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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Nanha Mora Doley Mori Anganiaa

Posted on: May 24, 2017


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

रोक सकता हमें ज़िन्दान-ए-बला क्या मजरूह
हम तो आवाज़ हैं दीवार से छन जाते हैं

Rok sakta hamen zindaan-e-bala kya ‘Majrooh’
Ham to aawaaz hain deewaar se chhan jaate hain.

[Can prison of calamity stop us?
We are the voice which can infiltrate the wall].

This she’r was written by the young Majrooh Sultanpuri probably sometime in the 1940s. Perhaps he was goaded by the idealistic impulses when he was  associated with the Progressive Writers Association (PWA), a left-oriented ideological group.  Nonetheless, for Majrooh Sultanpuri, it has been a quick transformation – from an idealistic poet of PWA  to a lyricist in the film industry.

Today, May 24th 2017 is the 17th Remembrance Day of Majrooh Sultanpuri (01/10/1919 – 24/05/2000) who ruled the Hindi film industry as a lyricist for over 5 decades. His long innings in Hindi film industry can be gauged by the fact that he wrote lyrics for music director Naushad in 1946 to A R Rahman in 2000. He wrote lyrics for the three generation of Kapoor family –  for Raj Kapoor in ‘Andaz’ (1949) to Randheer Kapoor in ‘Rampur Ka Lakshman’ (1972)  and to Karishma Kapoor in ‘Ham To Mohabbat Karega’ (2000). These are the testimonies of his smooth adaptation of the changing environments in Hindi film music. He achieved this without much diluting the quality of his lyrics.

Majrooh Sultanpuri was initially a reluctant lyricist if I go by his as well as others’ interviews. In 1945, he had accompanied his mentor, Jigar Moradabadi to Bombay (Mumbai) for participation in a Mushaira. Many film producers and directors saw such mushaira as an opportunity to select budding poets to write songs for their films. One of the producer-directors who attended the mushaira was AR Kardar. He  was producing and directing ‘Shah Jahan’ (1946) and was keen to engage Jigar Moradabadi to write songs for the film. However, Jigar Moradabadi declined the offer and instead suggested him to take his disciple, Majrooh Sultanpuri who had impressed the audience with his poetry in the mushaira.

Majrooh Sultanpuri was reluctant to write songs for the films as he felt that his association with films would affect his shaayari. However, at the end, he could not say no to his mentor and agreed to write the songs for ‘Shah Jahan’ (1946). This was the start for a reluctant lyricist which culminated into a very long and a successful filmy career.

After the success of his iconic songs ‘Shah Jahan’ (1946) such as gham kiye mushtakil, Majrooh Sultanpuri  also wrote songs for Naushad in films such as  ‘Qeemat’ (1946) and ‘Andaz’ (1949) and for Bulo C Rani in ‘Anjuman’ (1948) and ‘Nazaare’ (1949) among others. The success of ‘Andaz’ (1949) and ‘Aarzoo’ (1950) firmly established Majrooh Sultanpuri as a lyricist. However, his filmy career got a setback sometime in 1950 when the then Government of Bombay arrested him for inciting the workers through his recitation of poems. Although the Government gave him an opportunity to apologise his action, he refused and instead spent 2 years in Arthur Road Jail along with Balraj Sahani.

After his release from the jail, he found it hard to get the assignments. The absence of 2 years in Hindi film industry is a long period to successfully restart the career. By this time, Naushad had Shakeel Badayuni, SD Burman had Sahir Ludhinavi, Raj Kapoor with Shankar-Jaikishan had Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri. During this period, Majrooh Sultanpuri got work to write one or two songs in a few films. Perhaps, his jail stint thought him a lesson that he had to keep his ideological views separate from his filmy career. Thanks to his calibre and with some luck, his second inning started with a good number of films albeit with a gap.

In 1953, 9 films in which Majrooh Sultanipuri contributed lyrics were released. However, almost all these films did not fare well on the box office front although they had some very good songs. Among his 1953 released films, ‘Fareb’ (1953) had two beautiful songs aa mohabbat ki basti basaayenge ham and husn bhi hai udaas udaas ishq bhi gham se choor hai.  ‘Baaghi’ (1953) had hamaare baad ab mehfil mein afsaane bayaan honge. ‘Footpath’ (1953) had shaam e gham ki kasam aaj ghamgeen hain ham and ‘Hamdard’ (1953) had tera haathh haathhon mein aa gaya.

The year 1954 was a  milestone  in the filmy career of Majrooh Sultanpuri along with  OP Nayyar and Guru Dutt who all were associated with the film ‘Baaz’ (1953). Despite good songs, the film had failed at the box office. Guru Dutt’s next venture ‘Aar Paar’ (1954) was hopping to recoup the financial losses. The film became a super hit at the box office. For Majrooh Sultanpuri, it was a successful departure from the poignant songs which he used to write earlier to light-hearted songs like appeasement song (ye lo main haari piya huyi teri jeet re) and Hinglish/Bambaiyya/nok jhonk/teasing song (arrey na na na na na tauba tauba).

The success of ‘Aar Paar’ (1954) proved that Majrooh Sultanpuri was also an expert in writing light-hearted songs and that he could easily write songs for pre-set tunes without much compromising in the use of appropriate words in the lyrics. Later he wrote many such songs in films like ‘Mr and Mrs 1955’ (1955), ‘CID’ (1956), ‘Nau Do Gyaarah’ (1957),  ‘Paying Guest’ (1957), ‘Chalti Ka Naam ghaadi’ (1958), ‘Dilli Kaa Thug’ (1958) and many more.

With over 2000 songs in about 350 films during 1946-2000, it is not possible to discuss  the full career of Majrooh Sultanpuri in a single article. So I will skip his works with music directors like SD Burman, OP Nayyar, Chitragupt, Roshan, Madan Mohan, Ravi etc during the 1960s and with music directors like Laxmikant-Pyarelal, Rajesh Roshan, Anand- Milind, Jatin-Lalit, Bappi Lahiri, Anu Malik etc 1970s onward. However, I feel that I must include here the unique and the long lasting association of Majrooh Sultanpuri with  RD Burman.

When Nasir Hussain signed Majrooh Sultanpuri as lyricist for ‘Teesri Manzil’ (1966), the music director for the film was not finalised.  Majrooh Sultanpuri suggested the name of RD Burman as the music director. However, the name had to be vetted by Shammi Kapoor, the lead actor of the film as it was generally known that he would prefer OP Nayyar or Shankar-Jaikishan as the music director. After a presentation by RD Burman, Shammi Kapoor was so much impressed by the tunes of the songs composed by RD Burman that he instantly gave his nod.

The ‘khushnuma’ songs of Majrooh Sultanpuri which RD Burman composed the folk-based tunes with some elements of  rock, jazz and latino became an instant hit with the young generation. Personally, I feel that the songs of ‘Teesri Manzil’ (1966) was the beginning of the end of the golden era of Hindi film music. A new and modern style of Hindi film music started which was well received not only by the  younger  generation but also many of my generation. Majrooh Sultanpuri’s lyrics acted as a continuum during the change of Hindi film musical eras. And what a contrasting style of lyrics he wrote during 1966 itself!  For example, he wrote  o mere sona re sona re sone re, de dungi jaan juda mat hona re for ‘Teesri Manzil’ (1966) and also  chhupa lo yoon dil mein pyaar mera ke jaise mandir mein lau diye ki in ‘Mamata’ (1966).

I had called RD Burman-Majrooh Sultanpuri combination an unique one. The reason is that after listening to the songs of ‘Teesri Manzil’ (1966), one can immediately feel the vast differences in the types of songs composed earlier with that of the songs of Teesri Manzil. But the lyrical style of Majrooh Sultanpuri remains more or less the same. So it was a sort of blend of the golden era style of lyrics with modern melodies and rhythm.

Majrooh Sultanpuri wrote songs for RD Burman in as many as 75 films during 1966-1996 – the highest number of films he did with a music director. Laxmikant-Pyarelal ranked a distant second with 42 films during 1964-1992 and Chitragupt with 23 films ranked third. His association with music directors like SD Burman, OP Nayyar, Rajesh Roshan, Anand-Milind etc resulted in writing songs for films ranging between 15 and 20. But the fact remains that he worked with almost all the top music directors of his time.

An interesting observation about the association of Majrooh Sultanpuri with then upcoming music directors is in order. The first film which some of them did with him became the turning point for the successful takeoff in their career. Examples are Laxmikant-Pyarelal (Dosti, 1964), RD Burman (‘Teesri Manzil’, 1966), Rajesh Roshan (‘Kunwara Baap’, 1975) and Anand-Milind (‘Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak’, 1985).

In 1993, Majrooh Sultanpuri was conferred with the prestigious Dadasaheb Phalke Award, the first film lyricist to get the award.

As happens in any filmy career, Majrooh Sultanpuri’s  career got a set back during the second half of the 1990s. His favourite music directors were not in much demand and probably he could not adjust to the lyrical demands of the third generation of music directors.

One silver lining during this lean period for Majrooh Sultanpuri was Asha Bhonsle’s non-film pop album ‘Jaanam Samjha Karo’ (1997) in which all the eight songs were written by Majrooh Sultanpuri. This album was sold like a hot cake mainly because of the popularity of the song jaanam samjha karo which won MTV and V Channel award for Asha Bhonsle in 1997. I remember that not a single day passed on the TV musical channels without playing this pop song when the song’s  video was made public. While the younger generation may have liked the pop music and the way the video was shot on Milind Soman and Helen Brodie, I liked more for its lyrics and Asha Bhonsle’s rendition. At that time, I was not even aware that it was written by Majrooh Sultanpuri.

Just a few months before his death on May 24, 2000, one of his fellow lyricists had met him and enquired as to what he was doing. Majrooh Sultanpuri replied in Hindi ‘andhon ke shahar mein aaina bech raha hoon’. (I am selling mirrors in the city of blinds). This, by and large, sums up the status of lyricists in the neo-modern era of Hindi film music.

On the occasion of 17th Remembrance Day of Majrooh Sultanpuri, I recall his five of the six songs he wrote for the film ‘Garam Coat’ (1955), the 6th song being a Meera bhajan.  Five songs were rendered by Lata Mangeshkar for which she did not take any remuneration. Five songs from the film have already been covered in the blog. The film was produced by Rajinder Singh Bedi and was directed by Amar Kumar. The star cast included Balraj Sahani, Nirupa Roy, Vijaylaxmi, Jayant, Brahm Bhardwaj, Baij Sharma, Rashid Khan etc.

Here is the 6th song ‘Nanha Mora Dole Mori Anganiyaa’. The song was set to music by Pandit Amarnath Chawla, who was the senior most disciple of Ustad Amir Khan. The song is picturised on Vijaylaxmi who plays with her kid and admires his aimless walk in the courtyard of her village house. The background of this song is that Balraj Sahani has lost his entire salary on the salary day and his debtors would be asking for the money he owes them. He decides to commit suicide by coming in front of the train. However, by the time he reaches the spot, the train had just passed. A dejected Balraj Sahani waits for another train to come when he suddenly hears humming of a song sung by a mother for her child from a house on the other side of the railway track.  He reaches near the house and what he sees bring some smile on his face. Instead of committing suicide, Balraj Sahani goes back to his home.

Majrooh’s lyrics in this song is the true reflection of the village settings about 60 years back which are  still valid even in the 21st century for many of the villages in India. I have come across a couple of Hindi words used in the lyrics such as ‘humak’ (toddler’s walking attempts), ‘kilkaari’ (toddler’s loud sound when happy) after a long time.

[Ed Note: With this post, the film ‘Garam Coat’ joins the list of films with all songs covered on this blog. Yippeee time. . . ]


Song – Nanha Mora Doley Mori Anganiaa (Garam Coat) (1955) Singer – Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics – Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD – Pt Amarnath

Lyrics

nanhe re..e..e..
munne re..e..e..
nanhe re..e..e..
munne re..e..e..

nanhe re..e..e..
munne re..e..e..

hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm
nanha mora doley 
mori anganaiya
nanha mora doley 
mori anganaiya
door se dekhoon aur musakaaun
door se dekhoon aur musakaaun
moond ke ankhiyaan paas bulaaun
moond ke ankhiyaan paas bulaaun
natkhat hans ke chale paiyaan paiyaan
nanha mora doley
mori anganiyaa
nanha mora doley

komal aisa 
mora albela
komal aisa 
mora albela
aankh pade to
rang ho maila
aankh pade to
rang ho maila
daare phiroon main to achra ki chhaiyaan
nanha mora doley 
mori anganiyaa
nanha mora doley

humak humak chaley 
maare kilkaari
humak humak chaley 
maare kilkaari
chhoti chhoti batiyaan 
laage pyaari pyaari
chhoti chhoti batiyaan 
laage pyaari pyaari
laage nazar nahi 
le loon balaiyaan
nanha mora doley 
mori anganiyaa
nanha mora doley

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

नन्हें रे॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰
मुन्ने रे॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰
नन्हें रे॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰
मुन्ने रे॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰

नन्हें रे॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰
मुन्ने रे॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰

हम्म मम्म मम्म मम्म
हम्म मम्म मम्म मम्म
नन्हा मोरा डोले
मोरी अंगनइया
नन्हा मोरा डोले
मोरी अंगनइया
दूर से देखूँ और मुसकाऊँ
दूर से देखूँ और मुसकाऊँ
मूँद के अँखियाँ
पास बुलाऊँ
मूँद के अँखियाँ
पास बुलाऊँ
नटखट हंस के चले पइंय्यां
नन्हा मोरा डोले
मोरी अंगनइया
नन्हा मोरा डोले

कोमल ऐसा
मोरा अलबेला
कोमल ऐसा
मोरा अलबेला
आँख पड़े तो
रंग हो मैला
आँख पड़े तो
रंग हो मैला
डारे फिरूँ मैं तो
अचरा की छइंय्यां
नन्हा मोरा डोले
मोरी अंगनइया
नन्हा मोरा डोले

हुमक हुमक चले
मारे किलकारी
हुमक हुमक चले
मारे किलकारी
छोटी छोटी बतियाँ
लागे प्यारी प्यारी
छोटी छोटी बतियाँ
लागे प्यारी प्यारी
लागे नज़र ना
ले लूँ  बलइंय्यां
नन्हा मोरा डोले
मोरी अंगनइया
नन्हा मोरा डोले

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4 Responses to "Nanha Mora Doley Mori Anganiaa"

Yes, this is the type of semi-classical songs that I am mad about. and I agree with you that the the old class music lovers like me, (may be in minority by now) suffered a blow with films like ‘Teesary Manzil’ in 1966. I do not want to write more about this and offend many of my friends.

Dear Kamath Saheb,
Grateful for a superb post. Befitting tribute to great Majrooh saheb.
Thanks and regards,
Avadh Lal

Sadanand Ji,
Thanks for the tributes paid to Majrooh. This is the first time I am learning about Majrooh in so much detail.. Nice post.
Regards

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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