Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Kanu Roy


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

5178 Post No. : 17155

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Blog 10-Year Challenge (2012-2022) – Song No. 98
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This date ten years ago (viz 22 September 2012) saw six songs from six different movies getting covered in the blog.

Here are the details:-

Blog post number Song Movie (Year) Remarks
6695 Jeet jyot tez chamak raha hai Amar Jyoti (1936) 8 songs out of 11 songs covered by now
6696 Unse kehna ki wo pal bhar ke liye aa jaayen Ek Thi Ladki (1949) Movie YIPPEED by now
6697 Boliye sureelee boliyaan Grih Pravesh (1979) 3 songs out of 8 covered by now
6698 Is ishq muhabbat ki kuchh hain ajeeb rasmein Zulm Ki Pukaar(1979) One song covered out of six by now
6699 Chanda se hoga wo pyaara Main Bhi Ladki Hoon (1964) Movie YIPPEED by now
600 Ye chaand to mridang hai Shri Krishna Arjun Yudhh (1971) One song covered out of six by now

It can be observed that two movies (out of six) whose songs were covered on this date ten years ago have since been YIPPEED in the blo. That leaves us with four movies that are still eligible for Blog Ten Year Challenge today (on 22 September 2022).

“Grih Pravesh”(1979) is one such movie.

“Grih Pravesh”(1979) was produced and directed by Basu Bhattacharya for Aarohi Film Makers, Bombay. The movie had Sanjeev Kumar, Sharmila Tagore, Sarika, Manik Dutt, Danny, Dinesh Thakur, Master Bittoo, Sudha Chopra, Satya Bannerjee, Vimal Joshi, Nandlal Sharma, R.S.Chopra, Rajan Verma, Nitin Sethi, Ranjan, Gulzar, Shashi Jain, Nilesh, Khokha Mukerjee, Tarun Mukherjee, Devendra Khandelwal, Priyadarshinee, Master Bharat etc in it.

The movie had eight songs. Three of these songs have been covered by now.

Here is the fourth song from “Grih Pravesh”(1979) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Bhupinder Singh. Gulzar is the lyricist. Music is composed by Kanu Roy.

The song is picturised on Sanjeev Kumar and Sharmila Tagore.

Lyrics of the song and other details were sent to me by Prakashchandra as far back as in 2012 itself !

video link:

audio link:

Song-Machal ke jab bhi aankhon se (Grih Pravesh)(1979) Singer-Bhupinder Singh, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Kanu Roy

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra) (Based on audio link)

machal ke jab bhi aankhon se
chhalak jaate hain do aansoon..oon
machalke jab bhi aankhon se
chhalak jaate hain do aansoon
sunaa hai aabshaaron ko o
badi taqleef hoti hai
machal ke jab bhi aankhon se
chhalak jaate hain do aansoon
machal ke ae jab bhi aankhon se ae

khudaaraa ab to bujh jaaney do
iss jalti huyee lau ko…oooo
khudaaraa ab to bujh jaane do
iss jalti huyee lav/lau ko
charaagon se ae mazaaron ko
badi taqleef hoti hai
charaagon se ae mazaaron ko
badi taqleef hoti hai
machal ke jab bhi aankhon se
chhalak jaate hain do aansoon
machalke jab bhi aankhon se ae

kahoon kyaa aa woh badi maasoomiyat se
poochh baithhe hain aen aen aen
kahoon kyaa woh badi maasoomiyat se
poochh baithhe hain aen
kya sachmuch dil ke maaron ko
badi taqleef hoti hai ae
kya sachmuch dil ke maaron ko o
badi taqleef hoti hai
machal ke jab bhi aankhon se
chhalak jaate hain do aansoon
machalke jab bhi aankhon se ae

tumhaaraa kyaa tumhein to
raah de detey hain kaante bhi…..ee ee ee
tumhaaraa kyaa tumhein to o
raah de dete hain kaante bhee
magar hum khaaksaaron ko o
badi taqleef hoti hai
magar hum khaaksaaron ko o
badi taqleef hoti hai
machhalke jab bhi aankhon se
chhalak jaate hain do aansoon
sunaa hai aabshaaron ko
badi taqleef hoti hai
machal ke jab bhi aankhon se
chhalak jaate hain do aansoon
machalke jab bhi aankhon se
chhalak jaate hain do aansoon
machal ke ae jab bhi aankhon se
chhalak jaate hain do aansoon


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

5047 Post No. : 16960

Today 13th May’2022 is the seventy-sixth birthday of Shri Bishwanath Chatterjee compiler of Hindi Film Geet Kosh Vol-V (1971-1980). Those who have the copy of this Geet Kosh would have read about his brief introduction on the cover page no.2 of this Geet Kosh.
He has also been a co-compiler with Shri Hamraz ji for HGK Vol-I to Vol-IV etc. and a co-compiler with Shri Hamraz ji for the ‘List of Hindi Films (Talkie) – 1931-1987.

He has also been a co-author/co-editor with Vishwas Nerurkar for the books on Khayyam Saab, Kishore Kumar, Vasant Desai and Sudhir Phadke.

Here is a brief about him as mentioned in HFGK Vol-V (1971-1980) by Devi Shankar Kanojiya and other details which Shri Chatterjee shared with me. (Devi Shankar Kanojiya a family friend is younger to Bishwanath ji by five years and settled at Kanpur now. He was earlier working in Telecom department of Government of India.).

Bishwanath Chatterjee was born on 13th May’1946 at Nagpur. He is born and brought up at Nagpur only. After his studies he joined the Department of Audit & Accounts (Postal). (This department was later bifurcated in two i.e., Accounts and Audit being separate departments.)
His first posting was at Jaipur (for Jaipur circle) where he stayed for one year i.e. 1970-1971. His next posting was at Bhopal where he stayed till 14.05.1980 and was transferred to Nagpur w.e.f.15.05.1980.
He retired in May’2006 as Director of Accounts (Postal) and now settled in Nagpur. He has a daughter who is happily married and stays abroad with her family. She has a son.

It so happened that around 1966 Bishwanath ji got interested in Hindi Film Music, or rather the HFM attracted him so much that after two years i.e., around 1968 a thought to compile the details of all songs till date, then stems in his mind.
However, in absence of sufficient and required resources he had to suppress the idea temporarily but a strong urge to have such a compilation has already taken deep roots in his mind.
In ‘1975’ he got to know about Harmandir Singh Hamraaz ji through the weekly ‘Screen’ and came into contact with him. He came to know that Hamraz ji was also working on a similar project and in fact almost 50% work of compiling such information has been completed by Hamraz ji till then. So he decided to support full heartedly to Hamraaz ji. And he has been instrumental in preparing the ‘manuscript’ for the first four volumes of ‘Geet Kosh’ and after that he independently compiled the ‘Geet Kosh – Vol-V’.

He also accompanied Shri Hamraaz ji in extensive travels to places like Bombay, Poona, Indore, Baroda, Ahmedabad, Rajkot, and Calcutta, for gathering information and meeting various film personalities and film connoisseurs to get accurate information as possible.

In between, in the year of 1975 he founded ‘Saurabh Radio Shrota Sangh’ at Nagpur and also published ‘Saurabh-1977’ (as a co-editor). But due to economic constraints he had to discontinue this publication.

Shri Chatterjee has been a ‘passionate’ student of Hindi Film Music and has keen interests in Hindustani Classical Music. He has his own library consisting of lot of books about films and Geet & Ghazals.

I got a chance to meet him once during my stay at Nagpur in 2015-2017, where our regular reader Shri Avinash Shravane was also with us. It was a ‘film screening’ program by ‘Cine Montage, Nagpur’.
I left Nagpur on 09.03.2017 and since then I am in touch with him on phone-calls. As very rightly mentioned by Shri Kanojiya ji, Bishwanath ji is very humble, generous, enthusiastic and extremely sensible person.

Yesterday evening when I called him he was very happy and enthusiastic as ever. We discussed many topics and shared our thoughts too.

Once again I wish him a very happy birthday today, and a healthy and peaceful, yet’ full of music’al life ahead.

When I think about him I find the today’s song perfectly fit for this occasion as the ‘fragrance of his works and words – in the form of ‘Geet Kosh’ will be there forever –spreading the ‘spring’ of ‘nostalgia and memories’ for generations together.

‘Zindagi phoolon ki nahin
Phoolon ki tarah aa aa mehki rahe ae …’

Today’s song is from the ‘1979’ movie ‘Griha Pravesh’.

‘Griha Pravesh’ was directed by Basu Bhattacharya.

Basu Bhattacharya was also the writer and producer of this movie.

It had Sanjeev Kumar, Shamila Tagore, Sarika, Master Bittoo, Sudha Chopra, Manik Dutt, Vimal Joshi, Raj Verma, Nandlal Sharma, R.S. Chopra, Satay Bannerjee, Shashi Jain, Tarun Mujherjee, Nilesh, Khoka Mukherjee, Danny, Master Bharat, and Nitin Sethi.
Dinesh Thakur, Priya Darshini, Ranjan, Devendra and Gulzar made a friendly appearance in this movie.

Script of this movie was written by Gulzar and Basu Bhattacharya.
Editing of this movie was done by Om Prakash Makkar.
Dialogues of this movie were written by Gulzar, and he also wrote the lyrics for the songs in this movie.

Yesudas, Sulakshana Pandit, Chandrani Mukherjee, Pankaj Mitra, and Bhupendra had given their voices to the songs in this movie.

Music for this movie was composed by Kanu Roy.

Today’s song is sung by Bhupendra Singh and is a background song in the movie. It happens when the titles of this movie are rolling down.

Lyrics are by Gulzar and music is composed by Kanu Roy.

(I had noted this song more than five years back during my stay in Kenya and had earlier saved it for a special post.
Later on our dear Prakash ji had also sent the lyrics for this song with other remaining songs of this movie.).

Video


Song-Zindagi phoolon ki nahin (Grih Pravesh)(1979) Singer-Bhupinder Singh, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Kanu Roy

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra)

Zindagi ee
phoolon ki nahin
Phoolon ki tarah aa aa
mehki rahe ae

Zindagi
phoolon ki nahin
Phoolon ki tarah aa aa mehki rahe ae
Zindagi ee
phoolon ki nahin
Phoolon ki tarah aa mehki rahe ae ae
Zindagi ee

Jab koi kahin gul khiltaa hai
Aawaaz nahin aati lekin
Jab koi kahin gul khiltaa hai
Aawaaz nahin aati lekin
Khushboo ki khabar aa jaati hai
Khushboo oo oo mehki rahe ae
Zindagi
phoolon ki nahin
Phoolon ki tarah aa aa
mehki rahe ae ae
Zindagi ee

Jab raah kahin koi mudti hai
Manzil ka pataa to hota nahin
Jab raah kahin koi mudti hai
Manzil ka pataa to hota nahin
Ik raah pe raah mil jaati hai
Raahen mudti rahen
Zindagi ee
phoolon ki nahin
Phoolon ki tarah aa mehki rahe ae ae
Zindagi
phoolon ki nahin
Phoolon ki tarah aa aa mehki rahe ae
Zindagi ee
Hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
Hmm hmm hmm hmm
Laa la laa
Laa la la la laa
Ho ho ho ho o o o
O ho ho o o o

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Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
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ज़िन्दगी फूलों की नहीं
फूलों की तरह आ आ महकी रहे ए
ज़िन्दगी फूलों की नहीं
फूलों की तरह आ आ महकी रहे ए
ज़िन्दगी ई फूलों की नहीं
फूलों की तरह आ महकी रहे ए ए
ज़िन्दगी ई

जब कोई कहीं गुल खिलता है
आवाज़ नहीं आती लेकिन
जब कोई कहीं गुल खिलता है
आवाज़ नहीं आती लेकिन
खुशबू की खबर आ जाती है
खुशबू ऊ ऊ महकी रहे ए
ज़िन्दगी फूलों की नहीं
फूलों की तरह आ आ महकी रहे ए ए
ज़िन्दगी ई

जब राह कहीं कोई मुडती है
मंजिल का पता तो होता नहीं
जब राह कहीं कोई मुडती है
मंजिल का पता तो होता नहीं
इक राह पे राह मिल जाती है
राहें मुडती रहें
ज़िन्दगी ई फूलों की नहीं
फूलों की तरह आ आ महकी रहे ए ए
ज़िन्दगी फूलों की नहीं
फूलों की तरह आ आ महकी रहे ए
ज़िन्दगी ई
हं हं हं हं हं
हं हं हं हं
ला ल ला
ला ल ल ला
हो हो हो हो ओ ओ ओ
ओ हो हो ओ ओ ओ


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4343 Post No. : 15648 Movie Count :

4310

‘Sparsh’ (1980) was Sai Paranjpye’s first feature film. Besides directing it, she wrote the story, screen-play and dialogues.  At the time of making of the film, she faced enormous problems at every stage – from the selection of actors to the submission of the film’s final print to the Central Board of Film Certification and then to the Feature Film Jury of the National Film Awards on due date. And if I go by what the director of the film has revealed through her interviews in newspapers and periodicals and also in her Marathi book, ‘Sai – Maaza Kalapravaas’, the major obstacles came from the producer of the film – Basu Bhattacharya, who was known in Hindi film industry as a stingy producer.

Sometime in the later half the 1970s (the actual year is not known), Sai Paranjpye produced a 10-minute documentary film on the visually impaired for Delhi Doordarshan to be telecast on the World Handicap Day. For this purpose, Sai Paranjpye had to visit a blind school to get a feel of how the blind students study and do extra-curricular activities. She had gone to the blind school with the apprehension in her mind as to whether she will be able to emotionally cope up with when she would witness them in the school.  However, she was pleasantly surprised to observe that the blind students were playing on the ground with a lot of excitement as if they were normal students. She also met the principal of the school who was also blind and had done PhD from the University of Wisconsin (USA). He looked savvy and dynamic – same as how a normal person at his position would look. Then an idea occurred to her that visually impaired persons need to be treated like normal persons more than showering pity and sympathy. This idea was translated in her TV documentary.

Sai Paranjpye, however, felt that 10-minute TV documentary was too short to cover the important aspects of what she had witnessed in the blind school. So, she expanded the subject into a telefilm titled ‘Raina Beeti Jaaye’ with Kulbhushan Kharbanda and Sushma Seth which was telecast on Delhi Doordarshan (year is not known but it has to be sometime in the later 1970s.). The film was well received and there were demands for its re-run on Doordarshan. This encouraged her to make a full-length feature film with a story revolving around a couple – one handicapped with blindness and the other a normal person who is emotionally handicapped. She also covered in the script some day-to-day incidences of the blind students. Thus, the idea of ‘Sparsh’ (1980) was born.

Sai Paranjpye had written the script of ‘Sparsh’ keeping in mind Sanjeev Kumar and Tanuja in the lead roles. However, after agreeing to work in the film, at the last moment, Sanjeev Kumar got himself out of the project when he came to know that the film was to be produced by Basu Bhattacharya. Probably, Sanjeev Kumar had a bad experience in working with Basu Bhattacharya in ‘Anubhav’ (1971) and ‘Girha Pravesh’ (1979). In his place, Naseeruddin Shah was roped in. Since the director was not sure about the working chemistry between Naseeruddin Shah and Tanuja, the latter was replaced by Shabana Azmi who had earlier worked with Naseeruddin Shah. When no one was ready to produce the film, Basu Bhattacharya offered to produce the film under his banner, Aarohi Films. The music direction was entrusted to Kanu Roy, the ‘darbaari’ musician of Basu Bhattacharya as Sai Paranjpye calls him. For lyrics, she selected her favourite, Indu Jain.

The film was to be majorly shot at Blind School Relief Association (BSRA) at Delhi. For the first time, Sai Paranjpye personally realised that Basu Bhattacharya, the producer was a stingy person. He had asked all the actors in the film to come for the shooting in their own dresses. Sai Paranjpye had to arrange for the uniform of the blind students in the film with a donation of cloth from a reputed cloth mill of Mumbai. The producer had arranged the free accommodation to all the actors and the technical staff in the hostel of BSRA which were barely comfortable. There are many more interesting anecdotes while making the film which have been described in Sai Paranjpye’s Marathi book referred to above in her own witty style.

Because of the subject of the film, a couple of philanthropists had given the donations for making the film which was naturally passed on to the producer of the film. In addition, there were many others who have contributed in the making of the film. In the credit title of the film, the list of such persons is bigger  than the list of the main and supporting actors. In short, my guess is that Basu Bhattacharya did not have to shell out much for the financing of the film as a producer.

It is worth noting that when ‘Sparsh’ (1980) was being made, Basu Bhattacharya was already working on his home production, ‘Griha Pravesh’ (1979). Aspersions were cast on the Aarohi Films that a part of the finance meant of ‘Sparsh’ (1980) was diverted for financing ‘Griha Parvesh’ (1979). So, the finance from the producer was not forthcoming on time for ‘Sparsh’ (1980). By the time the  film’s shooting was completed, Sai Paranjpye realised that she was not only the director but also a de facto production controller.

The film’s shooting was completed and was sent for processing at Bombay lab. But the prints had not come back for a long time. In fact, the Lab had not taken the processing of the film since Basu Bhattacharya had not cleared his dues to the lab on his earlier films. Since Sai Paranjpye wanted to send the film for participating in the National Film Awards, there was an urgency to complete the work on time. The producer of the film was not in a hurry to complete the process. Sai Paranjpye met the owner of Bombay lab and requested to take the processing of the film. She also assured him that  she would  arrange to pay for the processing out of her own resources. Thus, the film was processed, dubbed and a print of the film was sent in time as an entry for National Film Awards, 1980. The film won 3 National Film Awards – the best film, Sai Paranjpye for the best screen-play and Naseeruddin Shah for the best actor. The irony was that Basu Bhattacharya as a producer received the best film award for ‘Sparsh’ (1980) in the hands of the President with a cash prize.

It took another 4 years for ‘Sparsh’ (1980) to get a theatrical release in 1984. The premier of the film was held at Eros theatre in Mumbai. In 1985, the film won 3 Filmfare Awards – The best film and two awards for Sai Paranjpye for best director and the best dialogue. On the one side, the film was critically acclaimed not only in India but also in International film festivals held at London, Cairo, Beijing and Sydney. On the other side, barring Naseeruddin Shah who got all his dues from Basu Bhattacharya after putting much pressure on Basu Bhattacharya, no one including Sai Paranjpye, Shabana Azmi, Kanu Roy, Indu Jain, playback singer Sulakshna Pandit etc. got their dues from the producer for the film. For music director, Kanu Roy, it was his last film who died of cancer few months after the completion of the film.

Incidentally, Sai Paranjpye, in her film ‘Katha’ (1982) named Farooq Shaikh as Basu who was doing a negative character in the film. Is it symbolic or just a co-incidence?

The star cast of ‘Sparsh’ (1980) includes Naseeruddin Shah and Shabana Azmi in lead roles supported by Om Puri, Sudha Chopra, Mohan Gokhale, Arun Joglekar etc with scores of blind students.  Ustad Amjad Ali Khan made a guest appearance in the film as a sarod player.  The film was certified by the Censor Board on January 30, 1980. The film is now available for watching on a video sharing platform with English sub-titles and it is in HD. The gist of the story of the film is as under:

The story centres around the two main characters. Anirudh (Naseeruddin Shah) is the principal of a blind school who is handicapped by his blindness. Kavita (Shabana Azmi), a young widow is emotionally handicapped due to death of her husband. She has become reclusive and shuns the society. Her only hobby is the gardening and singing. Her close friend, Manju (Sudha Chopra) tries to bring Kavita out of her shell and suggests to work for the blind school of which her husband is one of the patrons. But she  does not succeed much.

On a party arranged by Manju on the occasion of her marriage anniversary, she invites Kavita who reluctantly agrees to attend. In the party, Kavita sees Anirudh whom she had briefly met near her house. She meets him and gets formally introduced as a principal of a blind school. After getting to know her background, Anirudh requests her to join his blind school as he finds it difficult to get the required sighted personals for the school. After much persuasion by Manju, Kavita joins the blind school.

After joining the blind school, children are happy with Kavita as they get the motherly treatment which was not there earlier. She makes them participate in extra-curricular activities like handicrafts, sports, plays, music etc. Anirudh is happy that the children have been kept busy in constructive activities. Over a period of time, both Anirudh and Kavita come closer and start liking each other’s company. They get engaged.

However, Anirudh starts developing complex of being visually handicapped. He feels that after marriage Kavita would get projected having made a great sacrifice in marrying a handicapped person. He would always feel low in front of Kavita. He may have to depend upon her after the marriage. So, he decides to call-off the engagement. Kavita is shocked by his decision but she diverts her mind by continuing her work among the blind students of the school. She learns Braille, (the language in which blind students read the books) and translate many books in Braille.

One day, Anirudh comes to Kavita’s house and request her to leave the blind school as according to him, it is creating the resentments among the other visually impaired staff and teachers. Actually, this is an excuse. The real reason is that Anirudh finds himself uncomfortable ever since he called off his engagement with Kavita. This time, Kavita tells him that she would not leave the school as it is her need to be with the 200 students of blind school. And if Anirudh forces her to leave, she would revolt against the order. After the few days of this incidence, Kavita, while in the school comes to know that Anirudh has been transferred to another blind school out of Delhi. Kavita tenders her resignation sighting the reason that the school needs Anirudh more than her.

When Manju comes to know about these developments, she goes to meet Anirudh in his office and tells him point blank that he has been seeing the imaginary issues in his marriage out of his complex and ego without giving any consideration the impact of his decision on Kavita’s life who has once again been emotionally shattered with his decision. After Manju’s friendly banter, the realisation comes to Anirudh’s mind. The film ends with a scene showing Anirudh slowly walking towards Kavita’s house.

The highlight of the film is Sai Paranjpye’s crisp screen-play and dialogues which I feel has made the film more interesting to watch with no melodramatic scenes. Naseeruddin Shah’s restrained performance as a blind principal of the school is one of his bests among his acting in the middle-of-the-road films. Before the shooting, he had spent about a fortnight with the blind principal of BSRA, Delhi to observe his mannerism and conduct. One can observe in the film that Sai Paranjpye has not shown him as blind man in a conventional way which we are used to see in Hindi films. He looks like a normal sighted man. It is only his mannerism in talking, walking, picking up of things etc which gives an impression of a blind man.

The title of the film ‘Sparsh’ is very apt which literally mean ‘touch’. But in a broader sense, it means ‘feeling’ which is the essence of the film. I will highly recommend the readers of this Blog to watch the film, preferably in one seating if not already seen.

‘Sparsh’ (1980) has 3 songs, all written by Indu Jain and sung by Sulakshna Pandit. The songs have been set to music by Kanu Roy. I am presenting the first song ‘Geeton Ki Duniya Mein Sargam Hain Hum’ sung by Sulakshna Pandit and chorus. In audio clip, there is an additional stanza. Overall, it is an inspirational song.

With this song, ‘Sparsh’ (1980) make a debut in the Blog.

Notes and Acknowledgements:

  1. Some of the information about the background for making the film ‘Sparsh’ (1980) is based on an interview conducted by Sridhar Rangayan and Saagar Gupta titled ‘Queen of Humour: A Candid Interview with Award-Winning Director and Writer Sai Paranjpye,’ South Asianist, Vol 2, No.3 (2010).
  2. The anecdotes and trivia included in the article are based on the Marathi book, ‘Sai – Maaza Kalapravaas’ (2016) written by Sai Paranjpye.

Video

Audio

Song – Geeton Ki Duniya Mein Sargam Hain Hum (Sparsh) (1980) Singer – Sulakshana Pandit, Lyrics – Indu Jain, MD – Kanu Roy
Chorus

Lyrics

geeton ki duniya mein sargam hain hum
phoolon mein khushboo ke parcham hain hum
gaao bachcho
geeton ki duniya mein sargam hain hum
phoolon mein khushboo ke parcham hain hum
phir se gaao
geeton ki duniya mein sargam hain hum
phoolon mein khushboo ke parcham hain hum
 
chalte hain kadmon mein manzil bhare
mutthi mein khushiyon ki kunji dhare
chalte hain kadmon mein manzil bhare
muthi mein khushiyon ki kunji dhare
toofaan mein ghir jaayen kashti hain hum
taazi hawaaon ke jhonkhe hain hum
shabaash
geeton ki duniya mein sargam hain hum

phoolon mein khushboo ke parcham hain hum
geeton ki duniya mein sargam hain hum
phoolon mein khushboo ke parcham hain hum
 
nannhe dilon mein ummeeden hazaar
beejon mein jaise chhupi ho bahaar
nannhe dilon mein ummeeden hazaar
beejon mein jaise chhupi ho bahaar
kismat ki bagiya ke maali hain hum
kal ke karishme dikhaayenge hum
aa ha
geeton ki duniya mein sargam hain hum
phoolon mein khushboo ke parcham hain hum
geeton ki duniya mein sargam hain hum
phoolon mein khushboo ke parcham hain hum

chhote umar mein  akal se badhe
himmat ki mitti mein khele badhe
bolo
chhote umar mein akal se bade
himmat ki mitti mein khele badhe
taaron ko choo aayen itna hai dam
sir chadh jo bole ko jadoo hain hum
geeton ki duniya mein sargam hain hum
phoolon mein khushboo ke parcham hain hum
phir se gaao
geeton ki duniya mein sargam hain hum
phoolon mein khushboo ke parcham hain hum

——————————————–
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————

गीतों की दुनिया में सरगम हैं हम
फूलों में खुशबू के परचम हैं हम
गाओ बच्चो
गीतों की दुनिया में सरगम हैं हम
फूलों में खुशबू के परचम हैं हम
फिर से गाओ
गीतों की दुनिया में सरगम हैं हम
फूलों में खुशबू के परचम हैं ह

चलते हैं कदमों में मंज़िल भरे
मुट्ठी में खुशियों की पूंजी धरे
चलते हैं कदमों में मंज़िल भरे
मुट्ठी में खुशियों की पूंजी धरे
तूफाँ में घिर जाएँ कश्ती हैं हम
ताज़ी हवाओं के झोंके हैं हम
शाबाश
गीतों की दुनिया में सरगम हैं हम
फूलों में खुशबू के परचम हैं हम
गीतों की दुनिया में सरगम हैं हम
फूलों में खुशबू के परचम हैं हम

नन्हें दिलों में उम्मीदें हज़ार
बीजों में जैसे छुपी हो बहार
नन्हें दिलों में उम्मीदें हज़ार
बीजों में जैसे छुपी हो बहार
किस्मत की बगिया के माली हैं हम
कल के करिश्मे दिखाएंगे हम
आ हा
गीतों की दुनिया में सरगम हैं हम
फूलों में खुशबू के परचम हैं हम
गीतों की दुनिया में सरगम हैं हम
फूलों में खुशबू के परचम हैं हम

छोटे उमर में अकल से बड़े
हिम्मत की मिट्टी में खेले बढ़े
बोलो
छोटे उमर में अकल से बड़े
हिम्मत की मिट्टी में खेले बढ़े
तारों को छू आयें इतना है दम
सर चढ़ जो बोले वो जादू हैं हम
गीतों की दुनिया में सरगम हैं हम
फूलों में खुशबू के परचम हैं हम
फिर से गाओ
गीतों की दुनिया में सरगम हैं हम
फूलों में खुशबू के परचम हैं हम


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day: 4335 Post No.: 15631

The connoisseurs of Hindi film music of the 1960s and 1970s would recall the four melodious songs sung by Geeta Dutt in ‘Uski Kahaani’ (1966) and ‘Anubhav’ (1971). Fans of Gulzar would know that all these four songs have come from his pen. But I will not be surprised if only few of them would remember that all these four songs had been set to music by Kanu Roy. Among these few persons, most of them would not have known his real identity. In his case, it was not only of the confusion of same name but also the confusion with a wrong family tree.

Most of the websites including Wikipedia says that Kanu Roy was an actor and music director who started his acting career in 1940s and switched over to music direction from 1960 onwards. His filmography in IMDb shows him both as an actor and the music director. In some websites, Kanu Roy as a music director has been discussed with the photograph of the actor, Kanu Roy. He is also been wrongly associated with the family of Geeta Dutt as one of her brothers. The facts are:

1. Kanu Roy, the actor and Kanu Roy, the music director were different persons. Kanu Roy, the actor came to Bombay (Mumbai) in early 1940s to join Bombay Talkies. On the basis of Gulzar’s interview which appeared in a ‘Filmfare’ issue of 2012, Kanu Roy, the music director came to Bombay sometime in mid-1950s. (My guess is that he may have come with Basu Bhattacharya who was his close friend).

2. Kanu Roy, the actor was never a music director. Kanu Roy, the music director never acted in films.

3. Kanu Roy, the music director was not a brother of Geeta Dutt. I have seen a photograph of Geeta Dutt’s full family before her marriage. In this photograph, there is no Kanu Roy. The names of Geeta Dutt’s four brothers are Mihir Roy, Ranjit Roy, Mukul Roy and Milan Roy.

With multiple confusion about his name, even the basic profile of the music director, Kanu Roy is difficult to get. I could get some information from Gulzar’s interview published in one of the Filmfare issues of 2012 which is available on http://www.tanqeed.com . In this interview, Gulzar talked about his association as a lyricist with Kanu Roy which I have summarized below with my marginal inputs.

Kanu Roy had picked up the musical notes from Bengal. He began his career by assisting music director, Salil Choudhury who also had Kanu Ghosh as his Assistant Music Director. It seems Kanu Roy was a Welder by profession and had worked on the upkeeping of the Howrah Bridge. He was an introvert by nature and had in him a mix of timid and humble nature.

Basu Bhattacharya and Kanu Roy were great friends. It was Basu Bhattacharya who gave Kanu Roy his first break as a music director in ‘Uski Kahaani’ (1966) which he produced and directed at shoestring budget. Subsequently, he worked in another five films of Basu Bhattacharya. Because of the low budget films, Basu Bhattacharya would never allow Kanu Roy to have more than 6-8 musicians (as against 50-100 musicians the music directors like Shankar-Jaikishan, Naushad, O P Nayyar etc would have in their orchestra). Also, Kanu Roy would not get the regular shifts in the recording studios for rehearsals of the songs. He had to manage in the early morning hours of the recording studio. He did not have a bargaining power with Basu Bhattacharya to ask for more musicians. (Probably for the same reason, he may not have got the playback singers of his choice). It is remarkable that with these constraints, Kanu Roy could composed melodious songs in Basu Bhattacharya’s films.

Kanu Roy’s career ended with his life on 20/12/1981. He lived in poverty and died in poverty.

During his musical journey from 1966-80, Kanu Roy composed 28 songs in 8 films, of which 6 films were of Basu Bhattacharya. Of the remaining two films, one film ‘Mayuri’ (1970s) remained unreleased. Though his contributions to Hindi film music in terms of numbers were low, many of his melodious songs still linger on. Unfortunately, his name may not ring bell for many who may still enjoy those melodious songs.

Although most of Kanu Roy’s melodious songs have been covered in the Blog, I found one song which I liked for its all-round excellence – lyrics, rendition, melody, composition and the picturization. The song is ‘pahchaan to thhi pahchaana nahi’ from ’Griha Pravesh’ (1979). The song is rendered by Chandrani Mukherjee on the words of Gulzar. Having watched the film, I feel that this song summarises the theme of the film.

Amar (Sanjeev Kumar) and Mansi (Sharmila Tagore) has been married for 10 years with 8-year old boy. During this period, some staleness in their relationship develops. Both are under the illusion that they are in love but in practice, they are just being together under one roof. Now their marriage is in the verge of collapse when Amar develops affairs with his office typist Sapna (Sarika). He is caught in a bind in that while he loves Sapna, in the back of his mind, he is also emotionally attached to his family.

Finally, Amar tells Mansi of his intention to divorce her to marry Sapna. After the initial shock, Mansi agrees for divorce on the condition that he should bring Sapna to the house to meet her. The reason is that Sapna has seen Amar in the office as an Accountant and develop the liking for him in an office environment. But she has not seen him in his house where the environment is different.

Before Sapna visit to her house, Mansi gets her house painted. She undergoes herself to a new make-over. While doing this, the song under discussion plays in the background. Sapna visits her house with Amar. After a brief meeting, Mansi takes Amar aside and tell him that she is ready to leave him for Sapna. After the meeting, Mansi tells Amar to drop Sapna to her house. However, when crossing the road, Sapna walks over to the other side of the road while Amar gets stranded on the opposite side because of a marriage procession on the road. In the midst of the orchestra in the marriage procession playing ‘tu Ganga ki mauj mein Jamuna ki dhara’, both Amar and Sapna take leave by waving hands at each other. The scene is symbolic of conveying the message that Amar has a change of heart. The film ends with Amar returning home having coffee with Mansi and his son with the replaying of the film’s song ‘zindagi phoolon ki nahi, phoolon ki tarah mehkti rahe’.

The lyrics of the song under discussion are simple and convey retrospection on the part of a housewife who forgets to give attention to herself. Instead, much of her time is spent in the kitchen, looking after husband and the child and upkeep of the house. In this milieu, she forgets her own identity.

In keeping with the low budget of the film, Kanu Roy has used only three main musical instruments in this song – Sarod, Sitar and what I believe to be Khol (Bangla Dholak) which one can hear in a low rhythm as the song is rendered. The song starts with a prelude of Sarod and Sitar and the same instruments are used in the interludes of the song. Chandrani Mukherjee, who is the sister-in-law of Bappi Lahiri, has rendered the song with poignant feeling in keeping with the mood of the situation. The Audio clip is longer with the same lyrics because it has the longer prelude music than in the video clip.

This song sums up the story of a housewife in a middle-class society.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin(Grih Pravesh)(1979) Singer-Chandrani Mukherjee, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Kanu Roy

Lyrics

pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin
maine apne aap ko jaana nahin
pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin
maine apne aap ko jaana nahin
pehchaan to thhi

jab dhoop barasti hai sar pe to
paanv mein chhaanv khilti hai
main bhool gayi thhi chhaanv agar
milti hai to dhoop mein milti hai
is dhoop aur chhaanv ke khel mein kyun
jeene ka ishaara samjha nahin
pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin
maine apne aap ko jaana nahin
pehchaan to thhi

main jaagi rahi kuchh sapnon mein
aur jaagi huyi bhi soyi rahi
jaane kin bhool bhulaiyya mein kuchh
bhatki rahi kuchh khoyi rahi
jeene ke liye main marti rahi
jeene ka ishaara samjha nahin
pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin
maine apne aap ko jaana nahin
pehchaan to thhi pehchaana nahin
maine apne aap ko jaana nahin
pehchaan to thhi


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day: 4263 Post No.: 15489

———————————————–——————————-
Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No. 13
——————————————————————————

In olden days (even today for that matter) Indians were expected to behave in a particular manner. For instance, when it came to their day to day live, most of them were “gareeb” and they were told that they had the sole right on the resources of the nation in the form of doles aka subsidies. All political parties claimed to be pro poor parties and promised to “hataao” gareebi if voted to power. After repeatedly getting voted to power on the plank of hataaoing gareebi, the same politicians now claim to be for the “gareeb”. These “gareeb” are supposed to be gullible possessing of short memory so the politicians can get away despite failing to fulfill their past promises.

Movie makers were no different. They too made movies for the same segment of society that were treated as “gareeb” by the political classes. This section of society was supposed to like movies with escapist stories that bore little resemblance to real life. Depicting real life was considered no no. Movies depicting real life were considered boring. Why would a “gareeb” audience come to the movie hall to watch movies depicting his real dull life ? This was what the movie makers believed in.

Sometimes, some movie makers would make movies with realistic movies. Ordinary movie goers and even press would describe these movies as boring. Most movies like this flopped.

Top stars acted in such movies for creative satisfaction, but the ordinary fans felt betrayed when they would go to the movie hall and find their star sans his usual mannerisms.

Rajesh Khanna is “Aavishkaar” (1973), and Amitabh Bachchan in “Man Aazaad Hoon” (1990) are two such movies that readily comes to my mind.

“Aavishkaar” (1973) was directed by Basu Bhattacharya Aarohi Film Makers Bombay. This movie had Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila Tagore, Dina Gandhi, Denis Clement, Satyen Kappu, Monika Jasnan (child artist), Devendra Khandelwal, Margaret, new discoveries Mahesh Sharma and Minna Johar etc in it.

The movie dealt with a real life “boring” tale, viz the marital life of a couple, played by Rajesh Khanna and Sharmila Tagore. Fans of superstar Rajesh Khanna, who went to the movie hass expecting a movie like “Aaraadhana”(1969) were disappointed. There was no way juvenile fans (including yours truly) of Rajesh Khanna, who were brought up on stuff like “Haathi Mere Saathi”(1971) and “Apna Desh” (1972) were going to like this movie.

This movie was only for “mature” movie goers. Just like “rich” people were looked down upon by “gareeb” people, “mature” people, with their occasional boring movies were looked down upon by people loving “mainstream” movies.

Please do not believe the review of “Aavishkaar”(1973) that is carried by wikipedia etc. These reviews are written with the benefit of hindsight by people who were not even born when this movie was released. I remember the reviews carried out in mainstream Hindi media during 1973 which bore no resemblance whatsoever with its review that we now find online.

Coming to the songs of the movie, “Aavishkaar” (1973) had five songs in it. Four of these songs are covered in the past as described hereunder:-

Song Posted On
Hansne ki chaah ne kitna mujhe 19.09.2008
Naina hain pyaase mere 20.03.2010
Mahaa shoonya ke mahaan vistaar mein 18.07.2016
Baabul mora, naihar chhuto hi jaaye 27.05.2019

From the table above, we can see that one song from the movie was covered on this day, ten years ago. So, this movie provides us an opportunity to have a blog ten year challenge. At the same time, all the songs of the movie get covered as well.

Ten years ago on this day, two songs were covered in the blog

Song Movie title-Year Remarks
Naina hain pyaase mere Aavishkaar-1973 04 of 05 songs posted
Kaali badariya maare najariya Do Roti-1957 All Songs posted on the blog

Here is the fifth and final song from “Aavishkaar”(1973) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Manna Dey. Gyandev Agnihotri is the lyricist. Music is composed by Kanu Roy.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala.

With this song, “Aavishkaar”(1973) joins the list of movies that have all their songs covered in the blog.

Video

Audio

Song-Maa ko pukaar kar poochha bachche ne (Aavishkaar)(1973) Singer-Manna Dey, Lyrics-Gyandev Agnihotri, MD-Kanu Roy

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

maa ko pukaar kar poochha bachche ne
aaya kahaan se hoon maa
bolo to
padaa kahaan paaya
bolo to
sun kar sawaal ye
maa ke stanon se ufan padaa doodh
aur bah aaya aankhon se
uttar

mere laal
tum to hamesha thhe
mere man ki abhilaasha mein
tan ki paribhaasha mein
bachpan ke gudiyaaghar mein ae
kitni baar tujhe
khelte khelte
toda aa
todte todte ae
jodaa aa

paakar khoya aur
kho kar payaa aa hai
kahaan se bataaun tu aaya hai
padaa tujhe maine kahaan paaya hai
mere ae laal

tu
haan tu hi to hai
meri amar aasha
subah ka sapna
maa aur daadi ki
sunehri khwaahish
prem ki paramparaa aa
aag ki khwaahish
aur prem ki aasha se
bani teri kaaya hai
kahaan se bataaun tu aaya hai
padaa tujhe maine kahaan paaya hai
mere laal

————————————
Devnagri Script lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
—————————————
माँ को पुकार कर पूछा बच्चे ने
आया कहाँ से हूँ माँ
बोलो तो
पडा कहाँ पाया
बोलो तो
सुन कर सवाल ये
माँ के स्तनों से उफन पडा दूध
और बह आया आँखों से
उत्तर

मेरे लाल
तुम तो हमेशा थे
मेरे मन की अभिलाषा में
तन की परिभाषा में
बचपन के गुड़ियाघर में ए
कितनी बार तुझे
खेलते खेलते तोड़ा आ
तोड़ते तोड़ते ए
जोड़ा आ

पाकर खोया और
खो कर पाया आ है
कहाँ से बताऊँ तू आया है
पडा तुझे मैंने कहाँ पाया है
मेरे ए लाल

तू
हां तू ही तो है
मेरी अमर आशा
सुबह का सपना
माँ और दादी कि
सुनहरी ख्वाईश
प्रेम की परंपरा आ
आग की ख्वाईश
और प्रेम की आशा से
बनी तेरी काया है
कहाँ से बताऊँ तू आया है
पडा तुझे मैंने कहाँ पाया है
मेरे लाल


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3965 Post No. : 15047

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 2
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

One of the most iconic songs of Saigal Sb. A song that is a definitive representation of Hindi film music of the 1930s. That incomparable rendition by Saigal Sb under the music direction of RC Boral was recorded live for the film ‘Street Singer’ (1938). Recorded more than eight decades ago, this remains a signature piece for time immemorial. The vision of Saigal Sb, leaving his home, just carrying his harmonium with him, walking with a slow measured pace, and singing this thumri – it is one of the lasting images of Hindi cinema. That version of the thumri from the ‘Street Singer’ can be viewed here – “Baabul Mora, Naihar Chhuto Hi Jaaye“.

Anecdotes around that live recording and shooting tell of a microphone hidden in the harmonium, of the slow pace of walking so as to complete the singing and the visual shot keeping within the range of the camera. Playback singing had already been invented (1935) and was in progressive use in the industry. And yet, this song was recorded live. The performance can only be called – unprecedented, incomparable and peerless. Nothing more fascinates the diehard fans of Saigal Sb, than this one song by him. Many singers have sung this, but the Saigal version remains untouched, unsurpassed.

In the film, this song spans an extended sequence of scenes. And small parts of this song are also rendered by Kanan Devi. There is a sequence where Kanan Devi attempts to sing this song in the theatre. Later, Bhola (KLS) departs from their shared home, upset that Manju (Kanan Devi) is enamored by Amar Babu (Jagdish Sethi), and wants to move in with him. But after just one day away from Bhola, Manju returns home searching for him. And finds that he has left. She makes a phone call to Amar Babu, requesting him to bring his car. They start to drive towards the road that leads to Bhola and Manju’s home village. In the meantime, the scene shifts between Manju searching for Bhola, and Bhola walking away with the harmonium. The song is reprised here three or four times, sometimes just the mukhda, sometimes just the antaraa.

Amar Babu is driving the car with dismay in his heart. A windstorm arrives. There is lot of dust in the air, and visibility is not good. Manju alights from the car, and starts following the path on foot – the path that Bhola would have taken returning to his village. Tired and overcome by storm, Bhola falls down by the roadside. Manju sees someone lying on the road and rushes to him. The tryst happens again. Amar Babu watches them from a distance. And then with a wry smile on his face, he returns to his car, to start the lonely journey back to his home. Bhola and Manju start their foot journey back to their village. Once again the song is heard in the voice of Kanan Devi, as the visual shows the two mates, in a silhouette against a darkening sky. The hearts have met, they are returning home, and the lady’s voice is telling – “Le Babul Ghar Aapno, Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

Thirty five years later, in 1973, this classical thumri is now included in the film ‘Aavishkaar’, starring Sharmila Tagore and Rajesh Khanna. This time, the music composition is by Kanu Roy, who transformed it into a duet, with the participating voices of Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh. This time, in the picturization, this is presented as a background song, as the visual action on screen is mostly silent – and yet very expressive.

‘Aavishkaar’ presents a scenario of a brief hiatus in the lives of two people very much in love. In love they are, and they get married, and they start to live together. Maybe, just love is never enough. What love is – it needs to be examined, re examined and re invented often. And then it becomes love, more love and more meaningful. Else, just the drudgery of the consistent proximity, which used to be like heaven to start with, turns into stagnant boredom. Expectations still riding high, the lull now breeds contempt – a contempt that is actually screaming for and seeking a rejuvenated level of understanding and sharing. That is what ‘Aavishkaar’ is about.

The film starts on a day when it is the wedding anniversary of the protagonist couple. Amar (Rajesh Khanna) is aware, but still, broodingly ignores. He works late in office, he goes to see a film with a female co-worker, giving the audience the impression that he is seeking extra marital happiness. On his way back at night, he finally musters enough thought and courage, and buys a bouquet of Rajnigandha flowers. Arriving home, a certain scene transpires before he enters the house, and on an impulse, he places the bouquet in a flower pot next to the door, and enters the house, pretending that he does not remember the anniversary. A long night passes. There are flashbacks, there are arguments, there is even physical violence – highlighting the drift that has occurred in the relationship. Basu Bhattacharya has handled the conflict and the interactions very deftly. In my mind, this is the best handling of the situation of a very loving relationship gone sour. Many other films come to mind – ‘Arth’, ‘Dooriyaan’, ‘Anubhav’, ‘Aandhi’, ‘Grih Pravesh’, ‘Aap Ki Kasam’, the comical ‘Pati, Patni Aur Who’, ‘Abhimaan’ . . . and more. In ‘Aavishkaar’, the director portrays the conflict, the pain, and the reconciliation, at a very psychological level.

So, after a distraught and a tension filled hostile night, mostly sleepless and lot of exchanges and memories, the new day dawns. The rigmarole of the daily routine beckons. Mansi (Sharmila Tagore) gets up early and opens the front door to pick up the milk delivery. And then she sees. . . the bouquet standing in the flower pot. She picks it up. And the voice of Jagjit Singh drifts in from the background. She finds Amar standing behind her. . . and there is an embrace. A lot changed and a lot settled in that night of strife.

The two stanzas play out slowly. The first one as the couple are embracing and then they move back into the home. The second stanza is an external shot, mixing flashback again possibly, as we see the couple on the beach, in a mood of frolic, as the singer croons yet once again to say. . . “Le Babul Ghar Aapno, Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

The two instances that we are so familiar with, of the use of this song in Hindi films, both seem to have happy conclusion. But that was not the original thought when Wajid Ali Shah wrote and composed this thumri, way back in 1856. The British had played a game of deception with the Nawab of Awadh. In a bloodless coup, Wajid Ali Shah was dethroned and sent to Calcutta, and the British annexed Lucknow and the kingdom of Awadh. The Nawab was completely heartbroken, on leaving his beloved city, and his cultural roots. That is the time when this timeless poem was conceived.

Yes, the interpretations works both ways. There is this indication of a newlywed bride, going to her new matrimonial home. There is sadness on leaving the parent’s home, but there is also an eagerness and joyful elation of being with the one, with whom a new bond of love will be explored. And, there is the gloomy and poignant interpretation. Looking at the sad dilemma that was faced by Wajid Ali Shah – he was sentenced to leave behind his beloved city, his happy pastimes, and the people who made up his life that far. The discussions in literature talk about the passing passage of life into afterlife. That too, is a leaving behind of the home that one thinks to be their own, and then embark on a journey to meet the Maker. This jusxtaposition is captured so beautifully and so splendidly in this brief two verse thumri – “Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

In the context of this series, I bring on this song today to highlight another dimension of reuse that we see so often in Hindi films – the reuse of traditional poetry and folk music. This particular thumri is so simply a dear favorite of singers, that gathering the number of different renditions by different artists would be a big exercise in itself. Just to give you an idea, this thumri has been sung by the following singers – the list goes all the way from Bade Ghulam Ali Khan to Alisha Chinoy. The names, in no particular order are – Ustad Faiyaz Khan, Gauhar Jaan, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, Siddheswari Devi, Begum Akhtar, Rasoolan Bai, Naina Devi, Kesarbai Kerkar, Ustad Mushtaq Hussain Khan, Malka Jaan, KL Saigal, Jagmohan Sursagar, Kannan Devi, Ustad Khadim Husain Khan, Girija Devi, Shobha Gurtu, Pandit Bhimsen Joshi, Pandit Jitendra Abhisheki, Kishori Amonkar, Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh, Jagjit Singh (solo), Rajan-Sajan Mishra, Alisha Chinoy, Mahendra Chopra. . . and I am sure, many more artists of repute.

If I talk about Hindi films, then besides the two instances already covered in the write up above, this thumri appears in two more films. In 1954, Manna Dey has sung this for the film ‘Mahatama Kabir’ – a really wonderful rendition. Then later in 1964, Lata Mangeshkar has sung this for the Bhojpuri film ‘Naihar Chhutal Jaaye’.
[Ed Note: Dear Arun ji adds two more instances of this song being used in Hindi films, both from early 1930s. This song has been rendered by Durga Khote in the 1931 film ‘Trapped’ aka ‘Farebi Jaal’. Then again in 1934, this thumri appears in the list of songs for the film ‘Naachwaali’ – no information available regarding singer or music director.]

Such reuse that involves traditional poetry and folk songs, is really very simple, because this material is beyond the intellectual property disputes. For that matter, we have seen many such other creations being used in films across the decades. On the devotional side, the poems of Meerabai, Kabir Das, and Soordas are very popular and are used quite freely by the producers. Then we have the adabi poets, once again a traditional treasure that does not have any copyright issues attached. Ghazals of Ghalib are quite popular and have been used in many films across the decades. As I scanned the songs in HFGK I find that the ghazal “Dil e Nadaan Tujhe Hua Kya Hai” appears in 9 films from 1931 to 1980. The ghazal “Nuktacheen Hai Gham e Dil” appears in four films, “Ye Na Thee Hamaari Qismat” appears three times, “Phir Mujhe Deeda e Tar Yaad Aaya” also appears in three films, and so on.

Checking for Meerabai’s bhajans, one finds the popular ones like “Mere To Girdhar Gopal”, “Main To Gidhar Ke Ghar Jaaun”, “Tum Jo Todo Piya” etc., being used in many films. Not a precise search, but my estimate is that Meerabai’s bhajans appear in Hindi films more than 100 times. The search cannot be precise because there are many instances where the traditional bhajans or ghazals have been used without giving credit to the original poet. Additional note – Amir Khusro’s poetry appears in Hindi films no less than 10 times, of which at least 4 are occurrences of “Kaahe Ko Byaahi Bides. . .”.

The more difficult proposition would be to trace the folk songs reuse across Hindi films. With so much variations, and without acknowledgement to the original folk source, it is difficult to make an estimate of folk music reuse in films. But I will surely add that this segment would be more voluminous than the bhajans and ghazals. The song, or variations thereof, of “Jhumka Gira Re. . .” has been used in no less than four films.

Coming to the film ‘Aavishkaar’. The film is produced under the banner of Aarohi Film Makers and is directed by Basu Bhattacharya. The songs of this film are written by Gyandev Agnihotri and Kapil Kumar. And yes, this traditional thumri originally created by Wajid Ali Shah. The cast of actors is listed as Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila Tagore, Deena Gandhi, Denis Klement, Satyendra Kappu, Monika Jasnani, Devendra Khandelwal, Margaret, Mahesh Sharma, and Minna Johar etc.

Interesting side note – this film is the 2nd in the now famous trilogy by Basu Bhattacharya, on the topic of marital discord, the first one being ‘Anubahv’ (1971) and the 3rd being ‘Grih Pravesh’ (1977).

More interesting side notes. As we talk about reuse, I must mention the other interesting reuse in this film. Probably this is the only film where we can hear Sharmila Tagore singing. At one place in the film, the iconic Manna Dey song “Hansne Ki Chaah Ne. . .” is being sung by Sharmila. Then, at another place in the film, the song from ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) – “Duniya Banaane Waale, Kya Tere Mann Mein Samaai” is playing on the radio, and we can also hear Sharmila singing along with it.

So much for today. In the next episode, we shall explore another very interesting aspect of re-use of songs.

Audio

Video

Song – Baabul Mora, Naihar Chhuto Hi Jaaye  (Aavishkaar) (1973) Singers – Jagjit Singh, Chitra Singh, Lyrics – Traditional, MD – Kanu Roy
Jagjit Singh + Chitra Singh

Lyrics

baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

baabul mora. . .
baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

chaar kahaar mil mori
doliyaan sajaaye re
mora apna begaana
chhuto jaaye. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

[dialogue – Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila]

angnaa to parbat bhaya
deori bhai bides
le babul ghar aapno
main chali piya ke des
main chali piya ke des
main chali piya ke des

baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

चार कहार मिल मोरी
डोलियाँ सजाये रे
मोरा अपना बेगाना
छूटो जाये॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

[संवाद – राजेश खन्ना, शर्मिला टागोर]

अंगना तो परबत भया॰ ॰ ॰
डेयोड़ी भई बिदेस
ले बाबुल घर आपनो
मैं चली पिया के देस
मैं चली पिया के देस
मैं चली पिया के देस

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

 


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Shyaamla”(1979) was directed by Joginder Shelly for Avtar Pictures, Bombay. This movie had Reeta Bhaduri, Jasbeer Sumal, Gauri Kamat, Jalal Agha, Birbal, Savita Bajaj, Dinesh Thakur, Raj Rishi, Preetam Balle, Bharat Kapoor, Dharam Veer, Bhudo advani, Brahm Bhardwaj, Krishn Bhardwaj, Kamaldeep, Maruti, Bhagwan etc in it, with Rakhi and Parikshat Sahni is special appearances.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Tumhaara Kalloo”(1975) was directed by Basu Bhattacharya for Aarohi Films Bombay. This movie had Kuldeep Bhagi, Kajri, Somnath Mukherji, Devendra Khandelwal, Manik Dutt, Urmila Devi, Shailly Shailendra, Dharmveer, Shubhra, Radheshyam Dixit, Bharat Bhushan, Nagardas Sharma, Mahesh Dubey, Jagdish Bansal, Shankar Shambhu, Ramkumar, Babban, Kamal, Ghanshyyam, Dulari, Anita Dutt etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

An out and out theatre person who seemed to have stepped on to the silver screen by accident. My first introduction to Dinesh Thakur was when I went to see a stage play in Delhi. I was in school, and the book-reading bug had bit me big time. I was devouring books by the dozen almost on a weekly basis. I got introduced to a wide variety of written genres and authors. In the midst of this, one stream was reading stage plays. Of course, started with the Shakespeare’s ‘Midsummer’s Night Dream’ which was part of our English curriculum. I picked up books of plays written by western authors, and then also got interested in reading plays by Indian authors.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Rajesh Khanna – The Phenomenon – 2
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

There has been a long gap after the first post appeared in this series. My original thought was that I would be able to share posts in this series at the rate of one post per month. However I could not do sent any other post after the first one, which was sent on the occasion of the birth anniversary of the ‘First Superstar of Indian Cinema’.
Read more on this topic…


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over FOURTEEN years. This blog has over 17100 song posts by now.

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