Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Shyama


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4867 Post No. : 16659

Today, November 14, 2021 is the 4th Remembrance Day of Shyama (real name – Khurshid Akhtar) who enthralled the Hindi film buffs with her blinks and smiles in her Hindi films of 1950s. There was a spontaneity and energy in her performances reflecting, what I guess, her joie de vivre nature.

My earliest memory of watching Shyama was in ‘Aar Paar’ (1954) on its repeat release sometime in 1974 as a part of Guru Dutt’s Film Perspectives. I became familiar with her face when some of the songs picturised on her from the films like my all-time favourite, ‘Aar Paar’ (1954), ‘Bhai Bhai’ (1956), ‘Bhaabhi’ (1957), ‘Sharda’ (1957), ‘Mr Qartoon MA’ (1959), ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’ (1960) and many more, used to be telecast on Mumbai Doordarshan’s  ‘Chhaaya Geet’ programme. Some of her songs have remained in the limelight even today. I can never get tired of watching those songs pictuirsed on Shyama.

Shyama (07 Jun, 1935 – 14 Nov, 2017) was born in Lahore but her family had shifted to Mumbai in early 1940s. She did her schooling in Anjuman-E-Islam High School in South Mumbai. Shyama’s foray into her first Hindi film, ‘Zeenat’ (1945) was an accidental one. When she was on a visit to watch the film’s shooting along with her school friends, the film’s director, Shaukat Hussain Rizvi invited her to be the part of the chorus singers for the picturization of the qawwali song, “Aahen Na Bhari Shiqwe Na Kiye”. At that time, she was 9. Thereafter, she did small roles as a child actor and side roles as a teenager in around 35 films. At a young age, she had become the bread-earner for her large family. Her screen name, Shyama was given by Prakash Pictures’ Vijay Bhatt when working in his film, ‘Nai Maa’ (1946) as a child artist.

Everything was not roses on the way to reach the stardom for Shyama. She had to struggle very hard to get roles during the early stage of her life when she was growing from her childhood to a teenager. Her struggling days got over when she bagged her first lead role in Filmistan’s ‘Shrimati ji’ (1952) with Nasir Khan. Thereafter, there was no dearth of work for her in the films.

During her filmy career of over 4 decades, Shyama worked in around 175 films. Some of her notable films are ‘Hum Log’ (1951), ‘Sazaa’ (1951), ‘Dil-E-Naadan’ (1953), ‘Shart’ (1954), ‘Aar Paar’ (1954), ‘Musaafirkhaana’ (1955), ‘Chhoo Mantar’ (1956), ‘Bhai Bhai’ (1956), ‘Shaarda’ (1957), ‘Bhaabhi’ (1957), ‘Johnny Walker’ (1957), ‘Mr. Qartoon MA’ (1958), ‘Laala Rukh’ (1958), ‘Chhoti Bahen’ (1959), ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’ (1960), ‘Zabak’ (1961), ‘Bahurani’ (1963). From 1960’s onwards, Shayma switched over to character roles. She was active till the end of 1970s. However, after the death of her husband in 1979, she virtually took retirement from the films. Shyama faced the camera for the last time in ‘Hathyaar’ (1989).

I was going through her filmography from 1952 when she started getting lead actor’s roles to 1960 when her career was in the waning stage as a lead actor. It is amazing to note that during 1952-60, she worked in as many as 84 films making an average of nearly 10 films per year. I do not recall any other actress of her time achieved this distinction. The main reason for her large number films was that she accepted both the lead as well as supporting actor’s roles. Her films covered a variety of genres with a large assortments of lead actors like Motilal, Ashok Kumar, Premnath, Shammi Kapoor, Bharat Bhushan, Karan Diwan, Guru Dutt, Balraj Sahni, Sunil Dutt, Kishore Kumar, Johnny Walker, Ranjan, Mahipal, Talat Mehmood etc.

Shyama faced her worst financial and emotional turmoil in 1953 when she decided to marry director and cinematographer Fali Mistry. They fell in love  on the sets of ‘Sazaa’ (1951). The marriage was opposed by her father and her brothers. She had revealed her agony in her article in the Urdu film magazine ‘Shama’, published in November 1954, the English translation of which is available in Yasir Abbasi’s book ‘Yeh Un Dinon Ki Baat Hai’ (2018).

According to Shyama, apparently the problem for her large family was that having got used to living lavishly on her earnings, they feared that her marriage with Fali Mistry would strip them off comforts and luxuries. When she decided to go ahead with the marriage, she was forced to leave her own house without her money and jewelry as her father and brothers confiscated all her assets including the bank balances. She and her supporting mother had to stay with the family of producer-director M Sadiq for a month before she could buy her own house by arranging money. It took another six months for Shyama and Fali Mistry to get married. But the marriage was not revealed in public for a long time for fear of film producers avoiding her to sign the new films.

Shyama spent her financially secured retired life, socializing with her close friends like Nanda, Shakeela, Waheeda Rehman, Jabeen Jaleel etc. Just about 5 years before her death, she got a paralysis attack making her movements restricted. However, she majorly recovered from the paralysis. She breathed her last on November 14, 2017 due to lung infections, leaving behind her two sons and a daughter. Her elder son, Faroukh Mistry is a Cinematographer in Hindi feature films and has directed many documentary and advertising films. The second son, Rohinton Mistry is settled in London as a businessman. Both her elder son and her daughter, Shirin were with her while she breathed her last.

As a tribute to Shyama on the occasion of her 4th Remembrance Day, I have chosen a song pictuirsed on her in the film ‘Khota Paisa’ (1958). This film was among four films in which Shyama acted opposite Johnny Walker in lead role. The other three films in this combination were ‘Chhoo Mantar’ (1956), ‘Johnny Walker’ (1957) and ‘Mr Qartoon MA (1958). Incidentally, all these three films had OP Nayyar as the music director.

‘Khota Paisa’ (1958) had 7 songs of which 5 songs have been covered on the Blog. All the songs were written by Rajinder Krishan which were set to music by Madan Mohan. I am presenting the 6th song, “Ye Zaalim Nighaaon Ki Ghaat” which is sung by Asha Bhosle. It is a club song during which NA Ansari, the menacing pipe smoking villain, is present along with his henchmen.

It is interesting to note that in the record version there is some changes in wordings of the song as under:

Film Sound Track Version Record Version
Mukhda
ye zaalim NIGHAAON ki GHAAT
badi tikhi badi NATKHATI
Mukhda
ye zaalim MOHABBAT ki CHAAT
badi tikhi badi CHATPATI
Antara-2
GAA le ZARA jahaan mein
NAGMA to aashiqi kaajo NAYE pyaar ki RAT RATI
Antara-2
LE le MAZA jahaan mein
DAM BHAR LO aashiqi kaajo NA THHI pyaar ki PHATPATI
Antara-3
KATNE bhi de khushi se
ye BAHAAR ke zamaane
Antara-3
LOOTNE bhi de khushi se
ye PYAAR ke zamaane

Other features of this song is that Asha Bhosle seems to imitate the style of Geeta Dutt  and Madan Mohan’s musical composition of the song closely resembles that of OP Nayyar.

Video

Audio

Song – Ye Zaalim Nigaahon Ki Ghaat (Khota Paisa) (1958) Singer – Asha Bhosle, Lyrics – Rajinder Krishan, MD – Madan Mohan

Lyrics

ye zaalim nighaaon ki ghaat
badi teekhi badi natkhati
apne apne muqaddar ki baat
kiske hisse mein kitni bati
ye zaalim nighaaon ki ghaat
badi teekhi badi natkhati
 
jo nazar na milaayi
na jigar pe chot khaayi
us dil kaa faayda kya
jo kisi pe aa na jaaye
hai wo zindagi bhi koi zindagi
jo mohobbat kiye bin kati
ye zaalim nighaaon ki ghaat
badi teekhi badi natkhati
 
jo huwa na kisi ka
dushman hai zindagi ka
gaa le zara jahaan mein
nagma to aashiqi ka
tu jiya bhi to kya
do ghadi ke liye
jo na ye pyaar ki rat rati
ye zaalim nigaahon ki ghaat
badi teekhi badi natkhati
 
ye dil kaun jaane
lut jaaye kis bahaane
katne bhi de khushi se
hain bahaar ke zamaane
lut gaye dil kai
mit gaye dil kai
par mohobbat kabhi na ghati
ye zaalim nigaahon ki ghaat
badi teekhi badi natkhati
apne apne muqaddar ki baat
kiske hisse mein kitni bati

————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
————————————————
ये ज़ालिम निगाहों की घात
बड़ी तीखी बड़ी नटखटी
अपने अपने मुकद्दर की बात
किसके हिस्से में कितनी बटी
ये ज़ालिम निगाहों की घात
बड़ी तीखी बड़ी नटखटी

जो नज़र ना मिलाई
ना जिगर पे चोट खाई
उस दिल का फायदा क्या
जो किसी पे आ ना जाए
है वो ज़िंदगी भी कोई ज़िंदगी
जो मोहब्बत किए बिन कटी
ये ज़ालिम निगाहों की घात
बड़ी तीखी बड़ी नटखटी

जो हुआ ना किसी का
दुश्मन है ज़िंदगी का
गा ले ज़रा जहां में
नग़मा तो आशिक़ी का
तू जिआ भी तो क्या दो घड़ी के लिए
जो ना ये प्यार की रट रटी
ये ज़ालिम निगाहों की घात
बड़ी तीखी बड़ी नटखटी

ये दिल कौन जाने
लुट जाये किस बहाने
कटने भी दे खुशी से
हैं बहार के जमाने
लुट गए दिल कई
मिट गए दिल कई
पर मोहब्बत कभी ना घटी
ये ज़ालिम निगाहों की घात
बड़ी तीखी बड़ी नटखटी
अपने अपने मुकद्दर की बात
किसके हिस्से में कितनी बटी


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4377 Post No. : 15720

“I worshipped Bimal Roy. For me, his worth as a man was more than his films… It is impossible for me to describe what a man he was.”

The above quote was by Ritwik Ghatak, one of Bimal Roy’s desciples who later became an internationally known director of parallel cinema in Bangla films.

In Hindi film industry, there are many film artists, directors and those connected with the film music who are admired for their excellent professional performances. But there would be very few among them who would also be admired as the good human beings. Among few such personalities, the name of Bimal Roy comes to my mind because for the last few months, I have extensively read on the life and works of Bimal Roy. I have found that those who have closely worked with him like Dilip Kumar, Balraj Sahani, Vyjaynatimala, Kamini Kaushal, Nutan, Dharmendra, Shashi Kapoor, Hrishikesh Mukherjee, Gulzar and many more have highly talked about Bimal Roy as a fine human being besides an being an outstanding director. What touched me most about Bimal Roy was what Manobina Roy, his wife had said in an interview. Just a few minutes before his death on January 8, 1966, Bimal Roy had called her and said that he was deeply worried about his workers in Mohan Studio as to what will happen to them after his death. Only when she assured him and repeated her assurance that she would take care of them, Bimal Roy closed his eyes never to open them again.

Today, July 12th 2020 is 111th birth anniversary of Bimal Roy (12/07/1909 – 08/01/1966), one of the greatest Hindi film directors who rose from a still photographer to a cinematographer and then as a producer-director of some of the classic and socially relevant films. Although, there were many film directors from Bengal – especially in the Bombay Talkies who had directed Hindi films in Mumbai in the 1940s, it is said that it was Bimal Roy who brought ‘Bengaliness’ in his Hindi films in Mumbai. He was a trend setter in introducing the ‘middle of the road’ films.

Arunkumar Deshmukh ji has already discussed Bimal Roy’s biographical and celluloid journey in his article covering the song, chale re chale raam vanwaas. I would, therefore, skip his profile and his sequential journey in the film industry. I propose to concentrate mainly on three important phases in his filmy career which led to his meteoric rise in the film industry – as a Cinematographer, as a Director for films produced by New Theatres and as a Producer-director of Hindi films in Mumbai. In my view, the three phases were also the important turning points in the career of Bimal Roy.

Bimal Roy joined New Theatres (NT) as an Assistant Cameraman to Nitin Bose in 1932 during which he assisted him for ‘Chandidas’ (1932, Bangla version and also Hindi version in 1934), ‘Meerabai’ (1933) etc. He was promoted as a cinematographer in NT and shot films like ‘Devdas’ (1935), ‘Manzil’ (1936), ‘Mukti’ (1937), ‘Abhagin’ (1938), ‘Abhinetri’ (1940) ‘Meenakshi’ (1942) etc.

The high point in his career as a cinematographer was ‘Mukti’ (1937) – the first film from NT which was extensively shot outdoors, mostly in the forest of Gauripur (Assam). It was a challenge for Bimal Roy as a Cinematographer to shoot outdoors, the scenes with proper lightings. Even his indoor shots were exceptional. His camera works in the opening scene of the film itself is marvelous. The camera focuses on P C Barua who walks through three rooms, one after another before knocking the door of the fourth room. Here, only the camera ‘speaks’ in the scene in complete silence without any background music to create suspense as to what is going to happen next. The light and shadow effects have been effectively used to convey the mood of the situations in the film.

Kanan Devi, in one of her interviews had said that in ‘Mukti’ (1937), Bimalda through his camera work, made her more beautiful than what she looked in reality. P C Barua, the director, was so happy with his camera work in the film that in the publicity poster of ‘Mukti’ (1937), he made the name of Bimal Roy to appear next to his name with names of the actors appearing in the side. Probably, this may be the first occasion in NT that the publicity poster had prominently carried the name of the cinematographer.

Bimal Roy entered his second phase of his career when he turned as a director for the first time for the Bangla film ‘Udayer Pathe’ [(1944), ‘Towards the Twilight’]. A year later, a Hindi version of the film was made as ‘Hamraahi’ (1945), also directed by Bimal Roy. Manobina Roy, the wife of Bimal Roy was surprised as to why he chose the subject of exploitation by upper class of the lower strata of the society when he himself had the background of a landlord’s son. Probably, he may have seen such scenarios in his teenage days in his family and he wished to bring them to the notice of masses.

The challenge for Bimal Roy in this fiim was that NT boss, B N Sarkar has personally told to direct the film with the left-over cut pieces of the raw stock of negative film as those days, raw stock of films was rationed. There was no scope for wastage of the raw stock of films by way of reshoots. On the top of it, he had taken newcomers, Binita Bose (Roy) and Radhamohan Bhattacharya as the lead actors. With these backgrounds, it was imperative that he should also take the responsibility as a cinematographer. When the shooting of the film was completed, B N Sarkar was surprised that the film was completed by Bimal Roy without taking any extra stock of raw films.

The film though made with a small budget was one of the top box office grossers for NT. The film ran for more than one year in Kolkata’s Chitra theatre. With its Hindi version of the film, the name of Bimal Roy became well-known all-over India. In the Bengali speaking regions, ‘Udayer Pathe’ (1944) became one of the highly discussed films. The film became a trend setter for some subsequent Hindi films having ‘rich girl poor boy’ love story with the background of a class conflict. Chetan Anand’s ‘Neecha Nagar’ (1946) followed, more or less, the similar pattern in the story.

The extra-ordinary success of ‘Udayer Pathe’ (1944) did not help much in Bimal Roy’s career as a director as fortune of NT had taken a down turn due to the adverse impact on the film industry of the World War II and thereafter partition of Bengal by creating the then East Pakistan. Bimal Roy did direct two films for NT – ‘Anjangarh’ (1948) and ‘Pehla Aadmi’ (1950). The highlight of ‘Pehla Aadmi’ (1950) was that it was made on Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose. It was a challenge for Bimal Roy to shoot the battle scenes of the film in the studio itself which should look real in the film. I have watched the clip of the battle scene and it looks real. Though these two films were critically acclaimed, they did not fare well at the box office.

The downfall of NT in post-partition period and the emergence of Bombay (Mumbai) as the main film production centre prompted many artists and technicians in Kolkata to migrate to Mumbai. On the other hand, the Bombay Talkies was also going through the bad times. An opportunity came to Bimal Roy when he was invited by Ashok Kumar to direct ‘Maa’ (1952) for Bombay Talkies which he had to reluctantly accept due to the adverse conditions of the film industry in Kolkata. Bimal Roy came to Mumbai with his team consisting of Hrishikesh Mukherjee (Editor), Asit Sen (Assistant Director), Nabendu Ghosh (Dialogue writer) and Paul Mahendra (Hindi dialogue writer and actor). Later, some more artists and technicians from Kolkata like Kamal Bose (Cinematographer), Arvind Sen, Asit Sen, Debu Sen, Basu Bhattacharya and Salil Chaudhury joined Bimal Roy.

In terms of box office, ‘Maa’ (1952) did not add to the coffers of Bombay Talkies. Bimal Roy was all set to return to Kolkata along with his team when Ashok Kumar gave him another film, ‘Parineeta’ (1953) which was produced under the banner of Ashok Kumar Productions. Simultaneously, something was cooking within Bimal Roy’s team. Hrishikesh Mukherjee had revealed in an article that after watching an English film in Eros Theatre at Churchgate, Bimal Roy and his team were returning home on a BEST double decker bus and were discussing as to why they cannot make film like the one they watched. Bimal Roy asked as to who will write the story for the film to which everyone in his team offered to share the responsibilities. That was how Bimal Roy Productions was born on a double decker bus of BEST. And this was the third turning point in Bimal Roy’s career.

Bimal Roy embarked upon his maiden film ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953) as a producer-director. Bimal Roy had read the story ‘Rickshwala’ written by Salil Chaudhury, based on the Rabindranath Tagore’s poem, ‘Doi Bigha Zomi’. This was perhaps the first film in Bollywood depicting what is called ‘neo-realism’, a term normally used for post-war effects on the poor class of the population who tended to migrate to urban area for sustenance. Many in his team had reservations about the selection of Balraj Sahani in the role of Shambhu, the farmer because of his urban look. But Bimal Roy struck to his choice. He had seen him acting live on the sets of ‘Dharti Ke Laal’ (1946) when he had visited Mumbai at the time of the release of his film ‘Hamraahi’ (1945) and thereafter in ‘Hum Log’ (1951).

‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953) put Bimal Roy on an international pedestal. The film won for him the Prix International Prize at 7th Cannes Film Festival (1954). The film also won him National Award for the Best Film and also the inaugural Filmfare Award, 1954 for the ‘Best Film’ and ‘The Best Director’. With the success of this film, the seeds of the ‘middle of the road’ cinema was sown in Bollywood.

One of Bimal Roy’s film which did not fit into his psyche of film making was ‘Madhumati’ (1958). The reincarnation story of the film was written by Ritwik Ghatak who was an assistant to Bimal Roy during his Kolkata days. He was without work in Kolkata and had come to Mumbai for work. Bimal Roy assigned him to write a story and screen play for his forthcoming film and also direct the film. This was how the film ‘Madhumati’ (1958) was born. But, at the last minute, he had to go back to Kolkata as he could arrange finance for his Bangla film, ‘Ajantrik’ (1958). ‘Madhumati’ (1958) was thought of mainly for the financial survival of Bimal Roy Productions. Hence, the commercial elements in the film was evident with Dilip Kumar and Vyjayantimala in lead roles, Pran as villain and Johny Walker as comedian and 11 songs. With Bimal Roy handling the direction, the mix of classic touch and commercial elements led the film to attain the status of the most commercially successful film for Bimal Roy Productions and the highest grosser among Hindi films released in 1958. The film won 9 Filmfare Awards.

Bimal Roy has shown through his films like ‘Udayer Pathe’ (1944), ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), ‘Sujata’ (1959) and ‘Bandini’ (1963) that the victims of oppressions have superior morality than the oppressors. Bimal Roy had not been known to have leanings towards any political ideology. It is, therefore, a surprise to observe that in most of his films, the exploitation of downtrodden by the superior class of the society is evident though he belonged to a wealthy family of the landlords in a village near Dhaka in East Bengal (now Bangla Desh). The reasons for his ‘dislike’ for landlords or upper class probably stem from having been a victim himself when after the death of his father in 1930, his family was denied share in the estate and was expelled. He along with his mother and brothers had migrated to Kolkata where they may have initially faced the same problem as Balraj Sahani in ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ when he migrated to Kolkata.

Rinki Roy Bhattacharya believes that some characters in his films may have been modelled on the traits of a few of his family members. For instances, the arrogant and authoritarian fathers in ‘Udayer Pathe’ (1944), ‘Parineeta’ (1953) and ‘Devdas’ (1955) may have been based on Bimal Roy’s authoritarian father. The character of a whip cracking school master in ‘Devdas’ may be a whip cracking Head Master of Bimal Roy’s school in Dhaka. Pran’s character in ‘Madhumati’ (1958) may have been inspired from his uncle Jogeshchandra Roy who loved wines, women and dances.

During his filmy career, Bimal Roy directed 15 Hindi films which included his classics and popular films like ‘Parineeta’ (1953), ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), ‘Biraj Bahu’ (1954), ‘Devdas’ (1955) ‘Madhumati’ (1958), ‘Yahudi’ (1958) ‘Sujata’ (1959), ‘Parakh’ (1960), ‘Prem Patra’ (1962) and ‘Bandini’ (1963) which was his last film as a director.

Bimal Roy also produced 7 Hindi films which he did not direct but gave the opportunity to direct most of them to his assistants. These films were ‘Amaanat’ (1955) directed by Aravind Sen, ‘Parivar’ (1956) and ‘Apraadhi Kaun’ (1957) both directed by Asit Sen (comedian), ‘Usne Kaha Thha’ (1960) directed by Moni Bhattacharya and ‘Kabuliwaala’ (1961) directed by Hemen Gupta who was unemployed at that time. ‘Benazir’ (1964) and ‘Do Dooni Chaar’ (1968) were directed by S Khalil and Debu Sen respectively due to Bimal Roy’s illness.

Those who had worked closely with Bimal Roy had said that he was a man of few words. It was very difficult to initiate a conversation with him. Dilip Kumar had said in an interview that he found the most peaceful atmosphere among the studios when he worked with Bimal Roy because no one was allowed to talk loudly. Nabendu Ghosh, his screen-play and dialogue writer, has said that Bimal Roy spoke little but smoked cigarettes a lot. Probably, his cigarette smoking may have resulted in lung cancer at a later stage which took his life on January 8, 1966.

At the time of his death, Bimal Roy had started work on ‘Do Dooni Chaar’ (1968) and ‘Sahaara’. While the first film was completed by one of his assistants, Debu Sen and got released in 1968, ‘Sahaara’ which was based on Bengali novel ‘Chaitali’ by Ashapoorna Devi got sheleved. In fact, Bimal Roy had done some shooting of the film with Dharmendra and Sharmila Tagore when he got ill on the set after which he never recovered. When Dharmendra became a top star from early 1970s, he convinced Bimal Roy’s wife, Manobina Roy to revive the film for which he arranged the finances and pursuaded Saira Bano to act in the film. Hrishikesh Mukherjee directed the film under its new title ‘Chaitali’ (1975).

One of Bimal Roy’s dream project which was very close to his heart was a bilingual film ‘Amrit Kumbh Ki Khoj Mein’ (Hindi and Bangla). He had started the work as early as 1960 when he had shot about one hour of footage of Ardha Kumbha Mela held at Allahabad in 1960. Gulzar was entrusted with writing the script for the film. It was his intention to complete the shooting of the film during the next Poorna Kumbh Mela. During the last stages of Bimal Roy’s illness when he was bed-ridden, Gulzar used to visit him every day and read out what he had written for the script of his favorite film. With the death of Bimal Roy, the film remained a dream. However, scenes shot for the film were converted into a 12 minutes of documentary film ‘Images of Kumbh Mela (1960) by his son, Joy Bimal Roy.

On the occasion of Bimal Roy’s 111th birth anniversary, I have selected a song, ‘main na boloon na boloon na boloongi’ from ‘Maa’ (1952), his first film in Mumbai as a director. The song is sung by Geeta Dutt which is picturised on Shyama. The song is written by Bharat Vyas which is set to music by S K Pal.

With this song, all the songs of ‘Maa’ (1952) have been covered in the Blog.

Acknowledgements: In writing this article, I have been greatly benefitted by the following sources:

1. ‘Bimal Roy – The Man Who Spoke in Picture’ (2009), a book containing a collection of articles, edited by Rinki Roy Bhattacharya, the daughter of Bimal Roy.

2. ‘The Cinema of Bimal Roy – An ‘Outsider’ Within’ (2017) by Shoma A, Chatterji. (Book).

3. ‘Ravi Paar Aur Anya Kahaaniyaan’ (1999) by Gulzar – Chapter on ‘Bimal da’.

4. Remembering Bimal Roy (2007) – A documentary film by Joy Bimal Roy.

Editor’s note: This song is the 5000th song from the decade of 1950s(1951 to 1960) to appear in the blog.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Main na boloon na boloon na boloongi (Maa)(1952) Singer-Geeta Dutt, Bharat Bhushan, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas, MD-S K Pal

Lyrics

main na boloongi
o main na boloon na boloon na boloongi
aaj mere chhote se dil mein
chhupa hai kya raaz main na kholoongi
aaj main na boloon na boloongi aaj

kya raaz hai
hai to bataao

saawan ki ithlaate baadal se poochh lo ji
baadal se poochh lo
kajraare nainon ke kaajal se poochh lo ji
kaajal se poochh lo
bhole baalam
mohe laage sharam
haaye laage sharam
bhole baalam
mohe laage sharam
haaye laage sharam
ye bharam apne man ka na kholoongi
aaj main na boloongi
aaj main na boloon na boloongi aaj
main na boloongi
ho main na boloon na boloon na boloongi
aaj mere chhote se dil mein
chhupa hai kya raaz main na kholoongi
aaj main na boloon na boloongi aaj

achcha
hum bhi nahin sunte

o o o o o
suna maine jo
wo kaise sunaaun
wo baaten tumhe main kaise bataaun
kaho ji kaise bataaun
kuchh khud samjho
kuchh khud samjho
kuchh meri palkan se samajh lo ji
palkan se samajh lo
kuchh dil mein chhupi dil ki dhadkan se samajh lo ji
dhadkan se samajh lo
bhole baalam mohe laage sharam
haaye laage sharam
bhole baalam mohe laage sharam
haaye laage sharam
ye bharam apne man ka na kholoongi
aaj main na boloongi
aaj main na boloon na boloongi aaj


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3537 Post No. : 14207

An interesting observation regarding the Yippeee process for the film that is getting Yippeee’d today. Regular readers would have noticed a pattern in the manner that the films are getting Yippeee’d these days. Generally, in the case of films with just two or three songs remaining to be posted, the last two (or last three) songs kind of appear at a very rapid pace, almost on a daily basis, one right on top of the other. With such films, the penultimate one (or two) songs appear in quick succession followed by the final song of the film, on the next day.

Not in the case of the film being Yippeee’d today. On examining the list of songs of this film as they appear in the table below, the penultimate song of this film came on board on 12th Jan, 2018. And its Yippeee song today appears after a gap of almost two and a half months. And the reason for this delay – it is yours truly, of course. 🙂

When the penultimate song got posted on 12th Jan earlier this year, I immediately sent a note to Atul ji, requesting for doing the Yippeee honors for this film. The reason is that I wanted to bring on board the video of the song. Apparently the earlier posted songs of the film ‘Bus Conductor’, from 1959, were in video form, as one can make out from the write-ups of the first three songs of this film posted. These first three songs came on board on 2009, 2014 and 2016, and they were earlier available in video form. Now, these songs are no longer available, and the YT account of the erstwhile uploader has been blocked due to “multiple copyright infringements”. So the video clips of these songs are no longer available online. (Once again, the caveat – as far as I can search it online 🙂 ).

I have been able to acquire the video of this film through one of my good friends. I do not wish to say that we are the only ones having a this video film. Quite possibly, the video version is also in the hands of other friends, known or unknown. So anyway, I wanted to upload the video of this song for this post today. But as I was checking the previous posts for this film, I realized what had happened, Then I decided not to post the video clip of the song on YT. And the link that I am using in this post for now, is the audio upload of this song by Sa Re Ga Ma.
[Ed Note: The video clip of the song is now added on Vimeo, as suggested by Atul ji. The link is added below.]

And so, with this song, today we add the 1959 film ‘Bus Conductor’ to the list of films having all their songs showcased on our blog.

The film is a production from the banner of Sharda Films, Bombay, produced by Ashok Bhambri. It is a social drama, directed by Dwarka Khosla. The cast of actors, as listed in the Geet Kosh, reads like – Shyama, Premnath, Amarnath, Maruti, Satish Batra, Sujata, Umesh Sharma, Ramlal, Khairati, Narbada Shankar, Ameer Bano, Sadhna, Surya Kumari, Helen, Kanchanmala, Sheela Vaz and Cuckoo. An interesting aside here. Maruti, whose name appears in the list actors, plays the role of a dance teacher in the film. He is the friend of the hero, played by Premnath. As I was watching the credits of the film, I discovered that the story of this film is written by Maruti himself.

The film has six songs. All the songs are written by Noor Devasi. And the music has been composed by the duo of Bipin-Babul. The five songs of this film posted earlier, are listed below.

Dil Se Main Mujh Se Dil Takra Gaya Bus Conductor 1491 23-Jun-09
Zindagi Mein Rang Bhara Hai Pyaar Ka Bus Conductor 10550 29-Nov-14
Man Mein Tere Kyaa Hai Bataa De Gori Bus Conductor 12625 27-Nov-16
Daanv Chalne Ko Hai Bus Conductor 13613 26-Sep-17
Paas Hamaare Aaiye Bus Conductor 13909 12-Jan-18

Today’s song is in the voice of Asha Bhosle, and in the film it is presented as a dream sequence. Shyama is sleeping, and she sees a dream in which she is singing this song, as she plays the sitar, and that she is also dancing to this song. The sequence is filmed as alternating shots that show Shyama playing the sitar and singing, and also dancing simultaneously. Surely possible in a dream sequence only.

As I was checking out the earlier posts, I came across the query from Atul ji himself, as to what is the ‘Bus Conductor’ connection in the film. So I checked out the video. The role of the bus conductor in the film is played by Premnath, who is otherwise a rich person, belonging to an affluent family. The reason that he goes underground and becomes a bus conductor, is explained in the beginning of the film.

Premnath belongs to a very rich family of landlords. He is an aspiring writer, albeit an unsuccessful one. He writes short stories, and sends them for publication to different magazines. His stories are always getting rejected. And so he makes a decision that he will leave his home and its luxuries, and live like a common person, search for a job, and work to earn a living – all this for a learning experience of life, so that he is able to genuinely write about life and people, and make his stories more convincing.

There is an emotionally charged scene in the beginning of the film, in which we see him receive some more rejections in mail, and we see an outburst in which he tells his bhabhi (wife of elder brother) that he is leaving home, and will return only when he has achieved success as a writer. He declares that he forgoes all the comforts and luxuries of his rich-person life, will go out into the world to fend for himself, get a firsthand experience of a common man’s life, and write about it. With this loud and emotionally charged declaration, he departs from his home to start a new life incognito. I must add that the performance by Premnath in this scene, did not sound very convincing to me.

So he leaves his luxuries and finds a job as a bus conductor. The rest of the film is about his interactions with people. He makes friends with Maruti, who lives in a chawl and dreams about being a choreographer in films. He meets Shyama who is also from a rich family, but is forced to ride a bus one day when her car breaks down. She forgets her bag on the bus, giving an opportunity to the make-believe bus conductor to play the honest good Samaritan and take the bag to her home. Which of course leads to more things, as expected.

He also witnesses a murder, as one passenger alighting from his bus is pushed under the wheels of the bus itself – he tries to chase the culprit but is unable to apprehend him. The person behind the murder is connected with Shyama’s family, and story gets into the expected filmy complexities.

Of course, all is well in the end, as the rich girl gets a rich husband to be, the murder is solved and the culprit apprehended – rather killed as he runs on to a railway track as he is being chased by the hero and the police. If the writer wrote a new story and it got published; I must have missed that sequence in the quick review that I did of this film. And the rich-boy-masqerading-as-a-poor-boy returns home to his luxuries with his lady love.

On the whole, it is quite an un-convincing plot, with equally un-convincing performances. And as is always the case, it is the songs that draw us.

But nonetheless, one more film to be Yippeee’d on our blog.

 

Song – Radha Ki Paayal, Kanhaiya Ki Murli  (Bus Conductor) (1959) Singer – Asha Bhosle, Lyrics -Noor Devasi, MD – Bipin Babul

Lyrics

radha ki paayal
kanhaiya ki murli
radha ki paayal
kanhaiya ki murli
sapnon mein sun li maine
sapnon mein sun li
sapnon mein sun li
radha ki paayal
kanhaiya ki murli
radha ki paayal

bholi radha aise naache
bholi radha aise naache
jaise naache mor
jaise naache mor
paayal ki jhankaar mein goontha
saanwla maakhan chor
main bhi apni sudh kho baithi
main bhi apni sudh kho baithi
raat se ho gayi bhor
raat se ho gayi bhor
radha ki paayal
kanhaiya ki murli
radha ki paayal
kanhaiya ki murli
sapnon mein sun li maine
sapnon mein sun li
radha ki paayal
kanhaiya ki murli
radha ki paayal

bhor ki dulhan poochhe mujh se
bhor ki dulhan poochhe mujh se
akhiyaan bhaari bhaari kyon
akhiyaan bhaari bhaari kyon
sakhiyaan chutki le ke boli
sakhiyaan chutki le ke boli
jaagi ratiyaan saari kyon
jaagi ratiyaan saari kyon
krishn deewaani kya batlaaye
krishn deewaani kya batlaaye
jeevan apna haari kyon
jeevan apna haari kyon
radha ki paayal
kanhaiya ki murli
radha ki paayal
kanhaiya ki murli
sapnon mein sun li maine
sapnon mein sun li
radha ki paayal
kanhaiya ki murli
radha ki paayal
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
राधा की पायल
कन्हैया की मुरली
राधा की पायल
कन्हैया की मुरली
सपनों में सुन ली मैंने
सपनों में सुन ली
सपनों में सुन ली
राधा की पायल
कन्हैया की मुरली
राधा की पायल

भोली राधा ऐसे नाचे
भोली राधा ऐसे नाचे
जैसे नाचे मोर
जैसे नाचे मोर
पायल की झंकार में गूँथा
सांवला माखन चोर
मैं भी अपनी सुध खो बैठी
मैं भी अपनी सुध खो बैठी
रात से हो गई भोर
रात से हो गई भोर
राधा की पायल
कन्हैया की मुरली
राधा की पायल
कन्हैया की मुरली
सपनों में सुन ली मैंने
सपनों में सुन ली
सपनों में सुन ली
राधा की पायल
कन्हैया की मुरली
राधा की पायल

भोर की दुल्हन पूछे मुझसे
भोर की दुल्हन पूछे मुझसे
अखियाँ भारी भारी क्यों
अखियाँ भारी भारी क्यों
सखियाँ चुटकी ले के बोलीं
सखियाँ चुटकी ले के बोलीं
जागी रतियाँ सारी क्यों’
जागी रतियाँ सारी क्यों’
कृष्ण दीवानी क्या बतलाए
कृष्ण दीवानी क्या बतलाए
जीवन अपना हारी क्यों
जीवन अपना हारी क्यों

राधा की पायल
कन्हैया की मुरली
सपनों में सुन ली मैंने
सपनों में सुन ली
सपनों में सुन ली
राधा की पायल
कन्हैया की मुरली
राधा की पायल


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3533 Post No. : 14188

“Inquilaab”(1956) was produced by Kailash Kapoor and J P Sahgal and directed by Kedar Kapoor for W S Films, Bombay. This movie had Ranjan, Shyama, Kuldeep Kaur, Tiwari, Ramesh Sinha, S K Prem, Indu Paul, Praveen, Khairati, Pt Iqbal, Pal Sharma, Khursheed, Bihari, Bakshi, Sando, Bachcha, Sundar etc in it with guest appearances by Helen, Sapru, Bhagwan and Johny Walker.

“Inquilaab”(1956) had eight songs in it. Four songs from the movie have been covered in the past.

Here is the fifth song from “Inquilaab”(1956) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Geeta Dutt. Raja Mehdi Ali Khan is the lyricist. Music is composed by Hansraj Bahl.

Though the song is sung by one singer, it is lip synced by two ladies. I can identify Shyama but I am unable to identify the other lady. I request our knowledgeable readers to help identify her.


Song-Dilbar se pyaar chhupane mein bada maza hai (Inquilaab)(1956) Singer-Geeta Dutt, Lyrics-Raja Mehdi Ali Khan, MD-Hansraj Bahl

Lyrics

dilbar se pyaar chupaane mein bada maza hai
dilbar se pyaar chupaane mein bada maza hai
kuchh din ye takraar chalegi
shama aur parwaane mein
bada maza hai
dilbar se pyaar chhupaane mein bada maza hai

ummeedon ka gulshan mahke
dil mein shokh tamanna chahke
ae meri manzil saamne aaja
aaj kadam mere bahke bahke
husn ki duniya jhoom rahi hai
laga hai teer nishaane mein
bada maza hai
dilbar se pyaar chhupane mein bada maza hai

wo paas aayen main ghabraaun
sahmoon simtoon aur sharmaaun
kisko diya hai pyaar bhara dil
poochhe bhi to main na bataaun
hoti hai taskeen mohabbat
ban ban ke sharmaane mein
bada maza hai
dilbar se pyaar chupaane mein bada maza hai

dil mera jhoome shaam suhaane
bal khaaye lahraaye jawaani
aaja o tadpaane waale
meri umangen hain deewaani
chhalak rahe hain jaam nazar ke
aankhon ke maykhaane mein
bada maza hai
dilbar se pyaar chhupane mein bada maza hai
kuchh din ye takraar chalegi
shama aur parwaane mein
bada maza hai
dilbar se pyaar chhupane mein bada maza hai


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

ना जाने क्यों॰ ॰ ॰ होता है ये ज़िंदगी के साथ
अचानक ये मन
किसी के जाने के बाद
करे फिर उसकी याद॰ ॰ ॰

Aah, Shyama. . . the vivacious, bubbly, chirpy, charming Shyama. That is the image that the mind always carries, of this spirited young lady, so full of life on the screen. Some memories and some reflections are so firmly engraved in the mind that it simply does not register or acknowledge the passage of time and the passing of eras. That is the beauty of these memories – that their beauty simply never fades away.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Khaandaan”(1955) was produced by Akhtar Hussain and directed by M L Anand for Anand Pictures, Bombay. The movie had Shyama, Anwar, Lalita Pawar, Badri Prasad, Sundar, Manmohan Krishna, Neelam, Amir Bano, Murad, Rani, Ambar, Indira, Prakash, Ramavtar Zakhmi, Master Nisar, Ravikant, Munna, Tumtun, Maruti etc in it, with guest appearances by Pappu, Baby Saroj and Prabhu Arora.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Chaar Paise” (1955) was produced and directed by N K Ziri. The movie had Kishore Kumar, Shyama, Johnny Walker, Agha, Kammo, Nishi, Nazir Kashmiri etc etc. in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Kaala Aadmi”(1960) was produced and directed by Ved-Madan for Natraj Productions, Bombay. The movie had Ashok Kumar, Shyama, Mehmood, Johny Walker, Sheila Vaz, Minu Mumtaz, Raj Mehra, Amar, Baij Sharma, Neelofar, Brahm Dutt, Rammohan etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Khazaanchi”(1958), a remake of “Khazaanchi”(1941) was directed by P N Arora for All India Pictures, Bombay. The movie had Rajendra Kumar, Shyama, Helen, Balraj Sahni, Chitra, Manorama, Minoo Mumtaz, Rajan Haksar etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Shrimatiji”(1952) was directed by I S Johar for Filmistan, Bombay. The movie had Shyama, Nasir Khan, Ram Singh, Murad, Samson, Vimla, Indira, Prabha, Baldev Mehta, Ram Avtar, Yashwant, Mirazkar, Agha Miraz, Majnu, Johar etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 17000 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 5000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2022) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

17014

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Movies with all their songs covered =1325
Total Number of movies covered=4609

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