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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘JP Kaushik


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3976 Post No. : 15063 Movie Count :

4133

Missing Films of 1960s – 111
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“हम तो डूबेंगे सनम, तुमको भी ले डूबेंगे।“
(“hum to doobenge sanam, tumko bhi le doobenge”)

(I will drown no doubt my dear, but will take you down with me.)

Some conversations, some words, touch a certain nerve inside that they simply cannot be forgotten.  And some of them go even a step further.  Some such words become so indelibly ingrained in the collective memory of a society that they end up becoming a part of the current lingua franca, an idiom that normal people begin to use in everyday conversations.

The above dialogue is one such example. This phrase has become part of the Hindustani exchange – I am sure this is a matter of current experience for all of us. Let me tell you where this dialogue comes from. The earliest occurrence that I am aware of is this being used in a film – well, 68 years ago. The year was 1951. The film maker was Raj Kapoor. The film was ‘Aawaara’. The scene in reference is / was considered a daring scene in those times. Nargis and Raj Kapoor are seen in swimming costumes, in a splashing pool close to a beach. This comes a little before the song “Dum Bhar Jo Udhar Munh Phere. . .”.

Nargis invites RK to dive into the pool. RK feigns fear, as if expressing he does not know how to swim. This exchange is all through facial expressions. Nargis dives into the pool. RK follows. Nargis quickly scrambles out of the pool, then tells RK that the water is deep, and he might drown. RK lunges at Nargis’ hand and tries to pull her back into the pool, and speaks this dialogue – “हम तो डूबेंगे सनम, तुमको भी ले डूबेंगे।“.

The dialogues of ‘Aawaara’ (as also the story) are written by Khwaja Ahmed Abbas or KA Abbas for short. As a writer, he was associated with Raj Kapoor and RK Films all the way from ‘Aawaara’ in 1951 to ‘Henna’ in 1991. He had passed away in 1987. Raj Kapoor had started making ‘Henna’, but then he himself passed away in 1988. The film was completed by Randhir Kapoor.

The association he shared with Raj Kapoor lasted almost 4 decades. The association stands the testimony of ideology – KA Abbas was a very active member of both IPTA (Indian People’s Theatre Association) and PWA (Progressive Writers Association). And Raj Kapoor and his socialistic ideology as expressed in films like ‘Aawaara’, ‘Shri 420’, ‘Boot Polish’, ‘Ab Dilli Door Nahin’, ‘Jaagte Raho’ etc. These films have a focus on the underprivileged in the society, and are a call to make a better society.

The word “progress and progressive” attached with it has a history of its own. In 19th century England, the word progressive was the battle cry of all those who wanted a better deal for the underprivileged and wanted science and technology to spearhead the movement for social development. It stood for liberation and democracy. Munshi Prem Chand, doyen of Urdu writers, had delivered the Presidential Address of the first meeting of the PWA. It was a movement for the freedom-loving writers who were opposed to the status quo in the feudal-dominated Indian society. They thought that unless the Indian society was not transformed and the common masses were not in the driving seat, nothing could change. Writers like Krishan Chander, Ismat Chugtai, Saadat Hasan Manto, Ahmad Nadeem Qasmi, Ali Sardar Jafri, Sibte Hassan, Ehtesham Hussain, Mumtaz Hussain, Sahir Ludhianvi, Kaifi Azmi, Ali Abbas Hussaini, Makhdoom Mohiuddin, Farigh Bukhari, Khatir Ghaznavi, Raza Hamdani, M Ibrahim Joyo, Sobho Gianchandani, Shaikh Ayaz, Rajinder Singh Bedi, Amrita Pritam, Ali Sikandar, Zoe Ansari, Majaz Lucknawi, and yes, Khwaja Ahmed Abbas, made it the strongest literary movement.

My earliest introduction to Abbas Sb was sometimes in mid 1960s. Although we watched the movies diligently, on TV and on the big screen, it was not yet time to grasp all the names that came while the credits were rolling. Becoming familiar with the story writer or the art director or the choreographer, was still a few years hence. What stuck to my mind was really a very out of the way encounter. It was a tele-film which probably no one remembers any more. But somehow, that film and the name has simply remained glued in memory. It wasn’t accompanied by any pompous announcements etc. It was just a film, that happened to get telecast when I happened to be sitting in front of the television at a neighbour’s house one evening. The title of the film is ‘India, My India’. It was a very interesting documentary. Starting with the very early morning hour – like 5 am, the telefilm captured vignettes of rural and urban lifein India, from different parts of the country. For every hour, the location would change. And for the next about 5 minutes, the viewer was treated to a sampling of the local life and local color at that hour of the day, accompanied by a narrative description. Over a period of two hours, 24 different locations of the country were mapped into this documentary, showing life as it happens, at different times in a cycle of 24 hours. To my tiny intelligence, this was a wonderful new experience, and I am sure a wonderful new experiment for its creator.

Another place where this name was highlighted every week, was on the last page of the weekly tabloid – Blitz, published from Bombay and Delhi. Being a journalist household, we always had a huge selection of newspapers and magazines delivered every morning. Blitz was one of the weekly papers that was the staple of many member of our household (a joint family setup at that time). For me, Blitz was an attraction because it always carried something ‘scandalous and titillating’ 😉 . Of course, the name of KA Abbas was always prominently posted on the last page of the weekly edition, quite appropriately titled the ‘Last Page’. I remember I used to read it with interest, because it was always a wry and a sideways look at the socio-political current affairs. A good read, because it introduced many a names to my still fledgling memory, names that would become important in later decades.

KA Abbas was born in Panipat (now in Haryana). He came into a family of erudite scholars with a history of good education and social involvement. His father was a celebrated Urdu poet, Khwaja Altaf Hussain Hali, a student and scholar of Mirza Ghalib. His grandfather Khwaja Gulam Abbas was one of the leaders of the first war of independence in 1857 – the first celebrated martyr of Panipat who was blown from the mouth of a cannon. Abbas’s father graduated from Aligarh Muslim University, was a tutor of a prince and a prosperous businessman. He spearheaded an effort to modernise the preparation and manufacture of Unani medicines. Abbas’s mother, Masroor Khatoon, was the daughter of Sajjad Husain, an enlightened educationist. Abbas took his early education in ‘Hali Muslim High School’, which was established by his great grand father Hali. He was instructed in reading the Arabic text of the Quran. Abbas completed his matriculation at the age of fifteen. He did his B.A. with English literature in 1933 and LLB in 1935 from Aligarh Muslim University.

Abbas began his career as a journalist with ‘National Call’, a New Delhi based newspaper after finishing his BA. Simultaneously, while doing his LLB in 1934, he started ‘Aligarh Opinion’, India’s first university students’ weekly during the pre-independence period. In 1935, Abbas came to Bombay and joined ‘The Bombay Chronicle’. He occasionally served as a film critic. An event transpired and the film editor of the paper passed away. Abbas got promoted to be the editor of the film section.

While at The Bombay Chronicle, (1935–1947), he started a weekly column called ‘Last Page’, which he continued when he joined the Blitz magazine. ‘Last Page’, (‘Azad Kalam’ in the Urdu edition). This column continued till Abbas Sb passed away in 1987, making this the longest-running political column in India’s history (1935–87). A collection of these columns was later published as two books.

In 1936, a few months after having come to Bombay and starting work at ‘The Bombay Chronicle’, a meeting with Himanshu Rai and Devika Rani happened. As a result, the young journalist took his first steps into the film industry. He started working as a copywriter and a publicist for Bombay Talkies. And shortly thereafter, he sold his first story and screenplay to Bombay Talkies – the film being ‘Naya Sansaar’ (1941).

The world of Hindi cinema quickly opened up to him. Here was an energetic young man with liberal outlook and a new expression, seeking to inject a new wave into the world of cinema. ‘Naya Sansar’ was the first such offering. He won the Bombay Film Journalists Association (BFJA) award for the best screenplay in 1942, for this film.

1943 – the great famine of Bengal happened. A story took a foothold in his mind. He wrote the story, the screenplay, became a producer and a director also in the same step – the result was the 1945 release of ‘Dharti Ke Lal’. KA Abbas had fired the first volley of the neo-realist socially aware cinema in India. The film was made under the banner of IPTA.

In parallel, he wrote the script for Chetan Anand’s ‘Neecha Nagar’ and V Shantatram’s ‘Dr Kotnis Ki Amar Kahaani’. Both films were released in 1946.  ‘Neecha Nagar’ went on to win the Palme d’Or (Golden Palm) award at the Cannes Film Festival, in one of the three categories – the only Indian film to have that honor in the history of our industry.

In 1951, he set up his own banner – ‘Naya Sansaar’, and went on to create some very iconic films in the history of Indian cinema. Commercial success not being the criteria, the value of social awareness and the commentary on the state of current affairs in the society simply cannot be measured. A short sampling of his critically acclaimed work is as follows,

1951: Screenplay for ‘Awaara’, nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

1956: Screenplay for ‘Jaagte Raho’, won the Crystal Globe Grand Prix at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival in 1957 and the Certificate of Merit at the fourth National Film Awards.

1958 Screenplay and direction for ‘Pardesi’, nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

1960: Direction for ‘Eid Mubarak’ (children’s documentary) , got All India Certificate of Merit for the Second Best Children’s Film

1964: Screenplay, production and direction for ‘Shehar Aur Sapna, won the National Film Award for Best Feature Film

1965: Direction for ‘Hamaara Ghar’, won award at the International Film Festival, Santa Barbara, USA

1970: Screenplay, production and direction for ‘Saat Hindustani’, won the Nargis Dutt Award for Best Feature Film on National Integration at National Film Awards

1972: Screenplay, production and direction for ‘Do Boond Pani’, won the Nargis Dutt Award for Best Feature Film on National Integration at National Film Awards

Other major films he was associated with either as screenplay/story writer, producer, or director – or all of the roles, include ‘Aaj Aur Kal’ (1947), ‘Anhonee’ (1952), ‘Raahi’ (1953), ‘Munna’ (1954), ‘Shree 420’ (1955), ‘Chaar Dil Chaar Raahen’ (1959), ‘Gyaarah Hazaar Ladkiaan’ (1962), ‘Aasmaan Mahal’, (1965), ‘Bambai Raat Ki Baahon Mein’ (1967), ‘Mera Naam Joker’ (1970), ‘Bobby’ (1973), ‘Achaanak’ (1973), ‘Faaslah’ (1974), ‘The Naxalites’ (1980), ‘Love In Goa’ (1983), ‘Ek Aadmi’ (1988), and ‘Henna’ (1991).

As a journalist, he met with and interviewed several renowned world leaders and notable personalities – including the Russian Prime Minister Khrushchev, American President Franklin Roosevelt, Charlie Chaplin, Mao-Tse-Tung and Yuri Gagarin.

As a writer, he has authored more than 70 books in his lifetime in Hindi, Urdu and English.

In 1963, Abbas wrote, produced and directed ‘Shehar Aur Sapna’. This film is an experience totally different. The theme of the film is the dream city of Bombay, and the severe housing problem it faces. The myth of this city attracts thousands of young men who arrive here every day, with a dream of their own. But the harsh realities of making a living, and of having a roof on one’s head in this city, is an experience that can shatter many a tough determined minds.

The story is told through the experiences of Bhola, a young man – almost a village bumpkin, who comes to Bombay in search of livelihood, and Radha, a young woman also from a distant village, who is duped into a sham marriage, and is then plowed into flesh trade, from where she dares to escape, to start living on her own terms in this cruel and heartless city. For a time, their home is an abandoned drain pipe. Their support system is a trio of good samaritans, who themselves are inhabitants of the world of footpath dwellers – roles played by David, Anwar Hussain and Nana Palsikar. Manmohan Krishan plays the role of a wandering homeless poet (shades of ‘Matwaala Shaayar Ram Joshi’) who is a mute observer to all the events that transpire in the lives of this set of characters.

The progression of the storyline came as a shock to many who had never visited Bombay. No doubt the events depicted are dramatized to a certain extent, but surely they are also grounded in the realities of the living experience of this city. As the film comes to a close, the young couple are now parents to a newborn, their temporary shelter hosted by the three samaritans has been razed by bulldozers, to clear the way for an apartment complex being built by a rich builder, their drain-pipe home has finally found the purpose it was originally intended for – that is, the pipeline is laid and the drain pipe buried into the earth. The closing shot of the film shows the couple walking into a dying dusk, carrying the baby and their worldly belongings in a couple of makeshift shoulder bags, not knowing where to head – maybe towards a dream – a ‘sapna’, and nothing else.

A time of his own life that Abbas Sb has talked about in his writings and interviews – he too had slept of the footpaths of Bombay during his initial days in the city. As he prepared to shoot this film, he actually walked through the streets and bylanes of the city where the have-nots dwell in large numbers, at all times of the day and in all types of weather, to be able to recreate the landscape in the film to tell the story he wanted to. People making homes in drain pipes is a reality that he has seen and experienced. So it came quite naturally that he is able to present these sequences so convincingly.

The film is written, produced and directed by KA Abbas, under his own banner – Naya Sansaar, Bombay. The roles of the lead pair Bhola and Radha, are performed by Dilip Raj (son of the renowned P Jairaj) and Surekha Parkar. The rest of the cast is listed as Nana Palsikar, Manmohan Krishan, David, Anwar Hussain, Asit Sen, Jagdish Kanwal, Rasheed Khan, Ravikant, Ram Murty, Nazeer Kashmiri, Narbada Shankar, Moti Beena, Master Javed, and Pardesi amongst others.

Coming to the music of this film – the thing that makes the music of this film some sort of a rarity is the fact that it was never released on gramophone records. The songs of this film are essentially a recitation of poetry that occurs at four points in the story line. The poet protagonist is Manmohan Krishan. He is the one who sings all these four pieces, accompanying significant moments in this film. The lines of this poetry are penned by Ali Sardar Jafri and the music direction is by JP Kaushik (aka Jag Phool Kaushik).

The rare thing about these poetical pieces is of course their availability. These renditions were never released on gramophone records. Furhter, despite being an award winning film, the film itself has become a rarity, not available easily in public domain. Our dear friend from Jaipur, Pawan Jha, has uploaded one poetical segment elsewhere on YouTube. In absence of the availability of all the four pieces of poetry, I have extracted and edited the four pieces into a single video clip, from a copy of the film which itself is not the best. But no complaints – at least we have what we have. Small blessings that all the four poetical pieces are available. I debated and discussed with friends, whether this should be four different poetical renditions. As one listens to the four pieces, one can make out the one single thread that runs through these four pieces, giving credence to the Geet Kosh listings that lists these four pieces as parts 1 to 4. And so I felt it important to present them together as one poem with four parts. In the edited clip, I have included a very small segment of the film appearing just before each part presents itself in the storyline, to get a flavor of the backdrop against which each of these parts is presented.

The interesting thing about this post is that the film makes its debut today on our blog, and simultaneously, we can also declare it as yippeee’d – all the songs of this film are now posted. And it also brings us close, very close, to the culmination of this series of bringing on board the missing films of 1960s.

As one reviews the history of Indian cinema, one does not, should not categorize the luminaries like Satyajit Ray, Bimal Roy, Raj Kapoor, K Asif, Chetan Anand, Ritwick Ghatak, Mehboob Khan, Mrinal Sen, Rituparno Ghosh, Muzzafar Ali and the like. These legendary film makers each are a class unto themselves. And so is Khwaja Ahmed Abbas. His body of work put together may well form an institution that will be a matter of research and debate for decades to come. The medium of cinema is undoubtedly more rich, because KA Abbas worked on it. And because a compelling film like ‘Shehar Aur Sapna’ was created by him.

Born on 7th June, 1914, today is the 105th birth anniversary of this illustrious film maker. One of the very few whose dedication went exceptionally beyond the considerations of commercial success of his creations. His focus, his commentary, never wavered away from an acknowledged social responsibility of the medium of cinema. I fall back once again on the film ‘Aawaara’ and its dialogues – two samples.

Raj is running from the police and incidentally enters the home of Judge Raghunath and Rita. There is an exchange about the identity of the intruder. In a comic way, Raj is trying to convince Rita that he is a thief. And this is how he presents it –

“बस यही तो हमारे नए समाज का कमाल है।

जो चोर हैं, दूसरों की जेब काटते हैं, पब्लिक की आँख में धूल डालते हैं, मेरे जैसे फ़र्स्ट क्लास सूट पैंट पहनते हैं, उन्हें हम शरीफ समझते हैं। और जो ईमानदारी से मेहनत मजदूरी करके पेट पालते हैं, फटे पुराने कपड़े पहनते हैं, उन्हें चोर आवारा डाकू समझ कर धर लिया जाता है। ये पूंजीपति, ये काले बाज़ार वाले सेठ, ये मुनाफाखोर, ये ब्याज लेने वाले, ये सब कौन हैं। मेरी तरह चोर।“

“Bas yahi to hamaare naye samaaj ka kamaal hai.

Jo chor hain, jo doosron ki jeb kaat’te hain, public ki aankh mein dhool jhonkte hain, mere jaise first claas suit pant pehante hain, unhen hum shareef samajhte hain. Aur jo imaandari se mehnat mazdoori kar ke pet paalte hain, fatey puraane kapde pehante hain, unhem chor aawaara daaku samajh kar dhar liya jaata hai. Ye poonjipati, ye kaale bazaar waale seth, ye munaafakhor, ye byaaj lene waale, ye sab kaun hain. Meri tarah chor.”

And in the closing minutes of the film, as the court case against Raj is in progress, the judge invites Raj to say what he wants to, in his own defence. One part of that monologue goes like –

“आप जो चाहे मुझे सज़ा दे सकते हैं।

मगर क्या आप समझते हैं के मुझे फांसी देने से ये पाप क्रोध हिंसा और अपराध का जहर जो आपकी दुनिया में फैला हुआ है, ये दूर हो जाएगा।

मैं आपको अपनी जीवन कथा सुनाना नहीं चाहता। मगर इतना ज़रूर कहना चाहता हूँ, के अपराध के कीड़े मुझे खून में अपने माँ बाप से नहीं मिले थे। उस गंदे गट्टर से मिले थे जो हमारी गंदी चाल के पास से बहता है। वो गट्टर आज भी वहाँ बह रहा है। और अपराध के कीड़े अब भी उस में पल रहे हैं। और.. और सैंकड़ों हजारों बच्चे जो आस पास की चालों में रहते हैं रोज़ाना इन कीड़ों के शिकार हो रहे हैं। मेरी फिक्र ना कीजिये, उन बच्चों की फिक्र कीजिये, अपने बच्चों की फिक्र कीजिये। ऐसा ना हो

के एक दिन आप, और आप, और आप, और आपका बच्चा भी मेरी तरह इस कटहरे में बार बार कहे के मेरी रगों में भी शरीफ बाप का खून है।”

Aap jo chaahe mujhe sazaa de sakte hain.

Magar kya aap samajhte hain ke mujhe faansi dene se ye paap krodh hinsa aur apradh ka zehar jo aapki duniya mein faila hua hai, ye door ho jaayega.

Main aapko apni jeevan katha sunaana nahin chaahta. Magar itna zaroor kehna chaahta hoon, ke apradh ke keede mujhe khoon mein apne maa baap se nahin miley the. Us gande gattar se miley the jo hamaari gandi chaal ke paas se behta hain. Wo gattar aaj bhi wahaan beh raha hai. Aur apradh ke keede ab bhi us mein pal rahe hain. Aur. . aur sainkdon hazaaron bachche jo aas paas ki chaalon mein rehte hain rozaana in keedon ke shikaar ho rahe hain. Meri fiqr na kijiye, un bachchon ki fiqr kijiye, apne bachchon ki fiqr kijiye. Aisa na ho ke ek din aap, aur aap, aur aap, aur aapka bachcha bhi meri tarah is katehre mein baar baar kahe ke meri ragon mein bhi shareef baap ka khoon hai.

Touching upon the sordid realities of human existence, and the dichotomy of the crooked and dubious haves versus the helpless have nots just trying to survive. The dialogues bring home a message that is topical even today – a message that inevitably gets lost in the glitz of commercial compulsions.

His creations, his vision is exceptional. Even when he writes the story for ‘Bobby’ – yes it is a showman’s film, an RK creation. But beneath the formula drama, there is an effort to dissect and discuss the social divide of the rich-boy-poor-girl tale. It is was an RK film – one had a ice-cream flavored happy ending.

‘Shehar Aur Sapna’ is an out and out KA Abbas statement – the ending is poignant, rooted in the real world, but still colored with an idealist’s hope looking into the future – shades of “. . . Wo Subah Kabhi To Aayegi. . .”.

[Acknowkledgements – A part of this article is adapted from the material in multiple articles on Wikipedia.]

Song – Ye Shaam Bhi Kahaan Hui  (Shehar Aur Sapna) (1963) Singer – Manmohan Krishan, Lyrics – Ali Sardar Jafri, MD – Jag Phool Kaushik

Lyrics

(Part 1)

ye shaam bhi kahaan hui
ye shaam bhi kahaan hui
shaam bhi kahaan hui

patharon ki basti hai
patharon ka zinda hai
patharon ki deewaaren
jin mein qaid insaan hai
patharon ki sejen hain
patharon ka bistar hai
patharon ke takiye hain
patharon ki chaadar hai
neend aur sapne bhi
patharon mein dhalte hain
patharon ke seene mein
kitne paap palte hain
kitne paap palte hain

shaam bhi kahaan hui
ye shaam bhi kahaan hui
shaam bhi kahaan hui

(Part 2)

pathar ka bhagwaan yahaan hai
pathar ka shaitaan
pathar ke dil
pathar ke sar
pathar ke insaan
koi rasta kaise paaye
dil ka haal kisey samjhaaye
chaaron or khadi hai dekho
pathar ki santaan
pathar ki santaan

shaam bhi kahaan hui
ye shaam bhi kahaan hui
shaam bhi kahaan hui

(Part 3)

pyaar ko aaj nai
tarah nibhaana hoga
pyaar ko aaj nai
tarah nibhaana hoga
hans ke har dard ko
har gham ko bhulaana hoga
hans ke har dard ko

aansoo’on se jo bujhe jaate hain
aankhon ke chiraagh
aansoo’on se jo bujhe jaate hain
aankhon ke chiraagh
khoon e dil de ke unhen
phir se jalaana hoga
khoon e dil de ke unhen
phir se jalaana hoga
pyaar ko aaj nai

abhi khil jaayenge masle huye
kuchle huye phool
abhi khil jaayenge masle huye
kuchle huye phool
shart bas ye hai ke
seene se lagaana hoga
shart bas ye hai ke
seene se lagaana hoga
pyaar ko aaj nai

wo jo kho jaayen to
kho jaayegi duniya saari
wo jo kho jaayen to
kho jaayegi duniya saari
wo jo mil jaayen to
saath apne zamaana hoga
wo jo mil jaayen to. . .

(Part 4)

hazaar ghar hazaar dar
ye sab hain ajnabi magar
khabar nahin ke ab kidhar
mudegi apni rehguzar

yahaan se jaayenge kahaan
amaan paayeng kahaan
ye zindagi ki bebasi
ye bebasi ki zindagi..ee..ee

ye bebasi ki zindagi..ee..ee

shaam bhi kahaan hui
ye shaam bhi kahaan hui
shaam bhi kahaan hui

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

(भाग 1)

ये शाम भी कहाँ हुई
ये शाम भी कहाँ हुई
शाम भी कहाँ हुई

पत्थरों की बस्ती है
पत्थरों का ज़िंदा है
पत्थरों की दीवारें
पत्थरों के इंसान हैं
पत्थरों की सेजें हैं
पत्थरों का बिस्तर है
पत्थरों के तकिये हैं
पत्थरों की चादर है
नींद और सपने भी
पत्थरों में ढलते हैं
पत्थरों के सीने में
कितने पाप ढलते हैं
कितने पाप ढलते हैं

शाम भी कहाँ हुई
ये शाम भी कहाँ हुई
शाम भी कहाँ हुई

(भाग 2)

पत्थरों का भगवान यहाँ है
पत्थरों का शैतान
पत्थर के दिल
पत्थर के सर
पत्थर के इंसान
कोई रस्ता कैसे पाये
दिल का हाल किसे समझाये
चारों ओर खड़ी है देखो
पत्थर की संतान
पत्थर की संतान

शाम भी कहाँ हुई
ये शाम भी कहाँ हुई
शाम भी कहाँ हुई

(भाग 3)

प्यार को आज नई
तरह निभाना होगा
प्यार को आज नई
तरह निभाना होगा
हंस के हर दर्द को
हर ग़म को भुलाना होगा
हंस के हर दर्द को

आंसुओं से जो बुझे जाते हैं
आँखों के चिराग़
आंसुओं से जो बुझे जाते हैं
आँखों के चिराग़
खून ए दिल दे के उन्हें
फिर से जलाना होगा
खून ए दिल दे के उन्हें
फिर से जलाना होगा
प्यार को आज नई

अभी खिल जाएँगे मसले हुये
कुचले हुये फूल
अभी खिल जाएँगे मसले हुये
कुचले हुये फूल
शर्त बस ये है के
सीने से लगाना होगा
शर्त बस ये है के
सीने से लगाना होगा
प्यार को आज नई

वो जो खो जाएँ तो
खो जाएगी दुनिया सारी
वो जो खो जाएँ तो
खो जाएगी दुनिया सारी
वो जो मिल जाएँ तो
साथ अपने ज़माना होगा
वो जो मिल जाएँ तो

(भाग 4)
हज़ार घर हज़ार दर
ये सब हैं अजनबी मगर
खबर नहीं के अब किधर
मुड़ेगी अपनी रहगुज़र

यहाँ से जाएँगे कहाँ
अमान पाएंगे कहाँ
ये ज़िंदगी की बेबसी
ये बेबसी की ज़िंदगी॰॰ई॰॰ई

ये बेबसी की ज़िंदगी॰॰ई॰॰ई

शाम भी कहाँ हुई
ये शाम भी कहाँ हुई
शाम भी कहाँ हुई

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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3771 Post No. : 14747

Aah haa haa, what fun – “हम भी अगर बच्चे होते॰ ॰ ॰” and all the rest of the exuberant pandemonium that is involved in being a child – does it not give you a high of the mischievous anarchy that we have always enjoyed; sometimes secretly and most of the time overtly – “ना नौकरी की चिंता, ना रोटी की फिकर”.

To the child in all of us, who never grows up. I am sure you all know such ’children’. And I am also sure we all are very well acquainted with the person we see every day in the mirror, no matter whether there is hair on the pate to comb or no. 🙂  I dearly remember one of the managers I have worked with in the US, completely bald but very energetic – he always introduced himself as – “. . . a five year old imprisoned in a sixty five year old body”. And then, of course, we have our dear Bakshish Singh ji, who proudly claims his age to be 22-and-a-half years, three months and a few days, whenever you may ask him. And he has a stay order from the Supreme Court to back his claim. Too sad that I met him ten years after he got his orders; my stay order (from the same Supreme Court) stands at 32. 😀 😀

Music, especially the evergreen HFM, surely does wonders – does is not?

Celebrating the Children’s Day today, 14th November, and greetings to all the ‘child’ readers and friends on this blog 🙂

Thinking about it puts a little dismay in my mind, that we have special days set aside to remind ourselves about things and facts and experiences, which actually are a matter of, rather a part and parcel of our everyday life. We have Mother’s Day, and Father’s Day, and then we have Children’s Day. For the matter of celebration and to highlight this connection, it is okay that we have one day earmarked. But then we should also be aware of, and be celebrating these concepts everyday in our lives.

It is also the birth anniversary of the first Prime Minister of our country, after India became a free nation. Jawaharlal Nehru’s name got associated with this day, or rather the other way round – that his birthday was declared as the Children’s Day – for the recognition of his endearment to children, and his own professed acknowledgement that we need to celebrate the future leaders of this nation. Not to put any other twist on this thread, 🙂 I move on to the song being introduced with this post.

When you hear it, I am very sure the avid listeners of the radio will immediately recall this song. It used to be played often, especially on today’s day, and was a favorite. For a few months now, some of the regular visitor’s to my YT channel have been requesting for this song to be uploaded. This started after I uploaded another song from this film – ‘Hamaara Ghar’ from 1964 – “Chale Hawa Purvaai”. When I uploaded this song on 18th Jun last year, I got many requests to upload the song we are discussing today. Somehow, I just held on to those requests, wanting to bring this song online on this day. I missed the event of last year, and so the regular procrastination 😦  made me put it off for one full year.

The jingle that this song is, brings to mind many such jingles from the earlier days, when we had many group games which had songs attached to them. Here in north India, there are many such jingles part of the common folklore, such as “Kokila Chhupake Jumme Raat Aayi Hai. . .” (“कोकिला छुपाके जुम्मे रात आई है॰ ॰ ॰”), and “Aat Qila Bhai Baat Qila. . .” (“आटकिला भई बाटकिला, भई आमों वाली कोठरी॰ ॰ ॰”), and “Poshampa Bhai Poshampa, Daakuon Ne Kya Kiya. . .” (“पोशम्पा भई पोशम्पा, डाकुओं ने क्या किया॰ ॰ ॰”) etc. And ah yes, a very familiar one which we borrowed from the Britishers – “Ring a Ring o’ Roses, Pocket Full of Posies. . .”. Maybe some readers (five year olds struggling inside much older bodies) will recall these songs. And I am sure there are similar such game jingles popular in all regions in our vast sub continent. We used to sing these songs as we played the corresponding games – a group of 10 to 20 kids, all intent on having just fun. Sadly, the newer generation of youngsters hardly gets together to play such games, or make up such newer jingles. It surely is a lot of fun. 🙂

This particular jingle, apparently played as a child game, tells about one huffy-puffy arrogant royalty, who probably is not friendly with the people, and the people then teach him a lesson by putting a restriction on his food supply. And so the singers of this song tease this royalty and show him their thumbs (“ठेंगा॰ ॰ ॰”) while singing that now you go and eat your gold and diamonds, and that you are going to regret this arrogance; you will not be served bread (“रोटी”). In the second stanza, now the people are teasing that the royalty does not want to do any work, and so they will have to survive on dust and stones; they shall still not be served any bread. Then, in the third stanza, the people are singing that at last the royalty has come out of their palace, and are being remorseful and apologetic; so they are made to dance while holding their ears, and sing while holding their nose. And only then, having danced and sung as such, will they be given “रोटी” to eat.

Although presented as this delightful children’s song, this jingle surely is a stark comment on the social divide that exists in the society, telling about the arrogance of the so called ‘haves’, who in reality are not in a position to even feed themselves without the effort and assistance of the ‘have nots’, and the actual strength of the so called ‘have nots’ in being able to produce and provide that which is the most crucial thing required for survival – “रोटी”.

And to be so expected, given that this jingle is written by Ali Sardar Jafri. From his earliest days of creativity even as a student at Aligarh Muslim University, where he came under the influence of such progressive poets as Josh Malihabadi, Jigar Moradabadi and Firaaq Gorakhouri. He was also seriously influenced by the Communist ideology, and was expelled on account of being arrested by the British Govt., for writing anti-war poetry and being the secretary of the students wing of the Congress party. He later completed his studies from Zakir Hussain College, Delhi, and Lucknow University. He was a very active member of the Progressive Writers Movement and the IPTA (Indian People’s Theatre Association).

His works as a lyricist in Hindi films include ‘Naya Tarana’ (1943), ‘Dharti Ke Lal’ (1946), ‘Zalzala’ (1952), ‘Pardesi’ (1957), ‘Shehar Aur Sapna’ (1963), ‘Aasmaan Mahal’ (1965), and ‘Naxalite’ (1980). Between 1948 and 1978 he published eight poetry collections, which include, ‘Nai Duniya Ko Salaam’ (‘Salute to the New World’) (1948), ‘Khoon Ki Lakeer’ (‘A Line Of Blood’), ‘Amn Ka Sitara’ (‘Star Of Peace’), ‘Asia Jaag Utha’ (‘Asia Awakes’) (1951), ‘Patthar Ki Deewar’ (‘Wall Of Stone’) (1953), ‘Ek Khwab Aur’ (‘One More Dream’), ‘Pairahan e Sharar’ (‘The Robe of Sparks’) (1965) and ‘Lahu Pukarta Hai’ (‘The Blood Calls’) (1965). These were followed by ‘Awadh Ki Khae e Haseen’ (‘Beautiful Land of Awadh’), ‘Subhe Farda’ (‘Tomorrow Morning’), ‘Mera Safar’ (‘My Journey’) and his last anthology entitled ‘Sarhad’.

This last collection of poetry was carried by the then Prime Minister of India, Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee, on his bus journey to Lahore in 1999. Atal ji had invited Jafri to accompany him on this trip but ill health prevented him from doing so. Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee made history when he presented ‘Sarhad’, as a national gift, to the then prime minister of Pakistan, Janaab Nawaz Sharif, during the historic Lahore Summit, in February 1999. It was a milestone in Jafri’s life.
[Note: ‘Sarhad’ has also been produced as an audio album dedicated to Indo-Pakistan amity. It is produced by Squadron Leader Anil Sehgal and is composed and sung by ‘Bulbul e Kashmir’ Seema Anil Sehgal.]

In the course of his literary career spanning five decades, Jafri has also edited poetry anthologies of Sant Kabir, Mir Taqi Mir, Mirza Ghalib and Meera Bai with his own introductions. He also produced a documentary film ‘Kabir, Iqbal and Freedom’. In the 1990s, he produced two television serials, both of which were runaway successes – the 18-part ‘Kahkashaan’, based on the lives and works of seven Urdu poets of the 20th century he had known personally viz. Faiz Ahmead Faiz, Firaaq Gorakhpuri, Josh Malihabadi, Majaaz, Hasrat Mohani, Makhdoom Mohiuddin and Jigar Moradabadi; and ‘Mehfil e Yaaraan’ in which he interviewed people from different walks of life. Both serials had tremendous mass appeal. He was also the editor and publisher of ‘Guftagu’, one of the leading Urdu literary magazines of the Indian sub-continent. His works have been translated into many Indian and foreign languages.

In 1998, Jafri became the third Urdu poet to receive the Jnanpith Award (for 1997), after Firaq Gorakhpuri (in 1969) and Qurratulain Hyder (in 1989). He was also the recipient of several other significant awards and honours, including Padma Shri (1967), Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowship (1971), the Gold Medal for Iqbal Studies (in 1978, from the Pakistan Government), the Uttar Pradesh Urdu Academy Award for poetry, the Makhdoom Award, the Faiz Ahmad Faiz Award, the Iqbal Samman Award from the Madhya Pradesh government and the Sant Dyaneshwar Award from the Maharashtra government. Aligarh Muslim University (AMU) conferred a doctorate (D.Litt.) on him in 1986, fifty years after he was expelled from the university.

He passed away on Aug 1, 2000, in Mumbai.

As I was listening to this song in preparation for this article, the wording and the theme contained within took my mind back to a short story written by Leo Tolstoy. This story was part of our prose text book in probably the seventh or eighth grade. The story, titled ‘Ivan, the Fool’, tells the tale of an uneducated, unlettered farmer named Ivan, whom the local populace always referred to as ‘the Fool’. But in his ignorance of formal education and lack of erudition, lies the rustic wisdom of the land, and the nature. He has a sister named Martha, who is a mute. And there is a rule in their house. Only those who have done hard labor are allowed to sit at the table at mealtimes. Martha actually physically examines the hands of new visitors and guests, and if she finds no calluses on the hands of any person, that person will not be allowed to sit at the table and will not be given food. The story gets interesting when the Devil himself comes to the village, and tries to test Ivan and to sway him with promises of riches etc. The ignoramus that Ivan is, plays by the simple rules of his life, and the Devil has to depart, because he gets no food to eat while in the village, as per the rule of Martha.

This story, dated 1886, is a very interesting read. It highlights the concept of dignity of labor, and work is worship – a very striking reflection of the principles of communism which are enunciated in the ‘The Communist Manifesto’, authored by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels in 1848. ‘The Manifesto’ has been acclaimed as the most influential political document in the 19th and 20th century time period, and it presents an analytical approach to the class struggle (historical and then-present) and the conflicts of capitalism and the capitalist mode of production. The industrial revolution was underway in Europe, and the exploitation of the masses as poor laborers by the rich industrialists, once again sparked into very sharp focus, the eternal divide between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots’.

Reading between the lines, this children’s song is quietly characterizing that very thought. Starting from ‘The Manifesto’, into the tale of ‘Ivan the Fool’, and then reaching into this jingle – the verses tell us of the ‘royalty’ that shirks any hard labor – “राजा जी पछताएंगे, काम से जान चुराएँगे” as a result of which, they will not get anything to eat – “सूखी मिट्टी फांकेंगे, कंकर पत्थर खाएँगे”. Then, when the royalty descends from their palaces, as expresses their apologies to the people, then they will get food – “नाक पकड़ कर गाएँगे, तब वो रोटी पाएंगे”. A utopia painted that actually carries a very important lesson for children, at least – to understand the value of hard work and to respect the hard work of others. Many, many hats off to Ali Sardar Jafri, to bring this message down to such simplicity, that it leaves you wonder struck and speechless.

I bring in some excerpts of the details about this film and its songs, from the article that I had written in Jun 2017, for the debut song of this film – “Chale Hawa Purvaai”.

“Shehar Aur Sapna”, the 1963 production by Abbas Sb, which focused on migrant population and housing problem in the city of Bombay, had won the National Award for the Best Film of the year. Apparently, at the function where the award was given, the then prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, requested Abbas Sb for a film for children. It seems that Abbas Sb took on that request almost immediately, because the film ‘Hamaara Ghar’ was released in the very next year i.e. 1964. This year was also when Nehru ji passed away (on 27th May). I have not been able to locate the information about the release date of this film, and whether Nehru ji was able to see this film, that was produced by Abbas Sb at his request.

The star cast of this film includes Sonal Mehta, Yasmeen, Rekha Rao, Tanya Siraaj, Pasha Azeem, Deepak Prasad, Sunil Kaushik, Noel Moses, Jai Prakash Narula, Maruti, Narayan Devanpalli, Levi Aaron, Ghanshyam Rohera, Nana Palsikar, Surekha, Dilip Raj, Anwar Abbas, Meena Abbas, and Yunus Parvez. As one reads this list, one can make out that the first many names are likely child artists, who are the lead performers in this film. Incidentally, the name Sunil Kaushik is of the second son of JP Kaushik, the music director for this film. Also, if I am not mistaken, the name Pasha Azeem is of Abbas Sb’s son.

This social drama is a film on national integration, at the level of children. I am able to locate a poster of this film online. The poster, all in tones of light blue, depicts a row of thirteen children, boys and girls, standing in ankle deep waves on a beach, and the name of the film is written in the sky background, in all languages of India. The caption at the bottom says – “A Film For Children Of All Ages”. Abbas Sb in his element of social responsibility, as always.

The film has six songs, five of them are penned by Ali Sardar Jafri. The sixth is the song “Saare Jahaan Se Achha. . .” written by the legendary Iqbal. Music is by Jag Phool Kaushik, the music director who started his film career with Abbas Sb for his 1963 film ‘Shehar Aur Sapna’. On the blog “Beete Huye Din” by Shishir Krishna Sharma, I am able to locate a detailed write up on this music director. An interesting trivia to note is that Anil Biswas was the resident music director for all films of Abbas Sb, before 1963. In fact, at the first instance, when JP Kaushik went to meet Abbas Sb with a reference, seeking work as a music director, he was told that Anil Biswas had already started to work on this particular film. Later, I assume that as Anil Da moved to New Delhi, likely during the production time of this film, the work for music direction was given to JP Kaushik. As I read in this blog, two songs for this film were already recorded by Anil Da, but later both of them were not used in the film. It would be interesting to track down the whereabouts of these songs, which I would like to designate as rarities, on account of circumstances.

The Geet Kosh lists only the name Vijaya Majumdar as the singer in this song accompanied by chorus. However, as we listen to this song, we are able to make out at least two more unidentified child voices – and another unidentified male voice. The music is so minimal. The only instruments one can make out are a dholak, a flute, and clapping of hands. With just using these devices, and a very interesting use of singing voices and chorus, a really delightful song has come into being.

A dedication to the forever child – onwards and upwards. And greetings to all the children on this musical bandwagon. 😉

[Author’s Note: Parts of this article, relating to Ali Sardar Jafri, are adapted from the material available in Wikipedia.]

 


Song – Raja ji Pachhtaayenge, Royenge Aur Gaayenge (Hamaara Ghar) (1964) Singer – Vijaya Majumdar, Unidentified Child Voice 1, Unidentified Child Voice 2, Unidentified Male Voice, Lyrics – Ali Sardar Jafri, MD – JP Kaushik
Chorus

Lyrics

raja ji pachhtaayenge
royenge aur gaayenge
sona chaandi niglenge
heere moti khaayenge
ho ooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
thengaa. . .
thengaa. . .

raja ji pachhtaayenge
kaam se jaan churaaenge
sookhi mitti phaankenge
kankar pathar khaayenge
ho ooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
thengaa. . .
thengaa. . .

raja ji pachhtaayenge
mahal se baahar aayenge
kaan pakal kal naachenge
naak pakad kar gaayenge
ho ooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
naak pakad kar gaayenge
tab wo roti paayenge
aji tab wo roti paayenge
aji tab wo roti paayenge
aji tab wo roti paayenge
balle balle balle balle balle
chhoo-na-eena
o ho
chhoo-na-eena
o ho
chhoo-na-eena
o ho
chhoo-na-eena
o ho
hoooommoooomm
hoooommoooomm
[more playful noises]

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
———————————————————

राजा जी पछताएंगे
रोएँगे और गाएँगे
सोना चाँदी निगलेंगे
हीरे मोती खाएँगे
हो ओss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
ठेंगा॰ ॰ ॰
ठेंगा॰ ॰ ॰

राजा जी पछताएंगे
काम से जान चुराएँगे
सूखी मिट्टी फांकेंगे
कंकर पत्थर खाएँगे
हो ओss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
ठेंगा॰ ॰ ॰
ठेंगा॰ ॰ ॰

राजा जी पछताएंगे
महल से बाहर आएंगे
कान पकल कल नाचेंगे
नाक पकड़ कर गाएँगे
हो ओss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
नाक पकड़ कर गाएँगे
तब वो रोटी पाएंगे
अजी तब वो रोटी पाएंगे
अजी तब वो रोटी पाएंगे
अजी तब वो रोटी पाएंगे
बल्ले बल्ले बल्ले बल्ले बल्ले
छूनईना
ओ हो
छूनईना
ओ हो
छूनईना
ओ हो
छूनईना
ओ हो
हूम्मूम्म
हूम्मूम्म
[खिलवाड़ का शोर]


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Missing Films of 1960s – 32
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

At the beginning of this month, June 1st, I had a personal reminder to myself – passing away anniversary of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas. I was wanting to do a brief remembrance post. Other “things” intervened and the day came and went. Then, it so happened that on the 15th June, there was a set of reminders and requests for the birth centenary celebrations of Sajjaad Husain. Not many “things” intervened that day, and I was able to locate a rare recording of a song from film ‘Dharam’ (1945), as yet unposted, and was able to post the remembrance article in good time. You may remember the title line of that song “Chali Pawan Purvaai, Chali Pawan”.
Read more on this topic…


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 15100 song posts by now.

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