Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Har kisi ko nahin milta yahaan pyaar zindagi mein

Posted on: April 27, 2015


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, the 27th of April, is the death anniversary of Feroz Khan.

It feels like only the other day that Feroz passed away – the memory (and shock) of that day is still fresh in my mind. But, when I checked the year just now, I see it was in 2009. So it’s already 6 years since Feroz left us. How time flies!

Today’s generation might know Feroz Khan more as the father of Fardeen Khan, but to people of my generation (who were in (high)school in the 70s), Feroz Khan was a dashing, stylish hero, whose films usually had a lot of action and stunts, a lot of them in outdoor locations.

In other words, for school-going children of the time (like me), with a somewhat less critical eye with regard to “acting ability”, fultoos entertainment.

An earlier generation to mine would probably remember not just Feroz’s entry into the industry in the late 50s but also how he evolved over a career that spanned almost 50 years. For Feroz Khan’s roles in his early years were quite different from the roles he played in the 70s/80s.

In the 60s, Feroz played a negative or grey role in a few films. Ones that comes readily to my mind are Bahurani (1963), Oonche Log (1965) and Aadmi Aur Insaan (1969) but I am sure there are more out there.

He was also the official “jilted lover” of the time. In film after film, whether it was Aarzoo (1965), Raat Aur Din (1967), Aadmi Aur Insaan (1969), Pyaasi Shaam (1969), Safar (1970) or Upaasna (1971), the heroine would invariably fall for another guy (the hero), and poor Feroz would end up losing out. In the bargain, he got the occasional good song to sing (like “jo tumko ho pasand” in Safar and “darpan ko dekha” in Upaasna) but maybe he would have preferred to be the leading man and not “the other guy”, constantly losing out. 🙂

But there was another category of films in the 60s where Feroz DID get to play leading man. Never mind that they were invariably B-films (where, by his own admission, he often tried to channel Shammi Kapoor :-)), opposite then B-heroines like Mumtaz and Ameeta. But at least in these films, Feroz didn’t have to sacrifice his love. 🙂

Some of these films had good songs too – a song I am particularly fond of is the sweet, Chitragupt composition, “ek baat hai kehne ki” from Samson (1964) picturised on Feroz and Ameeta.

Some of these films were thriller/suspense films too. Like Ek Paheli (1971) where Feroz stars opposite Tanuja.

But then came the 70s – and there was a pretty remarkable transformation in Feroz Khan and his position in the industry.

It all started with Apradh (1972). Not only did Feroz star in this film (opposite Mumtaz) but he also produced and directed this film. So he had plenty of control over it, to shape it the way he wanted.

And the world got to see a different side to Feroz Khan.

They saw a stylish director, a lavish producer – one who pushed the envelope in trying to entertain the audiences. Feroz didn’t cut corners as producer/director – he went ALL the way.

This aspect of Feroz’s character would be seen in every film that he produced/directed. Whether it was Apradh, Dharmatma, Qurbani, Jaanbaaz or Yalgaar, Feroz’s stamp could be seen in the film. Lavish sets, outdoor locales, larger-than-life characters, action-packed sequences, lots of catchy music – Feroz gave all of this to his audiences without holding back. No half-measures or compromises.

In Apradh, he showed car racing in Germany – something new for Indian audiences.

In Dharmatma, he shot breath-taking scenes of Afghanistan’s landscape – possibly the first time, outdoor shooting was done in Afghanistan for a Hindi film.

In Qurbani, he had a scene of a Mercedes car in a parking lot being completely demolished. I remember this scene created quite a sensation at the time.

This was typical Feroz Khan. 🙂

Even as an actor, the Feroz Khan of the 70s was different. His films often involved gangsters, dacoits, smugglers – and he, as leading man, would be right at the centre of the action. There was often a Hollywood, “western” feel to his films – Khote Sikkay, Dharmatma and Kaala Sona come to mind.

And oh, gone was the “jilted lover” Feroz. In Qurbani, it is not Feroz who makes the sacrifice, it is Vinod Khanna. Feroz might have thought “my film, my rules”. 🙂

Came the 80s – and a Feroz Khan film became a rarity. Maybe this is one reason there was a lot of buzz before the release of Jaanbaaz (1986). Apart from the fact that the film had an all-star cast, the audience was waiting to see another Feroz Khan-made film. They hadn’t seen once since Qurbani (1980).

Jaanbaaz did fairly well at the box-office and was followed by Dayavaan (1988). I think this did fairly well too. It was a remake of the superhit Tamil film, Nayakan, loosely based on the life of Bombay’s underworld don, Varadaraja Mudaliar.

Feroz Khan then made Yalgaar (1991). Another of his action-packed films with gang rivalry but with a strong family angle to it too, if I remember the story right. I don’t remember how it did at the box-office, maybe it didn’t do too well.

Feroz then took a break from acting. Years later, in 1998, he tried to launch his son, Fardeen, with Prem Aggan. The film flopped badly – it must have come as a rude shock for Feroz. After that, though he did the odd film, Feroz faded away from the scene of action. Towards the end, his health also began failing, though news of his death did come as a shock to many, including me.

All in all, whether his films did well or not, Feroz Khan as producer/director will be remembered as somebody who made stylish films in which he pulled out all the stops to give his audience maximum entertainment. As one who enjoyed watching his films, I must thank him for that.

Let’s now move on to the song for this post.

It is from Jaanbaaz (1986). It also happens to be one of my favourite songs of the 80s. And I suspect, not just mine. Whenever I’ve discussed this song with anybody, I’ve found that person also nodding in agreement, in appreciating this song.

What’s not to like? The music is catchy (especially the guitar), there’s Sridevi looking pretty awesome, the lyrics are pretty good. And, very importantly, it seems to me at least to be a pretty romantic song (not that I am much of a judge of romance :-)). This song gets played several times in the movie, viz – a duet with Sridevi and Feroz Khan, and a background version where Feroz is reminiscing the good times. The unabridged audio of this song lasts over seven minutes. Parts of this full songhave been picturised and there are portions of audio that have not been picturised.

This is one of those songs that has a memory for me. I first heard it when I was on tour to Hyderabad in 1986 on a project. I was staying at Hotel Sarovar, opposite the Secretariat at the time. I remember being quite tired at the end of that day. As I lay down, I decided to just switch on the radio to listen to whatever was playing on it.

This song “har kisi ko nahin milta” began playing. I had never heard it before – and fell instantly in love with it. It had a sort of relaxing (if surreal) feel about it – exactly what I needed at the time.

I didn’t know which film it was from. I thought it was from an older film, especially because of the lyrics. By then, in the mid-80s, I had got used to lyrics like “ice cream khaogi…haan, haan”. When I heard this song with lyrics like “jeete jee humko pyaar mila, hum donon kismat waale hain”, and sung ever so softly by Manhar Udhas, it didn’t seem to fit in with the times. 🙂

Only later, when I asked somebody, I was told it was from the then-new film, Jaanbaaz.

So that is my first memory of this song. 🙂

Anyway, enough reading. Now, let’s all enjoy this song and think of Feroz Khan.

Video

Audio

Song-Har kisi ko nahin milta yahaan pyaar zindagi mein (Jaanbaaz)(1986) Singers-Sadhana Sargam, Manhar Udhas, Lyrics-Indeewar, MD-Kalyanji Anandji
Both

Lyrics (Audio version)
——————-

laa la
lalalalaala
laa laa
lalalaala

laa la
lalalalaala
laa laa laa
lalalaalala

har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
khushnaseeb hain wo jinko hai mili
ye bahaar zindagi mein aen
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein

har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
khushnaseeb hain wo jinko hai mili
ye bahaar zindagi mein aen
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein

chaahe chaandi chaman mein barasti rahe
khilta nahin phool bahaar bina
chaahe chaandi chaman mein barasti rahe
khilta nahin phool bahaar bina
hai satya bina jeena mumkin
naamumkin jeena pyaar bina
naamumkin jeena pyaar bina
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
khushnaseeb hain wo jinko hai mili
ye bahaar zindagi mein aen
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein

honthon se honth miley na bhale
chaahe miley na baanhen baanhon se
honthon se honth miley na bhale
chaahe miley na baanhen baanhon se
do dil zinda reh sakte hain
chaahat ki bhari nigaahon se
chaahat ki bhari nigaahon se
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein

har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein

zulfon ke narm andhere hain
jismon ke garm ujaale hain
zulfon ke narm andhere hain
jismon ke garm ujaale hain
jeete jee hum ko pyaar mila
hum donon qismatwaale hain
hum donon qismatwaale hain

har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein
khushnaseeb hain wo jinko hai mili
ye bahaar zindagi mein aen
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein

4 Responses to "Har kisi ko nahin milta yahaan pyaar zindagi mein"

Sadhana Sargam and Manhar sang it very well,and the song is very stylish like Feroz Khan ……….and one of my all time favourite,
Thanks Sir for the post and the lyrics,

Raat ke sannate mein iss gaane ko aksar main sunthaa hoon, ………
……….”just out of the world”

Like

Not exactly a confession, but the best state of mind to enjoy the songs from this movie is an inebriated one.

Feroz Khan was omnipresent in this movie in all departments.

Like

I missed the Feroze hype. I liked the early Feroze, as he was in Safar or Admi aur Insaan. I loved Qurbani, what with those lovely songs by Nazia Hasan and beautiful Zeenat dancing to them.

This song is nice, but I never took to it. I liked ‘Tera saath hai kitna pyara, kam lagta hai jeevan saara’ more.

Like

Feroze Khan was famous for many of his films like Chaar Dervesh, Aadmi aur Insaan, Reporter Raju , Bahu Rani and many more . He could fit in any of these roles from Hero to villain. He was my time favourite one too .Enjoyed song too Raja saab.
Shekhar.

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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