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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Rajendra Krishan


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

ना जाने क्यों॰ ॰ ॰ होता है ये ज़िंदगी के साथ
अचानक ये मन
किसी के जाने के बाद
करे फिर उसकी याद॰ ॰ ॰

Aah, Shyama. . . the vivacious, bubbly, chirpy, charming Shyama. That is the image that the mind always carries, of this spirited young lady, so full of life on the screen. Some memories and some reflections are so firmly engraved in the mind that it simply does not register or acknowledge the passage of time and the passing of eras. That is the beauty of these memories – that their beauty simply never fades away.

My very first encounter with her was the song “Mujhe Mil Gaya Bahaana Teri Deed Ka” (film ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’, 1960). I saw this song on Delhi TV, most probably in some edition of the Chitrahaar program. Shama (Shyama) is on screen with Shabaab (Ratna), her younger sister in the film. There is an exchange that leads to certain wrong impressions. Being secretly in love with Amaan (Bharat Bhushan), Shama interprets that conversation to be in her favour. And this happy song of an assumed fulfilment of love is the outcome. The expressions and the rendering of this love song trickled right into the mind and heart of a very young heart, and the lady on the screen became a favorite crush of mine.

A few years later, I would get a chance to see this complete film. And my heart was both joyous and asunder. I got to see more of her scintillating performance, especially the qawwaali “Ji Chaahta Hai Choom Loon Apni Nazar Ko Main”, in which she is brimming with excitement and delight. She makes you feel the thrill that she is experiencing, going in for the kill of the opposite party in the qawwaali competition. Her performance simply takes you along that joyous path of the victory of her singing group over that of Chand Khan’s (Khurshid Bawra’s) group. But then, I was also sad that in the final outcome, she is not the choice of the person she adores and worships. The film ends with her being the loser in the game of love. My heart wept for her, for her love was true and silent, and it made the sacrifice in face of knowing that her beau’s heart is smitten elsewhere. This film remains an all time favorite in my heart.

Then came other films, viewed some years later during college days. Films from the previous three decades were mostly showing as reruns in morning shows (9am to 12 am). We used to skip the morning classes in the college to go visit these unknown unseen films, for the love of that golden era. In that time, I would get to see ‘Aar Paar’ (1954), ‘Shart’ (1954), ‘Chhoo Mantar’ (1956), ‘Makkheechoos’ (1956), ‘Bhai Bhai’ (1956), ‘Sharda’ (1957), ‘Bhaabhi’ (1957), ‘Lala Rukh’ (1958), ‘Zabak’ (1961) and many more. The ‘puppy’ crush was long over and done with, but Shyama was a favorite actress – always would be ready to go see an unseen film, especially if Shyama was part of the cast of actors.

She was born as Khursheed Akhtar, in Lahore. Her date of birth is stated differently in different online sources. The anniversaries table on our blog gives the date as 12th June of 1935. Cineplot gives the date as 7th June, 1935. In his book ‘Beete Kal Ke Sitaare’, Shri Sriram Tamrakar quotes her birth date as 12th July 1933. There are other sources which are at variance with these dates too.

When she was two years old, her family moved to Bombay. Her father was a fruit merchant and had set up a shop in Byculla. With seven siblings, Shyama was part of a large family. School and studies never did interest her. Right from childhood, being a star on the silver screen was her dream. As a child, she had seen a film starring Ishwarlal and Khursheed (the famous singer-actress). She was very impressed by Khursheed’s singing and her acting. On seeing this role, a resolve started to form in her to become an actor. [Ed Note: This picture possibly could be ‘Shaadi’ (1941) or ‘Chandni’ (1942).]

As a young girl, she was quite mischievous and full of pranks. Her elder sisters would admonish her for being such a tomboy. In her own words (from an interview on Cineplot) she says that she always wanted a hungama, indulge in a little romance. But she was very disciplined and cultured too. She never smoked, or drank all her life. And she never appeared in a swimsuit throughout her career. She was very true to her Muslim upbringing and family traditions.

In 1944/45 she and her sisters and friends, one day went to see the shooting of a film at a studio in Dadar (Bombay). The shooting of the film ‘Zeenat’ (1945) was in progress. The specific sequence being filmed was the now iconic all female qawwaali “Aahen Na Bharin, Shiqwe Na Kiye”. As luck would have it, Shaukat Hussain Rizvi, the director of the film, wanted to have more girls to join the singing group. He asked this group of onlooker young ladies whether they would like to join the filming of this song. Without hesitation, Khursheed raised her hand. Rizvi Sb picked her to join the group and play the dholak. In the video of this song, one can see her sitting in the second row behind the main singers, wearing a traditional cap, with a dholak in her lap. The young lady got a billing in the star credits as Baby Khursheed. She was just about 10 years old.

Her father was very upset that his daughter had made this impromptu decision, and was set against her joining films. However, her mother and her sisters prevailed upon him and calmed him to get his consent to permit her to work in films. So out went the school and studies, and the little Khurshid started her career doing child roles and extras. By her own estimates, she probably has appeared 80 films in which she was just an extra or a chorus girl.

‘Nai Maa’ is a 1946 film, which Shyama herself indicates as being her first formal role as a child star. The film is from the banner of Prakash Pictures – the production house of the Bhatt brothers – Vijay and Shankar Bhai. With the consideration that there already were two actresses named Khursheed in the industry, Vijay Bhatt suggested for her to change her name to avoid same-name-confusions. He thought of the name ‘Shyama’. The young Khursheed happily took it on, and this name turned to be her career and her destiny.

Getting seriously into small roles as a child and a teenage artist, she did two very important things. One, she refused to be disheartened by the long succession of bit-roles and being a supporting cast member. Two, she took on to get trained in music and dance, and spent a good slice of her developmental years under the tutelage of the famous Badri Prasad, the multi-talented artist active in the industry at that time. Her perseverance paid off. Her roles started to get more prominent, and her co-stars the more famous ones. She appeared as the younger sister to KL Saigal in ‘Parwaana’ (1947). The same year, she also appeared as the younger sister of Motilal in ‘Beete Din’. On to 1949, and she was now the younger sibling of actor Shyam in the film ‘Kaneez’.

In 1950, she got a very prominent role as the wayward younger sister of Shyam and Karan Dewan in the film ‘Chhoti Bhaabhi’. The title role was played by Nargis (paired with Karan Dewan), but the role played by Shyama was pivotal as the rebellious daughter in the family, who is on the verge of eloping with Yakub, a self serving con-man. Then came 1951 – she was paired as the love interest of Balraj Sahni in ‘Hum Log’; and the same year, she got to play a prominent role in ‘Taraana’ as the third part of the love triangle completed by Dilip Kumar and Madhubala.

It was in 1952 that she was able to belie the popular adage in the industry – ‘once an extra, always and extra’. But this graduation was not without its moments of anxiety and a heart stopping near miss. IS Johar was looking for an effervescent and a lively young new face as the lead for his maiden directorial venture – ‘Shrimati Ji’. Familiar with Shyama and her capabilities from their earlier films together viz., ‘Chhoti Bhaabhi’ (1950) and ‘Ek Teri Nishaani’ (1949), Johar chose Shyama from a list of over 100 candidates for the role. Shyama was excited and happy with this groundbreaking development in her career.

But a scare was still in store, and the career that we see, was almost never. A couple of reels had been shot. One day on the studio floor, one of the financiers was present. On seeing Shyama, he made a curt remark that this girl is too thin to impress in a leading role, and walked away. One can imagine the turmoil that followed, with doubts appearing in the minds of the entire team. Shyama herself notes that she went home and cried all night – here was a once in a lifetime break that suddenly became so close to slip out of her fingers. After the crying session was over, she pulled herself together and made a resolve to address even this issue. Next day, she went out to seek medical help. Whoever would think of a thing like a diet to ‘gain’ weight? She went on a crash diet to do exactly this – gain weight. In a short period of time, she gained a reasonable amount of weight, and went right back in to complete the film.

One more significant episode occurred in the year 1951. Shyama was filming for ‘Sazaa’; she was the second lead to Nimmi and again, the third vertex of the love triangle that includes Dev Anand and Nimmi. The director and cinematographer of this film was Fali Mistry. Affections developed between the two, and two got married. Her family would have preferred a Muslim son-in-law. Fali Mistry being a Parsi, her father did not accept her new venture in life. She did get support from her mother, who was present at the small and quiet ceremony for the wedding. Her father  did not communicate with her for years. Shyama mentions in her interview that the ice between them was eventually broken when she gave birth to her first son, and went to him to get his blessings.

One of the understandings between Shyama and Fali was that she would continue to work in films. Apparently there were other suitors also, but as per herself, the proposals did not go further because the gentlemen did not agree to allow her to continue her work.

Through the 1950s, as well as early sixties, Shyama was in the top bracket of leading ladies in Hindi cinema. A golden period in her career, her popularity can be gauged by the fact that 82 of her films were released in the period from 1952 to 1960. In 1954 alone, 14 of her films came on the silver screen, and 13 in the year 1955. In all 27 films in a period of two consecutive years is a record in itself. An interesting aspect of her career has been that while she was in demand as the leading lady, she continued to do all kinds of roles, including second lead and even as a vamp. By her own admission, she was never too much hung up on being the leading lady, but was always more interested in the content of the role. In fact her only Filmfare award is for her performance in ‘Sharda’ in 1957 – as the best female actor in a supporting role. In the later part of 1960s, she transitioned into character roles and continued to work till the end of 1980s. Her last film as a character artist is ‘Hathyaar’ released in 1989.

Fali Mistry passed away unexpectedly in 1979, leaving behind a family of two sons and one daughter.

In the past 3, 4 days I was in travel myself, and was disconnected from the net for part of that time. Settling back after returning, as I processed through the email backlog, I got to see this message from Harish Raghuvanshi ji, informing about the sad demise of Shyama. She was 82, and as per her latest interviews some years back, she was quite satisfied with the full life she had led, and with her accomplishments on the silver screen.

As I sorted through the list of her songs as yet unpublished on our blog, searching for an appropriate song for this tribute, I came across this chirpy and playful song from the film ‘Ghar Basaa Ke Dekho’ from 1963. I had not heard it before. As I played this song, it struck me as so much Shyama herself, and I knew this is the song so suitable to go along with the write up about her. On screen, she leads the singing and dancing within a group of friends. Some of the faces are familiar, but I am unable to place any names. I request our knowledgeable readers and friends to help identify other actresses supporting Shyama in this song.

The words are from the pen of Rajendra Krishan and the lilting music comes from the mind of Chitragupt. The singing voices are of Suman Kalyanpur, Usha Mangeshkar and chorus. Shyama gets to lip sync most of the lines of Suman Kalyanpur, and the lines sung by Usha Mangeshkar are shared between more than one of the supporting ladies on screen.

A wonderful expression of a philosophy of life, that one can surmise from her interviews, was very dear to Shyama herself. The thought behind the bubbly vivacity in this song is just the same thought that first made her raise her hand unhesitatingly to Rizvi Sb’s query on who would like to join the filming of the group song (qawwaali song in ‘Zeenat’). That is Shyama.

Or to put it more correctly now – that was Shyama. Only the memories remain now.

bichhad kar chale jaao hum se kahin
magar ye na kehna mohabbat nahin

magar ye na kehna mohabbat nahin . . .

Dear Shyama, RIP – Rest In Playfulness, Always 🙂

[Acknowledgements: source material for the above article is referred from articles and interviews published on the blogs Cineplot, Beete Huye Din (by Shishir Krishna Sharma), Wikipedia, and a profile article in the book ‘Beete Kal Ke Sitaare’ by Shri Sriram Tamrakar.]

[Ed Note: This song also is a remembrance of Chitragupt; reviving memories of this prolific music director on the anniversary of his birth – 16th November.]

 

Song – Jidhar Jee Mein Aaya Udhar Hum Chale (Ghar Basaa Ke Dekho) (1963) Singer – Suman Kalyanpur, Usha Mangeshkar, Lyrics – Rajendra Krishan, MD – Chitragupt
Suman Kalyanpur + Usha Mangeshkar
Chorus

Lyrics

jidhar jee mein aaya
udhar hum chale
jidhar jee mein aaya
udhar hum chale
hamen duniya se kya
wo marey ya jaley
wo marey ya jaley
hamen duniya se kya
wo marey ya jaley
wo marey ya jaley

jinki kismet mein aish likha hai
aish karte hain aur jeete hain
jinki kismet mein aish likha hai
aish karte hain aur jeete hain
aah bharna hai jinki kismet mein
aah bharte hain ashq peete hain
zindagi kya hai ek hungaama
ek hungaama roz ho jaaye
kehkahon ke bagair kya jeena
zindagi kehkahon mein kho jaaye
jidhar jee mein aaya
jidhar jee mein aaya
udhar hum chale
hamen duniya se kya
wo marey ya jaley
wo marey ya jaley
hamen duniya se kya
wo marey ya jaley
wo marey ya jaley

aadmi ko mili hain kyon aankhen
dekh le jis qadar nazaare hain
aadmi ko mili hain kyon aankhen
dekh le jis qadar nazaare hain
baag tera hai phool tere hain
aur tere hi chaand taare hain
zindagi naam hain bahaaron ka
hum bahaaron ka ras nichodenge
zindagi ek baar milti hai
ek armaan bhi na chhodenge
jidhar jee mein aaya
jidhar jee mein aaya
udhar hum chale
hamen duniya se kya
wo marey ya jaley
wo marey ya jaley
hamen duniya se kya
wo marey ya jaley
wo marey ya jaley

zindagi teri ek hulchul hai
raqs hai saaz hain taraana hai
zindagi teri ek hulchul hai
raqs hai saaz hain taraana hai
ik jagah par qayaam kya karna
har chaman tera aashiaana hai
ek pal bhi na fikr mein beete
muskuraata ja geet gaata ja
aur duniya jo raah mein aaye
ek thokar usey lagaata ja
jidhar jee mein aaya
jidhar jee mein aaya
udhar hum chale
hamen duniya se kya
wo marey ya jaley
wo marey ya jaley
hamen duniya se kya
wo marey ya jaley
wo marey ya jaley

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

जिधर जी में आया
उधर हम चले
जिधर जी में आया
उधर हम चले
हमें दुनिया से क्या
वो मरे या जले
वो मरे या जले
हमें दुनिया से क्या
वो मरे या जले
वो मरे या जले

जिनकी क़िस्मत में ऐश लिखी है
ऐश करते हैं और जीते हैं
जिनकी क़िस्मत में ऐश लिखी है
ऐश करते हैं और जीते हैं
आह भरना है जिनकी क़िस्मत में
आह भरते हैं अशक पीते हैं
ज़िंदगी क्या है एक हंगामा
एक हंगामा रोज़ हो जाये
कहकहों के बगैर क्या जीना
ज़िंदगी कहकहों में खो जाये
जिधर जी में आया
जिधर जी में आया
उधर हम चले
हमें दुनिया से क्या
वो मरे या जले
वो मरे या जले
हमें दुनिया से क्या
वो मरे या जले
वो मरे या जले

आदमी को मिली हैं क्यों आँखें
देख ले जिस कदर नज़ारे हैं
आदमी को मिली हैं क्यों आँखें
देख ले जिस कदर नज़ारे हैं
बाग तेरा हैं फूल तेरे हैं
और तेरे ही चाँद तारे हैं
ज़िंदगी नाम हैं बहारों का
हम बहारों का रस निचोड़ेंगे
ज़िंदगी एक बार मिलती है
एक अरमान भी ना छोड़ेंगे
जिधर जी में आया
जिधर जी में आया
उधर हम चले
हमें दुनिया से क्या
वो मरे या जले
वो मरे या जले
हमें दुनिया से क्या
वो मरे या जले
वो मरे या जले

ज़िंदगी तेरी एक हलचल है
रक़्स है साज है तराना है
ज़िंदगी तेरी एक हलचल है
रक़्स है साज है तराना है
इक जगह पर क़याम क्या करना
हर चमन तेरा आशियाना है
एक पल भी ना फिक्र में बीते
मुसकुराता जा गीत गाता जा
और दुनिया जो राह में आए
एक ठोकर उसे लगाता जा
जिधर जी में आया
जिधर जी में आया
उधर हम चले
हमें दुनिया से क्या
वो मरे या जले
वो मरे या जले
हमें दुनिया से क्या
वो मरे या जले
वो मरे या जले

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This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today we pay tribute here on the blog to Mahendra Kapoor, one of the well-known voices of the golden era of Hindi music, on the occasion of his 9th death anniversary. There are many ways to start this tribute but, instead of “getting my eye in”, let me, Sehwag-style, straightaway go for it. By “it”, I mean the elephant in the room.

That is, why are there so many people who dislike Mahendra Kapoor’s voice? On many occasions when I’ve discussed music with other music-lovers, there have been varying opinions on Rafisaab, Kishore, Shankar Jaikishen, RD Burman and others. Most of these artistes are much-admired but there has  been the occasional detractor too. This makes for interesting debate for me, because I like to understand the rationale behind the minority contrarian view.

With Mahendra Kapoor, it seems to be just the opposite. In fact, I probably find myself now holding the minority contrarian view on him, considering the majority view of music lovers seems to not rate him much. In fact, even amongst some Atulites, there is a certain scepticism about Mahendra Kapoor. So where does this come from? And if many, knowledgeable, music-lovers share this, can they all be wrong?

Even OP Nayyar in an interview late in his life said that he didn’t exactly rate Mahendra Kapoor as a singer.  And this, from someone, who used Mahendra Kapoor fairly extensively in the mid/late 60s after being upset with Rafisaab. In fact, MK had delivered quite a few hits for OP – songs like “Mera Pyaar Wo Hai“(from ‘Ye Raat Phir Na Aayegi’, 1966), “Laakhon Hain Yahaan Dilwaale” and “Aankhon Mein Qayaamat Ke Kaajal” (from ‘Kismat’, 1968), “Andhere Mein Jo Baithe Hain” (from ‘Sambandh’, 1969), “Kamar Patli, Nazar Bijli“, “O Yaaron Ki Tamanna Hai Teri Zulfon Mein Fans Jaayen”  and “Tumhaara Chaahne Waala Khuda Ki Duniya Mein” (from ‘Kahin Din Kahin Raat’, 1968). All popular songs. In the interview, OPN made this comment in the context of missing Rafisaab, but I feel it was rather harsh on MK.

Yet, MK had a fairly successful career spanning five decades. Would that have happened if he had really not been of a certain standard?

My take on this is, each singer is different.  He has his own voice, style, range which makes him unique. This might endear him to others – or it might not, depending on the listener’s taste.  There are many who do not even like Mukesh’s singing. They consider him limited. And there are many who swear by him. So it is a matter of taste.

We could apply the same reasoning to MK too. He had his unique voice, style and range – which clearly did not appeal to some.  I think what made it much more difficult for him was the constant comparison with Rafisaab.  Invariably, it ended up making MK look like an imitator, the poor man’s Rafisaab – with the consequent aversion to his singing. In MK’s defence, this is not his fault. He was who he was, never claiming to be anywhere at the level of Rafisaab. He was very conscious of the fact that Rafisaab was in a different league altogether – MK considered him his guru. He can hardly be blamed if the composers wanted a Rafisaab clone and thought he could fit the bill.

I must mention here that when the two, MK and Rafisaab, did sing together in Aadmi (1968) for “Kaisi Haseen Aaj Bahaaron Ki Raat Hai”, MK totally held his ground. (This song was initially recorded as a Rafisaab-Talat duet, but in the film version, the playback pair was Rafisaab-MK).

And that is the point I am trying to make. I am no diehard MK fan – but I am not a critic either.  Like I’ve often said, I enjoy listening to various singers – and that includes MK. Every singer has sung excellent songs – and some not-so-good ones (at least in my humble opinion). MK is no exception. I’m no music expert, but I think the one thing that is most impressive about MK’s singing – and I hope even his critics will agree on this – was his high range. It is really astounding – he could hold his voice even at highest octaves, which even a singer of Rafisaab’s stature could not match. Just listen to “Chaand Chhupaa Aur Taare Doobey” from the 1958 film ‘Sohni Mahiwal’ and “Na Munh Chhupaa Ke Jiyo Aur Na Sar Jhukaa Ke Jiyo” from ‘Hamraaz’ in 1967, and you’ll know what I mean. Another song that comes to mind is “Ramchandra Kah Gaye Siya Se” (from ‘Gopi’, 1970). There are other songs too where this particular ability of MK was sought to be put to good use by the composers.

Talking about composers, it is hard to think of Mahendra Kapoor without thinking of Ravi. Now Ravi is another artiste who sometimes draws criticism from music lovers. But if anyone could get the most out of MK, it was certainly Ravi. Especially in BR Chopra films, the combination of Mahendra Kapoor and Ravi, with Sahir as lyricist, delivered hit after amazing hit. Songs of ‘Gumraah’ (1963) and ‘Hamraaz’ (1967), to name just two of these films, are hugely popular to this day. I used to have a cassette with songs of these two films (on the two sides) and would play it non-stop on long car journeys. To date, I can listen to the songs of these two films any number of times. Fast forward, and I would also like to mention “Dil Ki Ye Aarzoo Thi Koi Dilruba Miley” from ‘Nikaah’ (1982).

Another composer who used MK successfully is the Kalyanji Anandji duo. Manoj Kumar  often used Mahendra Kapoor as his voice, especially after the huge success of “Mere Desh Ki Dharti” (Upkaar). In fact, this is the first Mahendra Kapoor song that I remember listening to in my life. Other songs that come to mind are “Iktaara Boley” from Yaadgaar (1970), “Hai Preet Jahan Ki Reet Sada” and “Dulhan Chali O Pehan Chali” from ‘Purab Aur Paschim’ (also 1970), which were also hugely popular. In fact, except for the one Mukesh song in ‘Purab Aur Paschim’, Mahendra Kapoor was the main male playback in a film full of songs.

Manoj Kumar’s preference for Mahendra Kapoor, even in the 70s and later, when Kishore Kumar was the reigning voice, could be seen in ‘Roti Kapda Aur Makaan’ (1974) – “Aur Nahin Bas Aur Nahin” and ‘Kranti’ (1981) – “Ab Ke Baras Tujhe Dharti Ki Raani Kar Denge“. Both these films had Laxmikant-Pyarelal as composers, but Manoj Kumar preferred MK as his voice.

Apart from Hindi films, Mahendra Kapoor sang a number of songs for regional cinema. Younger generations (well, younger than those who were already familiar with MK from before the 80s) will probably remember him best for the TV serial, Mahabharat, produced by, who else but, BR Chopra.

So, whatever be anyone’s opinion of Mahendra Kapoor (and each person is entitled to his/her opinion), I will always be grateful to him for the songs of ‘Hamraaz’ and ‘Gumraah’.

Now, moving on to the song for today. This is from the film ‘Anmol Moti’ (1969), starring Jeetendra and Babita. After the phenomenal success of ‘Farz’ (1967), this was a popular pairing, especially after ‘Aulaad’ (1968) also did well. They also came together in ‘Bikhre Mot’ (1971), ‘Banphool’ (1971) and ‘Ek Haseena Do Deewaane’ (1972).

Anmol Moti (1969) is a film I remember seeing as a very young boy. In fact, I saw this film right after I saw ‘Suhaag Raat’ (1968), also starring Jeetendra. In that film, Jeetendra’s character dies at the end. So when I saw ‘Anmol Moti’, I was very confused. I remember asking my sisters how he had come back after dying. They had a jolly good laugh at my expense. 🙂

I haven’t seen this film recently but I do remember this being a film about pearl diving. It was also the first time I heard of an octopus in my life. I also remember a few songs from this film, the most famous song probably being”Ae Jaane Chaman Tera Gora Badan“. The song being posted today, “Sehmi Sehmi Kahaan Chali” was also quite popular in its time. So when I was looking for a song for Mahendra Kapoor, this one came to mind – and happened to still be available for posting. The music is by Ravi, the lyrics by Rajinder Krishan.

Enjoy this popular song from the radio listening days.


Song – Sehmi Sehmi Kahaan Chali (Anmol Moti) (1969) Singer – Mahendra Kapoor, Lyrics – Rajendra Krishan, MD – Ravi
Chorus

Lyrics

sehmi sehmi kahaan chali
chhod ke dilwaalon ki gali
kab tak aankh churaayegi
kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein
ho kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein

o sehmi sehmi kahaan chali
chhod ke dilwaalon ki gali
kab tak aankh churaayegi
kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein
hoy kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein

haaye tera ye alhadpan
tauba tauba ye chitwan
aankhon mein shole naachen
zulfon mein khele saawan
haaye tera ye alhadpan
tauba tauba ye chitwan
aankhon mein shole naachen
zulfon mein khele saawan
ghir kar aa
baras bhi jaa
kab tak yunh tarsaayegi
kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein
hoy kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein
o sehmi sehmi kahaan chali
chhod ke dilwaalon ki gali
kab tak aankh churaayegi
kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein
hoy kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein

nayi jawaani ki hulchul
jaise bin barsaa baadal
kehti hai har angdaayi
saath hamen bhi letee chal
nayi jawaani ki hulchul
jaise bin barsaa baadal
kehti hai har angdaayi
saath hamen bhi letee chal
aankh milaa
maan bhi jaa
kab tak haath na aayegi
kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein
hoy kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein

o sehmi sehmi kahaan chali
chhod ke dilwaalon ki gali
kab tak aankh churaayegi
kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein
hoy kabhi na kabhi to phansegi mere jaal mein
o sehmi sehmi kahaan chali
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

सहमी सहमी कहाँ चली
छोड़ के दिलवालों की गली
कब तक आँख चुराएगी
कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में
हो कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में

ओ सहमी सहमी कहाँ चली
छोड़ के दिलवालों की गली
कब तक आँख चुराएगी
कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में
होए कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में

हाए तेरा ये अल्हड़पन
तौबा तौबा ये चितवन
आँखों में शोले नाचें
ज़ुल्फों में खेले सावन
हाए तेरा ये अल्हड़पन
तौबा तौबा ये चितवन
आँखों में शोले नाचें
ज़ुल्फों में खेले सावन
घिर कर आ
बरस भी जा
कब तक यूं ही तरसाएगी
कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में
होए कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में

ओ सहमी सहमी कहाँ चली
छोड़ के दिलवालों की गली
कब तक आँख चुराएगी
कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में
होए कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में

नई जवानी की हलचल
जैसे बिन बरसा बादल
कहती है हर अंगड़ाई
साथ हमें भी लेती चल
नई जवानी की हलचल
जैसे बिन बरसा बादल
कहती है हर अंगड़ाई
साथ हमें भी लेती चल
आँख मिला
मान भी जा
कब तक हाथ ना आएगी
कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में
होए कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में

ओ सहमी सहमी कहाँ चली
छोड़ के दिलवालों की गली
कब तक आँख चुराएगी
कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में
होए कभी ना कभी तो फसेगी मेरे जाल में
ओ सहमी सहमी कहाँ चली


This article is written by Peevesie’s Mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Hullo to all in Atuldom

September 2, 2017. The lady who made the fringe-cut hair style popular would have been 76. Yes, I am talking of Sadhana and that hair style called “sadhana cut”. I am sure every girl of the 1960s and 70s would have sported the style at least once in her lifetime. Apparently this look was inspired from the British actress Audrey Hepburn (some more on this later).
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today’s song is a fun song from the film Khota Paisa (1958). It is sung by Rafi, Shamshad and chorus. The film was one of those in which Johnny Walker was the Hero opposite Shyama. Johnny Walker was on the peak of popularity during that period. The film was produced and directed by M.Sadiq, under his own banner Sadiq Productions, Bombay. Music was by Madan Mohan.
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This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The 9th of June is the birthday of our beloved Arunkumar Deshmukhji, often fondly referred to as our in-house encyclopaedia. 🙂

Arunji, it takes me great pleasure to wish you a very happy birthday on this occasion – and I say this on behalf of all Atulites for whom you are a very special person.
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This article is written by Peevesie’s Mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Hullo to all in Atuldom

Today we will have a song from the 1957 L.V. Prasad directed Meena Kumari- Raj Kapoor- Shyama starrer ‘Sharada’ – written as ‘Shaarda’ by Atulji in the ‘List-of songs-moviewise’. It is mentioned as ‘Sharada’ in the filmography of Meena Kumari (a rule in English grammar says that proper nouns can be written with any spelling, specially there is no right or wrong spellings as far as Indian words are concerned).
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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Wow, what a song, what a lovely song, what a lovely marathon of a song; so full of words, so full of emotions, so full of insistence of emotions. Rajendra Krishan has outdone himself in writing this song. And so does C Ram, outshine himself in tying this song into threads of music. And what rendition, Lata ji outshines herself. I am hearing this song for the first time today, and have simply fallen in love with it.
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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The strongest image that remains in the mind is that of the film director Sinha Saab, a bedraggled man in tattered garments, with ruffled grey hair and white beard, a leathery skin on face lined with wrinkles that appeared much before time – a young person who aged too rapidly for his years. With help of a walking stick, he climbs down from the shadows of the scaffolding where he has perched himself, watching the action on the floor below – the same floor where once, not too long ago, he was the ringmaster, and everyone bowed to him. Not anymore. Today, he is a ‘has been’, who lost his touch of Midas, and the same world that once clamored to him, has quickly forgotten and relegated him, literally, to the garbage heap.

With difficulty, he negotiates the narrow ladders that lead down from the scaffolding to the studio floor. Once there, he shuffles to the chair, his chair, in the days of glory; the chair with the word ‘Director’ written across its back. He sits. And then he is immobile, never to get up again, never to wake up.

When the crowd of workers return after lunch, everyone is shocked to see this grimy old man, sitting motionless in the director’s chair. Everyone is known to him, but today no one recognizes him, now that he is gone. None, save one light-boy, who remembers and recognizes his earliest benefactor – Sinha Saab.

The power of these images and these sequences now have a cult following, not only in India but worldwide. Remembering Guru Dutt on his seventy seventh anniversary. (9th July)
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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Mohammed Rafi – ‘अ’  से  ‘ह’ तक  (From ‘अ’ to ‘ह’) – 1
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

‘अ’

Celebrating another year without Rafi Sb, celebrating another anniversary of this peerless artist. And more than anything else, celebrating another year of endless memories and ruminations.  God does not duplicate, they say. And so, for us listeners, memories is all that is there to live by.
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This article is written by Mahesh Mamadapur, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

I happened to listen to this short song for the first time in today’s program on Radio Ceylon and instantly fell in love with it. It is from the film ‘Dhuaan’ (1953) under the music direction of Dhaniram. The first step in sending the post was obviously to check if it has been already posted. For this I usually open all the songs posted from the film and also read the comments herein.
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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than nine years. This blog has over 13700 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3400 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

13734

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Movies with all their songs covered =1031
Total Number of movies covered =3756

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Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 3250 days.

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