Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Pt Badri Prasad


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3969 Post No. : 15053 Movie Count :

4130

Today’s song is from a film of the first decade of the Talkie, ” Yangrilla “-1938. The song is sung by Sarla. No information is available about this singer. The cast of the film was Enakshi Rama Rau, Nayampalli, David, Gyani, Saalu, Shareefa, S L Puri, Fatty Prasad and few others.

It is generally said that in the early era, most actors and actresses came from poor families and most artistes had no or had negligible education. While it is true to a great extent, it is not 100% true. It is not that even in this period, there were no educated persons in the film industry. Right from the beginning of the Silent era to Talkie film era up to the end of the 40s decade, there were actors, actresses, directors,producers and musicians who were quite educated. Some of them had even been trained in western countries.

Take the case of Himanshu Rai and Devika Rani and their team of writer like Niranjan Pal, from the silent era. They were all highly educated and from rich. cultured families. Niranjan Pal was the son of the Freedom fighter Bipin chnadra Pal. B.N.Sircar is another example. Director Nanubhai Vakil was actually an advocate with B.A. LL.B degree. Surendra was BA, LL.B. Motilal was a graduate, so were Ramchandra Thakur, Nandlal Jaswantlal, Jayant Desai, Jairaj, Umakant Desai. Ashok kumar, Dev Anand and his 2 brothers etc.

Among actresses, Leela Chitnis, Shanta Apte, Durga Khote, Renuka Devi were graduates. Vanmala was BA,BT. Kamini Kaushal was BA. The point here is, there were educated and people with respectable family background were also a part of film industry. But of course, initially their number was smaller compared to others who were either illiterate or less educated. For example, the beautiful Meena Shorey and Sitara Kanpuri could not even sign- leave alone reading and writing !. That is why, they were cheated in their contracts by Sohrab Modi and W.Z.Ahmed ( of Shalimar Pictures and husband of actress Neena).

In today’s film, Yangrilla-38, the Hero, Heroine and the Director were all highly educated. The Heroine, Enakshi Rama Rao was the daughter of an ICS officer of Madras Presidency. She came to England for her graduation. After graduation, she took part in some stage dramas, where she got introduced to Niranjan Pal and Himanshu Rai. When Himanshu Rai decided to make a silent film on Tajmahal story, he asked Niranjan Pal to write the film story. Sita Devi aka Renee Smith was selected for the Vamp’s role and Enakshi was selected for the main role of Selima ( who was later named Mumtaj Mahal by Prince Khurram- who was later known as Shahjehan.). The film was named Shiraz.

Enakshi is a very unusual name. Comparatively, Meenakshi is a well known name. Meenakshi means ” one with eyes like Fish “. Enakshi means ” one with the eyes of Doe or Deer”. In other words, Enakshi means Mrignayani. Except name of this actress, I have never ever come across this name (Enakshi) in my life elsewhere !

Her work in film Shiraz was applauded in England, Germany and India. When she returned to India, She met Bhavnani, who made a silent film Vasantsena-31, with her in the lead role. More than as an actress of Silent and Talkie films, Enakshi’s name was known in Elite circles for different achievements, after she stopped working in films.

Not many of us know that Meenakshi Bhavnani ( Enakshi Rama Rao before her marriage ) has done an enormous service to expose Indian dances and Designs to West. No lesser is her contribution to expose Kashmir Crafts and Designs ( Fabric , Wood and Papier Mache ) to west. An American Tourist told in Kerala recently about her detailed work on Kashmir Designs ( shawls , Jackets ).This side of Meenakshi’s personality and work is in addition to her contribution as a Dancer, photographer and actress .Two scholarly Books written by Meenakshi Bhavnani were also published. Both the books are preserved in American Museum of Natural History.These are ..

(1) Folk And Tribal Designs of India
(2) The Dance of India: The Origin and History Foundation, Art and Science of the Dance in India .

This exceptionally talented woman stayed in Kashmir for sometime in 1950 and met cross section of people connected with Arts and Crafts . She had been a visitor thereafter as well . She also visited Leh and kargil for her Book. During this period she also clicked some photographs in Kashmir portraying its rich culture and scenic beauty.She also shot a Documentary “ VALEY OF KASHMIR “ during this period..
Meenakshi was an active member of the Crafts Council of India, which was founded in 1964 to support artisans and keep their crafts relevant and marketable amid rapidly changing economies at home and abroad.
The Photographs clicked by her have also appeared in National Geographic Magazine especially her series.
And in her book on folk dances of India , Meenakshi covers all forms of Kashmirian folk dances .

Enakshi married film maker Mohan Bhavnani ( 1903-1962 ) who was trained in Germany and Hollywood. She was a dancer , Actor , Photographer and writer on Arts , Crafts and culture. From 1929 to 1938, She acted in six films as a leading lady . Out of these six films five ( Vasantsena-31 , Trapped-31 ,Jagaran-36 , Himalaya ki Beti-38 and Yangrilla-38 ) were directed by her husband Mohan Bhavnani . Only Shiraz ( 1929 Produced by Himanshu Roy ) was directed by Franz Osten .

Producer Director Mohan Bhavnani was a learned and illustrious person. This is what the Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema says about him-
Mohan Dayaram Bhavnani (1903-62)

Hindi director born in Hyderabad, Sindh. Studied at College of Technology, Manchester (1921-4), then studied film-making in Germany at UFA (1924). Contracted to Kohinoor (1925- 6) where his Sulochana films were the earliest efforts in the Indian cinema to create a Hollywood-type movie star, e.g. Cinema Ni Rani where she plays a famous actress with whom the painter hero falls in love, or Wildcat of Bombay where she played multiple roles. Joined Imperial (1927-9), where he made Khwab-e-Hasti, adapted from the novel Dreamland (later also adapted by N. Taurog’s Strike me Pink, 1936). Scripted by A.S. Desai, this film is not to be confused with Kashmiri’s play of the same title. Vasantsena was the first Kannada intertitled film. Became independent producer with Indian Art Prod. (1931-2). Returned to Germany to study sound film technique. Started Ajanta Cinetone (1933-4) and his own Bhavnani Prod. (1935-48). Sound de´but was a flop, but it introduced Durga Khote. Hired Premchand to script Mazdoor, representing the author’s only direct encounter with film, following it with the unemployment melodrama Jagran. Produced and directed the first full-length colour film shot on 16mm Kodachrome and blown up to 35mm, Ajit. Joined Films Division and became its first Chief Producer (1948-55). In 1958 Bhavnani followed up an invitation from Zhou En-Lai to make a documentary on China and travelled extensively throughout the country shooting with cameramen Kishore Rege and S.K. Kulkarni. His wife Enakshi Rama Rao, who acted in Vasantsena, had earlier played the lead in Shiraz (1928) and became a noted dancer and author of the book The Dance of India (1965).

FILMOGRAPHY: 1925: Cinema Ni Rani; Matri Prem; Veer Bala; Seth Sagalsha; 1 9 2 6 : Pagal Premi; Diwan Bhamasha; Mena Kumari; Ra Kawat; Samrat Shiladitya; Bhamto Bhoot; 1 9 2 7 : Naseeb Ni Lili; Daya Ni Devi; Trust Your Wife; Wildcat of Bombay; Gamdeni Gori; 1929: Hawai Swar; Khwab-e- Hasti; Mysore, Gem City of India (Doc); Khedda (Doc); 1 9 3 0 : Vasantsena (all St); 1 9 3 1 : Shakuntala; Farebi Jaal; Lafanga Langoor (Sh); 1 932: Veer Kunal; 1 933: Afzal; Rangila Rajput; 1 9 3 4 : Dard-e-Dil; Mazdoor; Sair-e-Paristan; 1935: Jung Bahadur; Navjeevan; Shadi Ki Raat; 1936: Dilawar; Garib Parwar; Jagran; Wrestling (Doc); 1 9 3 7 : Zambo the Ape Man; 1 9 3 8 : Double Cross; Himalay Ki Beti; Yangrilla; 1 9 3 9 : Zambo Ka Beta; 1940: Jhoothi Sharm; PremNagar?; 1945: Biswi Sadi; 1 946: Rang Bhoomi; 1 948: Ajit; 1 9 4 9 : Vale of Kashmir (Doc); 1 9 5 0 : The Private Life of a Silkworm (Doc); 1 9 5 1 : Lest We Forget (Doc); 1 9 5 2 : Kumaon Hills (Doc); 1 9 5 3 : Folk Dances of India (Doc); Republic Day Record (Doc); 1 9 5 5 : Republic Day 1955 (Doc); 1 956: Operation Khedda (Doc); 1 957: The Himalayan Tapestry (Doc ).

Like the Heroine, the name of the film was also strange. I tried very hard to find out what the word Yangrilla meant, but I could not get it. Finally, undaunted, I started going through the list of books on line. Lo and behold ! I bumped into a book with a title ” Rilla of the Inglewood ” written by Lucy Maud Montgomary, published in 1921. Some part of the book was available for reading online and while reading it, I found that ” Yangrilla ” in Swahili language meant a Hunter. Not going into the book and its boring story, I was glad that at last I decoded the word Yangrilla…a Hunter. Considering that the film ‘ Yangrilla’-38 was a Costume drama, I can guess that this film’s story must have been connected with hunting, Jungle and such other interesting and thrilling matters. Film Yangrilla-38 was financed by Ramnarayan Dubey, who in later years swallowed Bombay Talkies with its Land and started an Industrial complex on its land with about 250 to 300 manufacturing units. Recently his grandson was in news for announcing revival of Bombay Talkies !

The Hero of this film was Nayampalli. S.B. Nayampally (or Nayampalli) was working at the firm of Killick, Nixon and Company, in Bombay when he was discovered by film director P.Y. Altekar at a gym where Nayampally regularly exercised. Altekar felt that Nayampally very much resembled the famous French boxer Georges Carpenter and would be perfect for the stunt films that had become popular at the time. At Altekar’s urging, Nayampally joined Imperial Studios and was quickly cast in his first film, Wedding Night(1929), opposite the popular actress Jilloo. When he arrived at Imperial to begin his first day of filming he was amused to find that the building now used for the studio had formerly housed the school he’d attended as a child.“Wedding Night was a stunt film of the Robin Hood type,” Nayampally explained in a 1964 interview. “It had a little more of a plot to it than many films of the same class. My next film, Hell’s Paradise (1929), I remember for three reasons. One, it was based on a real-life episode involving an Indian prince and a foreign girl, described as an adventuress. Two, Mama Warerekar, the noted writer, did the story. Three, the film had a kissing scene, probably the first ever in an Indian film.”

Nayampalli was cast in Imperial’s Noorjehan (1931), which was initially to be a silent picture, but because of the success of their film Alam Ara (1931), which was India’s first talkie, the studio decided to make Noorjehan partly with sound. Nayampally was not originally cast in Noorjehan, but a chance meeting with the film’s director, Ezra Mir, got him the role of Prince Salim in the film.Nayampally then played Karna in Imperial’s next sound film, the mythological Draupadi (1931), but the actor considered his best mythological role to be that of the wily Shakuni in Mahatma Vidur (1943), a part that was appreciated by critics and the public, alike.

As sound films came in, silent actors were being discarded in favor of those with stage backgrounds and could not sing, so Nayampalli joined the Grant Anderson Theatrical Company which specialized in Shakespearean plays. After gaining some experience he tried to rejoin films, but without much luck. His previous roles had been leads, so he decided if he wanted to work regularly, maybe he should take a different approach and he offered himself up for character parts.His break came in the role of a hunchback in love with the heroine in Ezra Mir’s Zarina which starred Jal Merchant and Zubeida. The dentures he wore for the role were created specially by a dentist named Jimmy Gheista who had trained abroad with the dentist who had made similar dentures for Lon Chaney.

Nayampally had learned early on how to apply make-up for his roles and, in fact, he became so good at it he eventually came to specialize in horror make-up, which earned him the nickname “The Indian Lon Chaney.” Indeed, Chaney, Erich von Stroheim, Emil Jannings, and John Barrymore were the actors that Nayampally most tried to emulate. Boris Karloff was another of his role models. He was able to put his make-up expertise to good use for the film Sair-e-Paristan (1934), where he was a vampire-like devil, and in Zingaro(1935), in which he played a monster created by a mad scientist, and then as a the hairy “missing link” in Zambo (1937) and its sequel Zambo Ka Beta (1938). For Kalkoot (1935) he created a make-up to resemble the wrinkled effect that Karloff had used in The Mummy(1932).

Nayampally continued working in films throughout the 1940s and 50s, particularly in mythologicals and costume pictures including Raj Nartaki (1941), Nagad Narayan (1943), Vishwas 1943), Taramati(1945), Urvashi (1946), Jhansi-Ki-Rani (1953), Durgesh Nandini (1956), Basant Bahar (1956) and Shiv Parvati (1962) His last credited film appearance was in 1970’s Priya.

After the career in films ended, he started making Documentaries. He made about 35 documentaries. He won ‘Silver Dolphin’ award for his documentary in the International Film Festival at Teheran in 1970. He died on 7-5-1994, in Mumbai.

Pt. Badri Prasad was the Music Director of film Yangrilla-38. He used 6 different singers for 11 songs in the film. Besides issuing records for its songs, the producer also floated 2 records of ‘ Bhavnani Productions orchestra ‘.

The uploader of today’s song, our own Sadanand ji Kamath has certified this song to be ” rarest amongst the rare ” songs. With this song, film Yangrilla-38 makes its Debut on the Blog.


Song- Kaase main kahoon piya hiya ki baat(Yaangrilla)(1938) Singer- Sarla Devi, Lyrics- Unknown, MD- Pt. Badri Prasad

Lyrics

Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki baat
Kaase main kahoon
Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki baat
Kaase main kahoon
Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki baat
Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki
kaun sunega prem kahaani
kaun sunega prem kahaani
aur usey phir meri zabaani
aur usey phir meri zabaani
yah duniya to preet ki bairan hai
Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki baat
kaase main kahoon

is duniya ke rahne waale
is duniya ke rahne waale
kapti paapi man ke kaale
kapti paapi man ke kaale
paap(?) hi inka ghar(?) aur joban hai
Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki baat
kaase main kahoon
kaase main kahoon
kaase main kahoon


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3778 Post No. : 14756

Today’s song is truly a rare song. It is from a film called Romantic India-1936. It was a C grade costume film, directed by veteran Mohan Sinha. Looking at the film’s cast of Jeevan, Shyamsunder, Noorjehan, Radharani, Pt. Badri pershad, Gulab etc etc., it is confirmed that it was one of those C grade films which had its own audience in almost every village, town and city in India.

During the 20s, 30s and the 40s decades, films catered to all types of movie goers. Various Genres were used like Mythological, Religious, Stunt, Adventure, Folk tales, Historical, Social, Mystery, Family, Drama, Fantasy, Costume, Comedy, Tragedy and every other conceivable Genre possible. These films catered to all age groups as well as all social divisions like the poor, middle class and the rich. The daily earners, workers and lower strata of the society were avid viewers of stunt films.

When I started seeing stunt films, the first choice was of course films of Fearless Nadia. However, by that time most of her films were unavailable and I could see only a few of them. Stunt films of Shankar rao Vazre, Master Bhagwan, Chandrarao Kadam, Kamran, Dalpat, Navin Yagnik, John Cavas, Boman Shroff, Billimorea brothers, Prakash, khaleel, Master Vithal, Baburao pehelwan etc were lapped up by me and my like minded friends. Most of these films were seen at the cost of attending school.

These stunt films had not only their own fixed audience, but also these films were shown in particular theatres of the towns. usually, these were situated in poor areas and the owners never believed in its maintenance. Perhaps, even the audience was uncomfortable in well maintained, soft cushioned, airy and clean theatres ! Like the audience and the theatres, the cast of stunt films, the directors and the producers were fixed and usual. The Music Directors had not much work, since the audience considered songs as a hindrance to the film story. Rarely commercial records of stunt film songs were made. Master Bhagwan once revealed that a stunt film was made completely in Rs. 50,000 easily, all expenses included ! Therefore, these films used to give good profits to the producers and investors.

Collecting information on actors working in such films was and is a tough task. In general, collecting details of any actor of yesteryear is very challenging. When I started writing on old films and its artistes, I realised that doing research on old time cine artistes is a very tedious task. The kind of sources one has to tap is simply unimaginable. If you happen to meet a close relative or a family member, who has the knowledge about the old timer, then you are lucky. This was precisely what happened in case of Bhudo Advani ( his son), Parshuram (his daughter), Mirza Musharraf ( his daughter/son in law ), Indurani (her son), Latika ( her daughter), Vasant kumar Naidu ( his Nephew) and Shankar rao Vazre( his grandson) who met/contacted me and I could get enough Bio data on them. But this is by and large by pure Luck only. Otherwise hard work in such searches is the only way and one does not know how much time it will take and what will be the final outcome.
A case in point is that of yesteryear Heroine Mrudula. I came to know some information and the address of Mrudula, by chance, and I was very happy. Mrudula was the First Heroine of Dilip Kumar in his Debut film Jwar Bhata-1944. She was staying in a building near Arey Dairy in Worli, Bombay. I immediately contacted Shishir krishna Sharma ji, who is an expert in interviewing such old timers and gave him the information. At the first opportunity, he went to that address. Unfortunately, she had left that place and with great difficulty, he got her current address. He reached that building- Samudra Mahal in Worli. However, to his dismay, the watchman at the gate did not allow him to enter, despite explaining to him. He was not even allowed to talk to her on intercom. The matter ended there only. Now we know where she lives, since 2 years but cant contact her. She is already above 90 years of age. Such are the unseen difficulties in meeting the surviving old artistes.

Similarly, when I started work on different Radharani named actresses, initially I thought that there were 3 Radha Ranis. Sadanand ji Kamath helped me by providing some clues and I reworked on the whole matter, finally arriving at the correct information. This is really hard work.

In case of Radha Rani, most important point is, there are only Two of them and NOT three as believed earlier. One was operating only in Calcutta and the other was from Bombay. Here are the details. Here, I am making it a concise version to avoid too long an article. Since the Radha Rani who worked in film Romantic India-1936 was from Bombay, here is only her information.

RADHA RANI (BOMBAYWALI) –

She was the daughter of a Military Officer. Born at Quetta, Baluchistan, in or around 1920-21, she had a British father and Indian mother. She had total Indian looks. Her initial education and schooling was done in Bombay. She became an expert in Horse Riding, swimming, cycling, driving and skating. She was very beautiful and attractive. At the age 15, she looked quite grown up with distinct features. While in school final itself, she got offers from films. Her first film was Romantic India-36. Being an expert singer, she started singing in films. Next she acted in Badhe Chalo-37.

She was called to Calcutta to act in film ‘ Swaraj ke Sipahi ‘-37. From Calcutta, she went to Madras to do a role in a Telugu film ‘ Bhakta Jaidev ‘-38. Returning to Bombay, Radha Rani acted in Sunehra Baal-38 and then joined Wadia movietone. Here she did 7 stunt/action films.

After this she became a freelancer and acted in 18 more films of different banners. She also acted in Punjabi film ‘ Kurmai’-41. Her achievements in films were amazing. Stepping directly from school classroom onto the Silver screen, in her first 5 years of career itself, she had bagged 15 feature films. This was mainly due to to her striking screen beauty, linguistic dexterity and histrionic versatility. She was a consummate actress, singer and dancer. She was very fond of reading English literature and would spend time reading books during shooting breaks.

She made a good pair with actor Zahoor Raja in 8 films. She acted in 3 films of his production company and in film Badal-42, he directed her. her last film was Rasilee-46. After this film she got married and went to England.

Filmography- Romantic India-36, Badhe Chalo-37, Swaraj ke sipahi-37, Bhakta Jaydev-38(Telugu), Sunehra Baal-38, kahan hai manzil teri-39, Hind ka lal-40, Diamond queen-40, Jai swadesh-40, Bambaiwali-41, Manthan-41, Safed sawar-41, Seedha Rasta-41, Darpan-41, Kurmai-41(Punjabi), Swami-41, Badal-42, Motorwali-42, Sewa-42, Suhagan-42, Jungle Princess-42, Mazaq-43, Mr.Jhatpat-43, Paraya Dhan-43, Sawal-43, Bhai-43, O Panchhi-44, Ghazal-45, Laaj-46 and Rasilee-46.

By a sheer coincidence, there was another ‘Same Name Confusion’ artiste in this film- Noorjehan. This was Noorjehan Sr. Her career spanned from the silent era to 1953. To add to the confusion, she also sang few songs. A part of her career clashed with the more famous singer actress Malika-E-Tarannum, Noorjehan. This created confusion in the minds of those interested in the history of Hindi films. After a study of long time spent in gathering information about the Senior Noorjehan, we are now able to distinguish between the two artistes. For our readers, here is information on the senior Noorjehan, who had worked in film Romantic India-36.

Noorjehan-Sr.’s real name was Zebunnisa,but since there were already many Zebs in the film line,she took the name of Noorjehan. She was from a Tawayaf family of Lahore. She started with Silent film Gulnar-1930,then came All for love,chandramani,Hind ke tare,Shaliwahan etc. After doing about 10 silent films,she first appeared in a Talkie Mirza Sahibaan-1933. (The silent films were produced till sept.1934).

She was actually not a professional singer,but in those days it was compulsory for the Lady actors to sing songs also,since playback had not started. That is the reason she sang also. She did about 57 Talkie films like patit pawan,Kala wagh,Kismet ki kasauti,Vaaman avtaar,Delhi Express,Jaane aalam,karvaan e husn,Rangeela Nawab,Sati toral, Stree dharma,Romantic India,Shaahu chor,tope ka Gola,Adarsh mahila etc. After 1937,she did not get major roles and songs also diminished. Her last film was Anarkali-53.
The confusion causing films of Noorjehan Sr. are…. 1941- Radhika- sang 2 songs, Sasural- 3 songs, Ummeed-1 song. She also worked in Sikander and Red signal.
1942- Dhiraj- sang 1 song. Also acted in Chandni
1943- Adab Arz-sang 1 song. Also acted in Vish kanya
1944-No film
1945-Ghazal
1946-Jadugar, Eight days, Gwalan, Maharana Pratap, Sofia, Talwarwala
1947- Aabida, Do Bhai, Meerabai.
After retirement from films, she lived in Bombay, Dadar area. She knew Driving, so she became a Lady Driver instructor in a Driving School, to sustain for some time. Thereafter no information on her.

Coming back to today’s film Romantic India-36, it was directed by Mohan Sinha . He was born on 2-12-1903 at Indore. He studied upto matriculation in Indore. His uncle was General Bhavnani Singh, who was in the Indore state army. With his help, Mohan got in state army as a Lieutenant. However, he did not continue for long and left the army. In 1933, he started a film company at Indore-Navyug films. But due to lack of opportunities in Indore, it was closed soon.

Mohan came to Bombay, floated Krishna Films and made and directed a film ” Fashionable India”-35. It was a hit film and he got offers from Rajputana films,General FPictures, Circo and National. He worked with all of them. Sinha went to Calcutta and started Murli pictures. he made ” Swaraj ke sipahi”-37, which was a flop. he came back to Bombay and directed Industrial India-38, for General films. Then came Swastik-39, Laxmi-40,Anuradha-40 and Vanmala-41. He floated Murari Pictures in 1942 and made badlati Duniya-43 and krishnarjuna yudha-45 ( This film was appreciated by Dr. Rajendra prasad, Dr. Shamaprasad Mukherji, Veer Savarkar and Acharya kriplani also). One interesting fact about Mohan Sinha was that he directed 3 films describing India of those days, namely Fashionable India-35, Romantic india-36 and Industrial India-38.

In 1946, Mohan Sinha directed K L Saigal in Omar khayyam and Surendra in 1857, Raj kapoor in Dil ki Rani-47 and Dev Anand in Jeet-49. Mohan Sinha directed in all 32 films. He wrote lyrics for 62 songs in 7 films. His last film was Shaan E Hind-60. He died in 1984. Mohan Sinha’s granddaughter Vidya Sinha was an actress.

Today’s song is sung by Noorjehan Sr. In the song there is a long talk by a male person. It seems, the singer is trying to motivate that person not to lose hopes and stop drinking.


Song-Mat hona behosh (Romantic India)(1936) Singer-Noorjahaan Sr, Unknown male voice, MD-Pt Badri Prasad

Lyrics

mat hona behosh
kabhi haan
mat hona behosh kabhi
tum prem sudha
peete rahna
tum prem sudha
peete rahna
haan aan aan aan
mat hona behosh
kabhi haan
mat hona behosh

prem nasha hai sabse niraala
prem nasha hai sabse niraala
kar dega tumko matwaala
kar dega tumko matwaala
amras ka hai sundar pyaala
amras ka hai sundar pyaala

ye tum kya kah rahi ho chandrakala
tum nahin jaanti
tum jaanti ho main sharaab nahin chhod sakta
mujhe peena padti hai
mujhe majbooran peena padti hai
bahut martaba maine koshish ki
ke main ise chhod doon
lekin main nahin chhod saka
aur ab
ab to main ise chhodna chaahta hi nahin
lekin tum kahti ho
ki sharaab se badh kar bhi koi cheez hai
to wo kya hai
kaisi hai
bataao
chandrakala mujhe bataao wo kya cheez hai
bolo
bolo chandrakala
chandrakala

amras ka hai sundar pyaala
amras ka hai sundar pyaala
pee ke ise peete rahna
haan
pee ke ise peete rahna
aa aa aa
mat hona behosh
kabhi
haan haa haa
mat hona besudh
kabhi haan
mat hona behosh


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3636 Post No. : 14464

Today’s song is from a very old film, ‘Himalay Ki Beti’ from 1938.

It is generally said that in this era, most actors and actresses came from poor families and most artists had no or had negligible education. While it is true to a great extent, it is not 100% true. It is not that even in this period, there were no educated persons in the film industry. Right from the beginning of the silent era to talkie film era up to the end of the 1940s decade, there were actors, actresses, directors, producers and musicians who were quite educated. Some of them had even been trained in western countries.

Take the case of Himanshu Rai and Devika Rani and their team of writers like Niranjan Pal, from the silent era. They were all highly educated and from rich, cultured families. Niranjan Pal was the son of the freedom fighter Bipin Chandra Pal. BN Sircar is another example. Director Nanubhai Vakil was actually an advocate with BA LLB degree. Surendra was BA, LLB. Motilal was a graduate, so were Ramchandra Thakur, Nandlal Jaswantlal, Jayant Desai, Jairaj, Umakant Desai. Ashok kumar, Dev Anand and his 2 brothers etc.

Among actresses, Leela Chitnis, Shanta Apte, Durga Khote, Renuka Devi were graduates. Vanmala was BA, BT. Kamini Kaushal was BA. The point here is, that educated and people with respectable family background were also a part of the film industry. But of course, initially their number was smaller compared to others who were either illiterate or less educated. For example, the beautiful Meena Shorey and Sitara Kanpuri could not even sign – leave alone reading and writing! That is why, they were cheated in their contracts by Sohrab Modi and WZ Ahmed (of Shalimar Pictures and husband of actress Neena).

In the film under discussion today – ‘Himalay Ki Beti, the hero, heroine and the director were all highly educated. The heroine, Enakshi Ram Rao was the daughter of an ICS officer of Madras Presidency. She came to England for her graduation. After graduation, she took part in some stage dramas, where she got introduced to Niranjan Pal and Himanshu Rai. When Himanshu Rai decided to make a silent film on the story of Taj Mahal, he asked Niranjan Pal to write the film story. Sita Devi aka Renee Smith was selected for the vamp’s role and Enakshi was selected for the main role of Selima (who was later named Mumtaj Mahal by Prince Khurram – who was later known as Shahjehan.). The film was named ‘Shiraz’ (1928).

Enakshi is a very unusual name. Comparatively, Meenakshi is a well known name. Meenakshi means ‘one with eyes like a fish’.  Enakshi means ‘one with the eyes of doe or deer’. In other words, Enakshi means Mrignayani. Except name of this actress, I have never ever come across this name (Enakshi) in my life elsewhere!

Her work in film ‘Shiraz’ was applauded in England, Germany and India. When she returned to India, She met Bhavnani, who made a silent film ‘Vasantsena’ (1931), with her in the lead role. More than as an actress of silent and talkie films, Enakshi’s name was known in elite circles for different achievements, after she stopped working in films.

Not many of us know that Enakashi Bhavnani  (Enakshi Rama Rao before her marriage) has done an enormous service to bring Indian dances and designs to the western world. She made immense contribution to bring the Kashmir handicrafts and designs (fabric, wood and papier-mâché) to the west.  An American tourist told in Kerala recently about her detailed work on Kashmir designs (shawls, jackets etc.). This side of Enakshi’s personality and work is in addition to her contribution as a dancer, photographer and actress. Two scholarly books written by Enakshi Bhavnani were also published. Both the books are preserved in the American Museum of Natural History. These are,
(1) Folk And Tribal Designs of India, and
(2) The Dance of India: The Origin and History, Foundation, Art and Science of the Dance in India .

This exceptionally talented woman stayed in Kashmir for sometime in 1950 and met a cross section of people connected with arts and crafts. She had been a visitor thereafter as well. She also visited Leh and Kargil for her book. During this period she also clicked some photographs in Kashmir portraying its rich culture and scenic beauty. She also shot a documentary ‘Valley Of Kashmir’ during this period.

Enakshi was an active membmer of the Crafts Council of India, which was founded in 1964 to support artisans and keep their crafts relevant and marketable amid rapidly changing economies at home and abroad. The photographs clicked by her have also appeared in National Geographic magazine, especially her series. And in her book on folk dances of India, Enakshi covers all forms folk dances of Kashmir.

Enakshi married film maker Mohan Bhavnanai (1903-1962) who was trained in Germany and Hollywood. She was a dancer, actor, photographer and writer on arts, crafts and culture.  From 1929 to 1938, she acted in six films as a leading lady. Out of these six films, five, namely ‘Vasantsena’ (1931), ‘Trapped’ (1931), ‘Jaagaran’ (1936) , ‘Himalaya Ki Beti’ (1938) and ‘Yangrilla’ (1938) were directed by her husband Mohan Bhavnani. Only ‘Shiraz’ (1928) produced by Himanshu Roy was directed by Franz Osten.

Producer director Mohan Bhavnani was a learned and illustrious person. This is what the Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema says about him-

Mohan Dayaram Bhavnani (1903-62)
Hindi director born in Hyderabad, Sind. Studied at College of Technology, Manchester (1921-4), then studied film-making in Germany at UFA (1924). Contracted to Kohinoor (1925-6) where his Sulochana? films were the earliest efforts in the Indian cinema to create a Hollywood-type movie star, e.g. Cinema Ni Rani where she plays a famous actress with whom the painter hero falls in love, or Wildcat of Bombay where she played multiple roles. Joined Imperial (1927-9), where he made Khwab-e-Hasti, adapted from the novel Dreamland (later also adapted by N. Taurog’s Strike me Pink, 1936). Scripted by A.S. Desai, this film is not to be confused with Kashmiri?’s play of the same title. Vasantsena was the first Kannada intertitled film. Became independent producer with Indian Art Prod. (1931-2). Returned to Germany to study sound film technique. Started Ajanta Cinetone (1933-4) and his own Bhavnani Prod. (1935-48). Sound début was a flop, but it introduced ​Dur ga Khote. Hired Premchand to script Mazdoor, representing the author’s only direct encounter with film, following it with the unemployment melodrama ​Jagran. Produced and directed the first full-length colour film shot on 16mm Kodachrome and blown up to 35mm, Ajit. Joined Films Division and became its first Chief Producer (1948-55). In 1958 Bhavnani followed up an invitation from Zhou En-Lai to make a documentary on China and travelled extensively throughout the country shooting with cameramen Kishore Rege and S.K. Kulkarni. His wife Enakshi Rama Rao, who acted in Vasantsena, had earlier played the lead in Shiraz (1928) and became a noted dancer and author of the book The Dance of India (1965).

FILMOGRAPHY: 1925: Cinema Ni Rani; Matri Prem; Veer Bala; Seth Sagalsha; 1 9 2 6 : Pagal Premi; Diwan Bhamasha; Mena Kumari; Ra Kawat; Samrat Shiladitya; Bhamto Bhoot; 1 9 2 7 : Naseeb Ni Lili; Daya Ni Devi; Trust Your Wife; Wildcat of Bombay; Gamdeni Gori; 1929: Hawai Swar; Khwab-e- Hasti; Mysore, Gem City of India (Doc); Khedda (Doc); 1 9 3 0 : Vasantsena (all St); 1 9 3 1 : Shakuntala; Farebi Jaal; Lafanga Langoor (Sh); 1 932: Veer Kunal; 1 933: Afzal; Rangila Rajput; 1 9 3 4 : Dard-e-Dil; Mazdoor; Sair-e-Paristan; 1935: Jung Bahadur; Navjeevan; Shadi Ki Raat; 1936: Dilawar; Garib Parwar; Jagran; Wrestling (Doc); 1 9 3 7 : Zambo the Ape Man; 1 9 3 8 : Double Cross; Himalay Ki Beti; Yangrilla; 1 9 3 9 : Zambo Ka Beta; 1940: Jhoothi Sharm; PremNagar?; 1945: Biswi Sadi; 1 946: Rang Bhoomi; 1 948: Ajit; 1 9 4 9 : Vale of Kashmir (Doc); 1 9 5 0 : The Private Life of a Silkworm (Doc); 1 9 5 1 : Lest We Forget (Doc); 1 9 5 2 : Kumaon Hills (Doc); 1 9 5 3 : Folk Dances of India (Doc); Republic Day Record (Doc); 1 9 5 5 : Republic Day 1955 (Doc); 1 956: Operation Khedda (Doc); 1 957: The Himalayan Tapestry (Doc)

The film ‘Himalay Ki Beti’ had 11 songs. Today’s song is sung by Prof Ramanand. He had 4 solos and 1 duet with Enakshi. She had 2 solos. One song was by Maya Chatterjee. There is no information in HFGK about the balance 3 songs. Pt Badri Prasad had given the music. I heard 4 more songs from this film, but all are copies of stage style songs. Prof Ramanand, the actor and the singer was different than Swamy Ramanand, the lyricist in few films.

The hero of the film was Prof Pt Ramanand Sharma. If you are a regular listener of radio early in the mornings,you would have heard many Bhajans sung by Sharma Brothers of Shriram Darbar. These four brothers – Gopal, Shukdev, Kaushalendra and Raghavendra are the sons of this Ramanand Sharma. These Sharma brothers have sung the famous Bhajan “Sooraj Ki Garmi Se” from the film ‘Parinay’ (1972). Ramanand was the singing hero of many early talkie films like ‘Noor-e-Islam’ or ‘Aurat Ka Dil’ (1934) and ‘Himalay Ki Beti’ (1938). He also sang many songs in other films. After his work in ‘Premnagar’ (1940), RC Boral of the New Theatres, Calcutta came down to Bombay and took Ramanand to Calcutta to act in films. But Ramanand was fed up with the film world and decided to only sing Ram Bhajans for his Shri Ram Darbar which he had established. He went back to Muzaffarpur and used to sing Ram Bhajans all over India. His 7 albums were released by HMV.

Here is a rare song from a rare film, ‘Himalay Ki Beti’ (1938). The film makes its debut on the blog.

[Author’s Note: Credits – Chinar Shade, autarmota.blogspot.com, HFGK, MuVyz, Wikipedia, indiancine.ma, and my notes.]

Song – Siddhraaj Jaago Aaj (Himalay Ki Beti) (1938) Singer – Prof Ramanand, Lyrics – Pt Narottam Vyas, Music – Pt Badri Prasad

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

jaaa..aa..aa..go..oo..o

sidhraaj jaago aaj
sidhraaj jaago aaj
padi hai vipat gaaj
padi hai vipat gaaj
bigade banaawo kaaj
sidhraaj jaago aaj

tum ho paropkaari
tum ho paropkaari
duniya jaanat saari
duniya jaanat saari
meri raakho laaj
sidhraaj jaago aaj

charan pada hoon aaye
charan pada hoon aaye
sharnaagat sahaaye
sharnaagat sahaaye
tum naam di awaaj (??)
sidhraaj jaago aaj
sidhraaj jaago aaj

sidhraa..aa..aa..aaj

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
जा॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰गो॰॰ओ॰॰ओ

सिद्धराज जागो आज
सिद्धराज जागो आज
पड़ी है विपत गाज
पड़ी है विपत गाज
बिगड़े बनावो काज
सिद्धराज जागो आज

तुम हो परोपकारी
तुम हो परोपकारी
दुनिया जानत सारी
दुनिया जानत सारी
मेरी राखो लाज
सिद्धराज जागो आज

चरण पड़ा हूँ आए
चरण पड़ा हूँ आए
शरणागत सहाय
शरणागत सहाय
तुम नाम दी आवाज (??)
सिद्धराज जागो आज
सिद्धराज जागो आज

सिद्धरा॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰आज


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3556 Post No. : 14263

Today’s song is from a rare film of the early talkie era – ‘Baala Joban’ from 1934. The film was produced by Gandharva Cinetone – a company owned by Baburao Patel, who also directed this film.

The name of Baburao Patel is known to every lover of old Hindi films, but as a political commentator and a member of parliament, he is known to others. From the mid 1930s to the 80s he was a name synonymous with daredevil journalism, superb quality English writing and an active life style. Add to it several marriages and countless children by legitimate relationships and otherwise.

Baburao Pandurang Patil (he is a ‘Marathi Manoos’ and not a Gujarati) was born on 4-4-1904, in Masvan village, about 100 kms from Bombay, in Palghar district, in a Vanzara ( Banjara) community. His birth date is a strange confluence of numbers. The date is written as 4-4-4. Also, if we take the total of the digits written as 4-4-1904, it also adds up to the number 4 only.

When he was 4 year old, his mother passed away, and his father remarried. Subsequently the family shifted to Bombay. He was put in an English medium school. However he did not complete his matriculation. Lack of formal education always pinched him in life and he always respected highly educated people. He compensated by avidly reading books on philosophy, religion, politics and medicine, and gained an excellent command over spoken and written English language.

After doing many petty jobs, in 1926 he joined ‘Cinema Samachar’, a film magazine in Hindi, English and Urdu languages. He never knew when he entered the film world and became a script writer and a director. He established his own banner ‘Gandharva Cinetone’ and made 5 films as a director – ‘Kismat’ (a silent film from 1931), ‘Sati Mahananda’ (1933), ‘Maharani’ (1934), ‘Baala Joban’ (1934) and ‘Pardesi Sainyan’ (1935). Later in life, he directed two more films with wife Susheela Rani Patel as the heroine – ‘Draupadi’ in 1944 and ‘Gwaalan’ in 1946.

He joined DN Parkar, who owned New Jack printing press and who was publishing a house magazine ‘Prabhat’ for Prabhat Films. He then started his own magazine ‘FILM INDIA’ in April 1935, at a price of 4 annas (annual 3 rupees). From the very first issue, it was printed on high quality art paper. The cover image of the first issue featured a hand painting of actress and novelist Nalini Tarkhud, from film ‘Chandrasena’. There were many ads in the magazine, which promised ”honest journalism and constructive criticism”, though in later issues his criticism was incisive, insulting and quite daring. The cine industry feared his reviews, but readers adored him. Khwaja Ahmed Abbas, the famous writer and film director was also on his staff, and looked after the magazine when Baburao was travelling.

In all these twists and turns of life, his surname became Patel instead of Patil. He continued with it. He hurt many of his fellow film makers and actors. In one case, Shanta Apte is on record having gone to his office and beaten him with a whip, for his defamatory and derogatory remarks in the magazine.

Baburao married 3 times. His first marriage took place when he was studying. The second was with Shirin and the third was with his ex-secretary Sushila Rani Tombat – a very good looking Konkani singer and dancer.

Sidharth Bhatia has written a book titled ‘The Patels of Film India’. Noted author Manto also wrote extensively on Baburao. Bhatia writes – ‘Baburao had an eloquence and power of writing. He had a sharp humour, often barbed. There was a tough guy assertiveness with his venomous pen’. Baburao called Kalpana Kartik “pigeon busted”, Suraiya “Ugly”, and Dev Anand “effiminate”. Meena kumari was “. . .like an inverted shuttle cock”.

His magazine celebrated 50 years in 1985. Baburao became MP from Madhya Pradsh in 1967 on a ticket from the erstwile Jansangh party. One good quality of Baburao was that he was very kind to the poor and helpless people. Baburao Patel died on 4-9-1982.

The cast of the film ‘Baala Joban’ is listed as Padma Devi (a fixture in all Baburao’s films and a personal ‘special friend’), Mubarak, Gulab, Shirin Bano (she later married director Nanubhai Bhatt; Mahesh bhatt is her son), Madhukar Gupte, Nandu Khote (stage and silent film actor; father of Shubha Khote, brother in law of Durga Khote), Raja Pandit, Badri Prasad etc.

Besides acting in the film, Badri Prasad was also the music director of this film. It was his debut film as a music director. He is a wonder in the annals of Hindi film history. There is no other known person in the history who was an actor, lyricist, singer, music director, producer, director and a choreographer- all at same time in his career. He was simply unique. There was no one else like him.

As an actor he has appeared in 147 films. I remember him in ‘Albela’ (1951) as Bhagwan’s father, in ‘Bhaagam Bhaag’ (1954) as Shashikala’s uncle, as the missing father of Nalini Jaywant in film ‘Hum Sab Chor Hain’ (1956), and as the wheelchair confined father of Zahida in ‘Anokhi Raat’ (1968).

As a singer, he has sung 11 songs in 7 films. As a music director, he has 16 films to his credit – ‘Baala Joban’, ‘Vishnu Bhakti’, ‘Fashionable India’, ‘Romantic India’, ‘Zambo The Ape Man’, ‘Swaraaj Ke Sipaahi’, ‘Badhe Chalo’, ‘Yangrilla’, ‘Himalay Ki Beti’, ‘Double Cross’, ‘Zambo Ka Beta’, ‘Jhoothi Sharam’, ‘Anuradha’, ‘Vanmala’, ‘Madhusudan’ and ‘Zevar’.

He has one film to his credit as a lyricist, one as a producer and one as a director. As a choreographer he has done 52 films – from ‘Namoona’ (1949) to ‘Raaj Nartaki’ (1991).

Badri Prasad was born on 14-11-1902, in Benaras, UP. He started acting in Ramleela in the Bhelpura area in Benaras. From there he reached Calcutta, spent time at New Theatres and other studios and then landed in Bombay in 1932. His first film as actor was ‘Navchetan’ (1932).

Then he worked as an assistant to some composers and gave music independently first time to ‘Baala Joban’. His last film as a composer was ‘Zevar’ in 1942.

Then he continued his career, working in character roles. In 1949 he first did choreography in ‘Namoona’ (1949). After for the next 40 years he choreographed in till his last film.  His last film as an actor is ‘Dhoop Chhaon’ from 1997 – an active acting career that spans a period of 44 years.

As a composer many famous singers sang for him, like Amirbai  Karnataki, Noorjehan, Snehlata, Shyamsunder, Radharani, Sarla Devi, Ameena, Gauhar, E Rama Rao, Ramanand, Vatsala Kumthekar , Vimla Kumari, Iqbal Bibi etc.

Badriprasad was a learned man with command over Hindi, Urdu, English and Sanskrit. He wrote many plays for AIR also. He had a very big collection of books in his house. He was called Pandit Badriprasad,due to his expertise in Sanskrit. He was a man of few words, so his fabulous career remained unknown and he was known only as a character artist.

He had 2 daughters. One daughter Surekha Pandit remained with him till his death. Surekha too is an actress, doing bit roles in films – ‘Anupama’, ‘Mere Sanam’, ‘Nartaki’, ‘Gaban’, ‘Sant Gyaneshwar’, ‘Mere Huzur’, ‘Aadmi Aur Insaan’, ‘Saat Hindustani’, ‘Do Dooni Chaar’, ‘Shehar Aur Sapna’, ‘Aarti’ etc. After marriage she was known as Surekha Parkar.

The singer for today’s song is Marutirao Pehelwan. He has also acted in this movie. He was originally from Kolhapur. In the early era of talkie films, many wrestlers joined film companies. They worked mostly in action films. Some such actors were Baburao Pehelwan (he was the hero of Master Bhagwan’s stunt films; later on worked as a stuntman with fight master Azim Bhai), Vasantrao Pehelwan (he was the one who brought Indurani from Poona to Bombay; was a popular villain in stunt films), Nandram Pehelwan (very popular in silent films but fell on bad days in the talkie era), Sadiq Pehelwan, Maane Pehelwan, Amir Khan Pehelwan etc.

Marutirao Pehelwan was different. He was handsome, tall, well built, could act and sing well. He was selected for the hero’s role in first Gujarati talkie film ‘Narsi Mehata’ (1932), made by Sagar Movietone. He acted as hero and other roles in about 40 films and sang songs too. His first Hindi film was ‘Lanka Dahan’ (1933) and last his film was ‘Apna Ghar’ (1942).

He married his co-star of many films – Tara (sister of Sitara Devi and Alaknanda). They left films and settled in Dhule, Maharashtra. Marutirao started a dairy business there. Famous dancer Gopi Krishna was their son.
[Author’s Note: From 1946, there was another comedian actor named Maruti, active in Hindi films. Initially, he too was billed as Marutirao, creating confusion. He was the father of comedienne Guddi Maruti.]

Today’s song is a Folk song of Rajasthan. It is in Marwari language. Shri Girdharilal Vishwakarma ji has uploaded this song as the ‘first Marwaari song in Hindi films”. On my email inquiry, he has kindly informed me that in this folk song, the wife is telling her husband (aali ja) that ‘bichhuda‘ (scorpion) has bitten her and she wants to go to her ‘peehar‘ (father’s house) now. I am very much thankful to him for this rare song.

[Author’s Note: Acknowledgements and thanks – The above write up refers to and has adapted material from books by Sidharth Bhatia, Saadat Manto, Isak Mujawar, Vithal Pandya, Biren Kothari (book on Sagar Movietone), Sanjit Narwekar, scroll.in, HFGK, Encyclopedia of Indian Films and my own notes.]

[Ed Note: Thanks to Shri Girdharilal Vishwakarma ji (of Jodhpur), who helped to decipher the correct lyrics.]


Song – Bichhudo Ri Ghaali Peehar Chaali Saa, Aali Jaa (Baala Joban) (1934) Singer – Marutirao Pehalwan, Lyrics – Traduitional, Music – Badri Prasad Manik

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

bichhudo ri ghaali peehar chaali saa
aali jaa
bichhudo ri ghaali peehar chaali saa
aali jaa
lehardaar beechhudo
naina ro lobhi beechhudo
ghansaagar mhaaro beechhudo

haan laladi sar daabe poochho thaake saa
aali jaa
laladi sar daabe poochho thaake saa
aali jaa
lehardaar beechhudo
naina ro lobhi beechhudo
ghansaagar mhaaro bee. . .

beechhoda naina par bichhudo lad gayo saa
aali jaa
beechhoda naina par bichhudo lad gayo saa
aali jaa
lehardaar beechhudo
naina ro lobhi beechhudo
ghansaagar mhaaro beechhudo

bambai jaavo to motor laajo saa
aali jaa
bambai jaavo to motor laajo saa
aali jaa
lehardaar beechhudo
naina ro lobhi beechhudo
ghansaagar mhaaro beechhudo

bichhude ri ghaali peehar chaali saa
aali jaa
lehardaar beechhudo
naina ro lobhi beechhudo

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

बीछुड़े री घाली पीहर चाली सा
आली जा
बीछुड़े री घाली पीहर चाली सा
आली जा
लहरदार बीछुड़ो
नैणा रो लोभी बीछुड़ो
घनसागर म्हारो बीछुड़ो

हाँ ललड़ी सर दाबे पूछो थाके सा
आली जा
ललड़ी सर दाबे पूछो थाके सा
आली जा
लहरदार बीछुड़ो
नैणा रो लोभी बीछुड़ो
घनसागर म्हारो बी॰ ॰ ॰

बिछोड़ा नैना पर बीछुड़ो लड़गयो सा
आली जा
बिछोड़ा नैना पर बीछुड़ो लड़गयो सा
आली जा
लहरदार बीछुड़ो
नैणा रो लोभी बीछुड़ो
घनसागर म्हारो बीछुड़ो

बम्बई जावो तो मोटर लाजो सा
आली जा
बम्बई जावो तो मोटर लाजो सा
आली जा
लहरदार बीछुड़ो
नैणा रो लोभी बीछुड़ो
घनसागर म्हारो बीछुड़ो

बिछुड़े री घाली पीहर चाली सा
लहरदार बीछुड़ो
नैणा रो लोभी बीछुड़ो


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

It is a well-known fact that when sound films came into being in 1931, majority of the films which were produced, especially in the 1930s, belonged to the genres of action, adventure, costume drama, mythology, fantasy, folk legend etc. There were few takers for films containing social, family drama and romantic themes. In a way, this was the legacy from silent films. Those who produced and directed silent films may have thought it prudent to try more or less the same genres in sound films to begin with.
Read more on this topic…


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over FOURTEEN years. This blog has over 17400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 5000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2023) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

17401

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1341
Total Number of movies covered=4685

Total visits so far

  • 15,645,505 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,970 other subscribers

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share

Category of songs

Current Visitors

Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 5000 days.

Archives

Stumble

visitors whereabouts

blogadda

blogcatalog

Music Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory
%d bloggers like this: