Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Ratandeep Hemraj


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4396 Post No. : 15767 Movie Count :

4346

Today is the 31st of July.
A date that has an immediate connect with most HFM lovers, for it signifies to them the passing away of one of Hindi film industry’s biggest legends.

Mohammad Rafi, or, as many (including myself) refer to him with the greatest respect, Rafisaab.

Today is his 40th death anniversary – and all of us here on the blog, and I’m sure millions around the world, remember him with great love, affection and respect.

That I’m a big Rafisaab fan is no secret.
This is also why, despite any other constraints I might have, I always try to write a post on 24th Dec (his birthday) and 31st July (death anniversary) for this blog.
It is my very small way of paying respect to someone who has given me so much joy in my life from just listening to his voice. I already feel blessed to be able to listen to him. To then be able to write about him is such a pleasure, and yet a humbling experience.

In many of my previous posts on Rafisaab, I’ve discussed him not just as a singer par excellence but also as a very special human being. For me, it’s difficult to separate the artiste from the person.
And in Rafisaab, I find myself lost in admiration on both counts – his mastery of his art, and his character as a human being.

In life one comes across, or reads about, all sorts of people.
There’s a lot to learn from others, their conduct and experiences in life.
The other day I’d written about Rajesh Khanna and how his life, inspite of all the mistakes he made, is a lesson for others.
The same applies to Rafisaab too – although not due to his mistakes, but due to his elevated thinking.
Much to learn from it.

The industry, for all its seeming “biraadari” and bhai-chaara, can be a nasty place. Stories of egos, back-stabbing, credit-grabbing, politics abound. Many artistes themselves say it’s a dog-eats-dog industry.

And yet, in such an industry, there was also a Rafisaab.

Throughout his career, from the late 40s till he passed away in 1980, there wasn’t a single blemish on his character. No story of ego, or back-stabbing or politics, or anything of that sort.
It’s quite remarkable – but that was Rafisaab.
Others in the industry might have tried to throw their weight around, even manipulate or belittle Rafisaab, but he never reciprocated with any anger or vengeance. He was on a different plane altogether – an elevated one.
This is why though there were incidents with legends like BR Chopra, OP Nayyar and Lata Mangeshkar, they always patched up with him.
Such was Rafisaab’s personality – you just could not but respect him, inspite of any difference of opinion you have.

Stories of Rafisaab’s humility abound.
Whenever he’d be praised for a song, he’d point upwards to suggest it was all God’s doing.
Such was his humility that he would ask a composer after singing “Was it ok?” And if the composer had even the slightest doubt, Rafisaab would sing it again.
This, even with composers of far less stature than Rafisaab.
No ego, just thorough professionalism, and the desire to give the best he could.

Stories of Rafisaab’s generosity abound. How he would take just a one-rupee token fee from struggling composers. How he would support various poor and underprivileged people, without the slightest fuss or publicity.

It’s hard to imagine a person like this in today’s world. Such a soft-spoken, gentle person, ever-smiling, and with so much kindness in his heart.

Yes, there’s a lot to learn from Rafisaab, the person.

I’m no singer (ok, am just a bathroom singer) but am sure professional singers would have a lot to learn from Rafisaab’s professionalism, and sheer dedication to his profession. He always tried to give the very best he could – because that is what the composer, and the public, deserved. So no half-hearted measures or shortcuts.

Mind you, for a large part of his career, he was a superstar singer, so he could have got away without so much effort. But he wouldn’t be Rafisaab then. Right till the end, whether it was his riyaaz at home, or his rehearsals, or recordings, the effort and dedication was a hundred percent.

Like most artistes, Rafisaab also had ups and downs in his career.
One fine day, from being the most popular male voice for at least two generations, he found himself overshadowed by Kishore Kumar as the most popular voice of a new generation. It obviously hit him hard – his self-confidence apparently took a bit of a beating.

But, like they say, you can’t keep a good man down for long – and Rafisaab came back.
And how!
By 1976-77, with Laila Majnu, Amar Akbar Anthony and Hum Kisise Kam Nahin all featuring hit songs from him prominently, he was back with a bang.

From then on, till his death in 1980, he was very much back in business. That’s how you come back even when you seem to be down and out.

Yes, there’s a lot to learn from Rafisaab, the artiste.

No wonder I am such a big fan of Rafisaab.
And I know I’m in pretty good company.
Company of at least a few million others.

I haven’t talked about Rafisaab’s songs here – what can I say? Right from his very early days, with songs like “yahaan badla wafaa ka” and “ik dil ke tukde” to his last days, with songs like “tu is tarah”, Rafisaab’s voice was totally in a league of its own.
Divinity incarnate.

And add to this divine voice, his control over pitch, his intonations, the “thehraav” in his voice. No wonder he could sing “o duniya ke rakhwaale” and “meri duniya mein tum aayi”, two songs on two totally opposite ends of the spectrum, with equal aplomb. Such was his mastery that he could easily adapt his voice to blend with any mood or moment.
Happy, teasing or sad.
Ghazal, qawwali or bhajan.
One moment, the despair of “ye mehlon ye takhton”. The next, the fun and frolic of “sar jo tera chakraaye”. Listen to this, and you feel it IS Johnny Walker’s voice.

Yes, that was another Rafisaab skill. To seamlessly adapt his voice to the actor on screen.

The “thehraav” in Rafisaab’s voice is something that I can never get enough of. I’ve listened to the title song of “Mere Mehboob” so many times, just to marvel at the “thehraav”.

Listening to Rafisaab’s voice is therapeutic for me. Whatever be my frame of mind, I just have to close my eyes and listen to “pukaarta chala hoon main”, and I suddenly feel better. 🙂

I could go on and on, but let me now move on to the song for today.

A few days ago, I was on youtube listening to some Rafisaab songs. But this time, instead of listening to his popular songs, I thought I’d look for lesser-known ones. There’s a special joy in discovering songs you’ve never heard before. True of any singer, but for me, especially true of Rafisaab.

I came across a few, shared them with Avinashji too, because he’s an even bigger Rafisaab fan than I am. 🙂

It was an enriching experience, since there were some songs with a decent spattering of Urdu – always a delight for me. 🙂

Today’s song isn’t one in this category. But I loved it the first time I heard it a few days ago, so I decided it would be the song for today.

Actually, I’m somewhat surprised I hadn’t heard this song before. Surprised because it’s from a 1982 film, Raakh Aur Chingaari. Starring Vinod Mehra, Vidya Sinha and Anil Dhawan. 1982 was still within my “active consciousness” of films and songs, and these actors are prominent actors – but somehow this film and song seem to have passed me by.

I also noticed that this film doesn’t figure on the blog yet – another surprise. So it’s making its debut here today.

Then the lyricist & composer. Lyrics by Tajdar Taj, music by Ratandeep Hemraj. Both new names for me.

I see that this combo is already on the blog in Sudhirji’s post.

But what is surprising is that this was MY era, and yet these names are new to me. It’s a very humbling realization. 🙂

I like the lyrics and the music – and of course, Rafisaab’s voice.

This happens to be a multiple-version song. The female version is sung by Chandrani Mukherjee.

So here it is “ye anjaan raahen”. Hope you like the song too.

And Rafisaab, you will always remain in our hearts.
Always.
There’s a very special place for you in all our hearts.
Thank you for making life that much more worth living. 🙂

Mohammad Rafi

Chandrani Mukherjee

Song-Ye anjaan raahen ye manzil paraayi (Raakh aur Chingaari)(1982) Singers-Rafi/ Chandrani Mukherjee, Lyrics-Tajdar Taj, MD-Ratandeep Hemraj

——————————
Rafi version
——————————

Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen

Kismat ne wo thokar maari
Dil ka sheesha toot gaya
Pyaar ki mehfil raas na aayi
Yaar ka daaman chhoot gaya
Kismat ne wo thokar maari
Dil ka sheesha toot gaya
Pyaar ki mehfil raas na aayi
Yaar ka daaman chhoot gaya
Saaya bankar
Saath chalegi
Jeevan bhar
Ye tanhaai
Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen

Aaj meri majboor wafaa
Khud mere liye ilzaam hui
Roothh gaye hain geet milan ke
Dard mein doobi shaam hui
Aaj meri majboor wafaa
Khud mere liye ilzaam hui
Roothh gaye hain geet milan ke
Dard mein doobi shaam hui
Jaane kis din tootegi ab
Saanson ki ye shehnaai
Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen

—————————-
Chandrani Mukherjee version
—————————-

Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen

Aaj meri majboor wafaa
Khud mere liye ilzaam hui
Roothh gaye hain geet milan ke
Dard mein doobi shaam hui
Aaj meri majboor wafaa
Khud mere liye ilzaam hui
Rooth gaye hain geet milan ke
Dard mein doobi shaam hui
Jaane kis din tootegi ab
Saanson ki ye shehnaai
Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Mohammed Rafi – ‘अ’  से  ‘ह’ तक  (From ‘अ’ to ‘ह’) – 8
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

‘ओ’
“ओ ओ ओ गोरी लाखों जनम से”

Yet one more truly vintage Rafi, if ever there was one. The songs by him simply do not cease to wonder the mind, such is the quality of expression and the depth of a seasoned rendition. The measured deliberateness of singing underscores the mastery of the singer on perfectly realizing the nuances of the emotions involved. Yes, truly vintage Rafi.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

= = = == == = = = = = = = = = = = =
Rafi Sb – In The Seventies – 21
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

(1970s Unreleased – Solo)

Ah yes, I am sure you would have guessed it already. When I wrote yesterday that the series is not yet complete, and given that all years in the decade are covered, then what is left are the unreleased songs from this decade. Films that got planned, music and songs got arranged and recorded, but the films either did not get made, were abandoned, or were not released, for various reasons. And as experience has told us time and again, such unreleased songs are a fabulous treasure by themselves. They form a very interesting category, in that the songs have been created, recorded and also released, sometimes formally and sometimes informally. They are away from the mainstream attention, since the films never came to the theatres, and their familiarity in the minds of general public is low. Most of these unreleased songs were first heard on radio, occasionally. They have remained in memory, albeit without any memory of information about them. Sometimes, they are also mislabeled in the mind’s catalog as non-film songs. Simply because they are not associated with any familiar or even obscure film names.

And so, the last two offerings of this series are two very fabulous songs from unreleased films from the decade of 1970. As I am sifting through the list of unreleased films in Geet Kosh, and in the song folders of unreleased films in my collection, I find such a huge treasures of absolute gems of top quality that have been recorded, but never came into the mainstream broadcast or record sales. Blissfully, they are available. Once again, I am spoilt for choices, even with the comparatively smaller sample size in this category, and finding it difficult to choose one. But I have to. And for the solo, I have chosen this wonderful poetical gem from the unreleased film ‘Insaan Aur Insaan’.
Read more on this topic…


Though “Shaitaan Mujrim” (1980) is a movie of recent vintage by the standards of this blog, little information is available about this movie. From the title, it appears to be a C grade horror movie of the kind that generally struggled to get released and failed miserably at the box office. It appears that this movie had Rakesh Khanna, Jyoti Matwankar, Dev Kumar, Raza Murad, Mohan Choti, Madan Puri, Seema Kapoor etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

It is now been forty one years that she passed away, and all of just 42 years of age. The singer who became a legend in her own lifetime, short as it may have been, just the same as her celebrated spouse. Called the nightingale of the Hindi film music, she brought a completely unique signature voice that she applied to her songs, and left such a wonderful legacy that will surely delight generations upon generations of listeners.
Read more on this topic…


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 15800 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15801

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Movies with all their songs covered =1212
Total Number of movies covered =4345

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