Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Tumse maangne mein laaj aaye

Posted on: August 13, 2021


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4774 Post No. : 16523

Today’s song is from a film of the First decade of Talkie films in India. After the advent of the Talkie films in India, with Imperial’s ” Alam Ara”, many strong filmmakers from the silent era jumped into the field of making Talkie films. Initially only Bombay and Calcutta were the two filmmaking centres, but soon, Kolhapur,Lahore, Madras and a few other places began making Talkie films.

Most filmmakers made films based on Mythology, Folk stories, Costume dramas, but few Social and Historical films were also made. Imperial, Sagar, Bharat, Ranjit, Krishnatone and Mohan Bhavnani’s Indian Art Production made Hindi films in the First year. From Calcutta it was only Maadan Theatres which made Hindi films.

In 1932, Kardar’s Playart Photophone from Lahore, Kamla Movietone and Oriental Pictures from Lahore, Shantaram’s Prabhat Film co. and Torne’s Saraswati Cinetone form Poona, Saroj and Sharda Movietone from Bombay, Elephanta Movietone from Punjab and from Calcutta- New Theatres and the Eastern Films from Hyderabad joined the band of Pioneering filmmakers.

Although preparations for making a Talkie film had started from 1929 itself, initial equipment acquisition and training the technicians took one year and early in 1931 beginning, the talkie films went on floors at Bombay and Calcutta. Calcutta’s Maadan Theatres was better equipped with superior Machinery and A 1 Class actors for their film “Shirin Farhad”. Ardeshir Irani at Imperial, Bombay was making his “Alam Ara” at Bombay. Both companies wanted to be the First to release their Talkie film.

Irani was a clever person. He had his own Network at Calcutta, through which he knew the progress of Maadan’s film. When he came to know that “Shirin Farhad’ would have 18 songs, he took a decision to have only 7 songs in his film. This reduced the shooting and editing days and he was in a position to release his Talkie film on 14-3-1931 at Majestic Cinema in Bombay and record his name in the History books, as the First Talkie Filmmaker. Maadan could only release their film on 30-5-1931 to become the second Filmmaker of Talkie films in Hindi. However, their film was much better technically and sound was clear…yet they were second !

Within the next few years, the decade was shining with popular and meaningful films from New Theatres, Calcutta and Prabhat Film co. Poona. The reason was that New Theatres made films with a solid story base. They tried to make films on well known authors’ works and Prabhat film company took up social evils as the central themes of their films. These two companies also made it a point to make Bilingual movies – in local and in Hindi languages, thus capturing the home market and the All India market with the Hindi version.

Today’s film “Abhagin”-1938 made by new Theatres, Calcutta was based on the story by Bangla famous author Upendranath Ganguli. It was a bilingual film. In Bangla language it was titled ‘ Abhigyan”. Hindi dialogues were by A.H.Shore and lyrics were by Arzu lucknowi. The screenplay was by Phani Majumdar – his first as a script writer, who became a well known Director in later days. Bimal Roy was the Cinematographer. He too became a big filmmaker and a Director.

The film was directed by Prafulla Roy. Prafulla Roy ( Born on 1-1-1892 at Kushtia, Bengal) started his career in the silent era by directing 2 silent films. His first talkie film in Hindi was Ramayan-34, made by Bharat laxmi Pictures, Calcutta. Bharat Laxmi Pictures had Prafull Roy as its director for Bangla and Hindi films. Roy directed 12 films in Hindi. 9 out of them were made in Calcutta, 1 film in Lahore (Prem yatra-37) and 2 in Bombay (Mera Gaon-42 and Phulwari-51). Roy had also acted in 2 New Theatres films, namely Millionaire-36 and Mukti-37.

The cast of the film was Prithviraj Kapoor, Molina Devi, Vijay Kumar, Nemo, Menaka Devi, Pankaj Mullick, Chaman Puri (makes his Debut. He was the eldest brother of Madan Puri and Amrish Puri). The film was released in Majestic Cinema, Bombay.

One of the names in the cast is that of NEMO. I remember him as Seth ji, who is disturbed in the night by the Bastiwala’s singing, in the film Shri 420. This strange name is a Latin word, meaning ” Nobody”. All these years, I tried hard but never got any information about him. Recently, however, I could get some information about Nemo. Here it is, for the first time, for our readers.

Nemo (Mirza Muhammad Begg) was born on 27th december 1903 at Calcutta. He passed his Senior Cambridge. One day he, along with some friends, visited New Theatres to see a film shooting. Mirza Muhammad Begg merely wanted to watch the shooting of ‘Yahoodi Ki Larki’ (1933) but, as luck would have it, his visit to the New Theatres studio in Calcutta led to a small role in the same film. The part was that of a Roman king and little did Begg know back then that he’d soon be turning to Latin to fish out a lasting identity.

A year later, he was invited by New Theatres’ founder B.N. Sircar to work as the production manager of ‘Karwan-e-Hayat’ (1935) and another chance role beckoned. A female actor who was supposed to play an old witch in the film failed to turn up for the shooting and Begg volunteered for the part. The make-up department stepped up to the challenge and Begg, unrecognisable in the get-up, did the job (and always considered it his best effort). What happened next is even more interesting. Once the film was ready, the makers felt apprehensive about revealing to the public that a man had played the witch’s role. Begg came up with a solution – a gender-ambiguous screen name for himself. And in a delightfully wacky move, he picked a name that means ‘nobody/nothing’ in Latin – ‘Nemo’.

The name stuck on and this was the beginning of Nemo’s steadfast association with New Theatres – one that resulted in a string of features like ‘Karodpati’, ‘Dushman’, ‘Doctor’ and ‘Zindagi’. He was Vidushak, the royal jester, in ‘Vidyapati’, a rigid but caring father in ‘Jawani Ki Reet’ and the devoted caretaker Dharamdas in P.C. Barua’s ‘Devdas’. These diverse characters earned him appreciation from audiences and critics alike. Further, the story of the Saigal hit ‘The President’ (1937) was based on his idea and he was duly credited for the same. Alongside his work in films, he also edited and published ‘Akkas’ – a very popular Urdu (and later, Urdu-English bilingual) film magazine in those days. Its surviving copies now serve as an important archive of the early talkies. His last film with New Theatres was Kashinath. When Calcutta was bombed by Japan in late 1942, Nemo migrated with his family to his ancestral hometown, Lucknow. He later went over to Bombay for a short while to work in Mazhar Khan’s ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945), and then returned to Lucknow to settle into a life far removed from the studio lights.

In the middle of it all lies an extraordinary fact – at the time he entered the movies, M.M. Begg was a national billiards champion! He won the inaugural Indian Open Billiards Championship in 1931 and never left the game thereon, despite a busy and flourishing film career. He won the trophy again in 1937, and between the 2 wins, he was the runner-up thrice. Not to mention, he represented the country at international tournaments and also headed various administrative organisations related to the game. His contributions towards establishing and popularising billiards and snooker in India are widely mentioned, and always in glowing terms. He was also obsessed with Racing.

It was nearly a decade after ‘Pehli Nazar’ that Raj Kapoor managed to pull Nemo out of his sabbatical for 2 memorable final acts in ‘Shree 420’ and ‘Jagte Raho’. In both, Nemo played similar roles of manipulative, corrupt seths who hide their sinister designs behind a facade of respectability. If he was jittery about facing the camera after a long gap, it doesn’t show (unless Seth Sonachand’s trembling chin is not a mannerism). He was particularly effective in ‘Shree 420’, where he puts on the most evil smile possible and hisses to Raj Kapoor, “Aap se mulaqaat ho gayi, is mein fayda hi fayda hai.” He also did 2 more films- Raja Vikram-57 and Nag Champa-58.

Nemo worked in 19 films of New Theatres and 4 others totalling 23 films in all. It is believed that he died in Bombay on 18-8-1960. Cinema, publishing, sports – Mirza Muhammad Begg distinguished himself in everything he touched. And chose to call himself a nobody. ( based on information from Filmdom-1946, HFGK, muVyz but mainly an article by Yasir Abbasi, with thanks.)

Today’s song is sung by Kamala Jharia. This is the 5th song from this film to feature on this Blog.


Song- Tumse maangne mein laaj aaye (Abhaagin)(1938) Singer- Kamla Jharia, Lyricist- Aarzu Lucknowi, MD- R C Boral

Lyrics

Tumse maangane mein laaj aaye
tumse maangne mein
Tumse maangane mein laaj aaye
tumse maangne mein

komal tan
komal man
komal tan
komal man
?? ka bojha
kaise uthhaaya jaaye
Tumse maangane mein laaj aaye
tumse maangne mein

koi jo maange muraad
ab bhi hai ?? baaqi
rah gayi maangke
lene ki tamanna baaqi
koi to maange muraad ab bhi hai
?? baaqi
rah gayi maangke
lene ki tamanna baaqi

?? dukh mein koyi
murjhaayi kali
khud khil jaaye
?? dukh mein koyi
murjhaayi kali
khud khil jaaye
sab kuchh ?? khona hai ke
sab kuchh mil jaaye
sab kuchh ?? khona hai ke
sab kuchh mil jaaye

kaun hai
kaun hai
kaun hai aisa jo ki
khud ko preet mein jalaa paaye
kaun hai aisa jo ki
khud ko preet mein jalaa paaye
???
Tumse maangane mein laaj aaye
tumse maangne mein

3 Responses to "Tumse maangne mein laaj aaye"

Dear Arunji ,

Lovely info on Nemo….it reminded me of Late Janakidas Mehra……cycling champion!

Warm Regards,

Umesh

Like

Thanks, Umesh ji.

Like

ab bhi hai ?? baaqi
sounds like :
ab bhi hai qatra baaqi

sab kuchh ?? khona hai ke
sounds like:
sab kuchh iss waaste khona hai ke

I have seen a photo of the cover of the magazine ‘Akkas’ in Yasir Abbasi’s book ‘Yeh un dinon ki baat hai’, which is about Urdu film magazine’s. ‘Aks’ means reflection or mirror image, so ‘Akkas’ means the capturers of images aka photographers, artists who make the pictures.

Like

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