where do I start?

Let me start as usual with “my generation”, the 70s.

For me, and I am sure for many Hindi film lovers born in the early 60s, Shashi Kapoor would have been an integral part of their childhood film-watching experience. He was a very familiar face throughout the 70s – whether in solo roles or in multi-starrer films.

Those were the times when Rajesh Khanna (for the first half of the decade) and Amitabh Bachchan (for the second half) ruled. The 70s also saw a whole lot of new actors emerge. There were also some from the earlier decade who continued to enjoy success – Dharmendra, Manoj Kumar, Sanjeev Kumar, Jeetendra to name a few.

And there was Shashi Kapoor.

One thing most people will agree about Shashi Kapoor – he was very handsome. He had this boyishly cute face, bright eyes, and a smile that got accentuated by crooked teeth and a deep dimple. No wonder you often heard of the term “chocolatey good looks” when people talked of Shashi. 🙂

I think girls found Shashi particularly handsome – he was easily my sisters’ favourite. I was very young then in the late 60s, but I still remember that when the one weekly film in our club happened to be a Shashi film, they’d be thrilled. 🙂 Thus I have fond memories of watching at a very young age, in that club, Shashi films like Haseena Maan Jaayegi, Aamne Saamne, Suhana Safar, Ek Shriman Ek Shrimati, Pyar Ka Mausam, Raja Saab, Rootha Na Karo, Jahaan Pyaar Mile and many more. Whether the film was good or not, was secondary. Shashi was a good enough reason to enjoy it. I remember for days after seeing Pyar Ka Mausam, they’d be singing “ni sultana re”. 🙂 And they loved Aamne Saamne’s “nain milaakar chain churaana kiska hai ye kaam”.

Even when we went on holiday to Bombay for the first time in the early 70s, and we decided to watch a movie, the unanimous choice was Sharmeelee, playing at that time. I think my sisters were even hoping to catch sight of Shashi Kapoor somewhere on the streets of Bombay. 🙂 Not even one in a million chance – but one lives on hope. I remember, for days after watching Sharmeelee, the song “khilte hain gul yahaan” was on their lips. 🙂

Back in our village, when we had to travel 25 km to see a film in a cinema hall, they managed to persuade my dad to take them for Jaanwar Aur Insaan (1972). My dad wasn’t into films at all – it’s possible they told him it was a film about animals (jaanwar). Whereas it’s more likely they were interested in the insaan (Shashi). 🙂

Ah, these childhood memories. 🙂

I was fond of Shashi too – from those late 60s films, while my sisters would sing Shashi’s “tum bin jaoon kahaan” in Antakshari, I’d sing “aaye baithe khaaye piye khiske”. A little more matter-of-fact. 🙂

Today, as I am writing this post, with all these memories coming to the fore, it strikes me that even in an era with Rajesh Khanna as superstar (and Amitabh Bachchan later), Shashi had his own following. Like my sisters. 🙂

Sharmeelee (1971) with superhit songs, Jaanwar Aur Insaan (1972), Aa Gale Lag Ja (1973) with superhit songs, Chor Machaye Shor (1974) with the famous “le jaayenge, le jaayenge, dilwaale dulhaniya le jaayenge”, Chori Mera Kaam and Salaakhen (1975), Fakira (1976) with hit songs.

All solo films for Shashi, all successful. Am not counting the multi-starrers, Roti Kapda Aur Makaan (1974), Deewaar (1975) and Kabhie Kabhie (1976).

As the decade progressed, and multi-starrers became more common, Shashi Kapoor was very much part of them, often to be seen opposite reigning superstar Amitabh Bachchan in films like Trishul (1977) and Suhaag (1979).

Yet, he could carry his own in a solo – as was to be seen in Satyam Shivam Sundaram (1978), a film made by his brother, Raj Kapoor.

So Shashi Kapoor was largely a “safe” actor in the 70s – both for viewers and producers. Of course not every film worked (there are many aspect to a film’s success), but, by and large, audiences liked watching him on screen.

Towards the end of the decade, Shashi got into film production too. He produced some well-known films – Junoon (1979), Kalyug (1981), 36 Chowringhee Lane (1981), Vijeta (1982), Utsav (1984).

But in 1984, disaster struck – his dear wife Jennifer passed away, due to cancer. I think after that Shashi was not the same again.

I’ve talked a lot about his films of the 70s, mainly because that’s the decade I have most memories of. Of course his career started much earlier. As a child artiste (a young Raj Kapoor in Aag and Awara), with his first film as an adult being BR Chopra’s controversial Dharamputra (1961). In that film, he had a negative role.

Although he came from the Kapoor khandaan, it was made clear to Shashi that he had to come up on merit. He had his share of struggles early on – and though he managed the odd hit (like in the multi-starrer Waqt), he really had his first mega solo hit only with Jab Jab Phool Khile (1965).

His co-star in that film was, as usual, Nanda. I say “as usual”, because Nanda was his co-star in many films during the 60s. She was a much bigger star than he was – but was happy to be paired opposite him. Shashi later said he was hugely grateful to Nanda for this. Nanda herself said that Shashi was her favourite co-star.

One thing that struck me in obituaries about Shashi Kapoor last December was that almost everyone spoke a lot about Prithvi Theatre. And rightly so.

While there’s no doubt that Shashi Kapoor gained a lot of popularity from cinema, I think in his heart his love was Prithvi Theatre. After all, he had met his wife Jennifer also through theatre in the 1950s. So one of the most satisfying moments for him and for Jennifer must have been to set up Prithvi Theatre in 1978 and fulfil his father Prithviraj Kapoor’s dream of having a permanent location for his Prithvi Theatres (it had been a travelling troupe during Prithviraj’s time).

Many of the obits talked about how dedicated Shashi Kapoor (and Jennifer, when she was alive) was to Prithvi Theatre. Even when he was in very poor health in his final years, he would want to visit and even watch performances.

So no mention of Shashi Kapoor is complete without a mention of Prithvi Theatre.

I’ve not talked about his acting in English-language films or his partnership with Merchant-Ivory. I’ve myself just watched only one of these films – Bombay Talkie (1970), directed by James Ivory. It also starred Jennifer.

I’ve also not mentioned that Shashi Kapoor was considered to be a true gentleman actor. Many of his co-stars, from Sharmila Tagore to Hema Malini to Zeenat Aman, have said this. He was also supposed to have had a good sense of humour, always keeping the set lively.

All in all, Shashi Kapoor was a much-loved person during his lifetime. And for good reason. And you cannot really ask for more than that.

Now for the song for today.

It is from the film “Suhaana Safar” (1970). A film that I remember seeing as a very young boy, but sadly have only very faint memories of. I seem to vaguely remember a bus in which Shashi and Sharmila travel. That’s all I can remember now. 🙂 A good excuse to watch it again. 🙂

The song is the title song. Aha aha aa ye suhaana safar hai, sung by Rafisaab. The lyrics of this song are by Anand Bakshi, music by Laxmikant Pyarelal.

The picturisation is of Shashi Kapoor in a jeep, generally giving out positive vibes, talking about travel, hawa, manzil etc. He finds himself behind a bus, and this infectious positive mood catches on with the travelers in the bus too. They join him in the song. Towards the end of the song, Sharmila Tagore (one of the travelers) looks out of the bus, Shashi waves to her – and it looks like he loses control of his jeep. (Am pretty sure it’s nothing serious :-)).

While watching the video and listening to the lyrics, I could not help thinking that this could be a metaphor for the suhaana safar of Shashi Kapoor’s life itself. And the suhaana safar that we have had following his films for decades. Indeed, it has been a wonderful journey – and we are thankful to him for letting us be part of it.

Interestingly, while I was having these thoughts, I got a message from Avinashji. As usual, when I thought of writing a post for Shashi Kapoor today, he had promptly messaged me, and offered to help me with providing the lyrics. Now, while sending me the lyrics, he echoed the exact same thoughts I had! About the suhana safar of Shashi Kapoor and what we have had with Shashi Kapoor. Serendipity. 🙂

I’ll now leave you with this positive song – and with remembering our suhaana safar with Shashi Kapoor.

There are two versions of this song – one by Rafisaab, the other by Suman Kalyanpur.

Rafi version (Audio)

Rafi version (Video)

Suman Kalyanpur Version (Audio)

Song-Aha aha aa ye suhaana safar (Suhaana Safar)(1970) Singer-Rafi/ Suman Kalyanpur, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-Laxmikant Pyarelal
Female chorus
All chorus

——————————————————-
Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
——————————————————-
O o
o o o
Aa aa aa aa
Aa aa aa aa

Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Rukti nahin hai nazaaron pe nazar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

Ho o o o
Hawaayein jhoom rahi hain
Gulon ko choom rahi hain
Hoye
Hawaayein jhoom rahi hain
Rokoon dil ko main kaise
Aise udaa jaaye jaise
maang liye ho kisi panchhi se parr
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

O o o
Musaafir chaltaa hi jaaye
Kabhi bhi manzil naa aaye
Musaafir chaltaa hi jaaye
Dheere dheere haule haule
Mujhse ye dil boley
Kat jaaye raste mein
Saari umar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

Chhup chhup chhainyya
Chhainyya
Chhup chhup chhainyya
Chhup chhup chhainyya
Chhainyya
Chhup chhup chhainyya
Patli kamar mori
Naazuk bainyya
Chhup chhup chhainyya
Chhainyya
Chhup chhup chhainyya

Ho o o
Mujhe ye raah naa bhulaa de
Kahin ye aur naa pahunchaa de
Mujhe ye raah naa bhulaa de
Kaisi hain ye matwaali
Lambi lambi kaali kaali
Zulf kisi ki hai
Ya ye dagar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Rukti nahin hai nazaaron pe nazar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

Aha aha aa ye suhaana safar
Aha aha aa ye suhaana safar
Aha aha aa ye suhaana safar

—————————————-
(Female version)
—————————————–
Hmm hmm
O o o
o o
o o o

Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Rukti nahin hai nazaaron pe nazar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho o o

Ho o o
Nigaahein jhoom rahi hain
Kisi ko dhoondh rahi hain
Ho
Nigaahein jhoom rahi hain
Koyee mulaakaatee miley
Aisa koyee saathi miley
Jo ban jaaye mera hamsafar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

Ho o o
Abhi to door hai manzil
Dhadakne lagaa abhi se dil
Abhi to door hai manzil
Taubaa taubaa
Haaye haaye
Dil pe kyaa guzar jaaye
Saamne wo aa jaaye agar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho o
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

Ho o o o
Mere dil bhool na jaana
Ki hain ye rastaa anjaana
Mere dil bhool na jaana
Aise naa machal jaana
Aagey naa nikal jaana
Chhod ke peechhe sanam ka ghar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho o
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Rukti nahin hai nazaaron pe nazar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

———————————————
Devnagri script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————————
Male version
———————————————


ओ ओ ओ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ

आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
रूकती नहीं है नजारों पे नज़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

हो ओ ओ ओ
हवाएं झूम रही हैं
गुलों को चूम रही हैं
होए
हवाएं झूम रही हैं
रोकूँ दिल को मैं कैसे
ऐसे उड़ा जाए जैसे
बाँध लिए हो किसी पंछी से पर
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

ओ ओ ओ
मुसाफिर चलता ही जाए
कभी भी मंजिल ना आये
मुसाफिर चलता ही जाए
धीरे धीरे हौले हौले
मुझसे ये दिल बोले
कट जाए रस्ते में
सारी उम्र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

छुप छुप छैंया
छैंया
छुप छुप छैंया
पतली कमर मोरी
नाज़ुक बैंया
छुप छुप छैंया
छैंया
छुप छुप छैंया

हो ओ ओ
मुझे ये राह ना भुला दे
कहीं ये और ना पहुंचा दे
मुझे ये राह ना भुला दे
कैसी हैं ये मतवाली
लम्बी लम्बी काली काली
ज़ुल्फ़ किसी की हैं
या ये डगर
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
रूकती नहीं है नजारों पे नज़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

————————————
Female version
————————————
हम्म
हम्म
ओ ओ ओ ओ ओ
ओ ओ

आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
रूकती नहीं है नजारों पे नज़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो

हो ओ ओ
निगाहें झूम रही हैं
किसीको ढूंढ रही हैं
हो
निगाहें झूम रही हैं
कोई मुलाकाती मिले
ऐसा कोई साथी मिले
जो बन जाए मेरा हमसफ़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

हो ओ ओ
अभी तो दूर है मंजिल
धड़कने लगा अभी से दिल
अभी तो दूर है मंजिल
तौबा तौबा
हाए हाए
दिल पे क्या गुज़र जाए
सामने वो आ जाये अगर
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

हो ओ ओ ओ
मेरे दिल भूल न जाना
कि है ये रास्ता अनजाना
मेरे दिल भूल न जाना
ऐसे न मचल जाना
आगे ना निकल जाना
छोड़ के पीछे सनम का घर
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो ओ
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
रूकती नहीं है नजारों पे नज़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

hullo Atuldom

“Raja Rani” was a 1973 movie which was directed by Sachin Bhowmik – otherwise known to be a story and screenplay writer; it was produced by Jagdish Kumar.

The movie had a star cast led by Rajesh Khanna and Sharmila Tagore (who seemed to look younger in this movie as compared to Aradhana of 1969 ??). The supporting cast consisted of David, Iftikar, Raj Mehra, Bhram Bharadwaj, Asit Sen, Suresh, Naaz. Dulari etc. Anand Bakshi wrote songs which tunes by R.D. Burman.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, 08th March 2017, is the 96th birth anniversary of Sahir Ludhianvi – the poet – lyricist – whom we fondly remember for his memorable or rather immortal poetry and songs too – and the classic poetic gems – which he contributed to the Indian Cinema.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Mere Hamsafar” (1970) was directed by Dulal Guha for Labela Films, Bombay. This movie had Sharmila Tagore, Jeetendra, Balraj Sahni, Jeevan, Laxmi Chhaya, Suresh, Shammi, Mohan, Sheri Prakash, Thoppa, Keshto Mukherjee, Sunder etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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