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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Mujhe jo khilaate hain…mohabbat ne itna asar to dikhaaya

Posted on: October 13, 2016


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today is the birth anniversary of Ashok Kumar, one of Hindi film industry’s legendary actors. It is ironic that it also happens to be the death anniversary of his younger brother, Kishore Kumar, another of the industry’s legends.

We pay tribute to both of them on this blog today.

Elsewhere we (will) have posts paying tribute to Kishore Kumar, this post pays tribute to Ashok Kumar.

For those who have seen Hindi films from the 1930s till the 1980s, Ashok Kumar will be a household name. Up until the 1960s he was a leading man, seamlessly moving into character roles during that decade and continuing so, for the next two decades.

Ashok Kumar was considered one of the most natural actors of the industry. He once said that he learnt a lot about acting naturally from observing Hollywood actors. And how well he learnt!

Ashok Kumar’s performances carried a stamp of dignity and refinement about them. His dialogue delivery was one of the highlights of his acting – especially the pauses and intonations which added so much more substance to, what might otherwise have been a bland line of dialogue. His facial expressions, whether it was a widening of the eyes, or a smile, or a full fledged-laugh, or a frown on knitted eyebrows – they were just right to reflect the need of that scene.

And this was Ashok Kumar, film after film, whatever his role. Over six decades. Now that is remarkable consistency for you.

In fact, well before the troika of Dilip Kumar, Raj Kapoor and Dev Anand were celebrated as the industry’s leading male stars, Ashok Kumar was THE big leading man, acting in films like Achhut Kanya (1936) and Kismet (1943), which are considered iconic to this day.

Ashok Kumar becoming the hero of a film was fortuitous . He got his break when Himanshu Rai of Bombay Talkies, replaced his leading man, Najmul Hassan with him for eloping with Devika Rani, the heroine of his film, Jeevan Naiya (1936). He was then still Kumudlal Ganguly and a lab assistant at the time, but took on the name of Ashok Kumar for acting.

After this lucky break, he never looked back. He had a very successful run at Bombay Talkies opposite Devika Rani (Achhoot Kanya, Janmabhoomi, Izzat, Savitri, Vachan, Nirmala). He then partnered with another senior heroine of the time, Leela Chitnis, in a series of successful films (Kangan, Bandhan, Azad and the very successful Jhoola).

So, in a space of just 5 years (1936-1941), Ashok Kumar had become a very successful hero, despite initially considered not having quite the looks for the job.

His success continued unabated.

Kismet (1943) broke all box-office records and catapulted him to a different league altogether. His successes continued – Najma, Chal Chal Re Naujawan , Shikari, Sajan, Mahal (“aayega aayega”, Samadhi, Afsana.

Even as he moved onto different sort of roles, often mature ones involving a love triangle, he always held his own. Whoever his co-stars, Ashok Kumar’s presence in a film always raised its watchability.

Many films of the 60s come to mind. Kanoon, Dharam Putra, Bandini, Aarti, Gumraah, Benazir, Meri Soorat Teri Aankhen, Oonche Log, Bheegi Raat, Mamta, Jewel Thief, Bahu Begum and so many more. All films I have seen – in each one I have appreciated his performance.

And of course, Aashirwaad. A film that was Ashok Kumar’s, from start to end.

The 1970s is a decade I am much more familiar with as I lived through it first-hand. Even in this decade, Ashok Kumar continued to be a presence in his character roles. I have very fond memories of his performances in Victoria No. 203, Chhoti Si Baat and Khatta Meetha, to name just a few.

The 1980s saw him in films like Shaukeen. And then there was “Hum Log”, the popular TV serial of the 80s on Doordarshan where Ashok Kumar could be seen introducing every episode.

All in all, he was an institution in himself in the industry.

Today, we remember him very fondly – and with a lot of respect.

Now, moving on to the song.

I have picked a song from Mehboob Khan’s Najma (1943).

This is a film I saw a few months ago, as part of my “Muslim social” watching spree. I thoroughly enjoyed the film – which, considering it was a Mehboob Khan film, is hardly surprising.

After watching the film, I posted a song https://atulsongaday.me/2016/06/22/gaaoon-khushi-mein-gaaoon/ in which I shared my thoughts about the film and about Mehboob Khan. Arunji has also written about Mehboob Khan in his post https://atulsongaday.me/2016/01/03/nazar-kuchh-aaj-aisa-aa-raha-hai/ .

So I will not repeat all this here.

Let me just talk briefly about the song. It is a fun song “mujhe jo khilaate hain paan mein mirche”. Arunji, in his above post, refers to the song, saying it was SO popular that sale of its records got Rs. 8000 for Ashok Kumar.

It is indeed a very pleasant song to listen to. And Ashok Kumar’s expressions and smile are quite good to watch too.

The situation is that Ashok Kumar’s family is very close to Veena’s family. Ashok Kumar’s father is employed by Veena’s father. The occasion is Eid, so Ashok Kumar has come to pay a social visit on the occasion. Veena, watching from behind the scenes, decides to have some fun and play a prank on Ashok Kumar. So, while arranging to serve paan from the kitchen, she liberally adds chillis to the particular serving meant for Ashok Kumar. All for fun only, of course.

Ashok Kumar struggles with it, of course but accepts the situation gamely. He then sings this song, clearly meant for Veena, but without explicitly naming her.

I quite like this song – and I hope you do too. I can understand why it was as popular as it was, in those times.

Once again, our respect and tribute to Ashok Kumar on his birth anniversary.


Song-Mujhe jo khilaate hain…Mohabbat ne itna asar to dikhaaya (Najma)(1943) Singer-Ashok Kumar, Lyrics-Anjum Pilibhiti, MD-Rafiq Ghaznavi

Lyrics

Mujhe jo khilaate hain
Paanon mein mirchein
Mujhe jo khilaate hain
Paanon mein mirchein
Unhen de raha hoon
Dua chupke chupke
Unhen de raha hoon
Dua chupke chupke

Mohabbat ne itna asar to dikhaaya
Mohabbat ne itna asar to dikhaaya
Udhar bhi asar ho chala chupke chupke
Udhar bhi asar ho chala chupke chupke

Na ho jaaye ae dil kahin ishq ruswa
Na ho jaaye ae dil kahin ishq ruswa
Mohabbat ki baatein zara chupke chupke
Mohabbat ki baatein zara chupke chupke
Zara chupke chupke
Zara chupke chupke
Mohabbat ki baatein zara chupke chupke

Kisi din to wo mere ho kar rahenge
Kisi din to wo mere hok ar rahenge
Ye dil keh raha hai
Ye dil keh raha hai
mera chupke chupke
Chupke chupke
Chupke chupke
Ye dil keh raha hai
mera chupke chupke
Dil keh raha hai
mera chupke chupke

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2 Responses to "Mujhe jo khilaate hain…mohabbat ne itna asar to dikhaaya"

Ahh! An appropriate song to remember Dada Moni. A song in his voice. Actually I spent 2 days looking for a song featuring Ashok Kumar and Nirupa Roy. They were also a popular pair. Today is her death anniversary too.

I have always maintained AK was a good singer. If only he had pursued more assiduously.

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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