Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Pyaare pappu gore gappu paas tu mere aa

Posted on: September 23, 2020


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4450 Post No. : 15909

Today’s song is a comedy song from a Costume/Action film “Jungle ka Jawahar”-52. The film was a production from Basant Pictures, owned by producer/Director Homi Wadia. In 1942, brothers JBH Wadia and Homi Wadia separated from each other on a very important point. The elder brother JBH Wadia was of the opinion that the life of the action-stunt films is a short one. He firmly believed that the market for action films will dry up within the next 10-15 years, hence the company should change over to Social films.

The younger brother Homi Wadia differed and wanted to continue with stunt films. He separated and established his own Basant Pictures. Most stunt actors joined his group – especially Fearless Nadia. Besides the Human artistes, Homi Wadia also replaced Animals used in stunt films. In Wadia films there was a Horse named ‘Punjab ka Beta’, a dog named ‘Tiger’, and a Motor car called ‘Rolls Royce ki Beti’. Basant Pictures brought a Horse named ‘Rajput’, dog called ‘Moti’, and a Motor Car called ‘Austin ki Bachhi’. In addition they also acquired a Motorcycle named ‘Runnio’.

The history of stunt action films is as old as the Silent film history. Silent films were essentially a Visual medium, as there was no sound. What could be achieved by dialogues had to be conveyed only with the visuals, hence there was not much scope for emotional films. In the initial stages of silent films, the audience was mainly of the middle and lower class of the society. Impressing and attracting them was easy with action films. That’s how the majority of silent films consisted of action or stunt scenes.

After the advent of Talkie films, the trend of stunt films continued and also became money spinners. Those days stunt films did not need any well known or famous actors or beautiful heroines. These films were made with minimum budgets. Master Bhagwan used to make a stunt film in just 60 to 70 thousand Rupees, covering all expenses. The Wadia, Mohan, Imperial or Ranjit action films cost a little more as they were more elaborate with some story and known actors.

There were specialist actors like Baburao Pehelwan, Vasantrao Pehelwan, Fearless Nadia, Prakash, Boman Shroff, Billimoria brothers, John Cawas and few others who were fixed stars of stunt films. In those days “SPL FX” techniques were not there and all the stunts were actually done by the actors themselves.

Veeru Devgan – yesteryear Fight Master, has written an article on “Stunts and Actions” in the “Encyclopedia of Hindi Cinema”. He says in it,

“It was from film Aan-52 that professionals were employed for the first time. Azeembhai handled the Horses and Douglas took care of the fights and fencing….
“Evolution of action hero began with “Phool aur Pathar”-66, when Dharmendra bared his chest for the first time….
“Stunts in Hindi cinema started taking centre stage in the late 60s and early 70s…..
“What is creditable is that most of today’s actors are ready to do all the action scenes themselves “.

These days, no film is complete without “SPL FX”. What we miss now is the Human involvement in film stunts !

The cast of today’s film was Fearless Nadia, John Cawas, Goldstein, Dalpat, Leela kumari, Rajani, Shyamsundar, Raja Sandow etc. This film is remarkable for 2 reasons. First is – for its Music Director, Madholal Damodar Master, this was his last film as MD. He retired from films, but excelled in another field with International fame, after retirement. More of it later in this post.

Secondly, one of the names in the film cast today was Raja Sandow. He indeed was in the film and film credits, though he had died on 25-11-1943 only ! Surprised ? Not only this film, but a total of 5 Hindi films and over a dozen Tamil films featured Raja Sandow in their films till 1960 ! This is because this legend of stunt films was so popular that his film shots were used again in different films for over a decade as a member of film cast. This must be unique in the world.

Raja Sandow (born P. K. Nagalingam) was an Indian film actor, film director and producer. He began his career as an actor in silent films and later became a prominent actor and director in Tamil and Hindi films of the 1930s. He is considered to be one of the pioneers of early Indian cinema.

Raja Sandow was born in Pudukottai, Tamil Nadu. He was trained as a gymnast and started his film career as a stunt actor in S.N. Patankar’s National Film Company at Bombay. He was given the name “Raja Sandow” because of his physique (after strongman Eugen Sandow). His first lead role was in Patankar’s Bhaktha Bhodhana (1922), for which he was paid Rs. 101 as salary. A passionate gymnast, he started his career as a stunt actor in S.N. Patankar’s National Film (1922). Top star at Kohinoor and its associate LAxmi Pics. (1922-8) under Manilal Joshi (Mojili Mumbai), R.S. Choudhury and Homi Master. Achieved fame when he formed a trio with director Chandulal Shah and heroine Gohar starting Jagdish Film with them (1928) and its successor, Ranjit Film (1929-36). Sandow’s star image in reformist melodramas, playing complex psychological characters opposite Gohar, was launched with Gunsundari and extended in several classic ‘negative’ roles in Shah-Gohar sound films, e.g. Desh Dasi, Prabhu Ka Pyara and Barrister’s Wife. Other noted roles include Indira MA where he plays Kishore.

He became famous by starring in silent films like Veer Bhemsen (1923), The Telephone Girl (1926). After acting in a few silent films he also worked as a director in Ranjit Studios for a monthly salary. His first film as director was Sneh Jyoti (1928).
Returning to Tamil Nadu, he directed and acted in a number of silent films for R. Padmanaban’s Associate Film Company. Many of his silent films had reformist social themes like Peyum pennum (1930), Nandhanar (1930), Anadhai Penn (1931), Pride of Hindustan (1931) and sathi usha sundari (1931). After talking films were introduced with Alam Ara in 1931, he went back to Bombay and starred in many Hindi and Tamil talkies. He was often paired with the actresses Gohar and Sulochana (Ruby Myers). Between 1932–35, he acted in many socially themed Hindi films like Shyam sundar (1932), Devaki (1934) and Indira MA (1935). In 1935, he was commissioned to direct his first Tamil film Menaka and returned to Madras. He continued directing and acting in films till his death in 1943. Vasantha Sena(1936), Chalak Chor (1936), Chandrakanta (1936), Vishnuleela (1938), Thiruneelakantar (1939) and Choodamani (1941) were some of the films he directed and starred in during that period. The last film he worked in was Sivakavi (1943). Sandow suffered a heart attack and died at Coimbatore on 25 November 1943. He was survived by his wife Leelabai and one Son.

As far as films are concerned, he acted in 58 Silent films, 16 Hindi Talkie films and also directed 2 Hindi Talkie films.

Sandow was the first Tamil film director to adopt the practice of using names of actors in film titles. He was the first to introduce intimate kissing scenes and dancers in revealing costumes to the then conservative Tamil film industry. He was also the first director and producer to move Tamil cinema from remaking mythological stories and into making social themed films. He even advertised his films as “Don’t miss to see your own picture”. Sandow was also the first director to use Tamil literary works for film by directing Anadhai penn in 1931 based on Vai. Mu. Kothainayagi Ammal’s novel of the same name.

Writing about Sandow, film historian Theodore Baskaran says: “As a director, actor, scriptwriter and producer, his contribution to Tamil cinema is significant. Many of the stars of the Forties and Fifties have worked with him. He was very competent at coaching actors and maintained complete control over his films. He was a martinet on the sets and was often compared to a ringmaster in a circus. In his films, the emphasis shifted from songs to the spoken word.”

Film historian Randor Guy has also described him as a tough task master: “Raja Sandow was a tough and no-nonsense guy who would not hesitate to shout at and slap his crew and cast including women! Regretfully there are no such directors these days!.”

The Tamil Nadu Government has instituted an annual award in his name called Raja Sandow memorial Award, given for outstanding services to Tamil Cinema. A Postage stamp had been issued in recognition of his contributions to Indian cinema.

Filmography-Talkie films in Hindi…Pardesi preetam-33, Noor e imaan-33, Toofani Taruni-34, Partha Kumar-34, kashmeera-34, Indira M.A.-34, Gunsundari-34, Ratan Manjiri-35, Raat ki rani-35, Desh Dasi-35, College girl-35, Barrister’s wife-35, Prabhu ka pyara-36, Matlabi Duniya-36, Dil ka Daku-36 and Chalaak Chor-36. He directed Raat ki rani-35 and Chalaak Chor-36.

An extraordinary point. Raja Sandow was so popular during the Silent era and early Talkie period, that even after his death in 1943 at Coimbatore, his film shots and leftover films were used in 5 Hindi films till 1953-that is till 10 years after his death. Even his name appeared in the film cast and credits !. I feel this is an exclusive honour, which I have never heard in case of any other actor. The films using his shots in them were Dhoomketu-49, Alladin and Wonderful lamp-52, Jungle ka Jawahar-52, Nav Durga-53 and Husn ka chor-53. This information is given in The Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema.

(Thanks for information from wiki, The Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, Atit ke sitare by Nand kishore, muVyz, HFGK and my notes).

The name Madholal Master must be unknown to the newer crop of Music lovers, because he retired from film music in 1952- much before most readers were even born. The story of Madhulal Master is as strange as his death. On the morning of 19th June 1990, The Times of India, Bombay flashed a news…” The old time Music Director and a Director of Indian Institute of Puppetry, shri Madholal Damodar Master is found murdered in his Shivaji Park home.”

Born on 21-6-1903, Madholal joined the film industry to become a Comedian, but he was first made a sound recordist assistant, then an assistant MD for two films and finally independent MD for Krishna Tone Film Company for their film, ‘ Navchetan’-32. In the next 21 years he gave music to 34 Hindi films, few Gujarati films and some documentaries, composing 267 Hindi songs. Unable to cope up with the changed pattern of Music and public taste, he retired from this profession after his last film- Jungle ka Jawahir-52. After this he pursued his hobby of Puppet making and soon developed a flourishing business. Internationally well known, he was the only Indian member honoured by the International Puppetiers’ Organization. Very few people know that it was his JOKER PUPPET which was used by Raj Kapoor in his ambitious film MERA NAAM JOKER-1970.

He was invited as a special guest for the release ceremony for the HFGK-Vol I, on 8-10-1988, after Harmandir ji meticulously made special efforts to locate him in Bombay. He was overwhelmed with this gesture. Madholal ji showed a Catalogue to Harmandir ji, in which Madholal ji had recorded information about all songs composed by him with details of every film that he did in his career. Harmandir ji was wonder struck with his systematic records. In the ceremony, senior artistes like Naushad, Sitara Devi, Rajkumari ji etc all touched his feet with respect. He regaled the audience with his humorous talk for an hour. He had spent 38 years before this in anonymity. It is very sad that his life ended in such a tragic way. ( His murderer was never found out, nor was the motive known and the case file was closed.)

Here is today’s duet from the film “Jungle ka Jawahar”-52. It is shot on Rajni and actor singer Shyamsundar. Enjoy….


Song- Pyaare Pappu Gore Gappu paas tu mere aa (Jungle Ka Jawaahar)(1952)Singers- Sulochana Kadam, Shyamsundar, Lyricist- Saraswati Kumar Deepak, MD- Madholal Damodar Master

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

pyaare pappu gore gappu
pass tu mere aa
o ri kallo jhapak jhallo
chhod de mujhko ja

pyaare pappu gore gappu
pass tu mere aa
o ri kallo jhapak jhalo
chhod de mujhko ja

adiyal tattu mere mitthu
meethe bol suna
ulti sulti khoti khoti
baaten nahin bana

adiyal tattu mere mitthu
meethe bol suna
ulti sulti khoti khoti
baaten nahin bana
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat

kahoon main mutalle chhod de muhalla
kahoon main nithhalli chhod mera palla
kahoon main mutalle chhod de muhalla
kahoon main nithalli chhod mera palla
main jungle ki sherni
tu shahar ka pilla
khaati gaajar mooli tu
main khaata rasgulla
main khata rasgulla
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat

ja ja ja na phira dimaag mera
ho ho ho dekha bada rubaab tera
are ja ja ja na phira dimaag mera
ho ho ho dekha bada rubab mera
mujhe jaan le,
nahin
kahaa maan le
nahin nahin
mujhe jaan le
kaha maan le
o tauba hai ??
mujhko nahi sata
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat

pyare pappu gore gappu
pass tu mere aa
o ri kallo jhapk jhalo
chhod de mujhko ja

adiyal tattu mere mitthu
meethe bol suna
ulti sulti khoti khoti
baaten nahin bana
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat

4 Responses to "Pyaare pappu gore gappu paas tu mere aa"

That is a post which is full of information especially the part about Raja Sandow. I had heard this name from my father. He used to be fascinated by the man’s stunts etc. But being given credit in movies for many years after his death is something unheard of, as you have said. Imagine when people lift tunes without giving a “thank you” this was commendable.
And the murder of Madholal Master unsolved is sad.
Thank you for all the information posted

Like

Peevesie’s Mom ji,
Thank you for liking the post.
I had Raja Sandow’s bio-note for many years, but there was no song available from his any film upto 1936. One day, by chance, I found this song and then 4 other films, in which his name appeared in the credits. That’s how I was able to introduce Raja Sandow for our readers here. Encyclopedia of Indian cinema clarified this issue also.
-AD

Liked by 2 people

audio

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Thanks, Prakash ji.

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