Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Hamaara Ghar


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

5141 Post No. : 17103

75 years. A passage of history that belongs to us. And we belong to it. Most of us have our conscious memories completely inside of this phase. There are those who have seen the phase prior to this. And may God Almighty give them, and all of us, good health and long years, to share and to love.

History is a but continuous flow of time and events and experiences. It is impossible to record them all. Each individual is a universe all its own. And then groups of people, tracts of geographies, ideas and movements, nations and natural phenomena – in fact an endless list of entities and experiences that have a history all of their own. Some of it is recorded, some resides in memories and lives through word of mouth. How exact and accurate it is, is anybody’s guess.

And outside of the history, life continues – regardless. Every era, every passage, every unit of time, every phase – each has specialties of its on connected with it. And for that passage, for that unit of time, that experience is the prime most. In the minds of those who are living through it, nothing else comes close in terms of the intensity of the experience. It is that in-the-moment (or in-that-passage) experience that is paramount. Nothing else before it compares with it. Of course it does not, it cannot. We have not experienced that past, which disqualifies us from the comparative experience judgment.

1947 – 15th August. A nation that we call our motherland – India, or any other name – started a new passage, a new chapter. The change that defined the novelty, the distinctiveness, the difference from the before-to-the-after was the event of a political change. The entity that we consider as our nation, was under the control of a foreign agency before this event. And then, on the day of that change – 15th August in the year 1947, the control passed into the hands of the native people. History has recorded and uniquely identified almost a century, or more, prior to this distinctive event, as a period of struggle to gain back this very political control that had been usurped quite deceivingly by the said foreign agency.

In a land as huge as this nation, a fairly large segment of population was impacted by this change, and the manner in which this change was put into effect. And then, there was another segment of the population, equally fairly large, or maybe even larger, for whom, nothing really changed as a matter of day to day living. The course of events made some transformation in the matters of political control and governance. Outside of that, it was life as usual, for most of them who were a witness to and were a part of this change.

Famously addressed as a significant tryst in the course of destiny, the natives of this land took control, and that was that. The rest was, as they say, business-as-usual.

That is a perspective of the historians. A dispassionate noting of the record of events, as pertaining to this entity that we call India.

And then, there is another perspective – the more passionate, the more emotional experience that comes from being connected, with a sense of belonging, a sense of deep attachment which is felt by individuals. Individuals who were part of what the historians call the period of struggle, individuals who were passive supporters of the struggle, and also people whose desires were aligned with the objectives of the struggle.

And when that event came to pass, on the definitive date of 15th August, 1947, there was also a whooping celebration, an expression of euphoria, and a sense of victory – having achieved the desired target, as a result of the efforts of a very large number of people.

The emotions that are tied to this event have been expressed by many who were involved, in their own unique ways. One of the manners of expression was the articulation in words – that sense of belonging, that sense of pride and ownership, that sense of honor one would associate with a land that we call as our own.

And when we look back further into the history, this expression, this articulation of the sense of pride and belonging, goes all the way back to the roots of our culture. When we look through the Vedas, the essential origin of all our knowledge and idioms, we come across this timeless expression stated therein – “जननी जन्मभूमिश्च स्वर्गादपि गरीयसी” – that the land where we are born, the pride of the sense of belonging to that “भूमि” – land, is beyond any experience – real or imagined. The so mentioned “स्वर्ग”, or the heavens in this adage, is an experience that one only talks about. Heaven – an imagined state of existence that is purportedly perfect, that is blemish-less, devoid of any defects and problems, a state of incomparable bliss that cannot be experienced in our material existence.

And so the adage goes on to propound that our land of birth, that we lovingly refer to as our motherland, is even greater and more fulfilling than the conceptual heaven. This is a prime thought, which creates a strong sense of affinity to our land – because nothing is better than it – not even the so called heaven.  “Saare Jahaan Se Achcha Hindostan Hamaara”.

Many a mortal men of letters have touched this emotion, and have gained immense strength from it. And this strength, this power of character, this intense experiential phenomena, has inspired and aroused a sentimental excitement in the minds. And the words then flowed from their minds, from their lips, and onto the paper. And verses and songs have been created, applauding the sense of extreme goodness and integrity of the emotional bond with the roots that tie oneself to the land of birth, giving a sense of a powerful identity. And that identity is what defines the existence for every individual – a sense of belonging, a sense of rooted security, a sense of a safe haven, where one is free to be oneself.

One such great man of letters that graced this land, during the passage of that which we identify as the period of struggle, is Allama Iqbal, one of the most significant writer and poet of our times. He put down these verses in the honor of this land – the land we refer to as Hindustan – “Sare Jahan se Achcha, Hindostan Hamaara”. The adage from the Vedas that is mentioned above – “जननी जन्मभूमिश्च स्वर्गादपि गरीयसी”, the thought and the concept so effortlessly and lovingly flows into the burden of this song.

This set of verses formed the song that is formally known as ‘Tarānah-e-Hindi’ – the Anthem of the People of Hindustan. The poem was first published in the weekly journal ‘Ittehad’ on 16 August 1904. It was publicly recited for the first time by Iqbal the following year at Government College, Lahore. Iqbal was a lecturer at the College at that time. He was invited by a student Har Dayal Mathur (later to become famous as Lala Har Dayal, one of the foremost freedom fighters and a leader of the Gadar Party), to preside over a function. Instead of delivering a speech, Iqbal sang “Saare Jahan Se Achcha”. The song embodied yearning and attachment to the land of Hindustan, and invoked a cultural memory that took the hearts of the young listeners at the function. In 1905, the 27-year-old Iqbal viewed the future society of the subcontinent as both a pluralistic and composite Hindu-Muslim culture.

After that rendition, it quickly became the sacred song of opposition to the British Raj. The song, an ode to Hindustan—the land comprising present-day Bangladesh, India and Pakistan, was later published in 1924 in the Urdu book ‘Bang-i-Dara’. The song has remained popular, and continues to be sung and performed at events of national significance, and even otherwise, as a song of patriotism for children.

The complete song consists of nine verses. Following is the complete text of this song.
[Acknowledgement – The full text of the song is taken from rekhta.org web site.]

saare jahāñ se achchhā hindostāñ hamārā
ham bulbuleñ haiñ is kī ye gulsitāñ hamārā

ġhurbat meñ hoñ agar ham rahtā hai dil vatan meñ
samjho vahīñ hameñ bhī dil ho jahāñ hamārā

parbat vo sab se ūñchā ham-sāya āsmāñ kā
vo santarī hamārā vo pāsbāñ hamārā

godī meñ kheltī haiñ is kī hazāroñ nadiyāñ
gulshan hai jin ke dam se rashk-e-jināñ hamārā

ai āb-rūd-e-gañgā vo din hai yaad tujh ko
utrā tire kināre jab kārvāñ hamārā

maz.hab nahīñ sikhātā aapas meñ bair rakhnā
hindī haiñ ham vatan hai hindostāñ hamārā

yūnān o misr o ruumā sab miT ga.e jahāñ se
ab tak magar hai baaqī nām-o-nishāñ hamārā

kuchh baat hai ki hastī miTtī nahīñ hamārī
sadiyoñ rahā hai dushman daur-e-zamāñ hamārā

‘iqbāl’ koī mahram apnā nahīñ jahāñ meñ
mālūm kyā kisī ko dard-e-nihāñ hamārā

 

Translation

Better than the entire world, is our Hindustan,
We are its nightingales, and it is our garden abode

If we are in an alien place, the heart remains in the homeland,
Consider us too to be right there where our heart would be

That tallest mountain, that neighbor of the sky,
It is our sentinel, it is our protector

In its lap frolic a thousand rivers,
Whose vitality makes our garden the envy of Paradise

O the flowing waters of the Ganga, do you remember the day
When our caravan first arrived on your banks

Religion does not teach us to bear animosity among ourselves
We are of Hind, and our homeland is Hindustan

In a world from where ancient Greece, Egypt, and Rome have all vanished
Therein still flourishes our name and identity

There is something blessed about us that our identity is never erased
Though in every period this world has been an adversary for centuries

Iqbal! We have no confidant in this world
What does anyone know of our hidden pain?

This song has also appeared in many Indian films. Two occasions of this song are already showcased on our blog, namely “Saare Jahaan Se Achcha Hindustan Hamaara” from the film ‘Bhai Behan’ (1950) and “Saare Jahaan Se Achcha Hindustan Hamaara” from the film ‘Ye Gulistan Hamaara’ (1972). Incidentally, the title of the latter film is also taken from this song – it is the second half of the second line in the first verse – “ham bulbuleñ haiñ is kī ye gulsitāñ hamārā”.

Today’s presentation is from the film ‘Hamaara Ghar’ from 1964. This is a children’s film made by KA Abbas. The film is produced under the banner of Naya Sansar, Bombay. The film features 6 songs, 5 of which are written by Ali Sardar Jafri. The sixth song, which is this song, is by Iqbal. Jag Phool Kaushik is the music director. Geet Kosh lists the name of singer as Vijaya Chaudhry and chorus. However, there are more voices in the song that are not identified.

This version of the song includes three verses from the original song.

75 years and counting. Maybe some of us will be here to witness the 100th year in 2047. Let that be a community resolution, that we shall celebrate together, the century of India’s independence.

As they say in our culture, word is eternal. And so this song will still be sung when we reach the century milestone. And that proclamation is contained within the verses of this song itself.

kuchh baat hai ki hastī miTtī nahīñ hamārī
sadiyoñ rahā hai dushman daur-e-zamāñ hamārā

 

Song – Saare Jahaan Se Achchha Hindostan Hamaara  (Hamara Ghar) (1964) Singer – Vijaya Majumdar, Lyrics – Allama Iqbal, MD – JP Kaushik
Unidentified Child Voice
Unidentified Male Voice
Male Chorus
Female Chorus
All Chorus

Lyrics

saare jahaan se achchha
hindostan hamaara
hindostan hamaara
saare jahaan se achchha
hindostan hamaara
hindostan hamaara
o o o
hum bubulen hain iski
ye gulsitan hamaara
ye gulshitan hamaala
saare jahaan se achchha
(aaa aaa aaaa)

hindostan hamaara
(aaa aaa aaaa)

laa
lallall lallall laa
laa
lallall lallall laa
laa
lallall lallall lallall lallall lallall laa

ghurbat mein hon agar hum
rehta hai dil watan mein
ghurbat mein hon agar hum
rehta hai dil watan mein
rehta hai dil watan mein
samjho wahin hamen bhi
samjho wahin hamen bhi
dil ho jahaan hamaara
hamaara
dil ho jahaan hamaara
saare jahaan se achchha
(aaa aaa aaaa)
hindostan hamaara
(aaa aaa aaaa)

lallal laa
ho ho ho

o o o
aaa aaa o

parbat wo sabse ooncha
aaa aaa haaa aaaa
parbat wo sabse ooncha
humsaaya aasmaan ka
humchhaaya aashmaan ka
wo santri hamaara
wo santri hamaara
wo paasbaan hamaara
hamaara
wo paasbaan hamaara
saare jahaan se achchha
(aaa aaa aaaa)
hindostan hamaara
(aaa aaa aaaa)

laa
lallall lallall laa
laa
lallall lallall laa
laa
lallall lallall lallall lallall lallall laa

mazhab nahin sikhaata
aapas mein bair rakhna
mazhab nahin sikhaata
aapas mein bair rakhna
aapas mein bair rakhna
hindi hain hum
hindi hain hum
hindi hain hum watan hai
hindostan hamaara
hamaala
hindostan hamaala
saare jahaan se achchha
(aaa aaa aaaa)
hindostan hamaara
(aaa aaa aaaa)

————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
————————————————

सारे जहां से अच्छा
हिन्दोस्तां हमारा
हिन्दोस्तां हमारा
सारे जहां से अच्छा
हिन्दोस्तां हमारा
हिन्दोस्तां हमारा
ओ ओ ओ
हम बुलबुलें हैं इसकी
ये गुलसितां हमारा
ये गुलशितां हमाला
सारे जहां से अच्छा
हिन्दोस्तां हमारा

ला
लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल ला
ला
लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल ला
ला
लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल ला

ग़ुर्बत में हों अगर हम
रहता है दिल वतन में
ग़ुर्बत में हों अगर हम
रहता है दिल वतन में
रहता है दिल वतन में
समझो वहीं हमें भी
समझो वहीं हमें भी
दिल हो जहाँ हमारा
हमारा
दिल हो जहाँ हमारा
सारे जहां से अच्छा
(आ आ आ)
हिन्दोस्तां हमारा
(आ आ आ)

लल्लल्ल ला
हो हो हो
ओ ओ ओ
आ आ ओ

परबत वो सबसे ऊंचा
आ आ हा आ
परबत वो सबसे ऊंचा
हमसाया आसमां का
हमछाया आशमां का
वो संतरी हमारा
वो संतरी हमारा
वो पासबां हमारा
हमारा
वो पासबां हमारा
सारे जहां से अच्छा
(आ आ आ)
हिन्दोस्तां हमारा
(आ आ आ)

ला
लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल ला
ला
लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल ला
ला
लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल लल्लल्ल ला

मज़हब नहीं सिखाता
आपस में बैर रखना
मज़हब नहीं सिखाता
आपस में बैर रखना
आपस में बैर रखना
हिन्दी हैं हम
हिन्दी हैं हम
हिन्दी हैं हम वतन है
हिन्दोस्तां हमारा
हमाला
हिन्दोस्तां हमाला
सारे जहां से अच्छा
(आ आ आ)
हिन्दोस्तां हमारा
(आ आ आ)


This article is written by nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4724 Post No. : 16436

———————————–————–
Geeta Dutt – Solos and Duets (06)
———————————–————–

Question:
Kitaaben bahot si
padhi hongi tum ne
magar koyi chehra bhi
tum na padha hai

Answer:
Padha hai meri jaan
Nazar se padha hai

Next Question:
Bata mere chehre pe
Kya kya likha hai

The above is a film song from the film ‘Baazigar” written by Zafar Gorakhpuri. There have been some songs in hindi films which refer to ‘Kitaab’, like
Dil ki kitaab kori hai kori hi rehne do and Haathhon mein kitaab baalon mein gulaab.

The second song above is my own post from 2015. As I read it again today, I found that I referred to the ‘Baazigar’ song in that post as written by Sameer, but that’s incorrect. Another reason why I am talking about books today is, in a recent post I talked about film magazines. That evoked a few comments from regulars, which in turn made me remember a lot of mishaps or near misses, which have happened in my life.

My love for reading has always been an important factor in my life. Not necessarily, useful things or text book learnings, but anything on any topic that catches my fancy and is readable and reasonably understandable to my unscientific mind. Scientific theories are beyond me, and maths was my weakest subject in school. But I was not at all lacking in analytical abilities and general knowledge, which seems to have gotten me through at least one all india level competitive exam, where lakhs of people aspiring for government jobs tried. It could have been sheer luck that I got most of ‘analytical ability’ part objective type answers correct. It certainly cannot have been the mathematical portion of the exams. One portion was of English language, that must have helped. I kept the ‘Maths’ part for the last, and some of the answers I just marked randomly :-). The exam was for undergraduates, but my father still could not believe it, when he saw the merit list.

Reading, reading and more reading, has made me a more balanced person, where I don’t get easily rattled. Never bored under any circumstances. Magazine is ‘risaala’ in urdu language. I have grown up with all kinds of publications, periodicals, weekly, fortnightly, monthly, and of course the daily newspapers. Digests also, in Urdu and ‘Reader’s digest’ in English. I have read many novels in Urdu too, which are difficult to come by now. I know, digital version is available, if I really want to read them now. All my maternal uncles and paternal uncle, would carry some newspaper or magazine with them whenever they came to our place. Now I go to their places, there is no sign of magazine or newspapers in their household. We can blame this on digital media, which has put paid to the printed material’s role, in our daily lives. It comes DTH, appears cheaper, requires no hard-work or maintenance even. Don’t have to save it from small children. That the children should be kept away from things digital, is another matter.

Thus, I was exposed to different type of publications in English, Urdu, Hindi and Marathi, while growing up. I consider myself fortunate to have seen “Blitz” in English and in Urdu, for e.g. All periodicals published in the south also I have read while growing up, be they political, sports or financial. Maybe in 1993 people still referred to books as ‘kitaab’, but now the word is rarely heard, unless I am watching an urdu drama series. There also only the older generation is heard talking of ‘kitaab’. In school textbooks were ‘kitaab’ and notebooks were ‘copy’ or kaapi.

Living and growing up in a metropolitan city has its own advantages. Major ones in my opinion are, the cosmopolitan outlook that one develops in personal and social aspects, plus the opportunities for growth and success in life professionally, are better. A thriving city is like a big machinery, it cannot afford to let any part of it be disrupted. Be it the lowest of slums or the poshest of locality. And overall people are not bothered what others are doing, which augers well in some ways. In terms of personal freedom and mental well-being.

So here I was, growing up in Mumbai, in which good fortune I had no contribution to make. It was destiny. A couple of things, like missed opportunities that have surfaced in the memory, is a job opportunity in a financial magazine. I got a call for some sort of test they were taking, I must have applied for the ‘trainee’ job, right after graduation. I attempted that test, without knowing what to expect there. I may not have fared well there, as I never got a call or any communication.

Another instance of a missed opportunity is one where I attended a walk-in interview somewhere in the Fort area for some trainee post at TCS in 1990-91. Computers were the new in-thing in the late 80’s and in college we had ‘computer science’ as optional subject. TCS was on its way up to the greater things it achieved in later years. There was group discussion also among the candidates who had turned up that day. I remember there were around 15-20 of us. At the end of it all some were shortlisted, then were told to take up the course, which was costing may be 10000/- or so, I don’t exactly remember. They said that the candidates will be absorbed in the company after that course, but the fees had to be paid. I came home and discussed all this with my parents. I was not so keen on computer programming, as it is, so didn’t press the issue. Theory subject were my forte, and I used to do well in subjects like economics. Late 80’s and early 90’s was also a period of great boom in share markets investments. It turned out that my father has shares of TCS, which he obviously got at the time of issue years ago. Lo and behold, if he knew or had an inkling of the company’s prospects and potential, then he could have guided me in that direction. But that was not to be, as it was not destined to be. After all God Almighty is the best of planners, and it is his will and his alone, that can take us in a particular direction.

Nida Fazli has said accurately:
“waqt se pehle qismat se zyada, kisi ko mila hai na kisi ko milegaa”

************************

Lakdi jal koyla bhayee
koyla bhayee raakh
Main baawri aisi jali
koyla bhayee na raakh

This is the actual doha, from which the initial lines of the song are inspired. Lyricist is Anjum and the composer of this truet song is Chitragupt. The singers are Geeta Dutt, Shamshad Begum, and Shanti Sharma. Shanti Sharma is a new name for me, but I see in the stats page that she has 2 songs in the blog.

This is a nice qawwali style song, I had saved the link for featuring in this series of Geeta Dutt. One more variation, in the singer’s repertoire for sure. She has been part of many qawwali’s in the career, as she was capable of singing all types and moods of film songs. She was comfortable in the mischievous songs also, with her strong vocals, with a hint of khanak, like Shamshad Begum. Asha Bhosle has in later years, tried to adopt the strength in voice which was a signature of Shamshad Begum and which Geeta Dutt has demonstrated in many songs.


Song-Dekho to dil hi dil mein jalte hain jalne waale (Hamaara Ghar)(1950) Singers- Geeta Roy, Shamshad Begum , Shanti Sharma, Lyrics-Anjum, MD-Chitragupta
All

Lyrics

Lakdi jal koylaa bhayee
Aur koyla jal bhayaa raakh
baaki dushman yoon jale ae ae
ki koyla bhaye na raakh

dekho to dil hi dil mein ean
dekho to dil hi dil mein
jalte hain jalne waale
haay jalte hain jalne waale
dekho to dil hi dil mein
jalte hain jalne waale
haay jalte hain jalne waale

aapas mein mil jul kar hansnaa
khel naseebe waalon ka
haay khel naseebe waalon kaa

aapas mein mil jul kar hansnaa
khel naseebe waalon ka
haay khel naseebe waalon kaa

ho oo oooo
kaam nahin duniya mein kisi ko
dekh ke jalne waalon ka
haan dekh ke jalne waalon ka
aaa aa aa aa
khoob samjhte hain matlab
in ulti seedhi chaalon kaa

hai dhokhe ki ye duniyaa aa
hai dhokhe ki ye duniyaa
kehte hain kehne waale
haay kehte hain kehne waale
dekho to dil hi dil mein
jalte hain jalne waale
haay jalte hain jalne waale

dekh ke ham ko jalte ho
kya seekhe chaal zamaane ki
haay seekhe chaal zamaane ki

dekh ke ham ko jalte ho
kya seekhe chaal zamaane ki
haay seekhe chaal zamaane ki

ho oo o o o
aankhen ho to haalat dekho
deepak ki parwaane ki
haay deepak ki parwaane ki

ooo oooooo
ye baat magar kapti dil ke
nahin samajh mein aane ki

qismat mein jab likkha hai
qismat mein jab likkha hai
rote hain rone waale
haay rote hain rone waale
dekho to dil hi dil mein
jalte hain jalne waale
haay jalte hain jalne waale


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4358 Post No. : 15681

“Hamaara Ghar”(1950) was directed by Nanabhai Bhatt for Hindustan Chitra, Bombay. The movie had Durga Khote, Umakant Desai, Veera, Agha, Meena Kumari, Geeta Bose, David, Jankidas, Ramesh Gupta etc in it.

The movie had seven songs in it. Four songs from the movie have been discussed in the blog in the past.

Here is the fifth song from “Hamaara Ghar”(1950) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Rafi and Shamshad Begam. Bharat Vyas is the lyricist. Music is composed by Chitragupta.

Only the audio of this song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.


Song-Chori chori mat dekh balam (Hamaara Ghar)(1950) Song-Shamshad Begam, Rafi, Singer-Bharat Vyas, MD-Chitragupta

Lyrics

chori chori mat dekh
chori chori mat dekh balam
bholi dulhan sharmaayegi
dulhan ko najar lag jaayegi
to khadi khadi mar jaayegi
haaye chori chori mat dekh

ghoonghat ke pat tu khol
ghoonghat ke pat tu khol
zara saaja ki najar bhar jayegi
nazron se najar mil jayegi
to gori amar ho jaayegi

haaye chori chori mat dekh

kajre ki ret teri hamko laage pyaari
ho o pyaari
kajre ki ret teri hamko laage pyaari
ho o pyaari
mad bhari raseeli ankhiyaan jaise kataari
ho mad bhari raseeli ankhiyaan jaise kataari
haaye ankhiyaan jaise katari
chham chham chham chham teri paayaliya
jab run jhun run jhun gaayegi
hum jhoom jhoom dekhenge
jab teri patli kamar bal khaayegi

haaye chori chori mat dekh
chori chori mat dekh balam
bholi dulhan sharmaayegi
nazron se najar mil jaayegi
to gori amar ho jaayegi

haaye chori chori mat dekh

more dil ki suno more sainya
padu mai tore paiya
ha ha painya
more dil ki suno more sainya
padu mai tore paiya
haan haan paiya
mora dhak dhak dhadke jiya
chhodo mori bainya
mora dhak dhak dhadke jiya
chhodo mori bainya
haaye chhodo mori bainya
taaron ki chunariya odh dulhaniya
jab saj dhaj kar aayegi
ghoonghat ki oat daale kal
wo khud hi tujhe bulaayegi
haaye chori chori mat dekh
chori chori mat dekh balam
bholi dulhan sharmaayegi
ho najron se najar mil jaayegi
to gori amar ho jaayegi

haaye chori chori mat dekh


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4342 Post No. : 15645

“Hamaara Ghar”(1950) was directed by Nanabhai Bhatt for Hindustan Chitra, Bombay. The movie had Durga Khote, Umakant Desai, Veera, Agha, Meena Kumari, Geeta Bose, David, Jankidas, Ramesh Gupta etc in it.

The movie had seven songs in it. Three songs from the movie have been discussed in the blog in the past.

Here is the fourth song from “Hamaara Ghar”(1950) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Rafi and Shamshad Begam. Bharat Vyas is the lyricist. Music is composed by Chitragupta.

Only the audio of this song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.


Song-Teri tirchhi nazar teri patli kamar (Hamaara Ghar)(1950) Singers-Rafi, Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas, MD-Chitragupta
Both

Lyrics

o teri tirchhi nazar
teri patli kamar
lahraa ke bal khaake ham pe jaaadu kar gayi
haan aankhon ka kasoor chhuri dil pe chal gayi
ho meri tirchhi nazar meri patli kamar
main kya jaanoon haaye kaise dil pe jaadu kar gayi
dekha jo tumko saamne duniya badal gayi

ho o o
teri nagariya mein beech dagariya mein
nanha sa dil mera kho gaya
teri nagariya mein beech dagariya mein
nanha sa dil mera kho gaya

ho o o
teri atariya mein beech bajariya mein
tu meri main tera ho gaya
oye nanha sa dil mera kho gaya
hoye teri chhoti si umar tera nanha sa jigar
tere maathe ki bindiya ghazab kar gayi
haan aankhon ka kasoor chhuri dil pe chal gayi
ho meri chhoti si umar mera nanha sa jigar
main kya jaanoon kaise bindiya ghazab kar gayi
dekha jo tumko saamne duniya badal gayi

haan aankhon ka kasoor chhuri dil pe chal gayi

ho o o o
baaten banaao nahin aankhen milaao nahin
dekht log lugaai hain
baaten banaao nahin aankhen milaao nahin
dekhat log lugaai hain

ho o o
hamse lajaao nahin aankhen churaao nahin
tumko raam duhaai hai
ho o dekht log lugaai hai
ghoonghat waale o hazur kaahe itna guroor
gore gaalon ki laali julam kar gayi
haan aankhon ka kasoor chhuri dil pe chal gayi
ho meri tirchhi najar meri patli kamar
main kya jaanoon haaye kaise dil pe jaadu kar gayi

dekha jo tumko saamne duniya badal gayi
dekha jo tumko saamne duniya badal gayi


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3771 Post No. : 14747

Aah haa haa, what fun – “हम भी अगर बच्चे होते॰ ॰ ॰” and all the rest of the exuberant pandemonium that is involved in being a child – does it not give you a high of the mischievous anarchy that we have always enjoyed; sometimes secretly and most of the time overtly – “ना नौकरी की चिंता, ना रोटी की फिकर”.

To the child in all of us, who never grows up. I am sure you all know such ’children’. And I am also sure we all are very well acquainted with the person we see every day in the mirror, no matter whether there is hair on the pate to comb or no. 🙂  I dearly remember one of the managers I have worked with in the US, completely bald but very energetic – he always introduced himself as – “. . . a five year old imprisoned in a sixty five year old body”. And then, of course, we have our dear Bakshish Singh ji, who proudly claims his age to be 22-and-a-half years, three months and a few days, whenever you may ask him. And he has a stay order from the Supreme Court to back his claim. Too sad that I met him ten years after he got his orders; my stay order (from the same Supreme Court) stands at 32. 😀 😀

Music, especially the evergreen HFM, surely does wonders – does is not?

Celebrating the Children’s Day today, 14th November, and greetings to all the ‘child’ readers and friends on this blog 🙂

Thinking about it puts a little dismay in my mind, that we have special days set aside to remind ourselves about things and facts and experiences, which actually are a matter of, rather a part and parcel of our everyday life. We have Mother’s Day, and Father’s Day, and then we have Children’s Day. For the matter of celebration and to highlight this connection, it is okay that we have one day earmarked. But then we should also be aware of, and be celebrating these concepts everyday in our lives.

It is also the birth anniversary of the first Prime Minister of our country, after India became a free nation. Jawaharlal Nehru’s name got associated with this day, or rather the other way round – that his birthday was declared as the Children’s Day – for the recognition of his endearment to children, and his own professed acknowledgement that we need to celebrate the future leaders of this nation. Not to put any other twist on this thread, 🙂 I move on to the song being introduced with this post.

When you hear it, I am very sure the avid listeners of the radio will immediately recall this song. It used to be played often, especially on today’s day, and was a favorite. For a few months now, some of the regular visitor’s to my YT channel have been requesting for this song to be uploaded. This started after I uploaded another song from this film – ‘Hamaara Ghar’ from 1964 – “Chale Hawa Purvaai”. When I uploaded this song on 18th Jun last year, I got many requests to upload the song we are discussing today. Somehow, I just held on to those requests, wanting to bring this song online on this day. I missed the event of last year, and so the regular procrastination 😦  made me put it off for one full year.

The jingle that this song is, brings to mind many such jingles from the earlier days, when we had many group games which had songs attached to them. Here in north India, there are many such jingles part of the common folklore, such as “Kokila Chhupake Jumme Raat Aayi Hai. . .” (“कोकिला छुपाके जुम्मे रात आई है॰ ॰ ॰”), and “Aat Qila Bhai Baat Qila. . .” (“आटकिला भई बाटकिला, भई आमों वाली कोठरी॰ ॰ ॰”), and “Poshampa Bhai Poshampa, Daakuon Ne Kya Kiya. . .” (“पोशम्पा भई पोशम्पा, डाकुओं ने क्या किया॰ ॰ ॰”) etc. And ah yes, a very familiar one which we borrowed from the Britishers – “Ring a Ring o’ Roses, Pocket Full of Posies. . .”. Maybe some readers (five year olds struggling inside much older bodies) will recall these songs. And I am sure there are similar such game jingles popular in all regions in our vast sub continent. We used to sing these songs as we played the corresponding games – a group of 10 to 20 kids, all intent on having just fun. Sadly, the newer generation of youngsters hardly gets together to play such games, or make up such newer jingles. It surely is a lot of fun. 🙂

This particular jingle, apparently played as a child game, tells about one huffy-puffy arrogant royalty, who probably is not friendly with the people, and the people then teach him a lesson by putting a restriction on his food supply. And so the singers of this song tease this royalty and show him their thumbs (“ठेंगा॰ ॰ ॰”) while singing that now you go and eat your gold and diamonds, and that you are going to regret this arrogance; you will not be served bread (“रोटी”). In the second stanza, now the people are teasing that the royalty does not want to do any work, and so they will have to survive on dust and stones; they shall still not be served any bread. Then, in the third stanza, the people are singing that at last the royalty has come out of their palace, and are being remorseful and apologetic; so they are made to dance while holding their ears, and sing while holding their nose. And only then, having danced and sung as such, will they be given “रोटी” to eat.

Although presented as this delightful children’s song, this jingle surely is a stark comment on the social divide that exists in the society, telling about the arrogance of the so called ‘haves’, who in reality are not in a position to even feed themselves without the effort and assistance of the ‘have nots’, and the actual strength of the so called ‘have nots’ in being able to produce and provide that which is the most crucial thing required for survival – “रोटी”.

And to be so expected, given that this jingle is written by Ali Sardar Jafri. From his earliest days of creativity even as a student at Aligarh Muslim University, where he came under the influence of such progressive poets as Josh Malihabadi, Jigar Moradabadi and Firaaq Gorakhouri. He was also seriously influenced by the Communist ideology, and was expelled on account of being arrested by the British Govt., for writing anti-war poetry and being the secretary of the students wing of the Congress party. He later completed his studies from Zakir Hussain College, Delhi, and Lucknow University. He was a very active member of the Progressive Writers Movement and the IPTA (Indian People’s Theatre Association).

His works as a lyricist in Hindi films include ‘Naya Tarana’ (1943), ‘Dharti Ke Lal’ (1946), ‘Zalzala’ (1952), ‘Pardesi’ (1957), ‘Shehar Aur Sapna’ (1963), ‘Aasmaan Mahal’ (1965), and ‘Naxalite’ (1980). Between 1948 and 1978 he published eight poetry collections, which include, ‘Nai Duniya Ko Salaam’ (‘Salute to the New World’) (1948), ‘Khoon Ki Lakeer’ (‘A Line Of Blood’), ‘Amn Ka Sitara’ (‘Star Of Peace’), ‘Asia Jaag Utha’ (‘Asia Awakes’) (1951), ‘Patthar Ki Deewar’ (‘Wall Of Stone’) (1953), ‘Ek Khwab Aur’ (‘One More Dream’), ‘Pairahan e Sharar’ (‘The Robe of Sparks’) (1965) and ‘Lahu Pukarta Hai’ (‘The Blood Calls’) (1965). These were followed by ‘Awadh Ki Khae e Haseen’ (‘Beautiful Land of Awadh’), ‘Subhe Farda’ (‘Tomorrow Morning’), ‘Mera Safar’ (‘My Journey’) and his last anthology entitled ‘Sarhad’.

This last collection of poetry was carried by the then Prime Minister of India, Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee, on his bus journey to Lahore in 1999. Atal ji had invited Jafri to accompany him on this trip but ill health prevented him from doing so. Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee made history when he presented ‘Sarhad’, as a national gift, to the then prime minister of Pakistan, Janaab Nawaz Sharif, during the historic Lahore Summit, in February 1999. It was a milestone in Jafri’s life.
[Note: ‘Sarhad’ has also been produced as an audio album dedicated to Indo-Pakistan amity. It is produced by Squadron Leader Anil Sehgal and is composed and sung by ‘Bulbul e Kashmir’ Seema Anil Sehgal.]

In the course of his literary career spanning five decades, Jafri has also edited poetry anthologies of Sant Kabir, Mir Taqi Mir, Mirza Ghalib and Meera Bai with his own introductions. He also produced a documentary film ‘Kabir, Iqbal and Freedom’. In the 1990s, he produced two television serials, both of which were runaway successes – the 18-part ‘Kahkashaan’, based on the lives and works of seven Urdu poets of the 20th century he had known personally viz. Faiz Ahmead Faiz, Firaaq Gorakhpuri, Josh Malihabadi, Majaaz, Hasrat Mohani, Makhdoom Mohiuddin and Jigar Moradabadi; and ‘Mehfil e Yaaraan’ in which he interviewed people from different walks of life. Both serials had tremendous mass appeal. He was also the editor and publisher of ‘Guftagu’, one of the leading Urdu literary magazines of the Indian sub-continent. His works have been translated into many Indian and foreign languages.

In 1998, Jafri became the third Urdu poet to receive the Jnanpith Award (for 1997), after Firaq Gorakhpuri (in 1969) and Qurratulain Hyder (in 1989). He was also the recipient of several other significant awards and honours, including Padma Shri (1967), Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowship (1971), the Gold Medal for Iqbal Studies (in 1978, from the Pakistan Government), the Uttar Pradesh Urdu Academy Award for poetry, the Makhdoom Award, the Faiz Ahmad Faiz Award, the Iqbal Samman Award from the Madhya Pradesh government and the Sant Dyaneshwar Award from the Maharashtra government. Aligarh Muslim University (AMU) conferred a doctorate (D.Litt.) on him in 1986, fifty years after he was expelled from the university.

He passed away on Aug 1, 2000, in Mumbai.

As I was listening to this song in preparation for this article, the wording and the theme contained within took my mind back to a short story written by Leo Tolstoy. This story was part of our prose text book in probably the seventh or eighth grade. The story, titled ‘Ivan, the Fool’, tells the tale of an uneducated, unlettered farmer named Ivan, whom the local populace always referred to as ‘the Fool’. But in his ignorance of formal education and lack of erudition, lies the rustic wisdom of the land, and the nature. He has a sister named Martha, who is a mute. And there is a rule in their house. Only those who have done hard labor are allowed to sit at the table at mealtimes. Martha actually physically examines the hands of new visitors and guests, and if she finds no calluses on the hands of any person, that person will not be allowed to sit at the table and will not be given food. The story gets interesting when the Devil himself comes to the village, and tries to test Ivan and to sway him with promises of riches etc. The ignoramus that Ivan is, plays by the simple rules of his life, and the Devil has to depart, because he gets no food to eat while in the village, as per the rule of Martha.

This story, dated 1886, is a very interesting read. It highlights the concept of dignity of labor, and work is worship – a very striking reflection of the principles of communism which are enunciated in the ‘The Communist Manifesto’, authored by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels in 1848. ‘The Manifesto’ has been acclaimed as the most influential political document in the 19th and 20th century time period, and it presents an analytical approach to the class struggle (historical and then-present) and the conflicts of capitalism and the capitalist mode of production. The industrial revolution was underway in Europe, and the exploitation of the masses as poor laborers by the rich industrialists, once again sparked into very sharp focus, the eternal divide between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots’.

Reading between the lines, this children’s song is quietly characterizing that very thought. Starting from ‘The Manifesto’, into the tale of ‘Ivan the Fool’, and then reaching into this jingle – the verses tell us of the ‘royalty’ that shirks any hard labor – “राजा जी पछताएंगे, काम से जान चुराएँगे” as a result of which, they will not get anything to eat – “सूखी मिट्टी फांकेंगे, कंकर पत्थर खाएँगे”. Then, when the royalty descends from their palaces, as expresses their apologies to the people, then they will get food – “नाक पकड़ कर गाएँगे, तब वो रोटी पाएंगे”. A utopia painted that actually carries a very important lesson for children, at least – to understand the value of hard work and to respect the hard work of others. Many, many hats off to Ali Sardar Jafri, to bring this message down to such simplicity, that it leaves you wonder struck and speechless.

I bring in some excerpts of the details about this film and its songs, from the article that I had written in Jun 2017, for the debut song of this film – “Chale Hawa Purvaai”.

“Shehar Aur Sapna”, the 1963 production by Abbas Sb, which focused on migrant population and housing problem in the city of Bombay, had won the National Award for the Best Film of the year. Apparently, at the function where the award was given, the then prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, requested Abbas Sb for a film for children. It seems that Abbas Sb took on that request almost immediately, because the film ‘Hamaara Ghar’ was released in the very next year i.e. 1964. This year was also when Nehru ji passed away (on 27th May). I have not been able to locate the information about the release date of this film, and whether Nehru ji was able to see this film, that was produced by Abbas Sb at his request.

The star cast of this film includes Sonal Mehta, Yasmeen, Rekha Rao, Tanya Siraaj, Pasha Azeem, Deepak Prasad, Sunil Kaushik, Noel Moses, Jai Prakash Narula, Maruti, Narayan Devanpalli, Levi Aaron, Ghanshyam Rohera, Nana Palsikar, Surekha, Dilip Raj, Anwar Abbas, Meena Abbas, and Yunus Parvez. As one reads this list, one can make out that the first many names are likely child artists, who are the lead performers in this film. Incidentally, the name Sunil Kaushik is of the second son of JP Kaushik, the music director for this film. Also, if I am not mistaken, the name Pasha Azeem is of Abbas Sb’s son.

This social drama is a film on national integration, at the level of children. I am able to locate a poster of this film online. The poster, all in tones of light blue, depicts a row of thirteen children, boys and girls, standing in ankle deep waves on a beach, and the name of the film is written in the sky background, in all languages of India. The caption at the bottom says – “A Film For Children Of All Ages”. Abbas Sb in his element of social responsibility, as always.

The film has six songs, five of them are penned by Ali Sardar Jafri. The sixth is the song “Saare Jahaan Se Achha. . .” written by the legendary Iqbal. Music is by Jag Phool Kaushik, the music director who started his film career with Abbas Sb for his 1963 film ‘Shehar Aur Sapna’. On the blog “Beete Huye Din” by Shishir Krishna Sharma, I am able to locate a detailed write up on this music director. An interesting trivia to note is that Anil Biswas was the resident music director for all films of Abbas Sb, before 1963. In fact, at the first instance, when JP Kaushik went to meet Abbas Sb with a reference, seeking work as a music director, he was told that Anil Biswas had already started to work on this particular film. Later, I assume that as Anil Da moved to New Delhi, likely during the production time of this film, the work for music direction was given to JP Kaushik. As I read in this blog, two songs for this film were already recorded by Anil Da, but later both of them were not used in the film. It would be interesting to track down the whereabouts of these songs, which I would like to designate as rarities, on account of circumstances.

The Geet Kosh lists only the name Vijaya Majumdar as the singer in this song accompanied by chorus. However, as we listen to this song, we are able to make out at least two more unidentified child voices – and another unidentified male voice. The music is so minimal. The only instruments one can make out are a dholak, a flute, and clapping of hands. With just using these devices, and a very interesting use of singing voices and chorus, a really delightful song has come into being.

A dedication to the forever child – onwards and upwards. And greetings to all the children on this musical bandwagon. 😉

[Author’s Note: Parts of this article, relating to Ali Sardar Jafri, are adapted from the material available in Wikipedia.]

 


Song – Raja ji Pachhtaayenge, Royenge Aur Gaayenge (Hamaara Ghar) (1964) Singer – Vijaya Majumdar, Unidentified Child Voice 1, Unidentified Child Voice 2, Unidentified Male Voice, Lyrics – Ali Sardar Jafri, MD – JP Kaushik
Chorus

Lyrics

raja ji pachhtaayenge
royenge aur gaayenge
sona chaandi niglenge
heere moti khaayenge
ho ooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
thengaa. . .
thengaa. . .

raja ji pachhtaayenge
kaam se jaan churaaenge
sookhi mitti phaankenge
kankar pathar khaayenge
ho ooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
ae ji roti kabhi na paayenge
thengaa. . .
thengaa. . .

raja ji pachhtaayenge
mahal se baahar aayenge
kaan pakal kal naachenge
naak pakad kar gaayenge
ho ooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
oooo ooooo
naak pakad kar gaayenge
tab wo roti paayenge
aji tab wo roti paayenge
aji tab wo roti paayenge
aji tab wo roti paayenge
balle balle balle balle balle
chhoo-na-eena
o ho
chhoo-na-eena
o ho
chhoo-na-eena
o ho
chhoo-na-eena
o ho
hoooommoooomm
hoooommoooomm
[more playful noises]

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
———————————————————

राजा जी पछताएंगे
रोएँगे और गाएँगे
सोना चाँदी निगलेंगे
हीरे मोती खाएँगे
हो ओss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
ठेंगा॰ ॰ ॰
ठेंगा॰ ॰ ॰

राजा जी पछताएंगे
काम से जान चुराएँगे
सूखी मिट्टी फांकेंगे
कंकर पत्थर खाएँगे
हो ओss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
एजी रोटी कभी ना पाएंगे
ठेंगा॰ ॰ ॰
ठेंगा॰ ॰ ॰

राजा जी पछताएंगे
महल से बाहर आएंगे
कान पकल कल नाचेंगे
नाक पकड़ कर गाएँगे
हो ओss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
ओsss ओssss
नाक पकड़ कर गाएँगे
तब वो रोटी पाएंगे
अजी तब वो रोटी पाएंगे
अजी तब वो रोटी पाएंगे
अजी तब वो रोटी पाएंगे
बल्ले बल्ले बल्ले बल्ले बल्ले
छूनईना
ओ हो
छूनईना
ओ हो
छूनईना
ओ हो
छूनईना
ओ हो
हूम्मूम्म
हूम्मूम्म
[खिलवाड़ का शोर]


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3608 Post No. : 14391

Mohammed Rafi – Duets – ‘अ’  से  ‘ह’ तक  (From ‘अ’ to ‘ह’) – 12
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –


‘च’ – चाँदनी छिटकी हुई है मुस्कुराती रात है ॰ ॰ ॰

तुम तो दिल के तार छेड़ कर ॰ ॰ ॰

The songs that you have rendered, the legacy that you have left behind, it strums the strings of the heart and brings unfettered pleasure to the listening mind. The treasure is limitless, and yet limited. Limitless – that we can hear them over and over again, and the listening pleasure multiplies. And yes, limited too – for we know now, what we have is what it is; there will be additions to this treasure no more.

Continuing with this delightful series of duets of Rafi Sb. We skip the ‘ङ’ letter in the alphbet – no meaningful words start with this letter and so no songs starting with it either.

We now come on to the next letter ‘‘. And to this delightful song from almost seven decades back. The film is from 1950 – a time when the companion singer was still known as Geeta Roy. The film is ‘Hamaara Ghar’. A wonderful chhaayageet song which comes from the pen of Anjum. The lyricists name appears as such; most likely this is the same person as Anjum Jaipuri. The melody comes from the mind of Chitragupt, a creator of many an unforgettable track.

The film is produced under the banner of Hindustan Chitra and is directed by Nanabhai Bhatt. The cast of actors is listed as Durga Khote, Umakant, Veera, Agha, Meena Kumari, Geeta Bose, David, Jankidas, Ramesh Gupta, Yashodhara Katju. I cannot with certainty make any guess about the lead pair of the film. I request knowledgeable readers and friends to please add more information about this film and this song.

The film has seven songs, two of which are already showcased here on our blog. Here is the third song from this film. Think 1950, and think melody – the queen. A delightful duet. Enjoy.

 

Song – Chaandni Chhitki Hui Hai Muskuraati Raat Hai (Hamaara Ghar) (1950) Singer – Geeta Roy, Mohammed Rafi, Lyrics – Anjum, MD – Chitragupt
Mohammed Rafi + Geeta Dutt

Lyrics

chaandni chhitki hui hai
muskuraati raat hai
chaandni chhitki hui hai
muskuraati raat hai
ek chanda aasmaan par
ik hamaare saath hai
ek chanda aasmaan par
ik hamaare saath hai

tumko kya dekhen sitaaro
tum puraane ho chuke
tumko kya dekhen sitaaro
tum puraane ho chuke
hum to un ko dekhte hain
jo hamaare ho chuke
jo hamaare ho chuke
dil se dil ki baat hai
ek chanda aasmaan par
ik hamaare saath hai

jhoomte hain aaj armaan
hans rahi hai zindagi
jhoomte hain aaj armaan
hans rahi hai zindagi
dil to pehle hi miley the
mil gai taqdeer bhi
mil gai taqdeer bhi
aji haath mein ab haath hai
ek chanda aasmaan par
ik hamaare saath hai

ik naya jeevan hai paaya
ik nai duniya basi
ik naya jeevan hai paaya
ik nai duniya basi
mil gayi hai do dilon ko
saari duniya ki khushi
saari duniya ki khushi
kya niraali baat hai
ek chanda aasmaan par
ik hamaare saath hai

chaandni chhitki hui hai
muskuraati raat hai
ek chanda aasmaan par
ik hamaare saath hai

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

चाँदनी छिटकी हुई है
मुस्कुराती रात है
चाँदनी छिटकी हुई है
मुस्कुराती रात है
एक चंदा आसमान पर
इक हमारे साथ है
एक चंदा आसमान पर
इक हमारे साथ है

तुमको क्या देखें सितारो
तुम पुराने हो चुके
तुमको क्या देखें सितारो
तुम पुराने हो चुके
हम तो उनको देखते हैं
जो हमारे हो चुके
जो हमारे हो चुके
दिल से दिल की बात है
एक चंदा आसमान पर
इक हमारे साथ है

झूमते हैं आज अरमां
हंस रही है ज़िंदगी
झूमते हैं आज अरमां
हंस रही है ज़िंदगी
दिल तो पहले ही मिले थे
मिल गई तक़दीर भी
मिल गई तक़दीर भी
अजी हाथ में अब हाथ है
एक चंदा आसमान पर
इक हमारे साथ है

इक नया जीवन है पाया
नयी दुनिया बसी
इक नया जीवन है पाया
इक नयी दुनिया बसी
मिल गई है दो दिलों को
सारी दुनिया की खुशी
सारी दुनिया की खुशी
क्या निराली बात है
एक चंदा आसमान पर
इक हमारे साथ है

चाँदनी छिटकी हुई है
मुस्कुराती रात है
एक चंदा आसमान पर
इक हमारे साथ है


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Missing Films of 1960s – 32
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

At the beginning of this month, June 1st, I had a personal reminder to myself – passing away anniversary of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas. I was wanting to do a brief remembrance post. Other “things” intervened and the day came and went. Then, it so happened that on the 15th June, there was a set of reminders and requests for the birth centenary celebrations of Sajjaad Husain. Not many “things” intervened that day, and I was able to locate a rare recording of a song from film ‘Dharam’ (1945), as yet unposted, and was able to post the remembrance article in good time. You may remember the title line of that song “Chali Pawan Purvaai, Chali Pawan”.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Hamaara Ghar”(1950) was directed by Nanabhai Bhatt for Hindustan Chitra, Bombay. The movie had Durga Khote, Umakant Desai, Veera, Agha, Meena Kumari, Geeta Bose, David, Jankidas, Ramesh Gupta etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This is the 16th song in the series ” VINTAGE KISHORE “. It is sung by Kishore and Shamshad Begum. Chitragupta is the Music Director.
Read more on this topic…


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over FOURTEEN years. This blog has over 17400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 5000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2023) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

17401

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1341
Total Number of movies covered=4685

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Active for more than 5000 days.

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