Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Kaanton se chhedte hain mere jigar ke chhaale

Posted on: May 24, 2013


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

The year is 1993. It is twenty five years now that the Dada Saheb Phalke award has been instituted. For the first time after twenty years of its inception, this prestigious award that represents a lifetime of significant contribution to the Indian cinema, is announced for a lyricist. And the recipient – Majrooh Sultanpuri.

Majrooh Sb – the poet extraordinaire, the longest serving lyricist in Hindi films, and the most prolific contributor ever of the Hindi film song, the genre that we all so dearly love. In 1993, Majrooh Sb was already past his 72nd spring and his pen had been creating these wonderful lyrics for forty seven years. Unlike so many other artists and performers, who face the specter of waning creativity, and a luckless battle with fickle dame of popularity, Majrooh Sb continued to grow younger in heart, and his verses continued to shine with the winning prospects of a young romantic and an incomparable the brightness of life that belied his long innings in the industry. It is a rare personality that can achieve these heights of inventive freshness, and continue to strike new grounds with poetry that has appealed to a multitude of generations across six decades. Those who have seen his debut in 1946 with the film ‘Shahjehaan’, and decidedly also the many millions more who came after them, can never forfeit the indelible memory of “Gham Diye Mustakil, Kitna Naazuk Hai Dil” and “Jab Dil Hi Toot Gayaa, Hum Jee Ke Kya Karange”. It is the same creator, whose pen, after being furiously busy for fifty five years, would steal the hearts and minds, and the lips of a new generation with his creations like “Pehla Nasha, Pehla Khumaar” from the 1992 film ‘Jo Jeeta Wo Sikandar”, “Baahon Ke Darmyaan, Do Pyaar Mil Rahe Hain” from the 1996 film ‘Khaamoshi – The Musical”, and become the rage of every day jargon with the bindaas expression of “Aey Kyaa Bolti Tu. . . Aati Kya Khandaala” from Ghulam, a film from 1998. And ah, yes, the names of these recent songs, as also the hits from the 1988 film ‘Qayaamat Se Qayaamat Tak’, still appear in such write ups without being colored blue and underlined, indicating that these wonderful creations are still to find their place on this blog. (Hint for our contributors team. 🙂 ).

This dynamo of the pen and incomparable verses, was stilled this day, thirteen years ago. And today, we are celebrating his memory by completing 700 songs on this blog, written by him. And a wonder it is, being a poet and lyrics writer, he is the just the fourth artist to reach this milestone on this blog. And given that the three artists ahead of him are the most prolific singers that the industry has known (Lata ji, Rafi Sb, and Asha ji), it indeed it a grand celebration of the inspired creativity and the tireless longevity of this doyen of song writers in our film industry.

Asraar Hasan Khan was born on 1st October, 1919 at the Sultanpur, in what is currently known as Uttar Pradesh on the map of India. His father was a sub inspector in the police, whose desire was that Asraar should study language and medicine, and take up the profession of a religious teacher as a‘maulvi’ (a priest) or as a ‘hakeem’, a doctor in the Unaani practice if medicine. However, as the young Asraar took on the intricacies of the Urdu and Persian languages, it awakened his native talent as a poet, and his path diverted from religious interests to writing poetry – shaayari and ghazals. Of course, the idea was not palatable to his father, that the famous shaayars of that age, Faiz Ahmed ‘Faiz, Majaaj Lucknowi and Jigar Moradabadi should become his son’s idols, turning him away from the study of Sharia and medicine. Acceding to his father’s wishes, he joined the Lucknow College of Unaani Medicine, and trained for one year to be a ‘hakeem’. But the lure of local ‘mushairaas’ (gathering of poets) in a city like Lucknow, was irresistible for the young Asraar, and his budding success and popularity at such gatherings eventually made him give up his educational pursuits as directed by his father. He came into the company of his idols, and Jigar Moradabadi became his mentor. It was Jigar Sb who gave him the name of ‘Majrooh’ (in Urdu, the word means injured, hurt, घायल), a blessing of an accomplished Guru that was to prove the touchstone of success and popularity for him, for the duration of his life.

With Jigar Sb, the young Majrooh had traveled to other cities to participate in ‘mushairaas’. He had also been to Bombay to attend a ‘mushairaa’ at the renowned Saabu Siddique Institute, where AR Kardar, one of the Mughals of Hindi cinema, had already heard him. In 1945, Jigar Sb suggested to Majrooh to return to Bombay and meet with AR Kardar. And the rest, as they say, is simply history as we know it. It was dream break for Majrooh, for who can even imagine a new fangled young man whom nobody knows in the industry, would get his debut assignment to write songs for the banner of Kardar Productions, for a film of the stature of ‘Shahjehaan’, working with the peerless music director Naushad, and having the honor of the inimitable KL Saigal Sb to sing his first creations for the film screen. It has to be providence and the blessings of his ‘murshid’ (guru). A new poet does not need any more stronger credentials to start his career. And with the stint of more than fifty five years in the industry, and an amazing repertoire of more than 2300 songs that made it to the screen, he proved that he
definitely was worthy and deserving of the debut break that was accorded to him. Given this number, it is quite certain that his total creations including film songs and non film ghazals and nazms would easily be much more than 3000 pieces of poetry.

There is no better way to talk about such an artist, than to list his accomplishments. But to deal with such a prolific body of work, is not a feasible proposition. If I were to avoid listing his hit songs, and want to list the films for which he wrote, or rather, the films that have become memorable simply because of the bevy of hit songs contained within – even that is a daunting proposition, given that he has wielded his pen for more than 350 films. It becomes a very difficult choice of what to list and what to leave out. If in 1946 it is ‘Shahjehaan’, then 1949 is ‘Andaz’, 1950 is‘Aarzoo’, 1953 is ‘Baaz’, ‘Footpath’, and ‘Daaeraa’, in 1954 it is ‘Aar Paar’ and ‘Waaris’, in 1955 it is ‘Mr. & Mrs. 55’ and ‘Musafirkhana’, in 1956 it is ‘CID’, ‘Ek Hi Raasta’, ‘Bhaagam Bhaag’, in 1957 it is ‘Nau Do Gyaraah’, ‘Paying Guest’ and ‘Tumsa Nahin Dekha’, in 1958 it is ’12 O’Clock’, ‘Aakhiri Dao’, ‘Chalti Ka Naam Gaadi’, ‘Dilli Ka Thug’, ‘Kaala Pani’, ‘Madhumati’, ‘Laajwanti’, ‘Sitaaron Se Aage’, ‘Sone Ki Chidiya’,‘Solvaan Saal’, in 1959 it is ‘Dil Deke Dekho’, ‘Sujaata’, ‘Kaali Topi Laal Rumaal’ and ‘Jaalsaaz’, and in 1960 it is ‘Bambai Ka Babu’ and ‘Manzil’.That is just the period of his work from 1946 to 1960, and mind you, it is just a sampling that I present of my own choice. By the time 1960 ended and 1961 came on, he had already completed working for 100 films.

And the things simply went on to being better, moving forward.

The most curious and the most definitive accomplishment that one can highlight is that not only his songs have been hummed and loved by multiple generations of listeners, but unlike other poets, he has provided an ever new collection of verses and poetry to each generation. So that in 2000, we love to recall “Hum Aaj Kahin Dil Kho Baithe” (‘Andaz’,1949) and “Ae Dil Mujhe Aisi Jagah Le Chal Jahaan Koi Na Ho” (‘Aarzoo’, 1950), and our hearts enjoy “Chadhti Jawaani Meri Chaal Mastaani”, (‘Caravan’, 1971), “Gum Hai Kisi Ke Pyaar Mein Dil Subah o Shaam”, (‘Rampur Ka Laxman’, 1972), “Hamen Tumse Pyaar Kitna Ye Hum Nahin Jaante” (‘Kudrat’, 1982), and then we go on to regale the sounds of “Akele Hain To Kyaa Gham Hai” and “Papa Kehte Hain Badaa Naam Karega” (both from ‘Qayaamat Se Qayaamat Tak’, 1988), “Aaj Mein Upar, Aasmaan Neeche”(from ‘Khaamoshi – The Musical’, 1996) and “Jaanam Samjha Karo” (‘Jaanam Samjha Karo’, 1999). I know that I am going to be bombarded with comments about the gaps in this sampling, and I know that there is a huge number of hit films in 1960s, 70s and 80s that I have not listed here, both for the consideration of space and time (and the length of the write up 🙂 ).

Majrooh Sb had a very deep knowledge of the language, the words and the meanings. And yet, his songs are very simple, to remember and to hum. They will catch the ear immediately and latch on into the memory very quick. Majrooh Sb is acknowledged to belong to that rare category of poets that are known as ‘Adabi’ shaayars – poets whose works are simple yet sophisticated, down-to-earth and yet maintaining a wonderful courtesy, sensitivity and politesse. His language, his words are devoid of double entendre and dubiousness, and make for very clean and wholesome listening pleasure and the entertainment of the mind.

For this post, I present one of his earliest creations. 1946 is famous in his lists for the film ‘Shahjehaan’. But the same year, he had also wielded his pen for another lesser known, less popular film by the name ‘Qeemat’. The film once again, was from the banner of Kardar Productions, and was directed by Nazeer Ajmeri. The team of Naushad Sb and Majrooh Sb worked together for this film also to create as many as nine wonderful melodies. This film makes a debut on this blog today is the third song from this movie in the blog, and the song presented is a soulful, pensive and yet a very sweet sound of sadness, in the voice of the inimitable Amirbai. The opening words of the song ‘Kaanton Se Chhedte Hain Mere Dil Ke Chhaale’ is such a tender agony and sets the stage for a song full of anguish and pain. The words are very simple and yet exquisite, and they play with the raw nerves of the heart – sore and aching.

A wonderful memory from the earliest year of Majrooh Sb’s active career in Hindi films. The pageant of words from this most prolific writer in the industry are capable of reflecting each and every aspect of life and emotions. And what better a salute to this tireless creator of enchanting verses, than the burden of the song he penned for the film ‘Dharam Karam’(1975), wherein the poet says

“Ik Din Bik Jaayega Maati Ke Mol”
“Jag Mein Reh Jaayenge Pyaare Tere Bol”
.

Thank you, Majrooh Sb – for all the pleasure and all the joy that you have bequeathed us with. Your words will always remain, till the time there is music in this creation.

kaanton se chhedte hain mere jigar ke chhaale
nirbal se khelte hain oonche makaan waale

With tiny thorns
Are being pricked
The swollen lesions of my heart
Reawakening the stifling pains
The dwellers of lofty mansions
Play these cruel games
With the weak and homeless

duniya to jaa rahi hai apni baraat le kar
koi kuchal gayaa hai ye kaun dekhe bhaale

Casual and unconcerned
The world is headed its own way
Trailing its own parades
Ah, that someone is crushed
Under the wheels of the chariot
Who has the time
To stop and see

shaayad ke bekason ka bhagwaan hi nahin hai
majboor gham hai jiska ji chaahe wo sataa le

Maybe the oppressed and destitute
Do not have a God
Whosoever desires can play with
And beleaguer
Those, whose sorrows render them
Feeble and defenceless


Song-Kaanton se chhedte hain mere jigar ke chhaale(Qeemat)(1946) Singer-Amirbai Karnataki, Lyrics-Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD-Naushad

Lyrics

kaanton se chhedte hain
mere jigar ke chhaale ae ae
mere jigar ke chhaale ae ae
kaanton se chhedte hain
mere jigar ke chhaale ae
mere jigar ke chhaale ae ae
nirbal se khelte hain
oonche makaan waale ae ae
nirbal se khelte hain
oonche makaan waale

duniya to jaa rahi hai
apni baraat le kar
duniya to jaa rahi hai
apni baraat le kar
koi kuchal gayaa hai
ye kaun dekhe bhaale
koi kuchal gayaa hai
ye kaun dekhe bhaale
kaanton se chhedte hain
mere jigar ke chhaale

shaayad ke bekason ka aa
bhagwaan hi nahin hai
shaayad ke bekason ka aa aa
bhagwaan hi nahin hai
majboor gham hai jiska
ji chaahe wo sataa le ae ae
majboor gham hai jiska
ji chaahe wo sataa le ae ae
kaanton se chhedte hain
mere jigar ke chhaale

——————————-

काँटों से छेड़ते हैं
मेरे जिगर के छाले
मेरे जिगर के छाले
काँटों से छेड़ते हैं
मेरे जिगर के छाले
मेरे जिगर के छाले
निर्बल से खेलते हैं
ऊंचे मकान वाले
निर्बल से खेलते हैं
ऊंचे मकान वाले

दुनिया तो जा रही है
अपनी बारात ले कर
दुनिया तो जा रही है
अपनी बारात ले कर
कोई कुचल गया है
ये कौन देखे भाले
कोई कुचल गया है
ये कौन देखे भाले
काँटों से छेड़ते हैं
मेरे जिगर के छाले

शायद के बेकसों का
भगवान ही नहीं है
शायद के बेकसों का
भगवान ही नहीं है
मजबूर ग़म है जिसका
जी चाहे वो सता ले
मजबूर ग़म है जिसका
जी चाहे वो सता ले
काँटों से छेड़ते हैं
मेरे जिगर के छाले

3 Responses to "Kaanton se chhedte hain mere jigar ke chhaale"

Thanks for the write-up Sudhirji. Small correction. Majrooh didnt write Aati Kya Khandala from Ghulam’98.

Rgds.

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Nitin Raikwar inviting all the girls to Khandala

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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