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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Salil Chaudhry


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4066 Post No. : 15201 Movie Count :

4178

Today, September 5th is 24th Remembrance Day of Salil Chowdhury (19/11/1925 – 05/09/1995), the legendary music director who was the pioneer in fusion music – blending Indian melodies with the orchestration of western classical music. As he himself admitted during an interview on All India Radio, Salil Da was greatly influenced by the music of Beethoven and Mozart because his father used to play gramophone records of their music which he had listened during his childhood.

Salil Da’s musical legacy has been carried forward by the likes of RD Burman, Ilaiyaraaja and AR Rahman. I will come back later the organic connection of Ilaiyaraaja and A R Rahman with the music of Salil Da.  It is the irony of fate that while the followers of his musical legacy have attained the top slots in the film industry, Salil Da could not get such recognition in Hindi film industry. Perhaps, he was quite ahead of time and those who mattered in the Hindi film industry (producers and distributors) failed to realise his potentials.

Salil Da has to be a genius person in the making if I go by his various activities during his childhood and younger days. At the age of 6, he learns piano. As a student, he writes and compose songs for the school’s plays. As a teenager, he gets actively associated in the Peasants Movements in his village. In the midst of such activities, he completes his high school and later graduation from Kolkata University. He becomes a member of Communist Party of India and gets actively involved with Indian People’s Theatre Association (IPTA) while he is simultaneously doing his post-graduation studies. He is a playwright, song writer, composer and sometime actor in IPTA plays. Salil Da participates in the peasants’ uprising and goes underground for a couple of years. During this period, he writes and composes ‘chetonaar gaan’ (songs of awakening). He learns almost all the important musical instruments like piano, flute, esraj, sarod, sitar, guitar, percussion which is in most cases self-thought. He is the first to set up Bombay Youth Choir and later Calcutta Choir Group which he personally conducts in the 1950s. He is a poet, story writer, lyricist and music director.

With so much of his multifarious activities in around Kolkata, how did Salil Da get involved with Hindi film music in Mumbai? I quote below, in his own words during an  interviews on All India Radio:

I came to Bombay by stroke of luck. I was writing script (of my story ‘Rickshawaala’) for a Bengali film.  When Hrishikesh Mukherjee heard the story, he liked it. He said that he would narrate the story to Bimalda (Bimal Roy) who was expected to come to Kolkata from Mumbai. So, I took the appointment of Bimlada and read out the entire script to him. Bimlda did not show any reaction to the story but advised me to meet him the next morning.

When I went to meet him the next morning, I was told that he had left for Mumbai by the morning flight on some urgent work. Within a week, I got the telegram from Bimalda that he had decided to make a Hindi film based on my story and I should come to Mumbai with the script. That’s how I landed in Mumbai for ‘Do Beegha Zameen’ (1953).

After the success of ‘Do Beegha Zameen’ (1953), Salil Da was employed in Bimal Roy Productions as a music director. He did many films for the banner like ‘Biraj Bahu’ (1954), ‘Naukari’ (1954), ‘Amaanat’ (1955), ‘Parivaar’ (1956), ‘Aparadhi Kaun’ (1957), ‘Madhumati’ (1958), ‘Usne Kaha Thaa’ (1960), ‘ Parakh’ (1960).‘Kabuliwaala’ (1961), and  ‘Prem Patra’ (1962). During this period, he also did many other films outside the banner of Bimal Roy Productions. Song compositions in almost all these films are outstanding. Some of the songs from Bimal Roy’s  films are evergreen and they are still remembered. For instance “Aaha Rimjhim Ke Ye Pyaare Pyaare Geet Liye” (from ‘Usne Kaha Tha’) and “O Sajnaa Barkha Bahaar Aayi” (from ‘Parakh’).

In ‘non-Bimal Roy’ films, Salil Da composed excellent songs in films like ‘Jaagte Raho’ (1956), ‘Aawaaz’ (1956), ‘Ek Gaon Ki Kahaani’ (1957), ‘Honeymoon’ (1960), ‘Chhaaya’ (1961),  ‘Maaya’ (1961) etc. The songs like “Zindagi Khwaab Hai” (‘Jagte Raho’, Mukesh’s first song under Salida), “Dhitang Dhitang Bole” (‘Awaaz’), “Raat Ne Kya Kya Khwaab Dikhaaye” (‘Ek Gaon Ki Kahaani’), “Mere Khwaabon Mein Khayaalon Mein” (‘Honeymoon’),  “Koi Sone Ke Dilwaala” (‘Maaya’), and “Itna Na Mujhse Tu Pyaar Badha” (‘Chhaaya’)  are some of my favourites of Salil Da.

Despite scoring beautiful songs in the films of early 50s, Salil Da was still regarded as a flop music director in the eyes of film distributors.  The box office success of‘ ‘Madhumati’ (1958) and the high popularity of its songs enabled Salil Da to shed the tag of ‘flop music director’. I remember that not a single day will pass without one or two songs from ‘Madhumati’ (1958) being played on the radio after the release of the film. Salil Da got his first Filmfare Award for the best music director for this film.

It is difficult to pin point the best song from ‘Madhumati’ as all the songs were outstanding. Because I am a trekker, I may be biased in my liking for “Suhaana Safar Aur Ye Mausam Haseen“. The sound of chirping of the birds in the prelude creates a natural atmosphere in the scene for the song. Incidentally, adding in the prelude the chirping sounds of the birds was suggested by SD Burman. Salil Da used folk-based melody from Bengal, Assam, Nepal and also from Poland for almost all the songs in the film. He requisitioned the services of Dattaram for playing dholak in all the songs (as revealed by Dattaram in his TV interview). One can hear Dattaram ‘thekas’ prominently in the song “Ghadi Ghadi Mora Dil Dhadke“.

With the tremendous success of ‘Madhumati’ (1958), Salil Da got more film assignments such as ‘Chhaaya’ (1961), ‘Poonam Ki Raat’ (1965), ‘Chaand Aur Sooraj’ (1965), ‘Pinjre Ke Panchhi’ (1966) (which he also directed), among many others.

During his second phase of the musical career, he did some notable films like ‘Mere Apne’ (1971), ‘Anand’ (1971), ‘Annadaata (1972), ‘Rajanigandha’ (1974), ‘Chhoti Si Baat’ (1976), ‘Anand Mahal’ (1977) etc. Some of the popular as well notable songs of Salil Da of this period are “Zindagi Kaisi Hai Paheli Haaye” (‘Anand’), (note the choir singing in the interludes), “Raaton Ke Saaye Ghane” (‘Annadaata’) (song may not have become popular but it is an intricate composition which only Lata could do justice), “Kai Baar Yoon Bhi Dekha Hai” (‘Rajnigandha’) (my favourite and whenever I wish to listen to this song, I prefer to watch on the video clip) and “Na Jaane Kyun Hota Hai Ye Zindagi Ke Saath” (‘Chhoti Si Baat’) (again, I prefer to listen to the song by watching the video clip of the song).

I know, I have missed some more of popular songs composed by Salil Da . I will end with  one more song from the stable of Salil Da which did not become as popular as it should have been. The song is  “Koi Hota Jisko Apna” from ‘Mere Apne’ (1971).  It is a complex composition which Kishore Kumar has ably rendered. The mukhda tune was inspired from the background score of ‘Anand’(1970).

After about 1975, his Hindi film assignments came down that too was limited to small banners. On the other hand, his assignments in Bengali and South Indian films were on the rise. Also, he had shifted his base to Kolkata in mid 1970s as he had planned for setting up of a modern recording studio in Kolkata. During about 25 years of his active association with Mumbai, he composed about 300 songs in about 65 Hindi films.

Discussion on Salil Chowdhury’s musical career in films will not be complete unless we take into account his sojourn to South Indian films especially the Malayalam films. He was introduced to Malayalam films  by Ramu Khairat, the Malayalam film director who was a part of IPTA delegation along with Salil Da to an East European country in 1960. Their IPTA background and the common interest in films made them friends. When Ramu Khairat finalised the making of Malayalam film, ‘Chemmeen’ (1965), he selected Salil Da as the music director. The film received tremendous response from the cinegoers. This film is regarded as the first successful ‘arty’ film in South India.

The highlight of the film was the popularity of its four songs. The extra-ordinary success of the songs changed the complexion of the South Indian film music. Salil Da set his firm footing in the South Indian film industries. He did 25 Malayalam films and 10 films in Tamil, Telugu and Kannada. In addition, he was also associated with about 40 Bengali films as a lyricist and music director.

One of the innovative ideas Salil Da experimented with his music was that he composed new songs based on his earlier songs as well as from the background score by giving a different structure to the new songs. For instance, in an interview, Salil Da gave an interesting example of his song “Aaja Re Pardesi Main To Kab Se Khadi Iss Paar”  from ‘Madhumati’ (1958). The mukhda tune was based on the melodic background music of ‘Jaagte Raho’(1956). This background music is played whenever Raj Kapoor is about to drink water to quench his thirst but the circumstances makes him to run away from the scene without drinking water. In the same song, Salil Da has used the mukhda tune of “Ghadi Ghadi Mora Dil Dhadke” as the interlude music.

Another example I had noted many years back and worth mentioning is the comparison of the song “Baag Mein Kali Khili Bagiya Mehki” from ‘Chaand Aur Sooraj’ (1965) with “Saathi Re Tujh Bin Jiya Udaas” from ‘Poonam Ki Raat’ (1965). Salil Da has used more or less the same tune for the antaras of both the songs. Salil Da’s different melodic and orchestration structures makes these two songs sounding different. Hence, first song sounds like that for a growing up girl waiting for her fiance and the other one as a haunting song. Also note in the latter song how the mukhda tune of the former song converted into the interlude music and gets merges with the antara tune.

I had mentioned earlier that there is some organic connection between Salil Da, Ilaiyaraaja and AR Rahman. During his assignments in the South Indian films, especially in Malayalam films as a music director, Salil Da had in his orchestra, Ilaiyaraaja as a lead guitarist and RK Sekhar (father of AR Rahman) as his Assistant and Arranger. AR Rahman joined Ilaiyaraaja’s troup as Keyboard player. Incidentally, Salil Da had predicted that one day Ilaiyaraaja would become the top most music director of India. His prophecy has come true.

A music analyst in his article in The Hindu has opined that in his early years of music direction, Ilaiyaraaja seemed to have been influenced by Salil Da in using fusion music which he improvised a lot in his later years. The same music analyst also felt that Salil Da was influenced by the music of Ilaiyaraaja in composing Bengali songs in his later years.

On the occasion of 24th Remembrance Day of the legendary music director, Salil Da, I have chosen a rarely heard Sanskrit song  ‘tava virahe vanamaali’ from the film ‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994). The music for the song has been composed by Salil Da in a classical raaga, Yaman. The song is written by the famous Sanskrit poet of the 12th century AD – Jaidev. It is rendered by Kavita Krishnamurthy. It is a classical dance song which is picturised on Shobna (Pillai), a well-known Malayalam and Tamil film  actress and a Bharatnatyam dancer. She is the niece of Padmini and Ragini.

I took the song’s lyrics from Geet Govind. English translation of the lyrics is embedded on the audio clip of the song. This is the song I liked best out of 8 songs in the film.

There is long history about the film ‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994). The film was directed by GV Iyer  a khadi-clad barefoot Gandhian who has been known for  making films based on spiritual themes. He was the first to make a feature film in Sanskrit, ‘Adi Shankaracharya’ (1983) which won 4 National Film Awards including the award for the Best Film. This was followed by ‘Madhvacharya’ (1986) in Kannada, ‘Ramanujacharya’ (1989) in Tamil, ‘Bhagvad Geeta – The Song of the Lord’ (1993) in Sanskrit.  In addition, he has acted in and directed many Kannada films since 1954.

‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994) was GV Iyer’s first foray into Hindi film which also falls under the spiritual theme.  The film was produced by T Subbarami Reddy, a parliamentarian and a well-known Telugu and Bollywood film producer. The main characters in the film, Swami Vivekanand was played by Sarvadaman Banerjee and that of Ramkrishan Paramhans by Mithun Chakraborty. Tanuja, Pradeep Kumar, Debashree Roy were some of the other actors in the film. Shammi Kapoor, Shashi Kapoor, Hema Malini, Rakhee, Jaya Prada, Manmooty, Meenakshi Seshadari and Anupam Kher did some minor roles as guest actors.

The film took about 5 years to complete and further about 3 years to get released for public viewing. Naseeruddin Shah who was selected to play the role of Ramkrishna Paramhans had to be dropped due to pressure from right-wing activists. The role went to Mithun Chakraborty despite having an image of disco dancer at that time. There were many objections from various quarters including Ramkrishna Mission. When issues were being addressed by the director, someone filed a suit in the high court which after sometime, cleared the film with about 20 cuts. The film was premiered on National Channel of Doordarshan on August 15, 1998 and thereafter it was released in the theatres. The film was a disaster at the box office.

‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994) was  Salil Da’s last Hindi film. Salil Da was regarded as an expert in background music but this was the only his Hindi film for which he could not give background music due to his sudden death on September 5, 1995.

Audio

Video

 

Song – Tava Virahe Vanamaali Sakhi Seedati  (Swami Vivekanand) (1994) Singer – Kavita Krishnamurthy, Lyrics – Jaidev (Traditional), MD – Salil Chaudhry

Lyrics

tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
 
dahati shishir-mayookhe
maranam-anukaroti
patati madan-vishikhe
vilapati vikalataroti
aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aaa
aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
dahati shishir-mayookhe
maranam-anukaroti
patati madan-vishikhe
vilapati vikalataroti
vikalataroti
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
 
aa aa aaa aa
aa aa aaa aa
dhvanati madhupa-samoohe
shravanam-api dadhaati
manasi valit-virahe
nishi nishi rujam-upyaati
dhvanati madhupa-samoohe
shravanam-api dadhaati
manasi valit-virahe
nishi nishi rujam-upyaati

vasati vipin-vitaane

tyajati lalitdhaam
luth’ti dharani-shayane
bahu vilapati tava naam
vasati vipin-vitaane
tyajati lalitdhaam
luth’ti dharani-shayane
bahu vilapati tava naam aa
tava naam
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virah..ae
vanamaali..ee

———————————-
Devnagari script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–

[Ed Note: The complete text of the original song (song no. 10 in the book) consists of 8 verses, which appear in the 5th chapter of this epic poem, placed between the 34th and the 35th shloks in the book. For the purpose of the film, only the first four have been adapted. There is a lead in verse which is a part of this song. It reads as,
वहति मलयसमीरे मदनमुपनिधाय ।
स्फुटति कुसुमनिकरे विरहिहृदयदलनाय ॥  ]

तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति ॥ १॥
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे वनमाली

दहति शिशिरमयूखे मरणमनुकरोति ।
पतति मदनविशिखे विलपति विकलतरोऽति ॥ २॥
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ
आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ आ
दहति शिशिरमयूखे मरणमनुकरोति
पतति मदनविशिखे विलपति विकलतरोऽति
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे वनमाली

आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
ध्वनति मधुपसमूहे श्रवणमपि दधाति ।
मनसि वलितविरहे निशि निशि रुजमुपयाति ॥ ३॥
ध्वनति मधुपसमूहे श्रवणमपि दधाति
मनसि वलितविरहे निशि निशि रुजमुपयाति

वसति विपिनविताने त्यजति ललितधाम ।
लुठति धरणिशयने बहु विलपति तव नाम ॥ ४॥
वसति विपिनविताने त्यजति ललितधाम
लुठति धरणिशयने बहु विलपति तव नाम
तव नाम
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे॰॰ए
वनमाली॰॰ई

 

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This article is written by Nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3990 Post No. : 15083

I have so many things to write about that sometimes they (those things crowding my thoughts) don’t let me sleep at night. Wish I had the habit of writing the diary. . . those “dear diary“, outpourings would have helped as a sounding board, more effectively than this blog.

Once upon a time I did start a daily diary, but that did not develop to the level of habit. Then many years ago a colleague advised in all seriousness that I should write down the daily thoughts, clearly impressed with the way I was able to warm to any topic and give a one minute lecture to an assorted audience or whoever was around me. I wasn’t really enamoured by that particular lady and I have never used her as a sounding board or even a ‘complaint register’. I tried to avoid talking about much of anything with her or say only as much as necessary, but she has a knack of introducing topics into conversation and getting people to open up.

I am not too choosy about whom I befriend, but if I develop a dislike of someone, then it gets fixed in my attitude for all times. I have tried very hard to get rid of this fallacy, and try to give second, third chances to people for redeeming themselves. I do this sort of exercise of finding excuses for people, whom I consider my friends, whenever they don’t behave as expected, on regular basis. This positivity of trying to always look at the brighter side, is good within a limit.

Till recently, I used to get very irritated with my parents same habit. So much so that I wrote in one of the posts, that my Mom looks at all things with her colour tinted glasses or ‘rangeen chashma’. This way she can see others in whichever colour she wants. Unn ko duniya bahut rangeen dikhaayi deti hai. In the sense that they live by the maxim that “hum achche to duniya achchi”.

I know the colleague who advised me to write down the thoughts etc., meant well. But I am unable to warm towards her till date, despite her being very close to a very close friend. With her natural ability and curiosity I suspect that she is able to gather all the information. Good for her, if she is happy then I don’t mind. We do meet occasionally as colleagues and also in common friend circles, but maybe I will be able to think of her also as a friend in future.

This lady also had some more well meaning advice to offer, on the topic of improving my daughter s complexion. This was many years ago. I was able to take in that advice from one ear, and throw it out of the other. Really she was simpleton, like my own mother and others. I hope that by now she has learnt differently.

Last week , Sudhir sir posted the song “Hum Kaale Hain To Kya Hua Dilwaale Hain”, in the repeat songs series. Some of the comments in the ‘Gumnaam’ song posts asked to know the meaning of those words of the mukhda. “Hum Kaale Hain To Kya Hua Dilwaale Hain” expresses an appeal against a deep rooted malice/prejudice in the society, which is blatant in the belief that only white is beautiful and black is not. Obviously the same malice is still prevalent if one goes by the no. of products available in the market for skin fairness. Nothing wrong if people want to make their skin fairer by these products, but the fact remains, this improvement or whatever, will only be skin deep. Nothing to do with core of the soul inside the skin. Food for thought.

Here is a song from the film ‘Minoo’ (1977), dealing with the same contrast of gora and kaala. The ‘Gumnaam’ song, took a funny route and this song in the voice of Antara Chaudhary is riding on a child’s innocence and a black goat named Kaali. Salil Chaudhari is the music director, and the lyrics are written by Yogesh. There was also a popular song in this film “Teri Galiyon Mein Hum Aaye”, which is already posted.

Today’s song used to play a lot on the radio when the movie was new. My younger brother was born in 1976, and my elder sister used to sing this carrying our baby brother along.

Oh. . . there are many such stories and happenings, some related and others not related to film songs. I just hope I am able to pen them down and share with all my fellow bloggers and fans of Hindi Film music.

Song – Kaali Re Kaali Re Tu To Kaali Kaali Hai (Minoo) (1977) Singer – Antara Chaudhry, Lyrics – Yogesh, MD – Salil Chaudhry

Lyrics (Provided by Prakashchandra)

kaali. . .

kaali. . .

o oo
kaali re kaali re
tu to kaali kaali hai 
gora sa ek bhaiyya 
maa ab laanewali hai
laanewaali hai
oo kaali re kaali re
tu to kaali kaali hai 
gora sa ek bhaiyya 
maa ab laanewali hai
laanewaali hai

bhaiyya hoga pyaara pyaara
chaand sareekha 
par dekh usey chaand bhi
ho jaayega pheeka 
bhaiyya hoga pyaara pyaara
chaand sareekha 
par dekh usey chaand bhi
ho jaayega pheeka 
main gaal pe kaajal ka 
lagaa doongi re teeka 
main gaal pe kaajal ka 
lagaa doongi re teeka 
lagaa doongi re teeka 
oo
kaali re kaali re
tu to kaali kaali hai 
gora sa ek bhaiyya 
maa ab laanewali hai
laanewaali hai

din raat usey dekha karoongi 
main sajaa ke
main khelungi bhaiyya ko 
godi mein uttha ke 
din raat usey dekha karoongi 
main sajaa ke
main khelungi bhaiyya ko 
godi mein uttha ke 
main roz sulaaungi 
usey loriyaan gaa ke
main roz sulaaungi 
usey loriyaan gaa ke
usey loriyaan gaa ke

ooo
kaali re kaali re
tu to kaali kaali hai 
gora sa ek bhaiyya 
maa ab laanewali hai
laanewaali hai
ho oo
kaali re kaali re
tu to kaali kaali hai 
gora sa ek bhaiyya 
maa ab laanewali hai
laanewaali hai

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Nahm)
———————————————————-

काली॰ ॰ ॰

काली॰ ॰ ॰

ओ ओ
काली रे काली रे
तू तो काली काली है
गोरा सा एक भैया
माँ अब लानेवाली है
ओ काली रे काली रे
तू तो काली काली है
गोरा सा एक भैया
माँ अब लानेवाली है

भैया होगा प्यारा प्यारा
चाँद सरीखा
पर देख उसे चाँद भी
हो जाएगा फीका
भैया होगा प्यारा प्यारा
चाँद सरीखा
पर देख उसे चाँद भी
हो जाएगा फीका
मैं गाल पे काजल का
लगा दूँगी रे टीका
मैं गाल पे काजल का
लगा दूँगी रे टीका
लगा दूँगी रे टीका

काली रे काली रे
तू तो काली काली है
गोरा सा एक भैया
माँ अब लानेवाली है

दिन रात उसे देखा करूंगी
मैं सजा के
मैं खेलूँगी भैया को
गोदी में उठा के
दिन रात उसे देखा करूंगी
मैं सजा के
मैं खेलूँगी भैया को
गोदी में उठा के
मैं रोज़ सुलाऊँगी
उसे लोरीयाँ गा के
मैं रोज़ सुलाऊँगी
उसे लोरीयाँ गा के


काली रे काली रे
तू तो काली काली है
गोरा सा एक भैया
माँ अब लानेवाली है
हो ओ काली रे काली रे
तू तो काली काली है
गोरा सा एक भैया
माँ अब लानेवाली है


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3963 Post No. : 15044

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 1
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Reading the title of the post, you must be wondering – “ये क्या हो रहा है?” (“What is this going on?”). This song – who says this song is not yet posted. Goodness, this film is yippeee’d long back. So why are we re-posting this song? Sudhir seems to have taken up certain vice (or vices) with unlikeable after effects. 😀 😀

Well, no and yes. No – I have not taken up any such vices 🙂 that may impair my abilities to make decisions about posting songs. And yes – this song, from film ‘Madhumati’ of 1958, is already posted here on our blog. The film ‘Madhumati’ made its debut here on 1st May, 2009. The eleven songs of this film made their appearances over the subsequent four plus years, and film was yippeee’d on 4th Jul, 2013. This song originally appeared on 3rd May, 2009. ‘Madhumati’ is a done deal.

Of course your question still remains – “ये क्या हो रहा है?”. The answer to that follows.

I will try to make the long story short. Beginning of this month, Bakshi ji and I were in Bombay, to attend the annual two day seminar titled ‘Cine Music Beyond Entertainment’, which is arranged by our friend Shri Kushal Gopalka, every year. In one of the post session discussions, I came to know about a very interesting anecdote. The session was on the life and work of music director Vasant Desai.

The anecdote is about the 1971 film ‘Guddi’. The Geet Kosh lists three songs for this film,

The first two songs are penned by Gulzar. The third is a traditional bhajan, written by Meerabai, one of the greatest saints of the Bhakti Movement in India, which originated in India in the eighth century AD. Meerabai, who belonged to the royal family of Mewar (in Rajasthan) spent her time here on this sub continent, in the fifteenth century AD. Music for these three songs is composed by Vasant Desai. All three songs are in the voice of Vani Jairam. When the film released in theaters, it had only these three songs in it.

Now, one of the supervisory activities that the producer and distributor staff undertake, especially in the first one or two weeks of the film exhibition, is that they go to select cinema halls where the film is being shown. They will be present in the hall as the film is being shown, and they will also mingle with the crowd during intermission and at the end of the film. The objective is to pick up and gather live feedback about the film from the audience. It helps them to make some choices and educated decisions about the future exhibition plans.

One thing that happened during this exercise was that the team gathered feedback that sounded negative. One part was the use of only one playback voice, and that too a very fresh debut. Plus the overall summary of live audience feedback sounded disheartening and negative. Immediate discussions happened involving Hrishikesh Mukherji, the producers (Rupam Chitra) and the distributors. One recommendation that came out of these discussions was to somehow modify the mix of songs in the film. It was felt that the bhajan song (of Meerabai) should go. What should replace it? How to create a new song for the film at a short notice? Please note that this description of events is for the very first one or two days after the release of the film.

One of the recommendations from the distributors was to include another song, preferably by Lata Mangeshkar. After quick discussions, it was decided to re-use the song of ‘Madhumati’. I really wonder how fast the decision and action taken process worked. Approvals were sought and taken – Bimal Roy’s estate, Salil Chowdhury et al. The team was reassembled, and the song was picturised. Apparently, the Meera bhajan was in the same setting in the film. At the party, Jaya Bhaduri is performing the Bhajan by Meerabai – “Hari Bin Kaise Jiyun Ri” – an expression of her waiting for Samit to come to the party. This song from ‘Madhumati’ fitted the emotional-expression criteria to the T.

The song was picturzed, it was edited into the film, replacing the bhajan, the censor certificate for revision to the film was applied for and taken. Multiple copies of the revised reel of the film was quickly processed and produced on emergency basis, and distributed to the theatres for immediate change to the film being shown. How fast this whole process worked – one may gauge the speed and success of this whole exercise from the fact that the revision appeared in the theatres before the first week of exhibition was complete, i.e. within the first 5 or 6 days only.

Now, interestingly, Vasant Desai was away from Bombay at that time. Important point to note is that this whole decision making and replacement process happened without the involvement of Vasant Desai, the music director.

Possibly many of our learned friends in this musical bandwagon may already be aware of this. I was not, so this was a startling discovery for me. I must add hurriedly that yes, I have seen this films, possibly more than once, but somehow I do not carry any memory of this song being present in this film.

The booklets of the film do not contain this song. And hence, the Geet Kosh also does not list this song. This song does not appear on the EPs/LPs of this film. This song has no other status in relation to this film, except that yes, it is included in the film. The credits at the beginning of the film remain unchanged. Vani Jairam is the only playback voice, and Vasant Desai is the sole music director. And so, the video of this song is the only evidence that this song is present in the film.

A very, very interesting episode. For me, it brought into very sharp focus, an idea that songs from earlier films are at times, re-used in later films. Before this discussion happened in Bombay, I was aware of one or two such instances. They were just interesting trivia in the mind. After this discussion highlighted this activity so sharply, an idea started to form in my mind. I started to search for more such instances. I searched through my own memory, I researched the remarks and footnotes in the Geet Kosh, and I discussed this with friends and collectors in our group and in my circle, trying to gather more information about such re-use of songs. And when I am able to gather a sizeable list, the thought came to the mind – this is a new series to discuss this very interesting facet of the Hindi film music.

As I am gathering information about such instances, I also became aware af the various modes of re-use. Yes, the re-use happens not only just ‘as is’, but there even are further variations on how this re-use may occur. As we proceed with the series, I will be highlighting and discussing these different re-use ‘styles’. It does make for a very interesting discussion.

And so, here is the first offering of this series. The song from ‘Madhumati’ of 1958 is re-used – as is, ditto, no change – 13 years later in ‘Guddi’ of 1971. Ah, I must correct myself. One change does happen. The original song in ‘Madhumati’ has three stanzas. The re-use version in ‘Guddi’ has only two stanzas. The first stanza of the ‘Madhumati’ version is left out.

This is the very first re-use ‘style’ – the song has been directly used and copied as is. No alterations, no additions, no other changes. Just get approvals, and simply insert the earlier song, as it fits into the storyline. This is the simplest form of re-use. I will be presenting more such instances moving forward.

So view this associated video clip, and listen to the original recording of this song, now being lip synced by Jaya Bhaduri. The scenario is so utterly different. The original setting in ‘Madhumati’ is mountains, forests, river and waterfall. The entire natural surroundings seem to be participating in the earlier picturization of the song. In this later ‘Guddi’ incarnation, this is just a song being sung at a party. The performer, very naturally, is just standing still, as the audience simply watches and waits for the song as it progresses. Absolutely minimal activity and movement in this scene.

Besides Jaya, we can also see Sumita Sanyal, Utpal Dutt and Vijay Sharma in the clip, as family members watching the impromptu performance. Samit Bhanj, for whose benefit and in whose wait, this song is being performed, is seen arriving at the party, just as the song gets started, and he thoughtfully waits just outside the entrance to the room, listening to the song being performed. Amongst the guests at the party, there are many familiar faces – of junior artists that are part of such scenes in films. But their names remain obscure.

Before I close this write-up, another very interesting aside. The film ‘Guddi’ has already been yippeee’d on our blog, as of 20th March, 2013. That is, as per the Geet Kosh list of songs. But now, we have one more additional song from this film. A repeat, but nonetheless another song that is part of this film, performed by the actor(s) in this film. Another cateogry called for – ‘yippeee+‘ – finding more songs in a film that are officially listed for the film. 😀 😀 I am sure there are more than one such instances earlier also, when songs for certain films have been posted that do not appear in the official list of songs.

So. . . starting this interesting journey of repeat songs in Hindi films. I hope this thread will interest you.

Song – Aaja Re Pardesi Main To Kab Se Khadi Is Paar  (Guddi) (1971) Singers – Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics – Shailendra, MD – Salil Chaudhry

Lyrics

aa jaa re. . . ae ae ae
pardesi

main to kab se khadi is paar
ye ankhiyaan thak gayin panth nihaar
aa jaa re. . . ae ae ae
pardesi
main to kab se khadi is paar
ye ankhiyaan thak gayin panth nihaar
aa jaa re. . .  pardesi

tum sang janam janam ke phere
bhool gaye kyun saajan mere
tum sang janam janam ke phere
bhool gaye kyun saajan mere
tadpat hoon main saanjh sawere oo oo
aa jaa re main to kab se khadi is paar
ye ankhiyaan thak gayin panth nihaar
aa jaa re. . . ae ae ae
pardesi

main nadiya phir bhi main pyaasi
bhed ye gehra baat zara si
main nadiya phir bhi main pyaasi
bhed ye gehra baat zara si
bin tere har saans udaasi oo oo
aa jaa re main to kab se khadi is paar
ye ankhiyaan thak gayin panth nihaar
aa jaa re. . . ae ae ae
pardesi

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

आ जा रे॰ ॰ ॰ ए ए ए
परदेसी

मैं तो कब से खड़ी इस पार
ये अखियाँ थक गईं पंथ निहार
आ जा रे॰ ॰ ॰ ए ए ए
परदेसी
मैं तो कब से खड़ी इस पार
ये अखियाँ थक गईं पंथ निहार
आ जा रे॰ ॰ ॰ ए ए ए
परदेसी

तुम संग जनम जनम के फेरे
भूल गए क्यों साजन मेरे
तुम संग जनम जनम के फेरे
भूल गए क्यों साजन मेरे
तड़पत हूँ मैं साँझ सवेरे ओ ओ
आ जा रे मैं तो कब से खड़ी इस पार
ये अखियाँ थक गईं पंथ निहार
आ जा रे॰ ॰ ॰ ए ए ए
परदेसी

मैं नदिया फिर भी मैं प्यासी
भेद ये गहरा बात ज़रा सी
मैं नदिया फिर भी मैं प्यासी
भेद ये गहरा बात ज़रा सी
बिन तेरे हर सांस उदासी
आ जा रे मैं तो कब से खड़ी इस पार
ये अखियाँ थक गईं पंथ निहार
आ जा रे॰ ॰ ॰ ए ए ए
परदेसी


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

One more Yippeee; the yippeee song for today. The film is ‘Gehra Raaz’ from 1971. In all, the film has four songs listed in the Geet Kosh. Today, we get familiar with the fourth song of this film.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The duration has been sliced to less than half, rather almost one third. That is, in comparison to the previous interregnum. Maybe not THE quickest but one of the quickest. Ah yes, I refer to the century milestone, the 122nd that we strike today. The reference to the duration is the time comparison between this one today, and the one that came just before it. We had hit the 12 thousand mark on 20th April. After that, it has been a real slow tread to come to the next one hundredth mark, which happened on 18th June. Counting the days, the number is 60. One of the tardiest to have occurred on this blog. But then we made it up, very sprightly and very quick – from 19th June to 10th July today. Counting the days, the number is 22. Wow, that is the bandwagon at its galloping best. The Raanchiwaala Gaanewaala is pulling out all the stops.

Congratulations to all the bandwagoneers – one more batch of a hundred songs is now added to the collection. And the musical journey continues, merrily onwards.
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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Recently, I read ‘In the Company of a Poet – Gulzar in Conversation with Nasreen Munni Kabir’ (2012). The book gives a bird’s eye view on the life of Gulzar – from setting his foot in Bombay (Mumbai) in mid-1950 to his continuing association with Bollywood. Before reading this book, I was under the impression that, like many others who came to Bombay to fulfill their aspirations to work in Bollywood, Gulzar was one of them. It was not so as revealed from his conversations in the book. Gulzar came to Bombay not by his own choice but as a part of his father’s plan to divide the financial responsibility of his large family following his post-partition migration from Dina (in Pakistan) to Delhi.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Yeh Hai Bombay Meri Jaan – 3
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

         Bombay Gangout – Part 3
         Lunch and After.

The arrangement for the lunch was in an adjacent cave in the dungeon itself.  We took leave of Mastermind, who had thus far been connected online with us, with the promise to reconnect, once the luncheon proceedings were done with.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Passing away seems to be such a normal part of life. But the heart is extremely distressed when this event visits upon a dear one, and also, a dear one to someone who is dear to the heart.
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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has over 15200 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

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Movies with all their songs covered =1178
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