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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Gehoon ke phulke khilaa de

Posted on: March 5, 2016


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Forgotten Melodies of the 1940s – 15
———————————————————

During the British rule in India, film censorship was introduced under Indian Cinematography Act, 1918 under which the films could be exhibited only after getting certification from the Censor Boards. During the height of freedom struggles, film censorship was used as a tool to discourage political and socio-economic issues which were perceived to be anti-British rule in India. In the talkie era, ‘Mill’ (Mazdoor, 1934) was probably the first Indian film to be banned for exhibition by the Censor Board after the film was released. The story and script written by Munshi Premchand dealt with the exploitation of labourers by a Mill owner. The film was considered to contain inflammatory undertones creating a rift betwen the labourers and owners in factories.

There were some script and song writers who found a way out to overcome the hanging sword of the Censor Board. They started using allegories and metaphors to convey the intended meanings to the audience at large but at the same time hoodwinking the Censor Board. This became more pronounced during the World War II (1939-45).

In ‘Naya Sansar’ (1941), a film produced and directed by K A. Abbas, there was a song ‘ek naya sansaar basa le….ke jisme dharti ho azaad, ke jisme jeewan ho azaad, ke jisme Bharat ho azaad’, written by Kavi Pradeep. Probably, in the midst of WW-II, the Censor Board may have taken a wider view of the word ‘azaad’ to mean freedom from the expansionary motives of Germany, Italy and Japan.

The best example of the use of allegory in Hindi film songs was door hato ae duniya waalon hindustan hamaara hai, also written by Kavi Pradeep for the film ‘Kismet’ (1943) with an hidden agenda. At the outset, it would appear that in the context of WW-II, the poet has addressed the world at large to keep away from India as it is ours. But covertly, there is a message to British rulers to Quit India (door hato). It is interesting to note that Mahatma Gandhi gave a call of Quit India Movement in August 1942. To the Censor Board, Kavi Pradeep has not left an iota of doubt when he writes in the same song ‘tum na kisi ke aage jhukna German ho ya Japan’. But in the next line, there is a hidden message for British Rulers when he writes ‘aaj sabhi ke liye hamaara yahi quami naara hai,….. door hato door hato’ which means that our Quit India movement is not confined to Germans and Japanese but to all (sabhi) including Britishers. For me, the refrain in the song is ‘door hato’ (Get off or Quit India in broader term) which has been repeated 18 times in the song.

Today, I am presenting a song with a somewhat similar intent but as more of a socio-economic satirical message to British Rulers than a nationalistic one. The song is ‘gehoon ke phulke khila de.. mohe baajri na bhaaye’ written by Pandit Indra Chandra for the film INSAAN (1944). The first impression that one gets from the lyrics of the song is that it is a case of husband-wife indulging into teasing repartees. The wife is fed up with eating baajri (a type of millet) rotis and she wants rotis made from wheat and rice from Delhi. The husband replies that Germans are on war as such she will to eat only baajri rotis. Wife asks husband to buy for her silk angiya ( a kind of garment used by rural women) with golden borders for which the husband replies that Japan has reached close to our border. The reference here is that of shortages of essential items due to WW-II. Probably, the British rulers may have imposed rationing to divert a part of food grains to the army.

There is an indirect reference to British rulers of India when the poet writes ‘iss paapi ne sukh mera loota’. At the outset, ‘iss paapi’ refers to the husband who is not fulfilling the demands made by his wife. But it is apparent that the metaphor of husband is used for the British Rulers who have been diverting the foodgrains and other essential items out of India for the army who are fighting the Germans in Europe.

The audio clip of the song was not available on YT. I have downloaded the mp3 clip from Dr Surjit Singh’s website and uploaded the video clip on YT. The song was composed by Gyan Dutt. The name of the singers have not been indicated. However, in the audio clip which was contributed by Shri Girdharilal Vishwakarma, the name of the female singer is shown as Zohrabai Ambalewaali while the name of the male singer is not mentioned. It does appear to me that the female voice is that of Zohrabai Ambalewaali.

The sound quality of audio clip is not good but it is sufficient to enjoy the playful rendition which looks like a stage song to me.


Song-Gehoon ke phulke khila de (Insaan)(1944) Singers-Zohrabai Ambaalewali, Unidentified male voice, Lyrics-Pt Indra Chandra, MD-Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

gehoon ke phulke khila de
gehoon ke phulke khila de
haan haan re piya
mohe baajri na bhaaye ae ae
gehoon ke phulke khila de
haan haan re piya
mohe baajri na bhaaye ae ae
Dilli se chaawal manga de ae
Dilli se chaawal manga de ae
haan haan re piya
mohe baajri na bhaaye ae ae
gehoon ke phulke khila de
Chandrabadan abhi baajri hi khaiyyo
German kare hain ladaai ee
Chandrabadan abhi baajri hi khaiyyo
German kare hain ladaai

resham ki angiya sila de morey raaja
gota kinaari laga de morey raaja
resham ki angiya sila de morey raaja
gota kinaari laga de morey raaja
jaade se jiya ghabraaye ae
haaye
jaade se jiya ghabraaye ae
haan haan re piya
mohe baajri na bhaaye ae ae
gehoon ke phulke khila de
naazuk haalat bano na hathheeli
Japan khada hai kinaare
naazuk haalat bano na hathheeli
Japan khada hai kinaare
haay mora khaana pehnan’na chhuta
iss paapi ne sukh mera loota
haay mora khaana pehnan’na chhuta
iss paapi ne sukh mera loota
maroon zahar vishh khaaye
maroon zahar vishh khaaye
haan haan re piya
mohe baajri na bhaaye ae ae
gehoon ke phulke khila de

hathh jaayegi badri kaari
do din dheeraj dhar matwaari
hathh jaayegi badri kaari
do din dheeraj dhar matwaari
do din ka hai joban saajan
kya barkha jab beete saawan
do din ka hai joban saajan
kya barkha jab beete saawan
jiya mora jalaaye ae ae
jiya mora jalaaye ae
haan haan re piya
mohe baajri na bhaaye ae ae
gehoon ke phulke khila de ae

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4 Responses to "Gehoon ke phulke khilaa de"

marun zahar VISH khaaye

Nazuk haalaat ?
Avadh Lal

The voice could be K C Dutt

The time has come to eat coarse grains like jowar, bajri, millet, nachni, ragi, millet, sorghum etc for its calcium, iron, slow sugar release and high fibre. Their importance can be guaged by the rising prices all over the world as more and more people realizes the importance of its nutritional values. No more it is coarse grain but now it is Of Course Grain.

In our village(may be in all villages) the farm-hands when they vist our place after the day long hard labour were served tea with jaggery; in the process they became stronger. We with sugar in tea became diabetic!

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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