Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Bambai Shehar Ki Tujhko Chal Sair Karaa Doon

Posted on: June 13, 2015


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Yeh Hai Bombay Meri Jaan – 6
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Aah, coming back to Bombay. 🙂

In the first five episodes of this series, I have covered the Bombay gangouts that took place in December last year.  However, my tales of Bombay are not yet done. Moving forward with this series, I am going to be writing about my personal experiences with this enigmatic city which is a confluence of contradictions.

I have been a visitor to Bombay since I was a toddler, both on account of family relations as well as on account of my dad’s work related to newspaper trade union movement.  Then, in the late 1980s, I started my job with Tatas, and got posted to Bombay, to start with. Today I am writing about the my first experience in terms of settling down in this city, and trying to find a home to stay.  This whole story, partly hilarious and partly depicting some difficult times, would be familiar to many who either stay here, or have spent some duration of time in this city.

And in that context, let me talk about this song and this film.  People who are familiar know about this film that deals with the issue of housing accommodation in Bombay.  The situation described in this film, is kind of similar to some of my experiences from 1987-88 as I tried to find a home, and came face to face with some very tough realities of life.  Interesting thing about this film is that this version is the second time this film was produced.  Aha, surprise. Yes, some people who maybe familiar with this film, will know that it was initially produced as a feature length project of the Film and Television Institute of India at Pune.  I know about this film, as I have seen the FTII version on Doordarshan, most likely in 1970 or 1971.  The few un-erasable memories of that film are that it was in black and white, that Jaya Bhaduri was the heroine, and that when I later would see the Basu Chatterji version, I would be amazed by the frame to frame similarity in the two versions.  So when ‘Piya Ka Ghar’ was released in cinema houses, my friends would not believe that I had seen the film earlier – the FTII version.  I would narrate to them the scene by scene episodes, and they would simply say that I have seen the film in the theatre, which by that time I had not.

The film is about the severe housing problem in the city.  Malti (role played by Jaya Bhaduri) a young girl from a village gets married and comes to Bombay.  The transition is a culture shock.  She is used to living in a large house with a large family.  In her matrimonial home, she is sharing a one room flat with her parents in law (Agha and Sulochana), her husband’s elder brother and wife (Suresh Chatwal and Ranjeeta Thakur), and a school going younger brother.  All the earlier occupants of this residence are well adjusted to that living style. But the new bride simply cannot accept that her bedroom of the night is the family kitchen of the day.  The rest of the film is about the difficulties of adjustment, her depression on account of not being able to have a private moment with her husband.  Things come to a head as the girl’s Tau (paternal uncle) comes to visit, and is appalled to see the living conditions.  There is a confrontation, and he insists that he will be taking back his niece to the village, till such time the groom is able to arrange a more befitting accommodation.  Emotions are high.  The groom’s elder brother offers to move out with his wife. The parents in law offer to give up the bedroom to the newly wed couple.  After all this exchange, the new bride has a change of heart, and decides to adjust herself into the household as it is.  The film ends with an overhead shot of the flat, with all people settled into their assigned places, the newlywed are sleeping in the kitchen, and Kishore Kumar is singing in the background –“Ye Jeevan Hai, Is Jeevan Ka, Yahi Hai, Yahi Hai Rang Roop”.

I remember one dialogue exchange that happens when the confrontation scene is happening.  The groom’s elder brother comments that in Bombay – “ghar mein jagah nahin to kya, dil mein to bahut jagah hai” (there may be paucity of space in the homes, but there is a lot of space in the heart). Now this gentleman, in the film, works in the theatre.  So the response he gets from Tau ji is – “ye sab naatak ki baaten hain, inhen naatak mein hi rakho” (these are dialogues in a stage play, keep them there).  But this dialogue remained with me, or rather came back to me when I started my stay in Bombay.  I will come back to it little later in the flow.

When I got my appointment letter from Tata Burroughs Ltd, I was thoroughly thrilled. (The company was later to be named Tata Unisys Ltd, and even later Tata Infotech Ltd.  Now the latest is that it has been merged into TCS – Tata Consultancy Services).  Getting a job with a Tatas company, in the IT sector with the added attraction that it was a joint venture with Burroughs Inc of USA, which used to be a big name in IT in that era.  And then to be in Bombay. I was a young heart on the seventh heaven, completely oblivious of the most interesting and taxing experiences that were awaiting me.  In fact, at that time, I had two simultaneous offers from Bombay, almost at par in terms of remuneration.  In the mid 80s, the Mafatlal group (mostly textile business) had also ventured into the new and lucrative IT field and were in the process of setting up a software development center in Bombay.  I had interviewed with them, and had an offer from them also.  My final interview was taken by one of the young ladies of the Mafatlal family.  In the interview, she had shown keen interest in my joining the company, and even promised to go house hunting with me in Bombay, once I joined.  The idea sounded very attractive, as was the lady herself; but I still chose to join Tatas.  Good choice in hind sight, since the Mafatlal venture did not prosper for long.

So once the decision was made to go to Bombay, my mother was of course the most concerned.  Where would I stay, what will I eat, who will take care of me etc. etc.  At point in time, we did not have any close relatives in Bombay.  One of my dad’s cousins, whom we used to visit when I was a child, had since passed away and the contact with the family was on a low to medium scale.  Plus they lived in Colaba area, my work place was to be in Andheri East.  So from a commuting perspective, it was a deterrent to start with.  After some quick exploration, we located another family contact.  My chacha ji’s saala (my father’s younger brother’s wife’s brother) was located in Kandivili.  Now that sounded the most promising, both in terms of geographical and familial proximity :).  We talked to my chacha ji, appropriate messages were sent to his brother in law, and it was arranged that they will take care of me for some unspecified initial period of my stay.

I coerced my cousin (chacha ji’s son) to travel with me, so that the introductions etc. would be comfortable.  And so, the day of travel came, and we two boarded the Frontier Mail to come to Bombay.  We had instructions to get down at Borivili, and take the local train to Kandivili. My cousin was more familiar as he had visited our hosts in the then recent past.  We reached Kandivili, and took an auto to reach Mamma ji’s place.  On arriving there, I was in for a surprise, rather a shock of my life.  I could then relate very intrinsically and very strongly, to the emotions that Malti (the newlywed bride in the film ‘Piya Ka Ghar’) goes through when she arrives at her matrimonial home.  Thankfully, for me it was not so severe; it was not my matrimonial home forever in the future.  But the experience was intense.  A first taste of the realities of life, outside the safe confines of my own home in Delhi.

Mamma ji (that is the relationship I now had with my gracious host), and his family were three people – himself, his wife (mammi ji) and one son (Ravi).  They have one more elder son, who was then already settled in the US.  Mamma ji and Ravi, they have a small opticians shop in one of the business complexes right next to the Kandivili station.  Their home, also very close to the station on the west side, was just a one room, just one room with kitchen and bath.  Everything was in that one room – living, dining, and sleeping.  Well the situation was actually not what it seemed, as I was soon to find out.  Mamma ji had recently (like a couple of years prior) purchased a flat in one of the societies, further west into the Kandivili area.  The construction of that building was very bad, almost literally the kind of corrupt and fraud examples we see in films.  Ravi took me to see the place.  The whole building had tilted, from all directions and the municipal authorities had declared it unsafe and got it evacuated.  The builder had provided temporary accommodation to the flat owners, but really no solution was in sight.  The only possible thing to do was to demolish and construct again.  Of course the builder was not ready for that, and so a legal battle was in progress.

So I landed into the middle of that difficult situation of that family.  The living conditions were just the same or even worse as compared to film under discussion.  After our arrival, the lady of house would sleep in the kitchen, and all gentlemen would sleep on the floor in the one room.  My cousin left after a couple of days.  My stay continued for some more time.  I was both embarrassed and thankful to be there.  Embarrassed because I was encroaching upon their space which was already fraught with difficulties, and thankful because in that time of my need, I had no other place to go to.  Also thankful that for the time period that I stayed with them, neither of the three members of the family ever make me feel by any comment, any gesture or body language expression that I was an unwelcome guest.  For the time I stayed with them, I was part of their difficult life, but not an unwanted or annoying part.  For those days, and for all the days since, I simply cannot forget how appropriate I found the above mentioned dialogue from the film – “ghar mein jagah nahin to kya, dil mein to bahut jagah hai” (there may be paucity of space in the home, but there is a lot of space in the heart).  And I realized, it is not a filmi or a ‘naatak ka’ dialogue.  It is a part of the reality in the life of Bombay. 🙂

Being in that difficult situation, of course a large part of effort was directed towards locating a suitable and more permanent accommodation for myself. And this is where I got the second and the bigger culture shock of my life.  I started this discussion with my gracious host, request for help to find a suitable rental or paying guest accommodation.  His first question to me was, how much money was I carrying.  I was taken aback.  In what followed, I realized that I had landed up in this city completely unprepared and unaware of the local housing situation.  I told him well, I was carrying maybe a two or three thousand rupees, but that I should soon be getting my first salary cheque.  Then he asked me if I could arrange for forty thousand rupees.  My surprises were mounting.  I said I wanted to rent a flat and not purchase it.  He responded in a friendly and knowing manner, yes that is what he was talking about.  Then he explained to me the conventional rental arrangement in Bombay – eleven months lease, eleven months advance rent, pugri (finder’s and signing fees) etc. all together would mean an expense of thirty to forty thousand depending on the quality of accommodation.

I was completely at my wits ends.  I said I cannot arrange for that kind of money.  Then he asked me if I knew any builder.  Again I was puzzled.  He explained that one way to get a simpler arrangement for rental accommodation is if you know a builder very well, and he agrees to oblige.  By the time this first conversation ended, I realized I was completely out of my league having come to Bombay. I was sure I would not survive here. And even started regretting not having taken the Mafatlal offer – the charming lady had offered to go house hunting with me.  Who knows what else it could have led to 😉

Other efforts started.  Office had some transit flats.  On enquiry I found that there are two categories, one for bachelors and one for married employees.  The bachelor transit flats were all occupied, with no availability for at least two months.  There was vacancy in married category (of course, the employee population at that time was very young, almost all bachelors), but of course I would have to produce a wife to avail that accommodation.  Now wherefrom to invent a wife instantly.  So that avenue was also blocked. Not exactly though, and I would come to that a little later.

Other option was a foreign assignment.  The company was famous for it.  The buzz was that you join Tata Burroughs, and within three months they will send you to US.  I tried finding out about that.  To my dreadful surprise (yes for some initial weeks, I was getting dreadful surprises at the rate of at least one a day) I was to find out that based on my good performance in the technical tests, I had been assigned a senior and different position on a local Bombay project, and the assignment was for at least 18 months.  All my flights of fancy were grounded, and all my dream planes which I wanted to ride to reach sunny California were locked up in hangars.  I had to be in Bombay.

Then started the builder connection.  I talked to as many people as I knew in the office and personally, to get a lead to some friendly builder.  Lot of promises were made, and a couple of introductions were initiated.  One of them did not finally materialize, after multiple appointments were made and missed.  One materialized.  I was instructed to go and meet the gentleman at his office in Ghatkopar.  I reached there, and after some wait, I was allowed into his office.  The image is still with me – the closest resemblance I can think of is Sadashiv Amrapurkar, only more obese, with almost no neck visible.  Fingers full of rings, as he busily ruffled through papers in front of him.  Without looking at me, “Bolo” (speak) he said.  I was sheepish and hesitant, and stuttered the name of the friend who had given the reference.  Cutting me short he said, “kya chaahiye?” (what do you want). I started detailed explanation of my job, and the current difficult situation.  Again cutting me short, he asked,”theek hai theek hai, chaahiye kya??” (Ok, Ok, what do you want).  I said I was looking for a rental accommodation for one year.  His summary response was, why should I give you?  I was taken aback at this quick disposal of the conversation.  I tried stutter out some more explanations, that I was based in Delhi, all my family was there, I expect to go to US within a year.  Impatient and exasperated, he said, “aisa sab koi bolta hai, tell me why should I give you a flat on rent” (everyone says that, tell me why should I give you a flat on rent).  By this time, I was beginning to simmer inside with my own anger and humiliation.  In all my life thus far I had never had to face such a situation, where the opposite person was very near making me beg.  I simply said that what I have told him is the truth, and that I had no plans to settle in Bombay.  He simply said, “jaao, koi flat nahin hai” (go, there is no flat).  Unable to take this humiliation any more, I simply turned back and walked out.  When I confronted the person who had referred me, he simply brushed away the incident as ‘hota hai’ – that is what happens.

I started think, “ye kahaan phans gaye yaar”, never having faced any such situation before in my whole life.  The clock kept on ticking, and there seemed no way out.  I discussed with Mamma ji again.  He once again asked me what my future plans were.  I clearly told him I am not planning to settle there.  I would be trying to get a US assignment, and within a year I plan to be away.  He understood, and said it is not worth investing even in a formal rental accommodation, I would only be losing money.  He suggested to try with my other colleagues, and see if I could get a sharing accommodation. Other than that, he simply said that I was welcome to stay with them, till as long as I wanted.  I was thankful, but I was also pained and embarrassed that I was already a few weeks into putting the entire family under stress.  Maybe it was just me feeling that, but that is what the emotion was.

All this while, I was also continuing to pester my office admin staff for getting a transit accommodation.  The vacancies in the married employees accommodation were still there, and very inviting.  So I decided to use some charm (ahem!) and some subterfuge.  I told them that the plans for getting a wife were in very advanced stage and that soon I will be in a position to “produce” a wife.  In any case, the transit accommodation was assigned only for three months.  After some cajoling, some discussion with senior HR manager, some explanation of my current experiences in “house hunting”, I was able to procure an approval to move into the married people’s transit flat.  I thanked God that I had a breather even for three months.  At least I would take off the load from Mamma ji, and then have some time in hand to work on alternate arrangements.

I packed my stuff and bid a goodbye Mamma ji’s family.  It was a very emotional departure, having stayed with them for almost a month like a son and a family member.  The promise was to join them for dinner at least once a week, till as long as I was in Bombay, a promise that I kept.

Now the next three months were a bliss from the heavens.  The location of the bachelor’s accommodation was a hostel type arrangement close to the office in Marol area.  But the married people’s transit flat – that was a whole different and wonderful story. The location was Pali Hill in Bandra area.  The accommodation was a couple of floors in a very upscale high rise building, with a view of the ocean, depending on which room one got.  The rooms were huge. The room that I got was four times the size of the place where I was staying with Mamma ji.  Every room had a spacious bath attached.  The kitchen was common, but in any case I would not be using to much of that.  All other occupants were couples and I was the only ‘odd man’ in the mix.  Whenever I was asked about my ‘better half’, I would hesitatingly smile and respond “jaldi aa rahe hain”, without any other explanations.  I was very sure they all secretly sympathized with my ‘single’ situation. 😉

So, I was now very happily settled in a very amply spacious accommodation.  Just for three months only, but still, things seemed to be moving.  This description has already become long, and there is still more tales to tell about the accommodation hunting and the US assignment.  So this saga is to be continued in the next episode of this series.

Now coming back to the film and the song. ‘Piya Ka Ghar’ is an charming comedy that tackles a very serious issue.  Given the star cast, that is to be expected, with comedy actors like Agha, Mukri, Keshto, Asrani, Paintal and Sunder in the mix.  Besides these, other members of the star cast are Jaya Bhaduri, Anil Dhawan, Ranjeeta Thakur, Suresh Chatwal, Sulochana Chatterjee, Master Suhas, CS Dubey, Sarita Devi, Shriram Shastri, Prakash Mishra, Raj Verma, Rahi, Vasant Bhatia, Alka, Raja Paranjape, Samar Chatterji, Bhanumati, Pardesi, and Ranga Reddy etc.  The film comes from Rajshri banner and is directed by Basu Chatterji.  The four songs of this film are penned by Anand Bakshi and the endearing music is by Laxmikant Pyaarelal.  Oh yes, I must modify my statement at the beginning of the article.  The FTII version has no songs, so my claim that the Rajshri version is frame to frame copy of the FTII version, is not fully true. 😉

This song is inserted in the film at the point where it finally dawns on Ram (Anil Dhawan) that part of the reason behind his newlywed wife’s depressing mood is that he has never taken her for an outing in the city since she came to Bombay.  As such, she is hankering for private moments with her husband, who is simply continuing with his original schedule and life style – work, home, eat, sleep, and back to work.  A side note here – I have seen it happen with many newlywed couples.  After the honeymoon, the gentleman immediately settles back into his old routine and life, without batting any eyelid.  That he is now married, and has a new role and new responsibilities to take care of, simply does not occur to him.  Marriage is a life changing event, and this understanding needs to be given to both partners, not only just the lady.

So the gentleman in this film finally comes to realize this, and decides to take his newlywed to a tour of the city.  A nice and peppy song, with an engaging picturization to go along with it.  Mukri appears as a taxi driver.  Realizing this, Anil Dhawan quickly abandons the taxi – reason is that Mukri is one of their neighbors, and a regular card playing visitor to their home.  The couple barges into a shooting spot, where Dharmendra is on scene.  As the husband is trying to explain to his wife what is happening, they are shooed away by one of the staff.  Paintal appears as the server in the restaurant.  Many place shown in the video clip are familiar – Churchgate, Gateway of India, Worli Seaface, Nariman Point, Flora Fountain, the beach at Chowpatty etc.  But there are many more locales that are shown in this clip.  I request the local Bombay wallahs to please identify and tell us more about them.

I feel that Basu Chatterji has done a great job keeping this song in the background.  The natural interaction between the couple, and their apparent delight in each other’s company, would have disappeared, had the director got the husband to actually sing the song.  Small touches that make it more natural and more lovable – like when in the bus, the husband puts his arm around the wife’s shoulder, she slaps his hand away, like her fear of getting into water at the beach, like kicking him in the restaurant, as he tries to touch her feet with his foot.  Lovely, simply lovely.

A wonderfully done piece, with a lot of Bombay locales and specialties on view.  See, listen and enjoy.

 

Song – Bambai Shehar Ki Tujhko Chal Sair Karaa Doon (Piya Ka Ghar) (1972) Singer – Kishore Kumar, Lyrics – Anand Bakshi, MD – Laxmikant Pyaarelal

Lyrics

bambai shehar ki tujhko
chal sair karaa doon
bambai shehar ki tujhko
chal sair karaa doon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon
bambai shehar ki tujhko
chal sair karaa doon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon

badi rangeeli
hain ye sadken
in sadkon pe
do dil dhadke
badi rangeeli
hain ye sadken
in sadkon pe
do dil dhadke
ik tera
ik mera
ik tera ik mera
aa haa haa
aa haa haa
tamtam pe baithegi
ke palkon pe bitha loon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon

badi mushkil se
mila aaj maukaa
aaj bhi ho na jaaye koi dhokha
badi mushkil se
mila aaj maukaa
aaj bhi ho na jaaye koi dhokha
chal haule
mann doley
chal haule mann doley
aa haa haa
aa haa haa
teri raahon pe
main apni aankhen bichha
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon

lagta hai aise
sun o shezaadi
aaj hui hai jaise teri meri shaadi
lagta hai aise
sun o shezaadi
aaj hui hai jaise teri meri shaadi
aa rani
aa jaani
aa rani aa jaani
aa haa haa
aa haa haa
aaj tujhe baahon ka
main haar pehnaa doon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon

bambai shehar ki tujhko
chal sair karaa doon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon
aa teri bhar ke
shikaayat aaj mitaa doon

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

बंबई शहर की तुझको
चल सैर करा दूँ
बंबई शहर की तुझको
चल सैर करा दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ
बंबई शहर की तुझको
चल सैर करा दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ

बड़ी रंगीली
हैं ये सड़कें
इन सड़कों पे
दो दिल धधके
बड़ी रंगीली
हैं ये सड़कें
इन सड़कों पे
दो दिल धधके
इक तेरा
इक मेरा
इक तेरा इक मेरा
आ हा हा
आ हा हा
टमटम पे बैठेगी
के पलकों पे बिठा लूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ

बड़ी मुश्किल से
मिला आज मौका
आज भी हो ना जाये कोई धोखा
बड़ी मुश्किल से
मिला आज मौका
आज भी हो ना जाये कोई धोखा
चल हौले
मन डोले
चल हौले मन डोले
आ हा हा
आ हा हा
तेरी राहों पे
मैं अपनी आँखें बिछा दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ

लगता है ऐसे
सुन ओ शहज़ादी
आज हुई है जैसे तेरी मेरी शादी
लगता है ऐसे
सुन ओ शहज़ादी
आज हुई है जैसे तेरी मेरी शादी
आ रानी
आ जानी
आ रानी आ जानी
आ हा हा
आ हा हा
आज तुझे बाहों का
मैं हार पहना दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ

बंबई शहर की तुझको
चल सैर करा दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ
आ तेरी भर के
शिकायत आज मिटा दूँ

 

 

9 Responses to "Bambai Shehar Ki Tujhko Chal Sair Karaa Doon"

Sudhir ji,
Avery lively and interesting recount of your experiences in Bombay. Thanks for this entertainment. Your articles are always highly readable.
The film “Piya ka Ghar’-72 was a remake of a hit Marathi film “Mumbaicha Jawai”-1970 (the son-in law of Bombay). So,you must have seen the FTII version only in 1971 and not in 1970 in any case.
-AD

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Dear Arun ji,

Thanks so much for your prompt comments and update. I was not aware of the Marathi original, so thanks for that information.

Best regards
Sudhir

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A most engrossing tale.
Sudhir ji, you are a born story-teller.
Thanks a lot.
Regards,
Avadh Lal

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Thanks Avadh Lal ji
for your kind appreciation.

Rgds
Sudhir

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Aaha… What a pleasant 😉 experience you had Sudhirbhai. Ek phone kar dete ya aawaaz hi de dete to ye naacheez aapka sab “bandobast” kar deti. Aapko bachelor hone ki sharmindagi mahsus na hone deti. 😀 Aisa kaha jata hai ki Bombai mein “chhokri” mil jaati hai lekin “nokri” nahi milti (reverse in your case 😉 ) aur “var” milta hai lekin “ghar” nahi milta. Your experience has proved it.
Waiting for your tale of transit from Bombai to US and then your stay in SoCal (just few miles away from my house 😦 😥 )

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Khyati Ben,

Aapne apna Bombay ka phone number mujhko diya hi nahin, to main kya karta. 😀

Rgds
Sudhir

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Excellent read! But should it not be “AA TERI HAR EK SHIKAYAT AAJ MEETA DOON”?
Thanks for the song!
Naishadh

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Fantastic, Sudhirji. I was engrossed from first word to last. How do you manage to write so beautifully? It is like every scene is playing out in front of my eyes. 🙂 Bombay (now Mumbai) was known for not being particularly kind to bachelors seeking accommodation. I don’t know how it is now, but in the 80s, this was definitely the case. 🙂

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I agree.. you truly are a wonderful and natural story teller Sudhir ji. And this post was even more special because it was about the city I was born in :). Bombay is full of life! :).

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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has more than 15500 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15505

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1195
Total Number of movies covered =4273

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Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

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