Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘P L santoshi


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4860 Post No. : 16650

There was a time when the combination of Pyare Lal Santoshi (P L Santoshi), as a director, Rehana as the heroine and C Ramchnadra as a music director was a sure shot of the box office success of the films. This combination gave hit films like ‘Shehnaai’ (1947), ‘Khidki’ (1948) and ‘Sargam’ (1950). But in 1952, this successful combination came to an end when ‘Shin Shinaaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) miserably failed at the box office. Though P L Santoshi remained active in the next about 2 decades, he did not regain the status in Bombay film industry which he had enjoyed in the 1940s.

P L Santoshi had the chequered career in the Hindi film industry. His career interchanged between lyricist, writer, director and producer, sometime all of them together. But his career mainly concentrated as a lyricist with around 650 songs to his credit. He also frequently changed his employment from one film studio to another when the studio system was in vogue.

Jabalpur-born P L Santoshi (07/08/1916 – 07/09/1978) completed his matriculation from Jabalpur and came to Mumbai in 1936. His filmography shows that he started as a lyricist in ‘Vish Vaman’ (1936) for which he wrote all the songs for the music director, Govindrao Tembe. Thereafter, he joined Jaddanbai’s film production company, Sangeet Movietone and wrote a few songs for ‘Moti Ka Haar’ (1937) and ‘Jeewan Sapna’ (1937). In the same year, he shifted to Ranjit Movietone and wrote lyrics for 18 films between 1937 and 1940.

In 1941, P L Santoshi joined Bombay Talkies as dialogue writer/lyricist for ‘Anjaan’ (1941), ‘Jhoola’ (1941), ‘Basant’ (1942). ‘Kismet’ (1943) and ‘Milan’ (1946). In 1946, he got an opportunity to direct his first film, ‘Hum Ek Hain’ (1946) under the banner of Prabhat Film Company in which Dev Anand made his debut as an actor and Rehana got her first lead role. The film did not fare well on the box office front.

Fortunately for P L Santoshi, Filmistan entrusted him with the directions of ‘Shehnaai’ (1947) and ‘Sargam’ (1950) for which he wrote story and dialogues besides writing songs. These two films became the box office hits. Buoyed by the success as a director, P L Santoshi floated his own film production banner, Santoshi Productions with its maiden film, ‘Shin Shinaki Boobla Boo’ (1952). And with this film, his fortune in the film industry reversed to such an extent that he could never recover to his past glory as a writer, lyricist and a director.

‘Shin Shinaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) was a fantasy film in which P L Santoshi’s favourite heroine, Rehana teamed up with Ranjan. The other actors were, Sadhana Bose, Veera, Mumtaz Ali, Indu Paul, Radhakrishan, Baby Tabbasum, Tiwari etc. The film’s story was written by Ramanand Sagar. The film was passed by Censor Board for the universal exhibition. However, the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting banned the release of the film on the ground of low moral tone, glorifying the criminal characters, treating the sacred objectives irrelevantly which are against the interest of the public decency and morality.

Although the ban was lifted probably through the intervention of the court, the film did not garner sufficient support from the cinegoers to make it a box office hit film. With this, P L Santoshi did not venture into the film production during rest of his career. His muse, Rehana suffered her career setback as a lead actor forcing her to ultimately migrate to Pakistan in 1956.

After the debacle of ‘Shin Shinaaki Boobla Boo’ (1952), P L Santoshi’s career went on a roller-coaster ride. His career as a lyricist virtually ended by the end of 1960s. Most of the films directed by him in second half of 1950s did not fare well on the box office front. The box office success of ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’ (1960) did not help him to revive his career as a director. His subsequent films, ‘Opera House’ (1961), ‘Pyaar Ki Daastan’ (1961), ‘Dil Hi To Hai’ (1963), ‘Holiday In Bombay’ (1963) and ‘Qawwali Ki Raat’ (1964) could not give fillip to his career as a director. He directed his last released film, ‘Roop Rupaiya’ (1968) after which he concentrated mainly on screenplay and dialogue writing until his death in 1978.

‘Shin Shinaaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) had 7 songs. All songs were written by P L Santoshi which were set to music by C Ramchandra. Six songs have been covered on the Blog, details of which are as under:

Songs Date of Posting Singers
Tum kyaa jaano tumhaari yaad me ham kitna roye 01/08/2009 Lata Mangeshkar
Ye khilti kali koi le 07/02/2013 Lata-Chitalkar
Shin Shinaaki Boobla Boo 17/12/2014 Chitalkar – Lata
Kuchh chuhalen hon kuchh charche hon 14/03/2016 Kishore Kumar – Lata
Arre baabaa…ye hansi baabaa…ye khushi baabaa 19/07/2017 Lata – Chitalkar
Sai re Sai re ghar ghar mein ik chor sai 01/08/2019 Lata Mangeshkar

I am presenting the 7th and the last song from the film, kaise hai mizaaj kahiye’ rendered by Lata Mangeshkar.

With this song, all the songs from the film ‘Shin Shinaaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) have been covered on the Blog.

Audio Clip:

Song-Kaise hain mizaaj kahiye kaise hain mizaaj (Shin Shinaaki Bubbla Boo)(1952) MD-Lata, Lyrics-P L Santoshi, MD-C Ramchandra

Lyrics

ho o o
bade soorma ban ke nikle thhe ghar se
ke bijli gira denge guzren jidhar se
o o o na shekhi rahi wo na daawa raha wo
arre uljhe pade hain
kisi ki nazar pe
kahiye

kaise hain mizaaj kahiye
kaise hain mizaaj
kaise hain mizaaj kahiye
kaise hain mizaaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj
kaise hain mizaaj kahiye
kaise hain mizaaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj

ye aap hi kaa ghar hai
ghabaraahiye nahin
aeji ghabaraahiye nahin
sharm buri cheez hai
sharmaahiye nahin
aeji sharmaahiye nahin
le leejiye jo chaahiye
aap hi kaa raaj
le leejiye jo chaahiye
aap hi kaa raaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj
kaise hain mizaaj kahiye
kaise hain mizaaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj

khaatir karoon kya aap ki
batlaahiye huzoor
aeji batlaahiye huzoor
main to paas aap ke
hain aap mujhse door
hain aap mujhse door
main aap ki iss bedili kaa
kya karoon ilaaj
main aap ki iss bedili kaa
kya karoon ilaaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj
kaise hain mizaaj kahiye
kaise hain mizaaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4829 Post No. : 16608

‘Anjaan’ (1941) was produced under the banner of Bombay Talkies and was directed by Amiya Chakraborty who made his debut as a director with this film. The star cast included Devika Rani and Ashok Kumar in the lead roles supported by Girish, P F Pithawala, V H Desai, Gulab, David, Fatty Prasad, Yusuf Suleiman, Master Suresh, Baby Madhuri, Rewashankar, Arun Kumar etc. For Devika Rani, it was her ‘comeback’ film after her last film ‘Durga’ (1939) and after the death of her husband, Himanshu Rai in 1940.

Another ‘first’ for the film ‘Anjaan’ (1941) was that R D Mathur, the US trained photographer who was assistant to Josef Wirsching, the German cinematographer of Bombay Talkies, made his debut as a Cinematographer for the film. He got this opportunity as Josef Wirsching, being a German, was jailed in India during the World War-II. R D Mathur earned his name as an ace cinematographer for his works in films such as ‘Mughal-e-Azam’ (1960) and Razia Sultana’ (1983). He also completed the cinematography work for ‘Paakeezah’ (1971) after the sudden death of the film’s cinematographer, Josef Wirsching.

Since the inception of the film productions by Bombay Talkies in 1935, Saraswati Devi and Ramchandra Pal used to be the music directors of all the films of Bombay Talkies released till 1940. ‘Anjaan’ (1941) was the first film of Bombay Talkies for which instead of Saraswati Devi or Ramchandra Pal, the music direction of the film was entrusted to Pannalal Ghosh, who had shifted from Kolkata to Mumbai in 1940 with his wife and playback singer, Parul Ghosh.

Pandit Pannalal Ghosh (24/07/1911 – 20/04/1960), the renowned flautist, who was the pioneer in introducing the flute as the musical instrument in the Hindustani classical musical concerts, had to start his initial musical career in the film industry in Kolkata at the age of 17 when he lost his father. He started with playing flute during the exhibitions of the silent films. When the sound films came into being, he became the music assistant, first to Kazi Nazrul Islam and thereafter to R C Boral when he joined the New Theatres as a musician. He had assisted R C Boral when for the first time, playback singing Indian films was introduced for ‘Dhoop Chhaaon’/Bhagyachakra’ (1935).

Pannalal Ghosh’s association with the film industry was mainly to earn money to take care of his family. His interest was to become a Hindustani classical musician with flute as his musical instrument. He formally became the ‘gadabandh’ disciple of Ustad Khushi Mohammed Khan and after his death, the disciple of Pandit Girija Prasad Chakraborty. Besides working for New Theatres, Pannalal Ghosh regularly participated in the programmes of the All India Radio, Kolkata as a flautist.

In early 1940, Pannalal Ghosh shifted his base to Mumbai along with his family as he felt that there was no recognition to his work in Kolkata. In Mumbai, he followed the same strategy – working in the films for sustenance and pursuing his interest in Hindustani classical music. He immediately got his first assignment as a music director for Kikubhai Desai’s film ‘Sneh Bandhan’ (1940). This was followed by ‘Anjaan’ (1941), ‘Basant’ (1942), ‘Sawwal’ (1943), ‘Duhaai’ (1943), ‘Bhalaai’ (1943), ‘Police’ (1944), ‘Beesvi Sadi’ (1945) ‘Aadhar’ (1945) etc.

However, Pannalal Ghosh could not get satisfaction with his work because of the way the Hindi film industry worked. During this time, Ustad Allauddin Khan of Maihar Gharana, the exponent of multiple musical instruments like sarod, sitar, flute, Veena etc. was staying in Mumbai. Pannalal Ghosh became his disciple at a time when he was already started giving public concerts. ‘Aandolan’ (1951) was his last film as a music director.

From 1955-60, Pannalal Ghosh took up the job as a Composer and Director of All India Radio, Delhi Vadhya Vrinda (Orchestra) and stayed in Delhi with his family. His connection with Hindi films was limited to playing flute as and when music directors called him to Mumbai. The best exmaples of his flute recitals can be found in the song main piya teri tu maane ya na maane from ‘Basant Bahaar’ (1956) and in the song mohe panghat pe nandlal chhed gayo re from ‘Mughal-e-Azam’ (1960).

I have always thought that the flute was a tiny musical instrument – may be not more than 12-18 inches long. I realised that it was not so when I when I saw the photographs of Pandit Pannalal Ghosh and Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia playing with their long flutes. The credit for elongating the flute’s normal length to as high as 32 inches goes to Pandit Pannalal Ghosh with an extra 7th hole so that the tiny folk instrument becomes capable of playing Hindustani classical music in various raags. Over a period of time, flute has become one of the concerts’ music instruments along with other music instruments. Probably, Pandit Pannalal Ghosh was the first Hindustani classical musician to play the solo flute in public concerts.

Pandit Pannalal Ghosh died of a massive heart attack on April 20, 1960 when he was 48. He has left a large number of his disciples to keep his legacy alive.

The story of ‘Anjaan’ (1941) as under:

Indira (Devika Rani) is employed by Ranima (Gulab), the widow of the landlord as governess to look after her two children. Ramnath (Girish) is the Estate Manager to Ranima who loves Indira and to get her on his side, he is ready to turn to the villainous acts. Indira falls in love with Dr. Ajit (Ashok Kumar) who often visits Ranima for her medical check-up. Now, this turns into a love triangle. The more love between Dr Ajit and Indira blossom, the more villainous Ramnath turns. Ramnath falsely accuses Indira of secretly visiting to Ajit’s house in the night about which he complains to Ranima. Indira gets her services as governess terminated.

After hearing from Ajit about the wrong doings by Ramnath, it is too much for Ranima for her already weak heart leading to the further deterioration of her fragile health. Ajit administers her injection to revive Ranima but in vain. She is dead. Ramanth finds a good excuse to implicate Ajit on the charge of the murder of Ranima.

The news of the alleged murder by Ajit unnerves Indira as Ramnath tells her that he is going the lodge the murder charges against Ajit. She agreed to marry Ramnath provided he lets Ajit free from the murder charges. Hereafter, she avoids meeting Ajit which creates misunderstanding in his mind about Indira. He decides to leave the place for the city. Ajit decision to migrate to the city is too much for Indira. She decides to meet Ajit at the railway station to tell him the truth. After listening her, Ajit tells her to wait for his return from the city.

Ramnath comes to know about the double crossing by Indira. He lodges the charge of murder on Ajit who is arrested in the city. To prove the motive for the murder of Ranima, Ramnath removes some costly jewelries and declares as missing, pointing finger on Ajit. In the trial in the session court, Ajit argues himself. The judge is impressed by his arguments. But the evidences are all against Ajit. However, it is the two children of Ranima whose evidences clinche the judgement in favour of Ajit. Ramnath is handed over to the police and Ajit gets Indira.(With inputs from the review of the film which appeared in the September 1941 issue of ‘Filmindia’ magazine).

The film had 10 songs of which 8 songs have been covered on the Blog as under:

Songs Date of Posting Singers
Aayi paschim se ghata naunihaalon jaago 02/03/2015 Devika Rani
Main to tumse bandhi rahoon 11/12/2015 Devika Rani
Mere jeewan ke pathh par chhaayi ye kaun 20/10/2020 Ashok Kumar-Devika Rani
Chhalko chhalko na ras ki gagariya 20/01/2021 Rajkumari
Kheencho kamaan kheencho 26/01/2021 Ashok Kumar-Suresh-Rewashankar
Pyaare pyaare sapne hamare Triple version song 06/02/2021 Ashok Kumar-Devika Rani-Suresh-Rewashankar

I am presenting the last and the final song ‘saanwariya re saanwaria’ which has two versions – a duet sung by Arun Kumar Mukherjee and Susheela and a solo sung by Arun Kumar Mukherjee towards the end of the film. The song is written by P L Santoshi which is set to music by Pandit Pannalal Ghosh. The audio clip of the song is longer by one stanza. Hence the lyrics of the song is based on the audio clip.

My guess is that Arun Kumar Mukherjee sings in both the versions of the song on himself. From the side profile of his face during the singing, I notice some resemblance of Ashok Kumar on his face who was his maternal cousin. In the star cast, the name of Arun Kumar is mentioned.

With this two-version song, all the song of ‘Anjaan’ (1941) have ben covered on the Blog.

Acknowledgement: Some of the information on the early life of Pandit Pannalal Ghosh has been sourced from pannalalghosh.com.

Audio Clip (Duet):

Video Clip (Duet):

Video Clip (Male Solo):

Song-Saanwariya re saanwariyaa (Anjaan)(1941) Singers-Arun Kumar Mukherjee, Susheela, Lyrics-P L Santoshi, MD-Pannalal Ghosh
Both

Lyrics(Based on Audio Clip)

saanwariya re saanwariya
saanwariya re saanwariya
chal chal re chal re saanwariya
chal chal re chal re saanwariya
saanwariya re saanwariya
chal chal re chal re saanwariya
ek nagariya ham donon ki
ek dagariya aa
ek nagariya ham donon ki
ek dagariya aa
chal re chal re saanwariya
saanwariya re sawariya
chal chal re chal re saanwariya

raah kanteeli door thikaana aa
raah kanteeli door thikaana
phir bhi hamko chalte jaana
raah katili door thikaana
phir bhi hamko chalte jaana
beet jaaye chaahe saari umariya
beet jaaye chaahe saari umariya
chal re saanwariya
haan
chal re chal re saanwariya
sawariya re sawariya
chal chal re chal re saanwariya

main tera rahoon tu meri rahe
main tera rahoon tu meri rahe
haan saanwariya re saanwariya
saanwariya re saanwariya

main tera rahoon tu meri rahe
jaise din ke saath ujhera rahe
main tera rahoon tu meri rahe
haan saanwariya re saanwariya
saanwariya re saanwariya

aabaad rahe ham tum donon
aabaad rahe ham tum donon
aabaad hamaara dera rahe
bajta rahe ye iktaara
bajta rahe ye iktaara
madhur preet ki baansuriya
madhur preet ki baansuriya
chal re saanwariya
haan
chal chal re chal re saanwariya
saanwariya re saanwariya
saanwariya re saanwariya
chal chal re chal re saanwariya
chal chal re chal re saanwariya


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4824 Post No. : 16602

“Saudaagar”(1951) was produced by S V Mungre and directed by M I Dharmsee for West Hind pictures, Bombay. This social movie had Rehana, Nasir Khan, Suraiyya Chaudhary, Bhudo Advani, Shakuntala, Ratan Kumar, Bala etc in it.

The movie had ten songs in it. Six were composed by C Ramchandra and four by Hanuman Prasad.

Four songs from the movie (three composed by C Ramchandra and one composed by Hanuman Prasad) have been covered in the past.

Here is the fifth song from “Saudaagar”(1951) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Lata Mangeshkar. P L Santoshi is the lyricist. Music is composed by C Ramchandra.

Only audio of the song is available. It is almost certain that the song was picturised on Rehana. I euest our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this melancholic song.


Song-Bigad gayi kyun meri taqdeer bante bante (Saudaagar)(1951) Singer-Lata, Lyrics- P L Santoshi, MD- C Ramchandra

Lyrics

dil mein chupaaye unki ulfat kaa khazaana
aankhon se likh rahe hain taqdeer kaa fasaana

aa aa aa aa
bigad gayi kyon meri taqdeer bante bante
bigad gayi kyo meri taqdeer bante bante
mit gayi ulfat ki lakeer bante bante
bigad gayi kyun meri takdeer bante bante

aa aa aa aa
manzil ke paas aakar manzil hi bhool baithhe
manzil ke paas aakar manzil hi bhool baithhe
kismat ne mitaa daali tadbeer bante bante
kismat ne mitaa daali tadbeer bante bante
bigad gayi kyun meri taqdeer bante bante
bigad gayi kyun meri taqdeer bante bante

aa aa aa aa aa
tujhko to zamaane ne hone naa diyaa meraa
tujhko to zamaane ne hone naa diyaa meraa
hum mit gaye khud teri tasveer bante bante
hum mit gaye khud teri tasveer bante bante
bigad gayi kyun meri taqdeer bante bante
bigad gayi kyun meri taqdeer bante bante


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4694 Post No. : 16380 Movie Count :

4451

‘Sajni’ (1940) was produced under the banner of Sudama Productions and was directed by Sarvottam Badami. The cast included Prithviraj Kapoor, Sabita Devi, Snehprabha Pradhan, Noor Jahan (Sr.), Tarabai, Ghory, Kesri, Dixit, Shakir etc. The story and dialogues for of the film were written by Zia Sarhadi. P L Santoshi, Pandit Indra and Zia Sarhadi wrote the songs which were set to music by Gyan Dutt.

From the cast and crew, Sabita Devi, Sarvottam Badami and Zia Sarhadi belonged to Sagar Movietone while Noor Jahan (Sr.), Kesari, Dixit, lyricists P L Santoshi, Pandit Indra and music director Gyan Dutt among others belonged to Ranjit Movietone. The advertisement of the film shows that the film was produced at Ranjit Studio. Why did the amalgam of artists from two competitive banners of film productions happened? The answer is in the genesis of Sudama Productions, the banner under which ‘Sajni’ (1940) was produced.

Sometime in the middle of 1939, Sagar Movietone of Chimanlal Desai faced the financial crunch to such an extent that to come out of it, the banner was required to be merged with General Pictures of Fazalbhoy to make a new entity, National Studios. Offers were given to the existing staff of Sagar Movietone to join National Studios. While most of the artists and crew members joined National Studios, Sarvottam Badami and Sabita Devi decided to join as stake holders in the newly set up film production company, Sudama Productions floated by Dr. Ambalal Patel in which Ranjit Movietone had a stake in it. The films produced under this banner used facilities available in Ranjit Studio and their artists/crew members. Incidentally, Dr Ambalal Patel was a ex-partner in Sagar Movietone.

Sarvottam Badami, the director of the film was a product of Sagar Movietone for whom he directed 10 Hindi films during 1933-39. Except for his first Hindi film, ‘Chandrahaas’ (1933), Sabita Devi acted in remaining of his 9 films as a lead actress. Under the banner of Sudama Productions, Sarvottam Badami directed 4 films – ‘Meri Marzi’ (1939), ‘Chingari’ (1940), ‘Sajni’ (1940) and ‘Holiday in Bombay’ (1941). In all these films, Sabita Devi was in the lead role.

‘Sajni’ (1940) was released on August 17, 1940. The film’s review was published in September 1940 issue of ‘Filmindia’. The reviewer had criticised the film for poor story and direction. The role of Sabita Devi as an uneducated village girl in the film was not in keeping with her image in the Hindi films as a sophisticated girl. The story of the film as per the review is summarized below:

The village’s wealthy money-lender’s son, Nanda (Prithviraj Kapoor) is in love with a peasant girl, Rupa (Sabita Devi). Nanda wish to get married to Rupa but his father is not in favour of his son’s marriage with Rupa due to the financial status of the girl’s family. Nanda is forced to marry Radha (Snehprabha Pradhan) whose father has given a good amount of dowry. To add to the misery of Rupa, her father dies.

Radha soon comes to know that Nanda was in love with Rupa and he still loved her even after the marriage. When Rupa comes know about this, she prevails upon Nanda to forget about her and to strengthen the marriage with Radha for the sake of the society. With Rupa’s blessing, Nanda agrees to her advice. Rupa sacrfices her love for Nanda to make his married life happy.

The main theme of the film’s story may appear familiar to those who has watched films of 1950s and 60s in which inequalities in the societal status make the hero/heroine a doomed lover. In the film under discussion, Sabita Devi is a doomed lover because of her background as a poor peasant girl. Due the unprecedented success of ‘Devdas’ (1935), films with a story of a doomed lover were in vogue especially during 40s through 60s. ‘Deedar’ (1951) and ‘Do Badan’ (1966) are examples among other films.

‘Sajni’ (1940) had 9 songs of which 7 songs were written by P L Santoshi and one each by Pandit Indra and Zia Sarhadi. Since none of the songs were available on any video sharing platform, I have recently uploaded a song ‘deepak ki baatee priyatam main deepak ki baatee’ which I am presenting here. The song is rendered by Snehprabha Pradhan and is set to music by Gyan Dutt.

The song reflects the state of the mind of Radha (Snehprabha Pradhan) married to Nanda (Prithviraj Kapoor). Thier married life is unsettled when she becomes aware that Nanda is still in love with Rupa (Sabita Devi).

With this song, ‘Sajni’ (1940) makes its debut on the Blog.

Audio Clip:

Song-Deepak ki baati priyatam(Sajni)(1940) Singer-Snehprabha Pradhan, Lyrics-P L Santoshi, MD-Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

deepak ki baatee ee
priyatam
main deepak ki baatee
mai….n
deepak ki baatee
priyatam
main deepak ki baatee
pal pal chhin chhin jalti jaatee mai…n
deepak ki baatee ee
priyatam
main deepak ki baatee
pal pal chhin chhin jalti jaatee mai…n
deepak ki baatee
priyatam
main deepak ki baatee

meri raam kahaani sun kar
jal marta parwaana
kahe jaata hai
dheere se wo…o
behta jaa raha ?? jaana
phir bhi jal ki pyaasi
phir bhi jal ki pyaasi
main deepak ki baatee
main deepak ki baatee
mai….n
deepak ki baatee
priyatam
main deepak ki baatee

andhiyaare mein andhiyaare ka
andhiyaare mein andhiyaare ka
rahta ek sahaara
mere andhiyaare jeewan mein
wohi ek hamaara
jab tak hai wo
tab tak hoon main
jab tak hai wo
tab tak hoon main
wo jaata main bujh jaati
wo jaata main bujh jaati
main deepak ki baatee
mai….n
deepak ki baatee ee
priyatam
main deepak ki baatee


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4632 Post No. : 16286

With the advent of sound films in India in 1931, many actors faced difficulties in on-screen performances with their voices. Only few actors of silent films who could, fluently or otherwise, speak Urdu and Hindi made a transition from silent to talkies. Master Vitthal, Master Nissar, Mazhar Khan, Prithviraj Kapoor, Baburao Pendharkar, Raja Sandow, Hiralal, Patience Cooper, Zubeida, Sulochana (Ruby Mayers), Gohar Mamajiwala, Madhuri (Beryl Claessen), Sabita Devi (Irin Gasper), Gulab, Jillo Bai, Lalita Pawar, Durga Khote etc were some of the actors who switched over from silent to talkies without much of difficulties. A few of them even learnt speaking Hindi and Urdu during the transition.

The makers of talkies faced another difficulty. They realised that most of the actors did not have a good voice for singing on-screen. While some actors could get away with their less than average singing ability due to their popularity with the film audience, the film-makers felt the need for new actors who could sing better and/or the trained singers who could also act. So, in early 1930s, a new category of actors who could also sing with good voices emerged in Hindi film industry. In this category, K L Saigal, Kanan Devi, Asit Baran, Ratan Bai, Uma Shashi, Pahadi Sanyal, Rajkumari Dubey, Shanta Apte, Surendra, Bibbo, Sitara Devi, Shahu Modak, Sardar Akhtar, Vatsala Kumthekar among many others emerged. Barring few exceptions, most of actor-singer (and singer-actor) lasted in the Hindi film industry as singers until system of playback singing was firmly established by early 1940s. Some of them continued to act in the films, their on-screen songs being lip synced by the playback singers.

In the early 1930s, there was one more category of singers in which film-makers were interested in taking them as singer-actor because of their popularity as Hindustani classical singers on All India Radio and in private concerts. Apart from filling up the void in singers for Hindi films, these trained singers were regarded ‘icing in the cake’ in the films for their box office success.

While most of the ‘hard-core’ Hindustani classical vocalists kept distance from the Hindi films, some of the popular singers of the semi-classical genres such as thumri, dadra and ghazal got attracted to work in Hindi films as singer-actor. Thus, the popular Hindustani semi-classical singers like Mukhtar Begum, Jahanara Kajjan, Akhtari Faizabadi (Begum Akhtar), Jaddan Bai, Indubala, Kamala Jharia among others entered the Hindi film industry during the early 1930s. Some of their large repertoire of semi-classical singing was replicated on the screen albeit in shorter forms. One can judge the importance of these songstresses for attracting the film audience when posters of a few Hindi films of early 1930s had their names in the bold letters of the same size as that of the films’ titles.

It is worthwhile to note that mostly female Hindustani semi-classical singers got associated with Hindi films as singer-actor in the early phase of sound films. Most of them were having their background as tawaifs or private concert singers. They mostly sang thumri, dadra, ghazals and other semi-classical genres. The male Hindustani classical singers felt it below their dignity to sing or record songs in these genres especially up to the beginning of early 20th century. It was only when Hindustani classical singing maestros like Ustad Abdul Karim Khan, Ustad Faiyyaz Khan, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan etc started singing thumri and dadra in their concerts in early 1930s with their respective gharana style, these sub-genres of Hindustani semi-classical music attained respectability.

In this context, I recall that even in post independent period, Ustad Amir Khan who was an exponent of Khayal singing, never sang thumri, dadra and ghazals in the concerts nor did he record songs in these genres. The only exceptions he made was that he sang a Ghalib ghazal, rahiye ab aisi jagah chalkar jahaan koi na ho, composed by Pandit Amarnath Chawla, his senior-most disciple, for a documentary film ‘Mirza Ghalib’ (1969). And he rendered this ghazal in Khayal style. (Ref: ‘Indore Ke Maseeha’, 2008 by Bindu Chawla). The second exception was for a Bengali film ‘Kshudito Pashan’ (1960) in which he sang a dadra under the music direction of Ustad Ali Akbar Khan.

Among the Hindustani semi-classical singers, Wahidan Bai of Agra was one of the late entrants in Hindi films. Although she was trained as Hindustani classical vocalist and was an occasional singr on All-India Radio, she did not like to pursue the career as a professional singer due to stigma attached to this profession. So, she got married to a businessman and settled as a housewife in Agra. However, the business went in doldrum and they shifted to Calcutta (Kolkata) in early 1930s to start a fresh business. Even the new business incurred losses and the couple were in dire financial condition. At this point of time, she approached A R Kardar who was her neighbour in Kolkata, for a role in the film. She got a song to sing in a small role and everyone was impressed with her voice.

Chandulal Shah, the owner of Ranjit Movietone offered Wahidan Bai to join his company as actor-singer. In Ranjit Movietone, she worked in ‘Toofaani Toli’ (1937), ‘Ban Ki Chidiya’ (1938), ‘Prithvi Putra’ (1938), ‘Professor Waman, M Sc’ (1938), ‘Rickshawala’ (1938), ‘The Secretary’ (1938) and ‘Thokar’ (1939). In all these films, she sang semi-classical genres of songs most of which became popular.

Wahidan Bai switched over to Sagar Movietone and played a lead role opposite Surendra in ‘Alibaba’ (1940), made in Hindi and Punjabi. In this film, she rendered for the first time a waltz music-based song, ham aur tum aur ye khushi with Surendra which became very popular. With the merger of Sagar Movietone with National Studios in 1940, Wahidan Bai worked in ‘Sanskaar’ (1940) as actor-singer which was her last film. Thereafter, she was mostly bed-ridden as she suffered from tuberculosis from which she did not recovered and died sometime in 1942. During her short filmy career, Wahidan Bai was associated with 11 films and rendered 26 songs.

[Note: Information on Wahidan Bai is mainly based on a chapter, ‘Jewels of Sagar’ in the Book ‘Sagar Movietone’ by Biren Kothari (2014), translated in English by Parth Pandya].

‘Thokar/The Kick’ (1939) was Wahidan Bai’s last film with Ranjit Movietone. The film was directed by A R Kardar. The star cast included M Kumar, Madhuri, Yakub, Noor Mohammed Charlie, Ishwarlal, Wahidan Bai, Wasti, Ram Marathe, Suresh, K N Singh, Dixit etc.

A short synopsis of the film’s story as given in http://www.indiancine.ma is reproduced below:

This is story about wealth not bringing happiness. The blind Mohan (Kumar) lives in a village with his ward Radha (Madhuri). He wins a fortune with a sweepstake ticket sold to him by the tramp Ramesh (Charlie), who claims his due and begins to take over Mohan’s life, making him move to the city and getting him married to Chinta (Wahidan Bai), a prostitute. When Mohan’s eyesight is restored, he finds that his wife is having an affair with Ramesh. Mohan takes revenge and eventually lands up in his old village, a poor man, but with Radha still unchanged, waiting for him.

There were 10 songs in the film – all written by P L Santoshi which were set to music by Gyan Dutt. One song from the film has been covered in the Blog. I present the second song from the film ‘kaali jo ghata chhaayi hai’ rendered by Wahidan Bai in the semi-classical singing style.

Audio Clip:

Song-Kaali jo ghata chhaayi hai (Thokar)(1939) Singer-Wahidan Bai, Lyrics-P L Santoshi, MD-Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

aa aa aaa
aankhon aankhon mein
pila di mere saaqi ne mujhe
ab na sheeshe ki zuroorat hai na paimaane ki
kaali..eee
kaali….eeee ee ee
kaali jo ghata chhaayi hai
haan haan jee ghata chhaayi
zulfen saaqi..ee.ee.ee ee
saaqi mujhe yaad aayi hai
haan haan mujhe yaad aayi

gudguda…aa deti hai
ae ae
deti hai dil ko zaalim
deti hai dil ko
shokh a a kitneeeee…ee ee ee
kitni teri angadaayi hai ae ae
haan teri angadaayi hai….ai
haan teri angadaayi

hum hain beemaa…..r e
beemaar-e-mohabbat
jab se…ae ae ae
na maseeha ho aa aaa aaa
maseeha na maseehaaayi hai…..ai
maseeha na maseeha aaye hain
haan na maseeha aaye
kaali ghata chhaaye hai…ai


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4624 Post No. : 16273

Today’s song is from a film of the first decade of the talkie era – Adhoori kahani-1939.

In the first decade of the Talkie era, Calcutta’s New Theatres was far ahead of other film studios of India in presenting musical and successful films. However, when its successful film Devdas-1935 came, it, possibly, unintentionally stressed on the painful dark emotions of Human Behaviour. It also, almost, glorified a failed Love, alcoholism and death of the Hero. I understand that the film was based on a famous novel by Sharat chandra Chatterjee. New Theatres being the leader in the industry, other filmmakers followed suit and there was a spate of films depicting Sadism, Pessimism, Tragedy, Perversion, Psychoti Behavious and similar not so good Human Emotions in their films.

Thus we had, in and around that period films like Minerva’s ‘Jailor’ (1938) and ‘Main Haari’ (1940), Ranjit’s ‘Adhoori Kahaani’ (1939), Kardar’s ‘Paagal’ (1940) and ‘Pooja’ (1940), Prabhat’s ‘Aadmi’ (1939), New Theatre’s ‘Badi Didi’ (1939) and ‘Dushman’ (1939), Sagar Movietone’s ‘Ek Hi Rasta’ (1939), Mehboob’s ‘Aurat’ (1940), Circo’s ‘Geeta’ (1940), New Theatres ‘Nartaki’ (1940), Mehboob’s ‘Behan’ (1941) and few other films.

In these circumstances, came a welcome relief from Bombay Talkies, in the form of pure, innocent, romantic Love stories featuring a cute Ashok Kumar with heroines like Devika Rani, leela Chitnis and others. This again changed the trend and the audience had good, healthy, entertaining musical films, till the mid 40’s, when the Crime stories invaded in the form of Kismat, Geeta and others, taking the film trend in a different way.

Today’s film Adhoori Kahani-39 had a tragic story, was directed by Chaturbhuj Doshi and the music was by Gyan Dutt. The cast was Durga Khote, Prithviraj, Rose, Keshav rao Datey, Ila Devi, Ishwarlal,Yaqub, Khatun, Mirza Musharraf and others. During the early era of talkie films, till the 1960s, there was a horde of Gujarati directors and producers. Bhatts, Trivedi, Thakur, Shahs, Desais, Pancholi, Doshi, Daves were some names frequently found directing various genres. Usually they specialised in certain class and type of films. The Bhatts (Shankar and Vijay) liked to do Mythological films, Ramnik Shah handled stunt, action, fantasy films, Jayant Desai was social film oriented etc.

Chaturbhuj Doshi (1894–1969) was a Hindi and Gujarati writer-director of Indian cinema. He was one of the top Gujarati screenplay writers, who helped script stories for the Punatar productions. He is stated to be one of the leading figures who launched the Gujarati film industry with work on notable films like ‘Gunsundari’ (1948) and ‘Nanand Bhojai’ (1948). He was ‘well known’ for his family socials and had become ‘a celebrity in his own right’. He made a name for himself as a journalist initially and was referred to as the ‘famous journalist’ & publicist by Baburao Patel, editor of Filmindia.

His debut film as a director was ‘Gorakh Aya’ (1938), produced by Ranjit Movietone, though he joined Ranjit in 1929, as a scriptwriter. In 1938, he directed another film for Ranjit, a social comedy, ‘The Secretary’, and both films were box-office successes for Doshi. His forte was socials, regularly adapting stories and novels for films. He worked initially on comedies like ‘Secretary’ and ‘Musafir’ (1940), but then ‘shifted to more significant films’.

Chaturbhuj Anandji Doshi was born in 1894 in Kathiawad, Gujarat, British India. He was educated at the University of Bombay, after graduation he started work as a journalist for a daily, Hindustan (1926), working for editor Indulal Yagnik. His entry into films was working as a scenarist in the silent era for directors like Jayant Desai, Nandlal Jaswantlal & Nanubhai Vakil. He joined Ranjit Movietone in 1929, and wrote stories and screenplay for several of Ranjit films.

Film ‘Gorakh Aya’ (Gorakh has come) in 1938, was the first film directed by Doshi. It was produced by Ranjit Movietone with screenplay by Gunvantrai Acharya & dialogues by PL Santoshi. The music, termed ‘good’ was composed by Gyan Dutt. ‘The Secretary’ (1938), was a “riotous comedy”, starring Madhuri, Trilok Kapoor. Charlie. The music was composed by Gyan Dutt, who became a regular in most of the films directed by Doshi. Musafir in 1940 was a comedy costume drama, which had Charlie playing a prince.

‘Bhakta Surdas’, a devotional film directed by Doshi in 1942, is stated to be the “most famous” of the several versions made. It starred KL Saigal and Khursheed “the singing idol(s) of millions”, winning “unprecedented popularity” everywhere.

‘Mehemaan’ (1942) starred Madhuri, Ishwarlal, Shamim and Mubarak. Music director Bulo C. Rani had come to Bombay in 1942, and joined Ranjit Studios assisting Khemchand Prakash in music direction.

Doshi helped enormously in the development of the Gujarati cinema. During 1948-49 he directed three successful Gujarati films which “brought immense success to the industry”. The success of the Gujarati film ‘Kariyavar’ in 1948, directed by Chaturbhuj Doshi from a story by Shaida, called Vanzari Vaav, helped establish the Gujarati film industry along with other films like ‘Vadilo Ne Vanke’ (1948) by Ram Chandra Thakur and ‘Gadono Bel’ (1950) by Ratibhai Punatar. His next Gujarati film was ‘Jesal Toral’ (1948) based on folk-lore, which proved a big box-office success. In 1949, Doshi directed another Gujarati film, ‘Vevishal’, an adaptation of Meghani’s novel of the same name.

He also wrote stories, and one of his stories ‘Pati Bhakti’ was used in the Tamil film ‘En Kanawar’ (1948) produced by Ajit Pictures, which starred the Veena maestro, Sundaram Balachander, who was also the debut director and music composer for the film. In all he directed 24 Hindi films. His last Hindi film was ‘Sanskar’ (1958). He had also written few songs in the film ‘Maya Bazaar’ (1932).

Chaturbhuj Doshi died on 21 January 1969 in Bombay, Maharashtra, India. Filmography

1932: Narasinh Mehta (Writer), 1934: Sitamgarh (Writer), 1938: Gorakh Aya, Secretary, 1939: Adhuri Kahani, 1940: Musafir, 1941:Pardesi, Sasural, 1942: Bhakta Surdas, Dhiraj, Mehmaan, 1943: Chhoti Maa, Shankar Parvati (Director, Writer), 1944: Bhartrahari, 1945:Murti, 1946: Phulwari, 1947: Bela, Kaun Hamara, 1948: Jesal Toral, Kariyavar (Director, Writer), Sati Sone, 1949: Bhakta Puran, Vevishal, 1950: Akhand Saubhagya, Kisi Ki Yaad, Ramtaram, 1954: Aurat Teri Yahi Kahani, 1956: Aabroo, Dashera, Dassehra, 1957: Khuda Ka Banda, Shesh Naag, 1958: Sanskar, 1960: Mehndi Rang Lagyo (Writer, Lyricist).

In the early era of cinema, there were many Marathi heroines in films. Naturally so, because Bombay was the biggest film making centre and it was in Maharashtra. Out of these early Heroines,- Shanta Apte (1916-1964), Snehprabha Pradhan (1920-1930 ), Leela Chitnis ( 1912-2003), Durga Khote (1905-1991), Shobhana Samarth (1915-2000), Hansa Wadkar (Ratan Salgaonkar in real life (1924-1971) and Shanta Hublikar (1914-1992) had few things common.
They operated in films almost same period.
They were educated and hailed from upper castes.
They all were rebellious in nature.
They all had failed or no marriages.
They all worked in Marathi stage dramas and
They all ( except Shobhana Samarth) wrote Autobiographies in Marathi …. Shanta Apte- Jau mee Cinemaat ? means- shall I join films ? , Snehprabha Pradhan-Snehankita, Hansa Wadkar- Sangte Ayka means- Listen to me (A Hindi film – Bhoomika-1977, with Smita Patil- was made based on this book ). I, Durga Khote by Durga Khote, Chanderi Duniyet by Leela Chitnis and Kashala Udyachi baat by Shanta Hublikar.

One of these actresses was Durga Khote, whose life story is very inspiring. A girl from a well to do family marries and after her husband dies, fights the circumstances, going against the existing society norms and becomes successful. Despite the major ups and downs in life she maintains her reputation of being an actress without a blemish or controversy in her professional career. She ends her life with a success story.

Durga Khote (14 January 1905 − 22 September 1991) was one of the foremost leading ladies of her times, she remained active in Hindi and Marathi cinema, as well as theatre, for over 50 years, starring in 182 Hindi films and numerous theatre productions.

In 2000, in a millennium issue, India Today named her among “100 People Who Shaped India”, noting: “Durga Khote marks the pioneering phase for women in Indian Cinema” as she was one of the first women from respectable families to enter the film industry, thus breaking a social taboo.

She also ranks among the top ten actresses in mother roles in Hindi cinema, most notable among them were as Jodhabai in K. Asif’s Mughal-e-Azam (1960); as Kaikeyi in Vijay Bhatt’s classic Bharat Milap (1942); her other memorable roles as mother were in Charnon Ki Dasi (1941); Mirza Ghalib; Bobby (1973) and Bidaai (1974). She has received the highest award in Indian cinema, the Dadasaheb Phalke Award (1983), for lifetime contribution to Indian cinema.

Khote was born as Vitha Lad, to a family which hailed from Goa and spoke Konkani at home. Her father’s name was Pandurang Shamrao Lad and her mother’s name was Manjulabai. She grew up in a large joint family in Kandewadi. She was educated at Cathedral High School and St. Xavier’s College where she studied for B.A. While still a college-going teenager, she married into the Khote family and settled down with her husband.

By the age of 26, Durga Khote was a widowed mother with two young sons; Bakul and Harin. She had to seek work in film to support her children. In doing so, she became a pioneer of sorts: She hailed from a traditional family and the film industry was regarded as the preserve of the base and the bawdy. Also, most of the female characters were played by men at the time.

Durga Khote debuted in a minor role in the obscure 1931 silent film Farebi Jaal or trapped, by M. Bhavnani. She had to sing 3 songs also in this film. Followed by Maya Machindra (1932) by Prabhat Film company.. She was soon promoted to play heroine in the 1932 double version (Hindi and Marathi) Ayodhyecha Raja, another Prabhat film, which was the first ever Marathi talkie, and proved to be a runaway hit, where she played the role of Rani Taramati. Indeed, she ventured yet another pioneering trend: Despite working closely with the Prabhat Film Company, she broke away from the “studio system” (exclusive contract with a studio to work in its films on a monthly salary) then in vogue and became one of the first “freelance” artistes of that era by working occasionally with the New Theatres, East India Film Co. (both at Calcutta), and Prakash Pictures.

In 1936, she played Saudamini in Amar Jyoti, which is one of her most memorable roles. The characters played by her were very much like her regal personality and she commanded a screen presence even in front of legendary actors like Chandra Mohan, Sohrab Modi and Prithviraj Kapoor.

In 1937, she produced and directed a film titled Saathi ( Sawangadi in Marathi), making her one of the first women to step into this role in Indian cinema. The 40s opened for her in a big way, with award-winning performances in Aachary Atre’s Payachi Dasi (Marathi) and Charnon Ki Dasi (Hindi) (1941) and Vijay Bhatt’s classic Bharat Milap (1942), both of which got her the BFJA Best Actress Award for two consecutive years.

Durga Khote remained active in the theatre circuit for many years, especially the Marathi theatre in Mumbai. She was actively associated with the Indian People’s Theatre Association (IPTA) and worked in several plays for the Mumbai Marathi Sahitya Sangh. In 1954, she famously performed the role of Lady Macbeth in V.V. Shirwadkar’s Marathi adaptations of Macbeth, as Rajmukut, (The Royal Crown), along with Nanasaheb Phatak.

Durga Khote played a wide variety of roles over a career that was not only long, but also untouched by scandal. She was the inspiration for several generations of Indian actresses, including veterans such as the late Shobhna Samarth, who frequently spoke of how she had been inspired by Khote’s example.

During later years, she played several important character roles, such as the mother of the protagonist. Her portrayal of Jodhabai, the queen of Akbar torn between duty towards her husband and love towards her son in Mughal-e-Azam (1960) was well received. In 1963, she acted in Merchant Ivory’s debut film The Householder (1963).

She went on to play other widely appreciated character roles in later movies, such as the role of the grandmother of the heroine in Bobby (1973), the hero’s aunt in Abhimaan (1973), and the very memorable Bidaai (1974), where she played a mother, a very sensitive role that can make one cry and received the Filmfare Best Supporting Actress Award.

Her final memorable role was in Subhash Ghai’s Karz (1980), where she played the role of the mother of Raj Kiran and later, mother to Rishi Kapoor, who played the role of Raj Kiran’s reincarnation after the screen death of Raj Kiran in the movie.

She acted in 182 Hindi films in her career. Her last film as an actress was Daulat ka Dushman-1983. She had also sung 32 songs in 13 films. Her last song was in film Panna Dai-1945. By the 1980s she successfully diversified into production of short films, ad films and documentaries by setting up Fact Films and later, Durga Khote Productions, which produced the Doordarshan TV series Wagle Ki Duniya.

Durga Khote was married when she was a teenager to Vishwanath Khote, a gentleman of her own caste and similar social background, in a match arranged by their parents in the usual Indian manner. It was a traditional marriage into an orthodox family, the couple lived a harmonious and happy life, and the marriage was blessed with two sons. Vishwanath was a mechanical engineer who had graduated from Banaras Hindu University. His family was upper middle class and professional, with modern English education and high social standing; his ancestors had been prominent bankers.

Unfortunately, Vishwanath Khote died young, when Durga was barely into her 20s. She and her sons continued to reside with her in-laws, as is traditional in India, but she was not comfortable with her dependent position, especially because her father-in-law was no more, and they were dependent on other family members for their expenses. She thus felt impelled to make a living any which way she could, and the opening in films happened entirely by chance. The fact that she came from a modern and English-educated family meant that, even as a widow, she was able to act in films, which was derided as a disreputable profession in those days.

She thus raised her two sons, Bakul and Harin, single-handedly. Both of them went on to become well-settled in life. But she suffered the loss of her son Harin, who predeceased her and died in his 40s. Harin was married to Vijaya Jaywant, and they were the parents of two sons. After Harin’s early death, his widow married a Parsi man named Farrokh Mehta and became famous as the film-maker Vijaya Mehta.

Durga Khote’s grandchildren (children of Bakul and Harin) include her grandson Ravi, a filmmaker; granddaughter Anjali Khote, an actress; and grandson Deven Khote, a successful producer who is one of the co-founders of UTV, and who has also directed a film. Deven Khote is noted for producing films such as Jodhaa Akbar and Life in a Metro.

Durga Khote’s brother-in-law, Nandu Khote (brother of Vishwanath), was a noted stage and silent movie actor. Two of Nandu’s children also became actors in the film industry. His son Viju Khote (1941-2019) was an actor perhaps best known for his role of “Kalia” in Sholay (1975). Nandu’s daughter is the actress Shubha Khote, who debuted in Seema (1955) and worked as a heroine in several films before moving to character roles. Still later, she moved to directing and producing Marathi films and also entered television in the 90s. Shubha’s daughter, Bhavana Balsavar, is also an award-winning TV actress who appeared in sitcoms like Dekh Bhai Dekh and Zabaan Sambhalke before deciding to settle down and raise a family. Thus, the acting profession which was pioneered by Durga Khote in her family has been fully embraced by her late husband’s family.

Later in life, Durga Khote wrote an autobiography in Marathi, entitled Mee, Durga Khote, which was translated into English as I, Durga Khote. For the last part of her life, she moved to Alibaug, near Mumbai. Durga Khote died in Mumbai on 22 September 1991. ( Thanks to her autobiography, wiki, muVyz and my notes.)

Today’s song is sung by Durga Khote and an unknown male, with chorus.


Song-Maiyya soona Mandir tera (Adhoori Kahaani)(1939) Singers-Durga Khote, unknown male voice,Lyricist – P L Santoshi, MD- Gyan Dutt
Chorus
Durga Khote + Chorus

Lyrics

Maiyya
soona Mandir tera
Maiyya
soona Mandir tera
dhoop nahin hai
deep nahin hai
koi nahin pujaari
dhoop nahin hai
deep nahin hai
koi nahin pujaari
chhaayi hai andhiyaari
chhaayi hai andhiyaari
tan-man ke jag deep jalaaye
kar de door andheraa
tan-man ke jag deep jalaaye
kar de door andheraa
maiyya
soona mandir teraa
maiyya
soona mandir teraa

madhuhaasini
priya bhaashini
dukh naashini
maateshwari
maateshwari
sukh taarini(?)
var daayini
hitkaaarini

pooja karne laal badhenge
praanon ke balidaan karenge
pooja karne laal badhenge
praanon ke balidaan karenge

bhakti bhaav ke thhaal sajenge
nav prabhat ke shankh bajenge
bhakti bhaav ke thhaal sajenge
nav prabhat ke shankh bajenge
jaag uthhega Bharat saara
hoga sarvatr(?) saveraa
jaag uthhega Bharat saara
hoga sarvatr(?) saveraa
Maiyya
soona Mandir tera
Maiyya
soona Mandir tera


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4521 Post No. : 16079 Movie Count :

4391

Today’s song is from a film which is 82 years old – Baazigar-38.

It was released just 2 years before I was born. The word Baazigar means a Juggler, Magician, an Illusionist – one who can create magic or one who has the capacity to do the unimaginable things. Perhaps, like a person who wins unexpectedly at the last minute after losing all the while, or one who turns the tables when no one expects him to do so. I have not seen this film, nor I know about its storyline, but my guess is, it must be a story of a person who was daring and changed the game in his favour when everyone thought that he would surely lose it.

There were 4 films called Baazi – made in 1951,1968,1984 and 1995 and then there were 4 films called Baazigar made in 1938, 1959, 1972 and 1993. There was even a film Baazigar-The Iron Man-2008, which was dubbed from a South Indian film.Today’s film Baazigar-38 was made by Ranjit Movietone. In the early era of the Talkie films, Ranjit was a respected big name. The spirit behind Ranjit Movietone was Chandulal Shah – who was a Baazigar himself in this film. An ordinary low level operator in the Cotton market built an empire in the film industry, like a true Baazigar, indeed !

Hindi film industry’s growth in the early years of 20s to 40s was contributed by 2 major communities. One of them was the Gujarati businessmen who immediately identified this business as the future gold mine. The other major community was the Local Marathi, who lent their brain and hard work to this industry. As the time went by, people from Punjab, U.P., Bengal and other states of India joined hands to help this industry to prosper. However, till the mid 50s it was the Gujarati Sethias who poured the finances. Financiers like Sampat Sheth, Gokuldas Pasta, Manik Sheth Patel, Chunilal Munim, Mangaldas Parekh, Abdulali Yusufali, Mohd. Ali Rangwala, Chimanlal Desai, Bhogilal Dave, Mayashanker Bhatt etc only supplied the money, but never dabbled in other departments nor did they learn anything about the film making, more than what was needed to get some profits.

One person, however, was different. CHANDULAL SHAH. He not only put crores of rupees in film making, but also learnt the technique and art of making films, direction, building organisations of producers, developing political connections and what not. He did everything that was needed to become a successful filmmaker and a leader in the industry. That is why Baburao Patel called him “Sardar”. Chandulal Shah made his company Ranjit Movietone, a force to reckon with.

Chandulal Shah belonged to Jamnagar-Gujrat. He was born on 13-4-1898. He was into the cotton trade and used to visit Bombay frequently. Later he started working in Bombay Stock Exchange. He used to visit the Laxmi films, nearby to watch shootings. On one occasion, the director of a silent film ” VIMLA “-1925 fell very sick and on the recommendation of a solicitor friend, Chandulal Shah got an opportunity to direct the balance film. Impressed by his work style he was offered 2 more films. He left the Stock Exchange job and took up the film line completely.

From Laxmi, he shifted to Kohinoor Film Company, where he met actress Gauhar Jan Mamajiwala, who became his mate for the next 50 years till he died. Gauhar used to feature in his films. With Gauhar, he did GUNSUNDARI in 1927 and in 1934 (silent and Talkie respectively).

This film was a tremendous hit and it helped them to establish their own film company, Ranjit Movies in 1929. In the next 3 year’s time they made 39 silent films. After the advent of Talkie, they changed the name of Ranjit to Ranjit Movietone. Chandulal liked to do things only kingsize. Thus he established Ranjit studios with 4 large sound stages. He also hired around 300 people in the beginning. They made ,on an average, 6 feature films every year. His studio was an assembly line production house. At a time at least 5 to 6 films were being made in his studios. He had a big army of famous Actors, Writers, technicians, directors, Music directors etc. on his payroll.

Actors like Gauhar jaan, Bilimoria, Nirupa Roy, Motilal, Madhuri, Khursheed, and K L Saigal, Music directors like Gyan Dutt, Bulo C Rani, Khemchand Prakash etc, Lyricists and writers like Kidar Sharma, Pradeep, Saadat Hasan Manto and many others were on his Payroll.

Chandulal was very proud of his empire and used to advertise ” There are more stars in Ranjit than in the sky “. At the peak time, there were about 700 people employed in Ranjit and the Government had opened a Ration shop in his studio premises for the workers’ benefit ! Khemchand Prakash did 20 films in Ranjit from 1940 to 1945, Gyan Dutt 25 films from 1937 to 1943 and Bulo C Rani did 20 films from 1943 to 1954 here.

From 1929 to 1963 Ranjit made Silent films-39, Tamil-1, Marathi-1 and Hindi Talkie films 120

Unfortunately due to a fire, except 7 talkie Hindi films, all other films were destroyed. Chandulal Shah was an active person. Besides filmmaking he took interest in many Cine Associations and also led delegations abroad. He was a keen Horse racer, better and a Gambler.

In 1944, in one day he lost ONE CRORE TWENTY FIVE LAKH rupees in cotton betting and that was the beginning of his downfall. He had to mortgage all his and Gauhar jaan’s properties, but it could not save Ranjit from ruins. He returned to Film Direction to make money and his First film after 14 years was PAAPI-1953. It had the hit pair of those times-Raj Kapoor and Nargis. For the First time Raj Kapoor did a double role, but the film flopped. Clearly the times were bad for Chandulal. All his kundali was topsy turvy !

He tried 3 more films, all failed. His last film was ‘Akeli mat jaiyo’-1963.A man who ruled an Empire started travelling in local trains and buses.

Chandulal Shah died on 25-11-1975.

The year 1938 was a year in which the film industry was trying to shed the “carried forward” load of the Silent era and make a new beginning towards a better future. Many new production houses, actors, directors and composers were in full steam and churned out films after films. major studios contributed heavily to the total films made that year. Ranjit made 5 films, New Theatres-4, Bombay Talkies-3, Mohan Pictures-6, Sagar Movietone-6, Minerva Movietone-4, Mohan Bhavnani-4, Prakash Pictures-4 etc.

In 1938, Master Bhagwan debuted as a Director with Bahadur kissan, Renuka Devi (Begum Khursheed Mirza) debuted as an actress with Bhabhi, Meenakshi Shirodkar debuted in film Bramhachari, Lalita Pawar produced a film Duniya kya hai. Surprisingly, all these 3 Heroines were married at the time of their Debut. There was a variety in film subjects – comedy, suspense, crime, social, mythological, social evils, stunts, adventure, historical, musical and various other Genres were tried in films. If one goes through the films made this year, it indicates the way the film industry was growing in its initial years.

Baazigar-38 a Costume Drama by Ranjit was directed by Manibhai Vyas- who started his career from the Silent era and became an independent Talkie director with Dukhiyari-1937. He directed 26 Talkie films. His last film was Bajrang Bali-1976. The cast of the film was Khatun, Trilok Kapoor, N M Charlie, Ila Devi, Anis, Suresh etc.etc. All the 13 songs of the film were written by P L Santoshi and Gyan Dutt provided the music.

Iladevi was a new name. Even after efforts, no information was available to me about her. From the question-answer column of the magazine Film India, I learnt that Ila Devi’s original film name was Miss Ilmas. I do not know in which religion or community, this name is used.After making her debut in Hindi films in ‘ Nishan -E- Jung ‘-1937, she changed her name to Ila Devi and acted in 6 more films. Four films in 1938 (Billi, Bazigar, Rikshawala and Gorakh Aaya) and two films in 1939 (Adhuri Kahani and Kahan hai teri manzil). After this her name is not found in any films, when I checked.

This change of name, after using one name in a film, is not unique, though,this seems to be the First such instance. I know, off hand, at least two more such instances in Film industry. Actress Ameeta (Tumsa nahi dekha fame) had used name Jaijaiwanti in her first film Thokar-1953 ( her second film kaafila -52 was released first as Ameeta,however), but she changed it to her name Ameeta from next film onwards. ( her real name was Qamar Sultana). The second example is actress Zeb Rehman who was known first as Preetibala, then she changed her name to Zeb Rehman.

There is another name ‘ Khatun ‘ in the cast. Miss Khatun Bano was born and brought up in a poor Muslim family of Lahore. As per the family tradition, she learnt dancing and singing. Once, when she was performing on stage in Lahore, the Talent hunter of Sagar movietone spotted her and she was offered a role in a Talkie film- which was a novelty in 1931. Her first film was Abul Hasan-31. Then came Subhadra haran-32, Meerabai-32, Maya Bazar-32 etc etc. In all, she acted in 59 films, till her last film Ibrat-60. She also sang 25 songs in 12 films.

Today’s song is sung by Rajkumari Dubey and Noor Mohd. Charlie, as per the uploader’s information on the You Tube. With this song film Baazigar-38 makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song-Hai koi dil lene waala (Baazigar)(1938) Singers- Rajkumari Dubey, Charlie, Lyricist-P L Santoshi, MD- Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

Haan aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil mol
haan aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil mol
haan aan aan aan
kya tum dil bechti ho
haan
mera dil hai itna bhola
chot lage sah jaaye
mera dil hai itna bhola
chot lage sah jaaye
mera dil hai itna komal
dhoop lage murjhaaye
mera dil hai itna komal
dhoop lage murjhaaye
le lo jee
le lo dil mol
le lo jee
le lo dil mol
haan aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil moi
haan aan aan aan aan

aise bhole komal dil ko
dil mein band rakhoonga
aise bhole komal dil ko
dil mein band rakhoonga
chot na lagne doongaa sajni
dhoop na lagne doongaa aa
chot na lagne doongaa sajni
dhoop na lagne doongaa
kya keemat hai bol
kya keemat hai bol

dil ka sauda dil se baalam
dil de de
dil le le
dil ka sauda dil se baalam
dil de de
dil le le
dil hai ye anmol ol
dil hai ye anmol ol
haa aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil moi
haan aan aan aan aan


This article is written by nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4488 Post No. : 16011

31/10/2020 – Remembrance day of S D Burman
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Sab kahan kuchh laala-o-gul mein numaayan ho gayin
Khaak mein kya sooratien hongi jo pinhaan ho gayin

Yesterday I was at the farewell function for officers retiring in my office. Many people were there, and the officers were felicitated with customary shawl and coconut, bouquet and token gifts etc. All attendees were wearing masks and photos were clicked. While all this was going on, there flashed the second line of the above sha’ir by Ghalib. With a change of one word, the sha’ir perfectly suits the situation, as is:

Sab kahan kuchh laala-o-gul mein numaayan ho gayin
“Mask” mein kya sooratien hongi jo pinhaan ho gayin

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We commemorated 114th birth anniversary of the Dada Burman or Burman Da, as he was affectionately called by colleagues and friends, senior and juniors alike, a month ago. Now it is his 45th death anniversary today. He formed an immortal dynasty with son R. D. Burman, which is unparalleled. As a father, he is bound to have a bigger hand in forming RDB, the musical phenomena than vice versa.

I have been a die-hard fan of S. D. Burman’s songs, whether they are by Mohammed Rafi, Kishore Kumar, Mukesh, Talat Mehmood, Lata Mangeshkar or Asha Bhosle. I want to list my favourite by each of these singers, here it is:

Singer Song
Kishore Kumar Dil aaj shaayar hai
Mukesh Chal ri sani ab kya soche
Talat Mehmood Jalte hain jiske liye
Lata Mangeshkar Ab to hai tum se
Asha Bhonsle O panchhi pyaare saanh sakhaare
Geeta Dutt Waqt ne kiya kya haseen sitam
Hemant Kumar Jaane wo kaise log the inke

(Not including the favourite Rafi songs and duets, saving it for another post)

A few trivia found on the net about the song of “Pyaasa” listed above:

• Jane Woh Kaise Log The Jinke Pyar Ko Pyar Mila – The tune of the line “Humne to jab kaliyan maangi” in this song may have been S.D. Burman’s adaptation of the line “Punjab Sindh Gujarat Maratha” from the Indian national anthem composed by Rabindranath Tagore.
• Jane Woh Kaise Log The Jinke Pyar Ko Pyar Mila – This was the only song in the film in which the voice of a male singer other than Mohammed Rafi was used. S.D. Burman’s decision to use Hemant Kumar for this song may have been to fulfill a promise he had made to the singer to give him at least one song a year – a promise Hemant Kumar himself reminded the composer of. Additionally, the fact that the song was influenced by Rabindra Sangeet may have swung the decision in favour of Hemant Kumar, a seasoned practitioner of this form of music.

I cannot talk about S. D.Burman and not rewind immortal songs of Abhiman, Guide, Tere ghar Ke saamne, Sujata, Bandini, Bambai ka babu, Pyasa, Kaaghaz ke Phool, Sharmilee, Paying guest, kaala bazaar, Kaala Pani, Jewel thief, Prem Pujari, Gambler, Talaash, Sharmilee etc.

The total songs composed by S. D. Burman are 666 in 87 movies. Out of these 666 songs which must include non-film songs too, 637 are already posted in the blog. This tally must exclude the songs composed for Bengali/Assamese and Oriya films. 23 songs sung by S. D.Burman are posted in the blog, so they may include some Bengali songs too. With less than 30 songs to complete the tally, it was bound to be a tough task to find a song to post. Still I did find a 50’s song, a solo by Shamshad Begum from the film “Chaalis Baba ek chor”. Lyricist is Pyarelal Santoshi. Eight songs from this film are posted out of 12 songs. I have only the audio of the song, which appears with to be in two parts and it is mentioned as two separate songs elsewhere. So there may not be 12 songs in this film.

The song itself appears like a kid is singing this song, with family members. Trying to make light of the financial problems, the singers all are enjoying making fun of their own situation. This is a feat, not easy to achieve, however worse or bad are the times.

Myswar is mentioning 4 solos by Shamshad Begum. One of those songs is titled “doodhwala bhaiyya aaya maange rupaiyya”, this seems to go with the theme of this current song which refers to sethani(land lord), dhobi, darzi etc. so dhoodwala coming and asking for his money is in same vein. Some links on youtube are giving name “darji hai kapda chor”. But I couldn’t find the “doodhwala bhaiyya” song, and it is not part of the links that I heard of the current song.

Shamshad Begum, is one of the most prolific playback singers of her generation. As per the stats page, she has sung 1273 songs in her career, 695 of which are posted in the blog.


Song-Moorakh baithha aaj ki soche (Chaalis Baba ek Chor)(1954) Singer-Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-P L Santoshi, MD-S D Burman
Chorus
Unknown male voice

Lyrics

Ae ji moorakh baithhaa aa
aaj ki soche
aur kal ki soche siyaa..aanaa
kaal ke pankh pasaare dekho
udtaa aa aaa
jaaye zamaana aa

ae ji hafton se
ae ji maheenon se
ae ji barson se
apni ye gaadi rahi chal
aaj nahin kal baba
aaj nahin kal
baba aaj nahin kal
baba aaj nahi kal

shor machaati wo aayi sethhaani
naam hai baby
baby ee
haan haan baby raani
bigdi deewaani
budhiya naani
kehne lagi ee
kehne lagi ee
de do kiraaya yaa
jaao nikal
ham ne kahaa
aaj nahin kal baby
aaj nahin kal
uss ne kahaa aaj
nahin kal
aaj nahin kal
baby aaj nahin kal
baby aaj nahin kal
baby aaj nahin kal

ae ae ae
chor chor chor chor
darji hai kapda chor
hamaara darji hai kapda
chor chor chor chor
darji hai kapda chor
hamaara darji hai kapda chor
dil ka chhotaa
neeyat ka khotaa
kapda diya thha knicker banaane
laaya banaa ke langotaa
ultaa machaave shor
machaave shor
o kapda
chor chor chor chor
darji hai kapda chor
hamaara darji hai kapda
chor chor chor chor

dhobiye ne dhobi dhobi
dho dho dho
dho dho dho

dhote to ho betaaj (?)
ae ji dhobi ke jhoote thaathh
ghar mein
tooti taati khaat
tooti taati
tooti taati

tooti taati khaat
bichha kar
soye puraana taat
gadhe par
baitthaa jaave ghaat
gadhe par
gadhe par
gadhe par

dhobi ke dekho thhaath
kisi ki pant
kisi ka coat
pehan kar bana
governer laat


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4469 Post No. : 15964

Yearwise discussion of Lata Mangeshkar songs in HFM: Part III: 1950
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So, we come to the year 1950. Lata Mangeshkar had announced her arrival on HFM scene in 1949. That year also marked the beginning of the golden era of HFM, which lasted till 1980.

Here are the details of the songs that Lata Mangeshkar sang in HFM in movies that were released in 1950:-

S N Movie Music director Lata song in the blog Lata HFM songs recorded in the year Lata solo songs Male duet Female duet Other songs Lyricists
1 Aadhi Raat Husnlal Bhagatram 6 6 5 1 0 0 Asad Bhopali (3) Sarshar Sailaani (2) Khumar Barabankvi (1)
2 Anmol Ratan Vinod 7 7 5 2 0 0 D N Madhok
3 Apni Chhaaya C Ramchandra 1 2 1 1 0 0 P L Santoshi
4 Aarzoo Anil Biswas 5 5 5 0 0 0 Majrooh Sultanpuri (3) Prem Dhawan (2)
5 Baawra Krishn Dayal B Sc 2 2 2 0 0 0 Raghupat Rai (1) Gafil Harnalwi (1)
6 Baabul Naushaad 3 3 2 0 1 0 Shakeel Badayuni
7 Beqasoor Anil Biswas (4) Hansraj Bahl (2) 6 6 4 2 0 0 Ehsan Rizvi (4) Aarzoo Lucknowi (2)
8 Bhai Bahan Shyam Sundar 1 1 1 0 0 0 Rajinder Krishan
9 Birha Ki Raat Husnlal Bhagatram 2 2 1 1 0 0 Sarshar Sailaani
10 Chhoti Bhaabhi Husnlal Bhagatram 4 5 3 2 0 0 Qamar Jalalabadi
11 Chore Pt Govindram 3 4 3 0 1 0 Rammurty Chaturvedi (3) I C Kapoor (1)
12 Gauna Husnlal Bhagatram 0 1 1 0 0 0 Qamar Jalalabadi
13 Hamaari Beti Snehal Bhatkar 1 3 3 0 0 0 Pt Phani (1) Unknown (2)
14 Hanste Aansoo Ghulam Mohammad 1 1 0 1 0 0 Shewan Rizvi
15 Hanste Rahna Wadhwa 0 1 1 0 0 0 Unknown
16 Khel Sajjad Hussain 2 2 2 0 0 0 Saaghar Nizami (1) Shams Azimabadi (1)
17 Khilaadi Hansraj Bahl 1 1 1 0 0 0 Nakshab
18 Laajawaab Anil Biswas 5 9 4 2 1 2 Prem Dhawan (4) Shekhar (2) Safdar Aah Sitapuri (2)
19 Maang Ghulam Mohammad 4 5 3 1 1 0 Sagheer Usmani (2) Nizaam (1) Raja Mehdi Ali Khan (1) Prakash (1)
20 Mashaal S D Burman 2 2 2 0 0 0 Kavi Pradeep
21 Meena Baaazaar Husnlal Bhagatram 6 6 1 5 0 0 Qamar Jalalabadi
22 Meharbaani Hafeez Khan 1 5 2 2 1 0 Anjum Jaipuri (2) Mashhar (1) Khawar Zamaan (2)
23 Niraala C Ramchandra 5 5 5 0 0 0 P L Santoshi
24 Nirdosh Shyam Sundar 1 1 1 0 0 0 Asad Bhopali
25 Pardes Ghulam Mohammad 6 6 5 1 0 0 Shakeel Badayuni
26 Pyaar Ki Manzil Husnlal Bhagatram 3 6 4 1 1 0 Shewan Rizvi (4) Rajinder Krishan (2)
27 Raaj Mukut Pt Govind Ram 1 4 2 1 1 0 Bharat Vyas
28 Raaj Raani Hansraj Bahl 1 2 2 0 0 0 D N Madhok
29 Samaadhi C Ramchandra 3 3 2 0 1 0 Rajinder Krishan
30 Sangeeta C Ramchandra 8 8 7 1 0 0 P L Santoshi
31 Sangraam C Ramchandra 5 5 3 1 1 0 Brajendra Gaud (2) Raja Mehdi Ali Khan (2) P L Santoshi (1)
32 Sargam C Ramchandra 9 9 2 4 1 2 P L Santoshi
33 Sartaj Husnlal Bhagatram 2 6 3 1 2 0 Majrooh (4) Partab (1) Shewan (1)
34 Shaadi Ki Raat Pt Govind Ram 0 2 2 0 0 0 Sarshar Sailaani (1) Feroz (1)
35 Surajmukhi Husnlal Bhagatram 1 2 0 1 1 0 Aabid Gulrej
36 Wafa Vinod 3 5 3 1 1 0 Hasrat Jaipuri(3) Aziz Kashmiri(2)
Total 36 movies 15 MDs 111 143 93 32 14 4 40 lyricists

Thus we can see that Lata Mangeshkar sang 143 songs under the music direction of 15 Music composers in 1950.

But during those days no one knew what future had in store. If one thinks about it, Geeta Roy was also doing very well. During 1949, she sang 103 songs while Lata Mangeshkar had sung 157 songs 143 songs. In 1950, Geeta Roy sang 166 songs ! More than what Lata Mangeshkar sang in the year ! So, it was Geeta Roy who was ahead of Lata Mangeshkar in 190s in the race for the leading female playback singer of HFM.

Out of 36 movies of 1950, all Lata songs of as many as 20 movies have already been covered. So, only 16 movies of 1950 can be taken up for discussing a Lata song in the blog.

“Apni Chhaayaa”(1950) is alphabetically the first such movie of 1950. This movie was directed by P L Santoshi for Chitralaya Limited, Bombay. This “social” movie had Sulochana Chatterjee, Balwant singh, Radhakishan, Mumtaz Ali, Sajjan, tiwari, Ram Singh, Dulaari, Mona, Neelam, Satyarani, Jawahar Kaul, Bab Raja, Narbada Shankar, Karadkar, Niranjan, Madan singh, Cuckoo etc in it.

The movie had ten songs in it, including two Lata songs. Four songs from the movie, including one Lata solo (incorrecly mentioned in HFGK as a Lata Chitalkar duet), namely Andhiyaare ghar mein jyot jali has been covered in the blog.

Here is the second and final Lata song from “Apni Chhaayaa”(1950) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Lata and Chitalkar. P L Santoshi is the lyricist.

The movie had two music directors, via=z Husnlal Bhagatram Nd Hanuman Prasad. HFGK mentions two songs as Hanuman Prasad composion and is silent about the music directors of other movies. Here I have assumed Husnlal Bhagatram as the music director of the song.

Only the audio of this rare song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of the song.


Song-Ae jee bade bade mahlon se wo ghar bhale (Apni Chhaaya)(1950) Singers-Lata, C Ramchandra, Lyrics-P L Santoshi, MD-Husnlal Bhagatram
Both

Lyrics

Ae jee bade bade
Ae jee bade bade mehlon se wo ghar bhale
jinmein nanha sa preet ka deepak jale
Ae jee bade bade
Ae jee bade bade mehlon se wo ghar bhale
jinmein nanha sa preet ka deepak jale
ae jee bade bade

un mehlon pe laanat
un mehlon pe thhoo
un mehlon pe thhoo
jin ki deewaaron mein daulat ki boo
aji daulat ki boo
jo dukhiyon ke aahon se ban ke khade
jo dukhiyon ke aahon se ban ke khade
Ae jee bade bade
Ae jee bade bade mehlon se wo ghar bhale
jinmein nanha sa preet ka deepak jale
Ae jee bade bade

daulat jahaan hai wahaan laakhon beemaari
laakhon beemaari
laakhon beemaari ki ek hai beemaari
ek hai beemaari
jis mein ghul ghul ke rahne waale maren
jis mein ghul ghul ke rahne waale maren
Ae jee bade bade
Ae jee bade bade mehlon se wo ghar bhale
jinmein nanha sa preet ka deepak jale
Ae jee bade bade

o jee duniya se door kahin ambuwa tale
duniya se door kahin ambuwa tale
chhoti hamaari madhhaiyya bane
tum Radha bano
tum Radha bano
ham Kanhaiyya banen

jahaan preet ki paavan jamuna bahe
aur prem ki mohan bansi baje
Ae jee bade bade
Ae jee bade bade mehlon se wo ghar bhale
jinmein nanha sa preet ka deepak jale
Ae jee bade bade


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4425 Post No. : 15845

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Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No. 64
———————————————————————————–

Ten years ago on this date (29 august 2010), as many as seven songs from seven different movies were covered in the blog. Here are their details:-

Blog song post number Song Movie-Year Remarks
2864 Haay mera dil le gaya koi aake ishaaron se Parbat 1952 Movie YIPPEED
2865 I love you O madam Dulhan 1958 5 songs covered (out of 8)
2866 Chaand ko dekho ji Chaand Mere Aaja 1960 6 songs covered out of 7. The seventh song too is apparently part of an already covered song
2867 Pyaase panchhi neel gagan mein geet milan ke gaayen Pyaase Panchhi 1960 5 songs covered out of 10
2868 Apni bhi kyaa zindagi hai niraali Aas Ka Panchhi 1961 YIPPEED
2869 Beta jamoore kah de duniya ko lalkaar ke Biraadari 1966 YIPPEED
2870 Chup ho aaj kaho kyaa hai baat Chhattees Ghante 1974 YIPPEED

“Dulhan”(1958) is still eligible for Blog Ten year Challenge” ten years later today (29 august 2020). The movie had nine songs in it and five of them have been covered so far.

Here are these songs of “Dulhan”(1958) that have been covered so far:-

Song Posted On
Jiyaa sharmaaye nazar jhuki jaaye 07.08.2010
I love you Madam Multiple version song 29.08.2010
Mooliram aur bhindimal ka nikal gayaa hai deewaala 14.04.2012
Mere gore gore gaal 25.11.2018

Here is the sixth song from “Dulhan”(1958) to appear in the blog. The picturisation shows Nirupa Roy leaving Raj Kaumar, but then changes her mind. Some dialogue from Raj Kumar are followed by a few lines of Hemant Kumar after which it is all Asha Bhonsle. P L Santoshi is the lyricist. Music is composed by Ravi.

HFGK mentions this song as a female solo, and the audio of the song is indeed a female solo song in Asha Bhonsle’s voice, but we can see from the picturisation that the song begins with Hemant Kumar’s voice. Remark in HFGK mentions that this song was sung by Hemant Kumar in a prose form. We can see that the picturisation combines these two seemingly separate songs to form what looks like a duet song. Incidentally, no records were made of Hemant Kumar version and it is there only in the picturisation.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Prakashchandra while BTYC details were provided by Avinash Scrapwala.

Lyrics of video link:(contains Hemant Kumar`s voice while the song begins)
video link:

audio link(does not contains Hemant Kumar`s lines)

Song-Rukne lage kadam aur…Kaise jaaoon main piyaa (Dulhan)(1958) Singers-Hemant Kumar, Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-P L Santoshi, MD-Ravi

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra)

(dialogues)

rukne lagey kadam
aur jhukne lagi nigaahein
aasaan ho chali hain
ulfat ki apni raahein

kaissey
jaaoon main piyaa.aaa
moraa..aaa maaney na jiyaa
tooney mujh pe
na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiyaa

kaissey jaaoon main piya
mora maaney na jiya
tooney mujh pe na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiya
tooney mujh pe na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiya
kaissey jaaoon main piya
mora maaney na jiya
tooney mujh pe na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiya
tooney mujh pe na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiyaa

ye mulaaqaat kaissi hamaari huyee
ye mulaaqaat kaissi hamaari huyee
main to pehli nazar mein tumhaari huyi
tum to nikley balamwa badey hi chhaliyaa
tum to nikley balamwa badey hi chhaliyaa
kaissey jaaoon main piya
mora maaney na jiya
tooney mujh pe na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiya
tooney mujh pe na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiyaa

bairi duniya ki baaton mein aanaa nahin
bairi duniya ki baaton mein aanaa nahin
mujhe dil se kabhi tum bhulaanaa nahin
charnon mein tumhaari rahoongi rasiya
charnon mein tumhaari rahoongi rasiya
kaissey jaaoon main piya
mora maaney na jiya
tooney mujh pe na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiya
tooney mujh pe na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiya
kaissey jaaoon main piya
mora maaney na jiya
tooney mujh pe na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiya
tooney mujh pe na jaaney kaissa jaadu kiyaa


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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