Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Laadli


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4802 Post No. : 16568

Today’s song is from the film Ladli-1949. This was one of the popular films of MD Anil Biswas in those times. He was still in his prime, but on the downward curve past his prime. By mid 50’s, films came at a snail’s pace to him and then in a few years he left Mumbai, shifted to New Delhi and his life took a 90 degree turn, personally and professionally.

Anil Biswas,the Bhishma Pitamaha of HFM, was a respected person in the industry.He started from the mid 30s and for the next 25 years or so,he created many everlasting gems in film songs. In Bombay, Playback was first started by him in the film Mahageet-1937. By the mid 50s his magic started waning and by 1960, he was almost gone from the industry. Initially he did 10-11 films with Sagar, then with Mehboob for National studios and then in Bombay talkies- where his name became immortal with the film Kismet-1943.

He married Ashalata in 1936. Along with her he started variety pictures and they produced films like Laadli-49,Laajawab-50 Badi bahu-51, Hamdard-53 and Bajuband-54. ( a less known fact is-Anil da had made a Guest appearance in the film Hamdard-53 as a barber.) He also acted in the film Mehman-53 (produced by Ashalata),as a Pujari and a song was shot on him.In both cases he did not get any payments. As a Producer he lost heavily, because Ashalata usurped all the money. Frustrated, he gave up everything and separated from her in 1954. By now, sweet links were established with singer Meena Kapoor-25 years younger to him, since 1948 itself. They got married with each other on 19-3-1957. The death of Brother in law and close friend Pannalal Ghosh in 1960 and younger brother Sunil in 1961 as well as his eldest son- Pradeep,broke his heart. He left Bombay and joined A.I.R. at Delhi on 1-3-1963,where he worked upto 27-6-1975. Later he was a consultant for Nehru University for a few years.

However,hardly anything is known about his eldest son Pradeep,anywhere. Here is some information,hitherto not known much,brought specially for our readers.
Pradeep was a very bright student and always topped in school and college. He passed his entrance exam and the interview,with flying colours for entry to NDA college at Poona,to join armed forces. He excelled even in NDA training.Not only was he very popular there but sang well too. He participated in the music Festival of Khadakwasla NDA and sang 3 songs,winning all prizes. He was also a NDA Topper.

Shri Gopinath Talwalkar,an A.I.R. Programmer at Delhi,used to interview the Toppers of NDA every year. That year Pradeep was the Topper, so he was interviewed. Though the interview was in Hindi, after the recording,Pradeep asked Talwalkar,in pure Marathi,whether his interview had been good. Talwalkar was shocked. Pradeep then explained that he was Anil Biswas’s son and he had learnt Marathi from his actress mother Ashalata. Pradeep knew Hindi,Marathi,English and Gujarati languages.

After completing his NDA training,he was posted as Flight cadet at Jodhpur. He was further promoted and became Pilot Officer in 1957. During one Training flight some altitude problems occurred and his plane crashed at Begumpet Airport, Hyderabad, killing Pradeep instantly. This happened in 1961.

This was also the time of crisis for Anil da. He was struggling to survive. Films were not coming to him. Since he married Meena Kapoor, Lata Mangeshkar-a fast close friend of Ashalata , had gone against him and Meena’s singing career was suppressed. He had already lost Pannalal Ghosh and Sunil-his brother and now Pradeep’s death devastated him and he was literally forced to seek employment with Delhi A.I.R., when the opportunity came. After retirement, till his death on 31-5-2003, he spent his life in total anonymity and recluse. So sad for a composer, who was once a fountain of enthusiasm and who was considered Mentor by leading contemporary composers like C.Ramchandra.

By 1949, the Indian film industry had reasonably stabilised having gone through the rigours of the war period and total shake up of the industry due to the Partition blues. 1949 was the best year in the Golden Era of HFM. There were so many films offering evergreen, out of this world songs, that the audience did not know which film to see and which song to hear. The sale of records registered a Record of Sales in 1949. 157 films were made in 1949. Barring the figure of 181 films in 1947 ( we know the reasons), 1949 produced the maximum films from 1931 to 1984 – a period of 50++ years. What’s more, almost every alternate film gave superb songs. Nearly every Music Director of Hindi films was present in 1949, with his film.

This was also a transition period, when older composers were giving way to newer ones. Additionally, the competition between Naushad and C Ramchandra for the Number One position was at its peak. Though CR is my favourite composer, during the period 47 to 49, it was all the way Naushad who was the undisputed Numero Uno as far as quality and number of hit films were concerned.

In this period Naushad’s strike rate of Hit films was more than double, compared to C R, percentage wise. Naushad had 8 Hits from his 9 films in the period 1947 to 1949. For the same period, CR had only 4 Hits in his 18 films.

The year 1949 had absolutely heavenly showers of Musical Films. Some of such films were Andaz, Badi Behan, Barsaat, Bazaar, Dulari, Jeet, Apna Desh, Chandni Raat, Chaar Din, Sunehre Din, Shayar, Dillagi, Ek thi ladki, Kaneez, Laadli, Lahore, Mahal, Namoona, Patanga etc etc. The year 1949 also witnessed the introduction of A and U Censor certificates, the establishment of Films Division, the start of Navketan productions of Anand brothers and a few other landmarks in Hindi film industry.

Today’s song is an excellent song but rarely heard and not so popular for reasons difficult to fathom. It’s singer was Shiv Dayal aka S.D. Batish. I have a lot of respect for S D Batish,who did a marvellous job of promoting Indian Music in the UK and USA. He is one of those rare people who left the film world, but continued serving the Music,by turning a corner in Life. Such people are few in this world. The monumental work he did for Indian Music in foreign lands is unparalleled. An important point is that he did not do this service to Music for his personal gains. For his sustenance,he had opened a Restaurant in Santa Cruz,California,which was providing him enough for a comfortable living in the USA.

Born December 14, 1914, in Patiala, India, Shiv Dayal Batish abandoned a career in the nascent telephone industry to study devotional song, folk drama, and Indian classical music under his guru Hakim Chandan Ram Charan. In 1934, he relocated to Bombay to try his hand at acting, but roles proved scarce and he returned to Patiala two years later, renewing his focus on music. By 1936 Batish was regularly appearing on All India Radio and recording his first sessions for His Master’s Voice. The film industry nevertheless retained its allure for him, and in 1939 he returned to Bombay, working for a spell under broadcasting legend Z.A. Bokhari. After earning his first film work as an assistant musical director in 1942, Batish later graduated to full-fledged Bollywood musical director, in the years to follow working with playback singer greats including Asha Bhosle, Lata Mangeshkar, and Mohammed Rafi.

Batish also moonlighted as a playback singer in 70 films, singing 115 songs, among them 1944’s Daasi and 1948’s Barsaat ki Raat, before relocating to Britain in 1964. After accepting a position with the BBC Immigration Unit, Batish became a regular in British radio and television, most notably composing “Nai Zindagi Naya Jivan,” the theme song to the Beeb’s classic South Asian series Apna Hi Ghar Samajhiye (“Make Yourself at Home”). He also returned to his roots as a live musician, performing Indian folk and classical music on the vichitra veena, a long-necked fretless flute. In 1965 Batish was summoned by percussionist Keshav Sathe to record the Indian-inspired incidental music for the Beatles’ second feature film, Help! — the experience also proved the beginning of his lifelong friendship with Beatle George Harrison, who later hired Batish to teach his then-wife Patti Boyd the stringed dilruba.

In 1969 Batish assembled wife Shanta Devi, daughter Vijay Laxmi and sons Ashwin Kumar and Ravi Kumar to record North Indian Folk and Classical Music, which for decades remained the lone Indian release to appear on the seminal folk label Topic Records. A year later, the family emigrated to the U.S., settling in northern California and founding a restaurant, the Santa Cruz-based Krishna Café. Although the restaurant business remained Batish’s primary focus for the remainder of his life, he continued playing live and also cut the occasional LP, most notably 1980s Raga Todi, 1985’s Om Shanti Meditation on Dilruba and 1997’s The 72 Carnatic Melakhartas.

He founded “Batish Institute of Music and Fine arts” in California and wrote about 12 books on Indian Classical music,like Ragopaedia,Raga Channels,Rasik Raga lakshan Manjiri etc. He had also founded Batish Recording Co.

He died at age 91 on July 29, 2006.

His singing on AIR drew the attention of an older cousin, Pandit Amarnath, who was an accomplished musician in the Punjabi film industry in Lahore. Amarnath gave Batish the opportunity to sing a song – Pagdi Sambhal Jatta – he had composed for the film Gawandi (1942). The song became a hit, making Batish popular. But, all told, the experience was bittersweet. Ashwin says his father did not relish acting in the movie: the frequent takes, the blinding light from mirrors used as reflectors unnerved him.

As Amarnath’s assistant, Batish learned various aspects of music direction: rehearsing with singers, synchronising instruments and working with an orchestra. These learnings opened yet another opportunity for him. He was invited to Bombay by the Marathi writer and film impresario Keshav Prahlad Atre (Acharya Atre) to compose music for the film Paayaachi Daasi. But, in the end, credit was given to Annasaheb Mainkar.

After the Partition in 1947, the year Amarnath died, Batish moved back to Bombay, this time not to try his luck as an actor, but as a singer and composer. Several prominent music directors of the day employed him for their movies – Anil Biswas for Laadli, Husnlal-Bhagatram for Sawan Bhado, Hamari Manzil, and Surajmukhi; Ghulam Mohammad for Kundan; Roshan for Barsat ki Raat and Taksal; and Madan Mohan for Ada and Railway Platform. Some of his more notable songs were sung with Geeta Dutt in films he provided music himself, such as Betaab and Bahu Beti. He was associated with films in Hindi and gave music to 20 films, composing 154 songs, as S.D.Batish,Master Ramesh and Nirmal Kumar. Some of his songs were famous.

Batish, whose musical oeuvre has been described as an “amalgam of classical music and Punjabi folk and popular styles” composed for 20 films, including Har Jeet, Tipu Sultan and Toofan. For two films, he composed under the name Nirmal Kumar – a moniker that Lata Mangeshkar had given him for luck, according to Ashwin.

By this time, Batish had grown disenchanted with the Hindi film world. Ashwin recalls that his father needed a steady income to sustain his young family, but payments were erratic and delayed. Irked by this, Batish worked for a while to set up an artistes’ union to give them a platform to air their grievances and demands. Then the family decided to go to England.

Shanta Devi, like Batish early in his career, had been an artist with the All India Radio at one time. To raise money for the air tickets, the family sold its land in Bombay’s Santa Cruz neighbourhood – now worth a fortune, Ashwin says. Its new home was on Birchington Road, a residential area in London’s West Hampstead.

The move to the US, as with the one to England, was a family decision. Shanta Devi’s initiative led to the Batish India House (at first called the Sri Krishna Café), a restaurant on Santa Cruz’s Mission Street that served Indian food while music was played by members of the Batish family. “I would serve food and then jump on stage to play music,” remembered Ashwin, who like his father plays several instruments, including the sitar and tabla.

The restaurant was featured often in the local paper, The Santa Cruz Sentinel, and ran till 1985, before music became the all-absorbing act, and SD Batish embarked on the “project of a lifetime”. His wish to collate, annotate, and set in writing every known detail of the Hindustani (the Ragopedia compendia) and Carnatic musical systems coincided with Ashwin’s discovery of Gopher, an early internet protocol that enabled files to be recorded, uploaded and distributed easily. It was a project envisioned after their visits to the library of the University of Berkeley yielded barely a few books on Indian music, and mostly on the Carnatic tradition. What was an inspiration for Batish to explain every raga became a boon not merely for music aficionados but also for his students who were familiar only with English.

He regularly performed with his children, Ashwin and daughter Meena, and lived long enough to see his grandchildren, Keshav and Mohini, grow into musicians. ( Thanks to obituary and bio byJason Ankeny and an article by Anu kumar in scroll.in dated 24-6-2021, along with muVyz, HFGK, Wiki and my notes. All excerpts are adapted ).

Today’s song is the 8th song from this film to be posted here. I like this song very much, I hope you too will like it.


Song- Kisi rangeen duniya mein na kya kya zindagi dekhi (Laadli)(1949) singer-S D Batish, Lyrics-Chandrashekhar Pandey, MD-Anil Biswas

Lyrics

kisi rangeen duniya mein
na kya kya zindagi dekhi
rulaa de gham ko bhi ek baar
aisi zindagi dekhi
kisi rangeen duniya mein
na roti pet ko
kapde na tan ko
ghar na rahne ko
na roti pet ko
kapde na tan ko
ghar na rahne ko
magar kehlaate hain insaan
aisi zindagi dekhi
rulaa de gham ko bhi ek baar

luti duniya kisi ki
ee ee ee ee ee ee
luti duniya kisi ki
par wo sotey bhool kar rona
kafan laaun kahaan se haaaaye
kafan laaun kahaan se haaye
aisi zindagi dekhi
rulaa de gham ko bhi ek baar

umar baali phati dhoti
idhar kheenche udhar kheenche
umar baali phati dhoti
idhar kheenche udhar kheenche
jawaani bhookh donon se
sataayi zindagi dekhi
rulaa de gham ko bhi ek baar

Tadapte bhookh se bachche
padi beemaar hai beevi
Tadapte bhookh se bachche
padi beemaar hai beevi
padi beemaar hai beevi
na kuchh paayaa aa aa
na kuchh paaya
to rassi se
lalakti zindagi dekhi
kisi rangeen duniya mein


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4506 Post No. : 16048

Today (18 November 2020) has got to be an important day in the calendar of Hindi Film Song lovers, especially those who are interested in the history of HFM and its artists. It was on this day 69 years ago that Harmandir Singh Hamraaz, the man behind Hindi Film Geet Kosh (HFGK) was born on 18 November 1951.

We in this blog are very familiar with Mr Harmandir Singh Hamraaz. The fact that we now have the details of almost all Hindi movies and their songs from 1931 till 1985 is something that we take for granted today. But that was not always the case. When we were growing up, there was no authentic record like HFGK those days. Hearsay ruled the roost. Artists claimed to have sung tens of thousands of songs. Their words were accepted and even included in publications such as Guinness Books of world records.

We lived in an era before internet and even TV. Information on any subject was difficult to obtain, so any information was like gold dust. Today we are upto date on informations pertaining to election results, sporting events results etc, but that was not the case till 1970s. I was a cricket enthusiast, but I often learnt about the results of cricket matches after several days, and sometimes even after weeks.

Information about Hindi movie songs was entirely dependent upon access to its record, or depended on the announcement made about the song on radio station. There were many Hindi movie music fans who were into noting down lyrics of songs. I was among them. I needed to listen to the lyrics of a song quite a few times on radio before I managed to get the lyrics correct. I would then note the lyrics down in a diary. Alongwith the lyrics, details about singers, lyricist and music director were also noted down, as announced on radio stations broadcasting these songs.

That diary had about 200 such lyrics. During those days (1970s), I had no idea how many songs of interest were there in Hindi movies. I was not alone, no one else was any wiser. In any case, I was only interested in new songs, recorded after 1970s. Older songs (any song prior to 1967) were “boring” to my mind. Singers like K L Saigal were objects of mirth for teenagers and pre teens like us, who wondered why these old timers could not sing like Kishore Kumar.

It was in 1980 that the first volume of HFGK (chronologically the third volume, namely volume III- dealing with songs of the third decade- 1951 to 1960) was published. It was published without any fanfare. It was followed by volume II (songs from 1941 to 1950)in 1984, volume IV (1961 to 1970) in 1986 and volume I (1931 to 1940)in 1988. Volume V (1971 to 1980) was released in 1991. All these were accompanied by functions graced by film personalities.

After a long wait of 18 years, volume VI (1980 to 1985) was published on 14 march 2018.

These compilations were authentic because the number of movies released were taken from authorised sources. Movies in India could only be released after obtaining censor certificate, and these censor offices had the list of movies censored by them. Number of songs available in these movies were taken from movie booklets, catalogues of record companies etc.

Collecting information contained in these volumes and presenting them in book form, and finally getting them printed and published had been a Herculean task. Harmandir Singh Hamraaz was doing something which was never done before. And he was doing it in a country where there is not much appreciation for this kind of work, no matter if it rewrote Hindi Film music history. In India, people do not buy even normal books and magazines, so it was not very likely that most “music lovers” would buy such volumimous books on a topic that is clearly a non best seller. Forget selling these books, there were no takers for publishing these books either. Finally Harmandir Singh Hamraaz had to publish these volumes himself. The responsibility of publishing Volume III in 1980 was taken up my Mr Harmandir Singh Hamraaz’s father.

Harmandir Singh Hamraaz got married only after he had seen the publication of volume III in 1980. His wife has been the publisher of the subsequent volumes of HFGK.

People today cannot imagine the influence of HFGK on our knowledge of HFM. When people went through the contents of the HFGK, they realised that only about 44,000 songs were created in Hindi movies from 1931 to 1980. Only around 25000 songs were created between 1945 and 1975. And we had two playback legends claiming to have sung 25000 and 28000 songs respectively during this period ! On counting their songs, it turned out that their actual count was in the region of 5000 songs each.

Even less prolific singers were supposed to have sung thousands of songs in the pre HFGK days. Influenced by HFGK, Mukesh Geet Kosh was published and it turned out that Mukesh had sung less than 1000 songs in Hindi movies. Mukesh fans were quite unhappy with Harish Raghuvanshi jee, a major contributor of HFGK and the author of Mukesh Geet kosh. 🙂

A blog like ours cannot be imagined in its present form if we did not have HFGK available to us. Thanks of HFGK, we can accurately gauge the progress of the blog on a regular basis. For instance, HFGK volume III tells us that the decade of 1950s (1951 to 1960) had 1160 movies and about 9000 songs. The blog today has 5099 songs from 1007 movies from this decade. Based on information from HFGK, we know when we cover all the songs of a movie. We know for sure that 384 of these 1007 movies have been YIPPEED. So we only need to look at the songs of 1007-348= 659 movies plus the 153 missing movies. So we know for sure that a little under 4000 songs from this decade are yet to be covered. Not every song will be available. yet that gives us an idea which movies and which songs to search for.

That is not all. HFGK also tells us about our progress in covering songs of a particular year, a particular artist etc. Thanks to the information contained in various volumes of HFGK, now we can say with confidence that we have less than 100 songs each to be covered for artists like S D Burman, Naushad, O P Nayyar, Roshan, Shailendra etc. We can confidently state that the year 1968 saw 458 songs created in 72 movies and that the blog has 313 of these songs (from 68 movies). So we are just 145 songs short of covering all the songs of the year 1968.

One can say that HGFK has opened an entirely new dimension for Hindi Film music lovers to explore and savour. With advent of time, Internet has happened which has made it very easy for people to collaborate online. Harmandir Singh jee left us the treasure of HFGK. Now we can go through its contents and seek to search for songs and movies that we may not otherwise be aware of.

He compiled HFGK in an era before computers and internet. Today, equipped with them, we can use the data contained in HFGK and gain valuable insight into HFM. In a way, we and others like us are reaping the rewards of HFGK. We in this blog are in a way trying to take the next step, namely trying and locating all the songs mentioned in HFGK, and gaining information that was not available at the time HFGK got compiled.

While Harmandir Singh Hamraaz is well known among hardcore HFM historians, he is not known among casual music lovers and definitely not in government circles. He deserves government recognition for his Herculean task. He should have been awarded Padmshree for his contributions. As fas as I know, these awards are accorded only if someone gives nomination. In most cases, the persons themselves send their own nominations. Knowing important persons in the Government also helps. It is clear that a self respecting person like Har Mandir Singh jee will not send his own nomination. I think some hardcore HFM lovers should take the lead and send his name for Padmshree. He richly deserves this honour.

On this occasion, here is a song from “Laadli”(1949). This movie, HFGK part II tells us, is directed by J P Advani for Variety Pictures, Bombay. This “social” movie had Sulochana Chatterjee, Jairaj, Kuldeep, Sulochana (senior), Ramesh Sinha, Shivnath Seth, Pt Iqbal, Narbada Shankar, Urvashi, Shivji, Randheer etc in it.

The movie had eleven songs in it. Six of these songs have been covered in the past.

Lata Mangeshkar’s voice figured in seven songs. Four out of these seven songs have been covered in the past.

The song under discussion is sung by Lata. Nazim Panipati is the lyricist. Music is composed by Anil Biswas.

What a fun song it is ! I am sure that most of us would not have become aware of it without consulting HFGK.

I take this opportunity to wish Shree Harmandir Singh Hamraaz a very happy birhday. Let there be many more happy returns of the day.


Song-Khula hua hai dil ka ye darwaazaa re(Laadli)(1949) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Nazim Panipati, MD-Anil Biswas

Lyrics

intzari mein teri saara sitamber beeta
rote rote teri furkat mein november beeta
aahen bhar bhar ke ye kehta hai calendar mujhse
hichkiyaan lete huye saara december beeta aa aa aa aa aa

khula hua hai dil ka ye darwaaja re ae
aathh roz ki chutti lekar aaja re
aaja re
khula hua hai dil ka ye darwaaja re ae
o baabu mere
aath roz ki chutti lekar aaja re
aaja re

dil tere hizr mein deewaana bana jaata hai
thandi aaho se barf khaana bana jaata hai
thandi aaho se barf khaana bana jaata hai
do hi ashkon se hua aa aa aa aa aa
do hi ashkon se hua unki gali mein keechad
meri afsaani bhi afsaana bana jaata hai
arre aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa dil ka rog mita ja re
mita ja re
mita ja re
aathh roz ki chutti lekar aaja re
aaja re
khula hua hai dil ka ye darwaaja re
o ainak waale
aath roz ki chutti lekar aaja re
aaja re

ho gaye qaid mere dil ko churaane waale
haspatalon mein gaye aankh milaane waale ae
haspatalon me gaye aankh milaane waale
aa tujhe dil ki main aen aen aen aen
aa tujhe dil ki main ik lori suna du jaalim
o mujhe hizr ke choolhe mein jalaane waale
mere dil ki ee ee ee
mere dil ki lagi bujha ja re
bujha ja re
bujha ja re
aathh roz ki chutti lekar aaja re
aaja re
khula hua hai dil ka ye darwaaja re
o baabu mere
aathh roz ki chutti lekar aaja re
aaja re


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4226 Post No. : 15432

Today’s song is from a comedy musical film – Laadli-49.

During the period 1947 to 1950, there was a spate of comedy and musical films.It was also in this period that Naushad and C Ramchandra played havoc with their music. Films like Bela,Daak Bungla, Do Bhai, Jungle mein mangal, Natak, Shadi se pehle,Shehnai, Gunsundari, Hip Hip Hurray, Khidki, Mera Munna, Suhag raat, Andaz, Badi Behan, barsaat, Ek this ladki, Mahal, Namoona and Patanga stirred the HFM from upside down and then up again !

For all other MDs, this period played a challenge to come up to their highest and best level to compete. MDs like Anil Biswas handled the situation with ease, with his musicals like Laadli and Lajawab. Film Laadli-49 was made by Variety pictures – owned by Anil Biswas and his wife Ashalata (Mehrunnisa Bhagat). It was directed by an old friend of Anil Biswas – J P Advani. However, he directed only 3 films of Anil Biswas – Veena-48, Laadli-49 and Lajawab-50.

Jagatrai Pesumal Advani was born on 17-5-1903 in Hyderabad ( Sindh ). After graduating, he studied film making in Germany in the 1920s. After coming back to India, he joined Mohan Bhavnani – a big gun in those days- as his assistant. His first film as a Director was Heer Ranjha-1931. He shifted to Saroj Movietone in 1934 and then to Karachi to work for Golden Eagle Company. He was considered an expert who could handle the Heroines at his will.

He directed about 30 films, including a Hindi/Punjabi bilingual film Sassi-Punnu-46. His Filmography is- 1931: Heer Ranjha; 1933: Zehar-e-Ishq; 1934: Afghan Abla; Dilara; Gafil Musafir; Johar-e-Shamsheer; Tilasmi Talwar; Vasantsena; Flashing Sword; 1935: Bahar-e- Sulemani; Farebi Duniya; Shah Behram; 1936: Elaan-e-Jung; Shokh Dilruba; Sipahsalaar; 1937: Saqi; Insaaf; 1939: Dekha Jayega; 1940: Dharma Bandhan; Sneh Bandhan; 1941: Shehzadi; 1942: Suhagan; 1943: Sahara; 1946: Sassi Punnu; 1948: Veena; 1949: Laadli; 1950: Wafaa; Lajawaab; 1952: Saloni; 1954: Danka; 1955: Hasina.

The cast of the film was Sulochana Chaterjee, Jairaj, Kuldip Kaur, Ramesh Sinha, Randhir, Narbada Shankar and others. There was a coincidence that 2 Sulochanas acted in this film. Along with Heroine Sulochana Chaterjee, the old timer Sulochana Sr. (Ruby Myers) also acted in a side role. Born in Chandranagar, Sulochana Chatterjee was the daughter of a military man and the family, five girls, including the late Kamla Chatterjee ( she looked like Geeta Bali, and was Kidar Sharma’s wife), and one boy, used to travel along with their parents to wherever their father was transferred.
From Calcutta they moved to Jabalpore and it was here that Sulochana did her school­ing. She also took an active part in school dramatics. After some time the family was transferred to Bombay and here her younger sister, Kamla, was spotted by Sohrab Modi, a friend of their father’s, and given a role as a child star in Modi’s picture Jailor (1938).

Once Sulochana happened to visit the sets one day and after watching her sister at work, She was offered a part in Harishchandra Pictures’ “Aina”-44, which she accepted. She was co-starred with Trilok Kapoor. She starred in scores of films after that, among them the comedy “Ladli”-50, in which she appeared with Jairaj, and “Grahasti”-48 which was a memor­able hit and in which she play­ed with Yakub and Masood.

Sulochana acted in two Bengali pictures “Apanaela”, produced by Saroj Mukerjee and directed by Benoy Banerjee with Pradeep Kumar as her leading man, and Benoy Banerjee’s “Minoti” in which she shared stellar honors with Smriti Biswas and Paresh Banerjee. Her well known films are Chaitanya Mahaprabhu-53, Rami Dhoban-53, Shahjehan-46, Veena-48, Nav Durga-53, Jagte Raho-56, Jis desh mein Gaqnga behti hai-60, Sarswatichandra-68 etc.

In all she acted in 119 films. Her first film was Shobha-42 and last film was Shabas Daddy-79. After retirement, she settled in Bombay. Sulochana Chatterjee died on 30-8-1999.

Her favorite pastime, was playing with her sister’s children. She cooked, too, and knitted off and on. She was fond of English pictures , liked Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck and comedies. Sulochana could play Bad­minton and drove a car. A gifted linguist, she knew Bengali, her mother tongue, Hindi, English, Marathi, Punjabi, Kutchi and Guajarati. She spoke them all fluently.

Film Laadli was a comedy musical. There were 5 Lyricists and the MD was Anil Biswas. In Hindi film industry,right from 1931 onwards,many composers from Bengal came to Bombay to try their luck,but only a few could make their name here. There was a host of small time Bangla composers (some of them were Big names in Bengal) came to Bombay for a while,did 2-3 films and went back. Few of them were Shoolpani mukherjee, S P Mukherjee, V V Ganguly, Niren Lahiri, Shivram Ghosh, A C Biswas, Bhishmadev Chatterjee, Sushant Banerjee, Robin Chaterjee, Naresh Bhattacharya etc.

Besides these composers,there were some less successful composers from Bengal, in Bombay, like Ashok Ghosh, Pannalal Ghosh, Robin Banerjee, Hiren Bose, Shyamal Mitra, Arunkumar Mukherjee and Manas Mukherjee. Their major problem was Language and cultural difference.

There were 4 major composers from Bengal,who succeeded here and etched their names in the HFM history. I call them A grade. They all operated at the same time during the Golden Age period. Two composers came from East Bengal-Anil Biswas and S D Burman. Two composers came from West Bengal-Hemant Kumar and Salil Chaudhari.

Anil Biswas was the first major composer from Bengal to start his career in Bombay in 1935, at the age of just 21 years, whereas S D Burman was the oldest having started his career in Bombay in 1946, at the age of 40 years ! The longest tenure was that of Salil Chaudhari,but his song total is the lowest, with an average of about 5 songs per film.This is much lower than the average of 8+ and 9 of the others. This may be, because in later part of his career Salil da gave music to many parallel films which had minimum songs.

The two senior composers were from the East Bengal and the two junior composers were from the West Bengal. The styles of these two groups were different because of the different pattern of Eastern and Western Bangla music. All four depended and used heavily from the folk tunes and Bangla songs,from their respective regions. Anil Biswas and Burman da drew heavily from the Eastern Bangla folk tunes and that is why sometimes their music had similarities.

A case in point is song – “Sundari O sundari” from Lajawab-50. It was based on a folk tune of East Bengal. By coincidence S D Burman too used the same tune and same Mukhda for his Bangla film, “Samar’-50. Not only this,S D Burman again used the same tune for a song in film ‘Munimji”-55 ( Anadi re Anadi).
Anil Biswas was hailed as one of the most original,revolutionary and experimental composer,even dubbed as “The Bhishma Pitamaha”of HFM.

He was original. When Anil Biswas came on the scene in the mid 30s, the Parsee Theatre music,Marathi Natya sangeet and Gujarati drama and Lok kala Sangeet was being followed in film music. He decided to change this pattern and used Robindra Sangeet and Folk tunes for his songs. He was Revolutionary because he introduced western instruments in his music as a routine,which no one had thought of,so far. He was experimental,because he tried a variety of singers.

Those days,when playback was not yet common,non singers sang songs and it was a terrible task to make them sing properly. Anil Biswas tried the First ever playback,in Bombay,in his film “Mahageet”-37,singing the playback song himself to be shot on Hiren Bose in the film.

In a span of 30 years and in his 86 films having 777 songs,he used 76 singers. Among his singers Lata stands at First rank with 120 songs. The second place is shared by Surendra and Meena Kapoor( naturally), with 44 songs. Next name is that of Anil Biswas himself,with 43 songs.

Going through the list of singers,one finds very unknown names like Omkar, Kamlakar, Kokila, Gajadhar, D.Manek, Tarachand, Devaskar, Madhav kale, Yusuf Effendi, Solanki and Swapna Sen. Except Madhav Kale and Yusuf Effendi,I have never heard the other names myself,nor have I read about them anywhere. It is likely that these singers were from the early era and his earliest films. He himself first sang in ‘Dharam ki Devi’-35 and his last song was in ‘Sautela Bhai’-62.

Today’s song is the 6th song of this film to be discussed here. The film had an all time immortal song by the Anil Biswas – Lata duo…”Tumhare bulane ko jee chahata hai….” Such fine songs are now only in memory. Today’s song is also a good song. This is a Chorus song. Anil Biswas was particularly fond of Chorus songs and his no film was complete without at least one chorus song. Now, enjoy this chorus song….

( My thanks to Cineplot, Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema and History of Indian Film Music, for information used herein)


Song-Gareebon ka hissa gareebon ko de do (Laadli)(1949) Singer-Lata, Lyrics- S H Bihari, MD-Anil Biswas
Chorus

Lyrics

gareebon ka hissa gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do

gareebon ka hissa gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do

ameeron o o
ameeron hamen sookhi roti hi de do o o
ameeron hamen sookhi roti hi de do o o
gareebon ka hissa gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
o o o o
o o o o

jo pahle thhi haalat wahi hai hamaari ee ee
ye pahle bhi bhookhe hain ab bhi bhikhaari
ye pahle bhi bhookhe hain ab bhi bhikhaari
hamesha se hain haath phaile huye do o o
hamesha se hain haath phaile huye do o o
gareebon ka hissa gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
o o o o
o o o o

ye oonchi imaarat ye resham ke kapde ae ae
na kutiya hi hamko na khaadi ke tukde
na kutiya hi hamko na khaadi ke tukde
hamen bhi to apna badan dhaanpne do o o
hamen bhi to apna badan dhaanpne do o o
gareebon ka hissa gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
o o o o
o o o o

agar rookhi sookhi ye khaa kar bachenge
to kal ko ye Gandhi Jawahir banenge
agar rookhi sookhi ye khaa kar bachenge
to kal ko ye Gandhi Jawahir banenge
inhen sirf jeene ka mauka hi de do o o
inhen sirf jeene ka mauka hi de do o o
gareebon ka hissa gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do

ameeron o (gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
)
ameeron o (gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
)
ameeron o (gareebon ko de do
gareebon ko de do
)


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, July 7, 2017 is the 103rd birth anniversary of Anil Biswas (07/07/1914 – 31/05/2003) who defined the Hindi film music at its incipient stage in Bombay film industry. It is a double celebration for him as the song to be discussed today will be his 300th song on the Blog.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Laadli”(1949) was directed by J P Advani. The movie had Jairaj, Sulochana Chatterjee, Randhir, Ramesh Sinha, Kuldip Kaur etc. in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

This is the 4th song in the series “Lata with uncommon singers “.

In today’s song Lata is singing with Ashalata Biswas.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

Most of of the present generation of music lovers may not remember Shiv Dayal Batish ( S D Batish), the classical musician, vocalist, playback singer and music director. During his filmy career in 40s and 50s, he composed music for 19 films (including 2 films with his pseudo name of Nirmal Kumar) and sang about 100 songs. His music compositions for Hindi films are generally labelled as Lahore style of Hindi film music which was used by Lahore based music directors like Pandit Amarnath, Pandit Govindram, Master Ghulam Haider, Shyam Sundar, Khurshid Anwar etc. S D Batish was the cousin of other Batish brothers – Pandit Amarnath, Husnlal and Bhagatram. It is said that originally, the family surname was ‘Vats’ ( or Wats) which became ‘Vatish’ and then to ‘Batish’.
Read more on this topic…


Here is a very old song from “Laadli” (1949). This song is sung by Lata who was then a newcomer.
Read more on this topic…


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16500 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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