Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

One two ka four four two ka one..my name is Lakhan

Posted on: August 11, 2021


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Blog Day :

4772 Post No. : 16521

While we in this blog discuss songs, we also discuss other topics of common interest, like sports (mainly cricket), festivals, history, economy etc.

Tokyo Olympics concluded a few days back. As Indians, we had lots of sporting events to look forward to. Indians were participating in many events. Indians had pinned hopes of medals on quite a few of them, seeing that some of them were actually ranked world number 1, 2, 3 etc in their sports and they were given similar seedings too in the Olympics. But most of these sportspersons disappointed.

On the other hand, there were a few who performed beyond their rankings and managed to win medals. India won a medal (silver) on the very first day of the Olympics. First three medals were won by female athletes. Later, males too joined in winning medals.

Icing on the cake arrived on 7 August 2021, the last day of Olympics. The final medal that India won in these games happened to a track and field medal. It was the very first time that India won a track and field medal. And it turned out to be a GOLD medal, no less !

This gold medal event was in men’s javelin throw. Indians had never taken so much intetest in an atheletics event before this Olympics. I was one of those who followed the event closely. Since India actually won the gold, I dug deep and got all the relevant details of this competition. In this article, I present my findings, which is basically a description of How the Javelin Gold was won in Tokyo Olympics.

There were 32 javelin throwers in the competition. They were divided into two groups, viz Group A and group B, each consisting of 16 athletes.

In the qualification round, each javelin thrower was given three attempts in which to achieve the qualifying marks of 83. 5 meters. Based on the performances, 12 javelin throwers were to qualify for the finals.

In case less than 12 javelin throwers achieved the qualification mark, then the remaining slots were to be filled from those who had hurled the javelin the farthest among the non qualifiers.

Only six javelin throwers (three from group A and three from group B) were able to achieve direct qualification by throwing the javelin beyond 83.5 meters. Here are the details of these six direct qualifiers.

Gr A Gr B Overall qualification round rank
Name (Country) Attempts Result Group rank Name (Country) Attempts Result Group rank
Neeraj Chopra (India) 1 (86.65 m) 86.65 m 1 1
J Vetter (Germany) 3 (82.04 m,82.08m, 85.64 m) 85.64 m 2 2
Arshad Nadeem (Pakistan) 2 (78.50 m, 85.16 m) 85.16 m 1 3
Jakub Vadlejch (Czech) 3 (79.27, 78.96 m, 84.93 m) 84.93 m 2 4
L Etelatalo (Finland) 1 (84.50 m ) 84.50 m (SB) 3 5
Julian Weber (Germany) 1 ( 84.41 m) 84.41 m 3 6

Only six javelin throwers could gain direct qualifications. There were six more slots of finalists to be filled. Those six non qualifiers who threw the javelin the farthest were picked to fill the remaining slots. Following six javelin throwers thus gained indirect qualification for the final:-

Gr A Gr B Overall qualification round rank
Name (Country) Attempts Result Group rank Name (Country) Attempts Result Group rank
A M Novac (Romania) 3 (83.27 m, 80.90 m, x) 83.27 m (SB) 4 7
V Vesely (Czech) 3 (x, 83.04 m, x) 83.04 m (SB) 5 8
Alaksei Katkavets (BLR) 3 (81.08 m, 81.73 m, 82.72 m) 82.72 m 4 9
Andrian Mardare (Moldova) 3 (80.69, 78.95 m, 82.70 m) 82.70 m 5 10
Pavel Mialeshka (BLR) 3 (x, 82.17m, 82.64 m ) 82.64 m 6 11
Kim Amb (Sweden) 3 (82.40 m, 79.87, x ) 82.40 m (SB) 7 12

Thus four javelin throwers from group A and two from group B gained indirect qualification for the final. Remaining 20 javelin throwers (9 from group A and 11 from group B ) were eliminated.

The qualifying mark of 83.50 m does not appear too daunting for the competitors on paper, seeing that the personal best throws of most competitors, including those who failed to qualify was well over 83.5 meters. Some of the non qualifiers in fact had hurled the spear well over 90 m in the past. Some of them were past Olympic medal winners and world champions as well. Those who failed to qualify for the final included Walcott Keshorn (Trinidad and Tobago)-2012 Olympics gold medalist (90.16 m personal best), Julius Yego (Kenya)- 2016 Olympics silver medalist (personal best of 92.72 m), Cheng Chao Tsun (Taipeh)- Asian record holder with 91.36 m throw, Peter Anderson (Grenada)-current world champion (personal best 87.31 m) etc.

But World class sports is played on the field and it depends on performance on the day. Past records and achievements count for little. It is the three throws in the qualifying competition that determine who goes ahead to the finals and who get eliminated. Only six javelin throwers gained direct qualification. The six javelin throwers sneaked in as indirect qualifiers. The last qualifier who qualified could only hurl the spear to a distance of 82.4 meters, more than one meter behind the qualification mark.

Indians were cautiously optimistic about the chances of Neeraj Chopra because his performance during the current season vis a vis the performance of other leading contenders suggested that he was a medal contender.

Many leading contenders were eliminated after the qualifying round. The biggest gold contender was J Vetter of Germany, who had a season’s best of 97. 76 meters achieved in July 2021. But he too was on the verge of elimination in the qualifying stage, before he survived by crossing the qualifying mark on his third and final throw. Neeraj Chopra of India gave Indians a pleasant surprise by easily qualifying on his very first throw, and that throw was the longest throw of the qualifying stage. Thus he qualified as number 1 qualifier among the 12 qualifiers for the final. Vetter qualified as number 2. Pakistan’s Arshad Nadeem qualified at the third place, and Pakistanis suddenly found something to look forward to in the Tokyo Olympics.

The timings of sports telecast of Tokyo Olympics suited India perfectly. The telecast would beging early morning iST and would continue till late evening. Javelin throw finals were scheduled on Saturday 7 August 2021. Unlike the qualifiers, the finals were at night time. It was in the afternoon in India.

The rules for the finals were that all 12 throwers would be given three throws each. The first eight contenders after these three throws would get another three throws each. The throwers would then be ranked based on their best throws.

When the competition began, I took pen and paper and began to note down the throws of the participants. During the first three throws, the sequence of throwers was arbitrary (or so it seemed to me). The number 10 qualifier (Adrian Mardore) threw first followed by Neeraj Chopra (number 1 qualifier), then number 12 qualifier (Kim Amb) followed by number 7 (A M Novak) etc. The first three throws of the twelve throwers in the sequence in which they threw was noted down by me in a table like this :-

S No Thrower (Country) First throw (m) Second throw (m) Third throw (m) Best throw (m) Standing after three throws
1 Adrian Mardare (Moldova) 81.16 81.73 82.84 82.84 Eighth
2 Neeraj Chopra (India) 87.03 87.58 76.79 87.58 First
3 Kim Amb (Sweden) 77.22 78.31 79.69 79.69 Eleventh
4 A M Novac (Romania) 77.03 79.29 x 79.29 Twelfth
5 Vitazlav Vesely (Czech) 79.73 80.30 85.44 85.44 Second
6 Julian Weber (Germany) 85.30 77.90 78.00 85.30 Third
7 Lassi Etelataro (Finland) 78.43 76.59 83.28 83.28 Seventh
8 J Vetter (Germany) 82.52 x x 82.52 Ninth
9 Arshad Nadeem (Pakistan) 82.40 x 84.62 84.62 Fourth
10 Pavel Mialeshka (BLR) 82.28 79.35 78.13 82.28 Tenth
11 Jakub Vadlejch (Czech) 83.98 x x 83.98 Fifth
12 Aliaskei Katkavets (BLR) 82.49 81.03 83.71 83.71 Sixth

After the first three throws, bottom four throwers were eliminated. J Vetter, the world record holder and the overwhelming favourite for the gold, had just one legal throw in his first attempt. That throw of 82.52 m kept him in the fourth position till the second round. But he fouled his third round and as many as five throwers threw longer than his 82.52 m in their third attempts. These five throwers advanced, and Vetter was relegated to the ninth position after third round. Thus he was among those four who were eliminated after round three. It was a big upset. The other three people who were eliminated threw lesser distances than what they had thrown during the qualifying stage, and their elimination was no surprise.

The remaining eight contenders then hurled three more throws in the ascending orders of their standing after three throws, viz the person eighth in the standing threw first and the person standing first threw last.

Here are the throws of the eight javelin throwers in the order in which they took their fourth, fifth and sixth attempts.

S No Thrower (Country) First throw (m) Second throw (m) Third throw (m) Fourth throw Fifth throw Sixth throw Best throw (m) Standing after six throws
1 Adrian Mardare (Moldova) 81.16 81.73 82.84 81.90 83.30 81.09 83.30 Seventh
2 Lassi Etelataro (Finland) 78.43 76.59 83.28 79.20 79.99 83.05 83.28 Eighth
3 Aliaskei Katkavets (BLR) 82.49 81.03 83.71 79.24 x x 83.71 Sixth
4 Jakub Vadlejch (Czech) 83.98 x x 82.86 86.67 (SB) x 86.67 Second (SILVER)
5 Arshad Nadeem (Pakistan) 82.40 x 84.62 82.91 81.98 x 84.62 Fifth
6 Julian Weber (Germany) 85.30 77.90 78.00 83.10 85.15 75.72 85.30 Fourth
7 Vitazlav Vesely (Czech) 79.73 80.30 85.44 (SB) x 84.98 x 85.44 Third (BRONZE)
8 Neeraj Chopra (India) 87.03 87.58 76.79 x x 84.24 87.58 First (GOLD)

One can see that six out of eight throwers who were eligible for three additional throws failed to improve upon their best attempts achieved during the first three attempts. There were just two throwers who achieved their best during the fourth, fifth and sixth attempts. They climbed up the rankings and affected the rankings of those whom they overtook.

Adrian Mardore of Moldova, who was eighth after three throws achieved his best throw of 83.30 m in his fifth attempt. With this throw, which was 2 cm better than the best throw of seventh placed Lassi Etelataro of Norway, climbed up to seventh position, relegating Lassi Etelataro to the eighth position in the final standing.

The other thrower who gave his best during the final three throws changed the higher standings in a major way. Jakub Vadlejch of Czech republic had managed just one legal throw during his first three attempts, but that throw was far enough to keep him in top 8. In his fifth attempt, he hurled the javelin to a distance of 86.67 m. It was season’s best performance for him, just like his throw during the qualification stage was his season’s best. With this throw, he climbed upto the second position. Athletes, who were occupying second, third and fourth position were pushed one place down as a result. So, his compatriot Vitaly Vesely, who too had thrown his season’s best throw in the final, had to be content with the bronze. Julian Weber of Germany, who too had achieved season’s best throw in the final, was fourth. Arshad Nadeem of Pakistan, ended up fifth.

One can see that Neeraj Chopra of India led from the front and he was never threatened for the gold. It all sounds so easy with the benefit of hindsight, but it was obviously not as easy at it looks like. In a country known for missing opportunities, allowing opportunities to slip away, choking at the last moment etc, it was such a refreshing change to see an Indian performing like a seasoned pro, grabbing the contest by the scruff of its neck and not allowing others a sniff of a chance. He qualified for the final in just one throw, ending up at number one among all qualifiers. In the final, his first two throws were longer than the throws of all other competitors and so he had sealed his gold in his first two throws itself. It looks so easy if you have a talented sportsman representing you. In reality, it was the very first time that an Indian was winning a Track and Field medal in an Olympics.

Indians would have settled for medal of any hue, even bronze, as their first track and field atheletics medal. The fact that it was a gold has immense significance. European nations keep winning track and field golds, and that changes nothing, but a solitary track and field Gold won by an India will change the fate of atheletics in India, and elsewhere. Let us not forget, even today India is world’s fifth biggest economy. If Indians take to atheletics with the same vengeance with which they take to cricket, then atheletics worldwide will get more popular than what it already is because one sixth of world population lives in India. We have already seen what happened to cricket in India (and worldwide) when India won ODI world cup in 1983, and later T20 World cup in 2007. I can foresee a situation when an atheletics revolution will take place in India in near future.

Those who think that this medal is one off and the normal service will resume after that, I disagree. THis event has changed Indian sports for ever. I can cite an Indian example to prove my point. India was a very weak chess playing nation till 1970s, that too when Chess was a game that originated in India. It was belived that Indians can never become chess grandmasters. It was in 1988 that India had her first chess grandmaster (Vishwanathan Anand). This event popularised chess in India as never before. Vishwanathan Anand went on to become five times world champion, and India today had 69 grand masters in chess. Chess too has an Olympics, called Chess Olympiad, played every two years. How many of us know that India at present is joint world champion in Chess Olympiad (with Russia)! All this had happened in a matter of three decades. I see a similar thing happening in Athletics. Indian economy and market can easily support and sponsor this forthcoming athletics revolution in India.

If one looks at the medal tally of various nations in Olympics, one will find that the medal tally in a way is a refection on the economic development of a nation. The top ten nations in the medal tally are major economies. Most are high income nations and others are just one rung below, viz Middle income group nations. Sporting prowess in a way has some definite correlation with HDI (Human development Index) of a country. There are some notable exceptions (viz some African nations), but otherwise economical development leads to overall betterment in sporting achievements. Hopefully, India too will join the ranks of top medal winners two to three decades from now, like how India has already become a top chess playing nation, rubbing shoulders with the likes of Russia, USA and other chess superpowers.

What is the medal tally that India achieved in Tokyo Olympics ? One gold, two silvers, four bronze. One two ka four, four two ka one. Hindi movie “Ram Lakhan” had already created a song for this occasion, as far back as in 1989, when Vishwanathan Anand was India’s sole chess grandmaster !

Here is this popular song of its time. It is sung by Md Aziz, Anuradha Paudwal, Nitin Mukesh and chorus. Anand Bakshi is the lyricist. Music is composed by Laxmikant Pyarelal. It is picturised on Anil Kapoor, Madhuri Dixit, Jackie Shroff and others as a dance song.

Video

Song-One two ka four four two ka one…My name is Lakhan (Ram Lakhan)(1989) Singer-Md Aziz, Anuradha Paudwal, Nitin Mukesh, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-Laxmikant Pyarelal
Male chorus
Female chorus
All chorus

Lyrics

dhina dhin taak
dhina dhin taak
dhina dhin taak
dhina dhin taak

raam paam paam
raam paam paam
ram pa pam
raam pam
raam paam paam
raam paam paam
ram pa pam
raam pam
ram pam pam pam
ram pam pam pam

ae ji
o ji
ae ji o ji
lo ji suno ji
main hoon manmauji
karta hoon main jo woh tum bhi karo ji
one two ka four
four two ka one
my name is Lakhan
my name is Lakhan
sajnon ka sajan
mera naam hai Lakhan
ae ji o ji
lo ji suno ji
main hoon manmauji
karta hoon main jo woh tum bhi karo ji
one two ka four
four two ka one
my name is Lakhan
my name is Lakhan
sajnon ka sajan
mera naam hai Lakhan

tak tunna tak tunna
dhidhik dhidhik
dhidhik dhidhik
tak tunna tak tunna
dhidhik dhidhik
dhidhik dhidhik

hmm
duniya chakori
duniya chakori
paisa hai chanda
paisa hai chanda
sooli pe latka har ek banda
sabke galey mein
sabke galey mein
maaya ka phanda
maaya ka phanda
seekho o yaaron
inse yeh dhandha
inse yeh dhandha

o
o o o
o
o o o o
do bol meethhe bas bol ke
har maal becho kam taul ke
re baaba kam taul ke
re baaba kam taul ke
tum apni khaali jeben bharo ji
karta hoon main jo woh tum bhi karo ji
one two ka four
four two ka one
my name is Lakhan
my name is Lakhan
sajnon ka sajan
mera naam hai Lakhan

o o o
aa aa aa aa
o o o o
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
(sargam)

o
o o o
o o o
o o o
o o o
o o o
main kuchh na jaanoon is’se ziyaada
main kuchh na jaanoon is’se ziyaada
tu mera mohan
main teri raadha

jeevan nahin itna seedha saada
kaise karoon tumse koi vaada
vaade hain jhoothe
sachhe ho tum
jaise bhi ho
bade achche ho tum
bade achche ho tum
kehte ho sabse
main hoon manmauji
manmauji ho toh mauj karo ji

one two ka four
four two ka one
sajnon ke sajan
karo koi jatan
karo koi jatan
jaldi ho milan

dhina dhin dha
dhina dhin dha
dhina dhin dha
dhina dhin dha

hmm
kha pee raha hai
kha pee raha hai/font>
saara zamaana
saara zamaana
jo bhookha pyaasa hai woh deewaana
hai woh deewaana
arre daulat ki jhoothhi
hmm
chamak pe na jaana
hmm
mehnat se roti rozi kamaana
rozi kamaana

hmm
hmm hmm hmm
o o o
kehna badon ka tum maan lo
achcha bura kya hai
jaan lo
kya hai jaan lo

arre kehta hoon main jo
woh tum suno ji

maine suna nahin phir se kaho ji
nahin number two koi
donon ho number one
mere Ram Lakhan jiyo Ram Lakhan
mere Ram Lakhan jiyo Ram Lakhan
sajnon ke sajan jiyo raam Lakhan(o o o o)
sajnon ke sajan jiyo raam Lakhan(o o o o)
sajnon ke sajan jiyo raam Lakhan(o o o o)
sajnon ke sajan jiyo raam Lakhan(o o o o)
sajnon ke sajan jiyo raam Lakhan(o o o o)

13 Responses to "One two ka four four two ka one..my name is Lakhan"

Wow ! Atul ji.

What an in depth analysis! Even a non sports person like myself understood everything!

Our blog is not just for Music, but for everything under the Sun.

Like

Thanks for your appreciation. Hopefully this article will enable people to appreciate Neeraj Chopra’s feat in a more informed and knowledgeable manner.

Like

Atul ji,

Thanks for one more excellent article.
I enjoy reading your posts on general topics, as you do lot of spade work and data searching, making your articles highly credible and informative.
Many people, as you have averred, may consider the Neeraj phenomena as an ‘One Off’ incident, but I too feel that this one spark may ignite a fire which has the capability of becoming a blaze. Of course it may take some time.
The economically developed countries naturally can afford spending on sport promotion. With what the present Govt. is doing in India today may lead us to a place in the Big group, enabling us to spend more on sports-other than Cricket.( to be fair, Govt. does not spend anything on Cricket. They generate their own finance)
When nepotism and corruption from Govt. controlled sports bodies stop completely, better sportsmen will develop surely. We have the Talents. My point is proved as the Army and other Forces generally hog prizes in sports, because they are free from these ills.
Once again thanks for a very informative and ‘ DIL SE ‘ article, as expected from you.
-AD

Like

Thanks a lot for your comments. Your appreciation means a lot to me. You clearly share my optimistic on Indian future in sports and other fields. India is on the right track.

Like

I am also surprised that such a famous and popular song of the late 80’s was still not discussed here till today.
May be it was destined to be in appreciation of Neeraj only !

Like

Dear Atul ji,

Very informative & well researched article. As you said in one of comments, it’s clear that Neeraj Chopra’s feat was truly magnificent & he was no.1 from the moment go…….Truly world champion!

Thanks a ton!
Umesh

Like

Thanks for your appreciation. I dream of a future when we will have similar memorable days on a regular basis on sports field.

Like

First and foremost, thank you very much for this “aankhon dekha haal” post. I had missed seeing the event.
Specially loved the in-depth report on how the players moved up the table & changed their season’s best.
And you have written all that was running through my head (as I was reading the post) About how the Czech player, placed 8th after the qualifiers, had his best throw to reach silver medal.
Though the song says “One Two Ka four, Four two Ka one” it can only be a slogan for the number of medals India won
The song is one that I love, But I would never have connected it with sports but for all the Whatsapp Memes that we were bombarded with after India’s Olympic showing.

Like

Excellent Post Sir ji. Enjoyed reading it. The in-depth analysis and statistics have further made this post very interesting. This ‘gold medal celebration’ and the ‘highest total number of medals’ won, deserved a well crafted post like this. Let us hope that the future will bring many more such occasions to celebrate, and specially in the field of ‘athletics’ sports’ for India.
Thanks again for this ‘special post’.
Regards,

Like

Thanks for the appreciation. Hopefully, this breakthrough medal will help start an athletics revolution in India.

Like

“Aankhon dekha haal” it really is. This is a truly informative and researched post. The old habit of writing down cricket scores from radio commentary must have helped.

There have been some prospects in the past too like P. T. Usha, who were contenders and raised hopes of Gold medal in Athletics, but that was not to be. Nothing succeeds like success, after all.

Like

Thanks for the appreciation. Yes, habit of keeping records has come handy for me. I find that one understands a topic better if explained through tables and charts, rather than through words.

Like

Wow! What an article.Thanks for giving such a vivid account of the event.. You have mesmerized the readers as if one is physically present in the field and watching the event.. Thanks once again.

Like

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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