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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘PL Santoshi


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3695 Post No. : 14611

In the 1930s and in early 1940s, most of the music directors compose mainly raag-based and folk-based tunes to the lyrics.  The musicians would play the entire melody on their respective instruments in line with the tune. Since, in the absence of playback singing, songs would be recorded live, music directors were constrained to use minimum musical instruments, that too mostly within the options of Indian instruments consisting of harmonium, percussion, tabla/dholak, sitar, saarangi, flute etc.

Once the playback singing system stabilised in around late 1930s, music directors got flexibility in using more musicians and also started using western musical instruments such as piano, guitar, violin, mandolin, trumpet, clarinet etc. This gave them flexibility in composing preludes, interludes and orchestration. Anil Biswas who came to Bombay (Mumbai) sometime in 1935 with 12 of his Anglo-Indian musicians, changed the concept of orchestration of the songs. He was the first to use counter melody in orchestration. Probably, he was also the first music director of Hindi films who composed a song, Hum Aur Tum Aur Ye Khushi  based on waltz music (generally used for ball-room dance), for the film ‘Alibaba’ (1940). Anil Biswas could do it because he had in his orchestra, musicians well-versed in playing western music instruments.

There were perceptible changes in the style of song compositions in Hindi films of 1950s and 60s (also thereafter) as compared with those of 1940s. Songs of 1950s and 60s were not only melodic but their musical preludes, interludes and overall orchestrations appealed to the listeners. How did the Hindi film music witness musical metamorphosis in 1950s and 60s? The answer is that during this period, some of the Christian musicians and music arrangers from Goa played a pivotal role in taking the Hindi film music from the vintage era ( 1931-1947) to the golden era (1948-1980).

To understand as to how the Christian musicians from Goa got connected with Hindi film industry, one needs to go back to the history of Goa. After the annexation of Goa by Portuguese in the 16th century, they established churches, chapels and convents in their captured territories. As part of church services, there was a need to establish choirs – a group of singers accompanied by musicians. The locals who were converted in to Christianity were trained to sing and play western instruments such as organ and violin. The services of these trained singers and musicians were also utilised for the occasions such as weddings, community feasts and funerals. Over a period of time, with the regular exchange of people from other Portuguese territories such as Angola and Mozambique, these musicians learnt some more western instruments such as piano, trumpet, saxophone, guitar, clarinet etc.

The Portuguese did not do much to the education system. Nor did they provide employment opportunity to the locals. As against this, Goans found employment opportunity in British India especially at Mumbai, the nearest city for Goans. For those who had learnt music, Mumbai provided them opportunity to become musicians in the night clubs which were patronised by the higher strata of the societies.

During the World War II (1939-45), there were shortages of musicians in the night clubs as many foreign musicians especially from Germany and its allied countries either left India or they were arrested. The Goan musicians with their affinity to jazz music filled the vacancies. Also, the British and its allied troops which were stationed in major cities like Bombay, required night clubs as a source of entertainment.

During the late 30s and early 40s, many Goan musicians migrated mainly to Mumbai. Some of the well-known Goan musicians like Antony Gonsalves, Chic Chocolate, Sebastian D’Souza (came to Mumbai via Lahore), Frank Fernand, Chris Perry, Sonny Castelino, Lucilla Pacheco migrated to Mumbai. I guess that none of these musicians would have remotely thought of joining the Hindi film industry at the time of their migration. Generally, for musicians trained in western classical music, their intention will be to join a music band, earn a name and have their own music band.

Except Antony Gonsalves, all others mentioned above, had joined the dance bands as musicians. Those days, there was a craze for jazz music  and all these dance bands would mostly play jazz music in Taj Mahal Hotel, Green Hotel (run by Taj Mahal), Astoria Hotel, Ambassador Hotel, Ritz Hotel, Bristol Grill, Mocambo etc. During my way to college in Churchgate in early 1960s, I used to see displays outside some of these hotels and restaurants showing the names of the dance bands with prominent musicians schedule for the performance in the night. Perhaps, I may have read the names like Chic Chocolate, Frank Fernand and Chris Perry but without knowing at that time that they were associated with Hindi film music.

How some of these Goan musicians did get connected with Hindi film industry in the latter half of the 1940s is not clear. Probably, some of the music directors like Anil Biswas, C Ramchandra, Khemchand Prakash, Naushad either individually or collectively may have visited the night clubs to witness the performance of the dance bands. They would have been impressed by the harmonic presentation by musicians with foot tapping music. They saw the opportunity to use in Hindi film songs  by way of prelude and interlude orchestra which would appeal to the listeners.

But how to achieve the synergy of harmonic orchestra to the tune in melodic form in Hindi film songs? The uses of a large number of western musical instruments for orchestra which need to be played in harmony require a music composer (in Hindi film parlance, a music arranger) who can write music for each musician and for each instrument in the orchestra who may play the instruments in different notes. Goans with their training in Western classical music from their days in church choirs to dance bands were well versed to do the job of writing the music.

During the late 1940s, Goan musicians and music arrangers worked in Bombay film industry during the day time to supplement their income while the main source of their income continued to be from the dance bands. Sometime in early 1950s, the then Bombay State introduced prohibition and raised entertainment tax which affected the business of night clubs. Some of the Goan musicians had to become full time musicians and music arrangers in Bombay film industry while working with dance bands became a part time job.

Among the many Goan musicians, Antony Gonsalves, Frank Fernand, Sebastian D’Souza and Chic Chocolate have been the major music arrangers for the Hindi film music during 1950 to 1975. I guess, these four music arrangers may have been associated with about 90 per cent of the Hindi film songs during 1950-75.

All these four music arrangers have contributed so much to the Hindi film music that each one merits a full article. This will have to wait for some other time. In the meanwhile, I present below a brief sketch of the musical career of each one of them.

Antony Gonsalves (12/06/1927 – 18/01/2012) mostly worked as a free-lance music arranger due to the fact that he also played violin for almost all the top music directors. He started as a musician playing mainly violin with Naushad in 1943. He got his first assignment as music arranger with Shyam Sundar in Dholak (1951). His orchestration in Mausam Aaya Hai Rangeen is worth listening. He had also done orchestration for Hum Aapki Aankhon Mein  in ‘Pyaasa’ (1957) during which he also played violin. During his active filmy career between 1950-1965, he is said to have been associated in more than 1000 songs.

Antony Gonsalves taught violin to Pyarelal (of Laxmikant-Pyarelal) and RD Burman for 4 years. He had also become a keen follower of Hindustani classical music. In fact, in 1958, he had 110 musicians in his raag-based symphony orchestra playing his composition in various Indian raags blended with western music, a thing which is very common in the present generation. Unfortunately, his experiment did not click with the audience.  But his work was noticed at the international level.

Antony Gonsalves cut short his filmy career in 1965 and went to USA on an invitation from Syracuse University, New York. He remained in the USA for 10 years after which he returned to India and settled in his village Mojorda in Goa in seclusion during the rest of his life keeping away from the Hindi film industry.

An interesting trivia here – in the iconic song tuned by Laxmikant Pyaarelal – “My Name Is Anthony Gonsalves“, L-P have said that they used this name of their ‘teacher’, as a mark of honour for him.

Frank Fernand (03/05/1919 – 01/04/2007) worked as a music arranger mainly with Hemant Kumar, Ravi, Kalyanji Anandji though he also worked with other music directors. He migrated to Mumbai  in 1936 to join one of the dance bands. He got his first break as a music arranger in ‘Barsaat’ (1949) and also played trumpet and violin in some songs. During his career as musician/music arrangers, he is said to be associated with about 70 Hindi films. Frank Fernand’s work can be judged from Dil Deke Dekho Dil Deke Dekho, Baar Baar Dekho Hazaar Baar Dekho and Aage Bhi Jaane Na Tu  among his other works.

Sometime in the 60s, Frank Fernando ventured in to producing Konkani films and thereafter a couple of Hindi films in the 1970s. While his Konkani films earned him money, his first Hindi film ‘Priya’ (1970) was a box office failure while the second film ‘Aahat’ (1974) could be released only in 2010 after his death. In 1985, Frank Fernand was afflicted with Parkinson’s disease which kept him in the confine of his house in Bandra.

Sebastian D’Souza (29/01/1906 – 09/03/1996) was a dance band leader in early 1940s in a hotel in Lahore. During his Lahore days, he is said to have worked for Shyam Sundar and Ghulam Haider. After partition, he came to Mumbai. His first film as music arranger was with OP Nayyar in ‘Aasman’ (1952). His association with Shanker-Jaikishan started with ‘Daagh’ (1952) which continued uninterrupted till 1975.  With his attachment with OP Nayyar, Shankar-Jaikishan and occasionally with Salil Chaudhary, his outside assignments as music arrangers were few.

One can notice the ingenuity of Sebastian D’Souza’s in music arrangements in that despite working with OP Nayyar and Shankar-Jaikishan for a long time, his orchestrations retained the individual  stamps of these music directors in their respective songs. That Sebastian D’Souza could work with a temperamental music director like OP Nayyar for a long time speaks volume about his talent and of his mild nature.

It is said that Sebastian D’Souza’s counter-melody in orchestration was so good that  Jaikishan used some of his counter-melodies as  tunes for the songs. I am sure that in ‘Madhumati’ (1958), Salil Choudhary must have been impressed by Sebastian’s counter-melody in Aaja Re Pardesi and used it as a mukhda tune for Ghadi Ghadi Mora Dil Dhadke. Sebastian’s great work can be felt in almost all songs of S-J and OPN. However, the one song which I am very fond of because of orchestration is Poochho Na Hamen Hum Un Ke Liye from ‘Mitti Mein Sona’ (1960). The piano in this song was played by a Goan musician, Sunny Castellino who was a music arranger for ‘Aawaara’ (1951).

During his filmy career, Sebsatian D’Souza arranged music for about 125 films with around 1000 songs. He retired from film industry in 1975.

Merlyn D’Souza, daughter-in-law of Sebastian D’Souza has been continuing his musical tradition. She works as a music producer, music arranger and sometime as music director – both in films and theatres. In the music industry, she is often referred to as ‘Female AR Rahman’ due to her work in fusion music.

Chic Chocolate (real name : Antonio Xavier Vaz, 1916-1967) came to Mumbai in in the late 30s to become a lead jazz trumpeter in a dance band. His idol was Louis Armstrong, the American jazz trumpeter. Interestingly, he even looked like Louis Armstrong. Soon he became one of the best trumpeters in Mumbai’s jazz music scene. By the end of the World War-II, Chic Chocolate had already formed his dance band named ‘Chic & His Music Makers and had become one of the leading dance bands in Mumbai.

It is not clear as to when he started working for Hindi films. His earliest connection to Hindi film industry as a music arranger points to the film ‘Samaadhi’ (1950) in which he collaborated with C Ramchandra, The song  Gore Gore O Baanke Chhore which has jazzy music, brought him to the attention of Hindi film industry. His music arrangements in all the songs of  ‘Albela’ (1951) was a high point of his career as music arranger. I think, in this film, Chic Chocolate poured all his experience in Jazz music in such an extent that the songs which became a new category of songs with Indo-Jazz music.

In  Deewaana, Ye Parwaana, one can see Chic Chocolate playing trumpet with the musicians from his dance band ‘Chic & His Music Makers’. Because of runaway success of ‘Albela’ (1951), his dance band became more famous. He also adopted for his dance band the uniform that was used for his band in this song.

He mostly worked with C Ramchandra in the 1950s though he had also worked with other music directors. Take for instance, his music arrangements in the song, Ae Dil Mujhe Bata De in ‘Bhai-Bhai’ (1956) and Rut Jawaan Jawaan  in ‘Aakhri Khat’ (1966) in which he is seen playing trumpet.

With ‘Naadaan’ (1951), Chic Chocolate donned the hat of music director for the first time. This was followed by ‘Rangeeli’ (1952) and ‘Kar Bhala’ (1956).

Chic Chocolate passed away in May 1967 shortly after the release of ‘Aakhri Khat’ (1966). His son Erwell Vaz is a drummer.

Hindi film music is the work of so many creative artists, musicians and music arrangers. I guess, in the 50s and 60s, music arrangers must have spent more man-hours for arranging music than the music directors for whom they worked. Unfortunately, in film and music industry, it is mainly the singers and music directors who get the credit. However, in the recent period, names of at least lead musicians and music arrangers are mentioned in the credit titles of many of the films as well as the covers of CDs.

Today, I present the 7th song (out of 8 songs, including two multiple version songs)  from the film ‘Naadaan’ (1951) for which Chic Chocolate got his first opportunity to set the tune to the songs in addition to the music arrangements. The song is ‘Saari Duniya Ko Peechhe Chhod Kar’ sung by Lata Mangeshkar. The song was written by PL Santoshi.

The tune of the song has a distinct style of C Ramchandra who was credited as Music Supervisor. Surprisingly, none of the 8 songs in the film has jazz flavours. This is not to undermine the overall contributions of Chic Chocolate in the songs of the film. It is worth mentioning in this context that Chic Chocolate had composed many jazz songs for his dance band in the 40s. There are at least six 78 rpm gramophone records which bear the name of Chic Chocolate as the music composer.

The song under discussion appears to be a dream sequence going by the sets used in the picturisation of the song.

Acknowledgements:

  1. Naresh Fernandes – Taj Mahal Foxtrot – The Story of Bombay’s Jazz Age (2012)
  2. Gumnaam Hai Koi – The Untold Story of Music Arrangers and Musicians : Part-I & II – Rajya Sabha TV (2015)

 

(Video)

(Audio)

Song – Saari Duniya Ko Peechhe Chhod Kar (Nadaan) (1951) Singer – Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics – PL Santoshi, MD – Chic Choclate

Lyrics

saari duniya ko peechhe chhod  kar
saari duniya ko peechhe chhod  kar
hum sitaaron ki duniya mein aa gaye..ae
chaand taaron ki duniya mein aa gaye
saari duniya ko peechhe chhod  kar
hum sitaaron ki duniya mein aa gaye
chaand taaron ki duniya mein aa gaye
saari duniya ko peechhe chhod  kar
 
chalo khelenge saajna aankh micholi
o o o
o o
o o
chalo khelenge saajna aankh micholi
bhar len sitaaron se hum apni jholi
bhar len sitaaron se hum apni jholi
chaand chhup chhup ke karta ishaare
kitne dilkash hain ye sab nazaare
hain ye sab nazaare
hum ek nai duniya mein aa gaye
chaand taaron ki duniya mein aa gaye
saari duniya ko peechhe chhod kar
hum sitaaron ki duniya mein aa gaye..ae
chaand taaron ki duniya mein aa gaye
saari duniya ko peechhe chhod kar
 
saare aalam pe chhaayi hai chaandni
kyon na gaayen hum ulfat ki raagini
aaa  aaa 
aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa
aa aa aa
la la la la la
la la la la la
la la
saare aalam pe chhaayi hai chaandni
kyon na gaayen hum ulfat ki raagini
aaj harsoo hai
aaj harsoo hai mousam khushi kaa
luft aayega ab zindagi kaa
ab zindagi kaa
hum nazaaron ki duniya mein aa gaye
chaand taaron ki duniya mein aa gaye
saari duniya ko peechhe chhod kar
hum sitaaron ki duniya mein aa gaye..ae
chaand taaron ki duniya mein aa gaye
saari duniya ko peechhe chhod kar
hum sitaaron ki duniya mein aa gaye..ae
chaand taaron ki duniya mein aa gaye
saari duniya ko peechhe chhod kar 

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

सारी दुनिया को पीछे छोड़ कर
सारी दुनिया को पीछे छोड़ कर
हम सितारों की दुनिया में आ गये॰॰ए
चाँद तारों की दुनीया में आ गये
सारी दुनिया को पीछे छोड़ कर
हम सितारों की दुनिया में आ गये
चाँद तारों की दुनीया में आ गये
सारी दुनिया को पीछे छोड़ कर

चलो खेलेंगे साजना आँख मिचौली
ओ ओ ओ
ओ ओ
ओ ओ
चलो खेलेंगे साजना आँख मिचौली
भर लें सितारों से हम अपनी झोली
भर लें सितारों से हम अपनी झोली
चाँद छुप छुप के करता इशारे
कितने दिलकश हैं ये सब नज़ारे
हैं ये सब नज़ारे
हम एक नई दुनिया में आ गये
चाँद तारों की दुनीया में आ गये
सारी दुनिया को पीछे छोड़ कर
हम सितारों की दुनिया में आ गये॰॰ए
चाँद तारों की दुनीया में आ गये
सारी दुनिया को पीछे छोड़ कर

सारे आलम पे छाई है चाँदनी
क्यों न गायें हम उलफत की रागिनी
आss आss
आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ
आ आ आ
ल ल ल ल ला
ल ल ल ल ला
ला ला
सारे आलम पे छाई है चाँदनी
क्यों न गायें हम उलफत की रागिनी
आज हरसू है
आज हरसू है मौसम खुशी का
लुत्फ आएगा अब ज़िंदगी का
अब ज़िंदगी का
हम नज़ारों की दुनिया में आ गये
चाँद तारों की दुनीया में आ गये
सारी दुनिया को पीछे छोड़ कर
हम सितारों की दुनिया में आ गये॰॰ए
चाँद तारों की दुनीया में आ गये
सारी दुनिया को पीछे छोड़ कर
हम सितारों की दुनिया में आ गये॰॰ए
चाँद तारों की दुनीया में आ गये
सारी दुनिया को पीछे छोड़ कर

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This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3503 Post No. : 14074

 

Today’s song is from the film ‘Milan’ (1946).

Bengali people, in general, are fond of reading. The literacy percentage of Bengal during last century and before that has been quite noteworthy. The literate population of Bengal is divided in two parts. One is Bhadralok– a term used to indicate upper and middle class – affluent and educated people; and the other is Madhabit (or what we call a middle class in rest of India). Both these classes of society in Bengal were patrons of books. In addition, Bengal also boasts of a large number of very famous authors. Eminent writers like Rabindranath Tagore, Bankim Chandra Chatterji, Sarat Chandra Chatterji, Sunil Gangopadhyaya, Bibhuti Bhushan Bandopadhyay, Satyajit Ray, Mahashweta Devi, Tarashankar Bandopadhyay, Shirshendu Mukhopadhyay, Shardendu Bandopadhyay, Humayun Ahmed, Kazi Nazrul Islam, Michael Madhusudan, Manik Bandopadhyay, Premendra Mitra, Badal Sircar, Sukumar Rai, Jibanand Das, Rajnikant Sen and many others were, and continue to be popular in Bengal.

No wonder, then, that their novels, dramas and short stories became the basis of Bangla films, both in the silent as well as talkie era. In rest of India, almost all major production houses had their own story departments, where many Munshis, Pandits and the likes of them were employed to provide ‘made to order’ story material for films. The Lahore, Bombay and Madras centres depended heavily on mythology, folk tales, history, and stage dramas etc. for their films.

Since Bangla films had their firm stories, their films were closer to the audiences in Bengal and Eastern India in general. This literary sourcing was firmly entrenched in the minds of the film directors of the 1930s to the 1950s, in Bengal. When an exodus of actors, directors and technicians started from Calcutta to Bombay, in the 40s and 50s, most directors from Bengal made Hindi films in the Bombay center, based on Bangla novels, dramas and short stories. Some important examples are, ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (Salil Choudhari’s short story of 1943), ‘Devdas’, ‘Parineeta’, ‘Parivar’, ‘Biraj Bahu’, ‘Yahudi’, ‘Ratnadeep’ etc.

When Nitin Bose left Calcutta and came to Bombay to join Bombay Talkies, no one was surprised. Bombay Talkies was known to attract Bangla talent and gave them opportunities to showcase their skills. Being owned by a Bengali-Himanshu Rai and managed by a Bengali-Shashadhar Mukherjee, Bangla cine artistes were always welcome. For his first directorial venture in Bombay, Nitin Bose suggested Rabindranath Tagore’s novel Noukadubi, first published in 1906. This story was a favourite of producers. Already a Bangla film on it was made in 1932. Nitin Bose further suggested to make it a bilingual film – in Hindi and Bangla, for Bengal and East India.

The year was 1946. Himanshu Rai had passed away in 1940, S. Mukherjee left in 1942 with his friends. Devika Rani had left in 1945. Bombay Talkies was in dire straits already. The powers that be at the company thought that making a bilingual film will open doors to Bengal and other East Indian states. While the Hindi version ‘Milan’ was made in 1946, the Bangla version ‘Naukadubi’ was made in 1947.

Dilip Kumar was an upcoming new hero in Bombay Talkies. He had just done 2 films. ‘Jwar Bhata’ in 1944 and ‘Pratima’ in 1945. He was chosen for ‘Milan’ as its hero. The film needed two heroines. One, Ranjana was already available and selected. For the second heroine, Bombay Talkies gave advertisements in newspapers. From several applicants, a new Kanpur born Bengali speaking girl Meera Mishra was selected.

Meera Mishra’s joining the films generated a lot of interest and excitement because she was the wife of an IPS officer. She was chosen to play Kamala in both versions. For the role of Hemnalini, Meera Sircar was selected for the Bangla version, and Ranjana did this role in the Hindi versions. The role of Ramesh, the hero, was assigned to Dilip Kumar in the Hindi version, and to Abhi Bhattacharya in the Bengali version. The role of  Akshay Babu was assigned to Pahadi Sanyal in both Hindi and Bangla versions.

In a manner of speaking, Meera Misra made her debut opposite to Dilip Kumar as her first leading man. The film was directed by Nitin Bose and Anil Biswas was the music director. Parul Ghosh lent her voice in both the versions. In ‘Noukadubi’ she had five Tagore songs, her only Bengali songs.

Both ‘Noukadubi’ and ‘Milan’ did well. Initially Meera had planned to retire after this one film. However, her husband, Kripa Sindhu Mishra was killed in action during Delhi riots and Meera decided to carry on with her film career. She had a son Jishnu from the Late KS Mishra. Her other films include ‘Abhijatya’ (1949), ‘Eki Gramer Chhele’ (1950), ‘Abarta’ (1950), ‘Sandhyabelar Rupkatha’ (1950), ‘Sabyasachi’ (Hindi-1948, based on Sarat Chandra Chatterjee’s ‘Pather Dabi’. Meera played the role of Sumitra) and Bishnupriya (1949). Her other Hindi films include ‘Ghar Ki Numaish’ (1949), ‘Kashmir Hamara Hai’ (1950), ‘Azaadi Ke Baad’ (1951), ‘Chamakee’ (1952), and ‘Chhoti Maa’ (1952). She quit films early and settled into married life again. Her second husband was Mr Ranjit Gupta, Chief Secretary to the Government of West Bengal. She passed away in Calcutta in 2008.

‘Milan’ was produced for Bombay Talkies by Hiten Choudhury, who was with New Theatres earlier. He was the earliest member to leave New Theatres and join Bombay Talkies in Bombay. After Nitin Bose left Bombay Talkies, it was Hiten Choudhury who brought in Bimal Roy to make film ‘Maa’ (1952). Bimal Roy, who had come to Bombay for the premiere of his film ‘Pehla Aadmi ‘ (1950), subsequently settled in Bombay. Asit Sen, BN Banerjee, Salil Choudhury, Hrishikesh Mukherjee and few others too left New Theatres to join Bimal Roy in Bombay.

Director Nitin Bose was working with Dilip Kumar for the first time. That time Dilip had not yet developed the nasty habit of interfering in director and composer’s work. He was still learning and he learnt a lot from Nitin Bose. It seems that the famous hair style of Dilip was also suggested by Nitin Bose while shooting a boat scene for Milan. Dilip acknowledges that Nitin Bose had groomed him.

Later Nitin Bose directed Dilip again for ‘Deedar’ (1951) and ‘Ganga Jamuna’ (1961). Nitin Bose once wrote that during the shooting of ‘Ganga Jamuna’ he was sitting aside on a chair, helplessly watching Dilip Kumar do his (the director’s)  job. By that time Dilip had obtained a Doctorate in this “art of interference”.

Dilip had become famous due to his early tragic films, when he used to die frequently in most of them. In 1948 alone, out of his 6 films, he died 4 times. In the year 1955, he died in 3 films. In the entire 50’s decade he died 6 times. In a total of 57 films, Dilip kumar had died in 18 of them. Interestingly his last film ‘Qila’ (1998) also saw him dead! A real tragedy king indeed !!! By the way, in his 57 films 39 directors worked with him. SU Sunny directed him in 4 films. Nitin Bose, Bimal Roy and Subhash Ghai directed him in 3 films each.

‘Milan’ was based on Rabindranath Tagore’s novel ’Noukadubi’, published in 1925. This story was a favourite of producers. It was produced in Bangla in 1932, 1947, 1979 and 2011. Hindi versions came in as ‘Milan’ (1946), ‘Ghoonghat’ (1960) and ‘Kashmakash’ (2011). The cast of the 1946 version incudes Dilip Kumar, Meera Mishra, Ranjana, Pahadi Sanyal, Shyam Laha, S.Nazir, Moni Chatterjee, KP Mukherjee etc. The story is –

The story is set in 1905. Ramesh (Dilip Kumar) is studying law in Calcutta and has just appeared for his final exams. He is a friend and neighbour of Jogen who is also studying law. Jogen (Shyam Laha) lives with his father Annada Babu (Moni Chatterjee) and sister Hemnalini (Ranjana). Ramesh and Hemnalini are fond of each other and Ramesh visits their house most days for tea. Their association is disliked by another friend Akshay (Pahadi Sanyal) who also likes Hemnalini.

Ramesh has been asked to come back to his village for the holidays by his father but is dissuaded from going by Hemnalini. Ramesh’s father Braja Mohan (KP Mukherjee) is from the priestly caste and lives in the village. He receives an anonymous letter stating that his son is involved with the neighbour’s daughter who comes from a tradesman caste and that he spends his entire time there.

Braja Mohan goes to the city and brings Ramesh back with him to the village. He has arranged Ramesh’s wedding with a poor widow’s daughter. Ramesh tries to convince his father about his involvement with Hemnalini. His father after satisfying himself that Ramesh has as yet not committed himself to Hemnalini prevails upon Ramesh to marry Sushila because of the promise he had given to the girl’s mother. There is a storm at night when the wedding party from the groom’s side is returning to their village by boat. During the crossing the boat capsizes. Nearly all on the boat are drowned including Ramesh’s father and Ramesh appears to be the only one to survive. He sees a woman in bridal dress lying unconscious on the bank. He brings her to his village but soon understands that this is a case of mistaken identity. She continuously checks him when he calls her Sushila and tells him her name is Kamala (Meera Mishra). He realizes there was another bridal procession and their boat too had capsized.

After the formalities of his father’s funeral service Ramesh decides to take Kamala to Calcutta. He finds out about her only living relative, an uncle, and writes to him. A letter arrives telling him of the death of Kamala’s uncle but the sender has mentioned Kamala’s husband’s name and profession. His name is Nalin and he’s a doctor. Ramesh now starts searching for Dr. Nalin. He has so far made no mention about his marriage to Hemnalini or her family nor told anyone regarding the mistaken identity of his supposed bride to avoid any embarrassment to the girl.

On arrival in Calcutta, Ramesh suggests that Kamala get an education. After allaying her apprehension regarding her age he admits her in a girl’s boarding school. Akshay’s sister also studies in the same school and through her Akshay gets to know the truth about Ramesh’s marriage. In the evening he questions Ramesh in front of Hemnalini. Ramesh deflects the question and asks Hem to trust him. Preparations are on at Annada’s house for the wedding of Hemnalini and Ramesh. Their wedding is set for the coming Sunday but Ramesh is asked by the principal to take Kamala home for the weekend. Ramesh postpones the wedding and brings Kamala back from school. Akshay brings Jogen to Ramesh’s house where they see Kamala and on being questioned Ramesh keeps silent. Hemnalini goes into a state of shock when she’s told about Ramesh’s wife.

Her father takes her to Kashi to recuperate. Ramesh decides to leave Calcutta and he takes Kamala with him to Ghazipur. Kamala reads the letter Ramesh has written to Hem explaining the entire situation and mentioning Kamala’s husband’s name. She finally recognizes the truth about her and Ramesh’s situation. She decides to kill herself and leaves the house. She is rescued and comes under Nalin’s mother’s care.

She realizes that Nalin is her husband but finds out that Hemnalini and he are to be betrothed. However, Nalin is not happy about the betrothal as he refuses to believe that Kamala is dead and wants to wait a while longer. Finally the truth comes out and she’s accepted by her husband and his mother while Ramesh and Hemnalini get back together.

The film had 8 songs. Today’s song is the 5th song to be posted. All other songs are also available on You Tube. Enjoy the video song.

[Author Note: My acknowledgements and thanks to Dr. JP Guha ji, the book ‘Hero-I’ by Ashok Raj, HFGK, and my own notes.]

 


Song-Gungun gungun boley bhanwra (Milan)(1946) Singer-Parul Ghosh, Lyrics-P L Santoshi, MD-Anil Biswas
Dilip Kumar
Ranjana

Lyrics

gungun gungun boley bhanwrva aa
hamaari bagiya mein aaike
wo gungun gungun bole bhanwrva aa
hamaari bagiya mein aaike
hamaari bagiya mein aaike ho bhanwra
gungun gungun boley
hamaari bagiya mein aaike
wo gungun gungun bole bhanwrva aa
hamaari bagiya mein aaike

madhuvan se laaye sandesha bahaar ka
madhuvan se laaye sandesha bahaar ka aa aa
taar(?) jaaye mere pyaar ka
veena baja ke
baawri bana ke
haumaari bagiya mein aaike ho bhanwra
gungun gungun bole
humaari bagiya mein aaike
wo gungun gungun bole bhanwrva aa
hamaari bagiya mein aaike

Dialogues
———————————
iraada badal bhi sakta hai
lekin uske liye ek munaasib bahaana gadhna padega

bahaana

haan aakhir pitaaji ka hukm
baghair kisi vajah ke thhode hi taala jaa sakta hai
aur aap kya samajh rahin hain
ham apni marzi se jaa rahe hain

oh

lekin ye sab ek shart par

kya shart

jo gaana abhi ham sun rahe thhe wo poora ho

poora hoga

aaiye
————————
gungun gungun boley bhanwrva aa
hamaari bagiya mein aaike
wo gungun gungun boley bhanwrva aa
hamaari bagiya mein aaike
wo jaan gaya re
jaan gaya re
wo jaan gaya re
mere man mein hai kya
jaan gaya re
kahta phire sab kaliyon se jaa
kahta phire sab kaliyon se jaa
mere man mein hai kya
jaan gaya re
jaan gaya re
dekh rahi thhi
main raah kisi ki
dekh rahi thhi
main raah kisi ki
ankhiyaan bichhaai ke
?? lagaay ke ae
ankhiyaan bichhaai ke
?? lagaay ke
hamaari bagiya mein aay ke ho bhanwra
gungun gungun boley
hamaari bagiya mein


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3469 Post No. : 13929

It is almost close to midnight, and in some regions, it is the ‘witching hour’. Well, on our blog, it is the ‘Yippeee-ing hour’ 🙂 🙂 .

Today’s yippeee film is an obscure film from 1960 – ‘Delhi Junction’. This film has recently been a matter of gossip in the circle of collectors. You see the thing is that there is word going around that this film is available with someone, who is willing to sell it for a price; quite a price I assure you. At first, it seemed to be another interesting stir in the collector’s community, types if which continue to create waves quite frequently, and then come to a naught. But then it seems, it became a serious talk. A couple of posts emerged on the YouTube containing short video clips of the songs of this film. So it seems there is serious game afoot, and it is possible that we may get some more confirmed news – time frame undefined. Depends on when someone is able to meet the pricing demands. Let us see.

The film has some really memorable songs, as can be ascertained from the table of posted songs, included further down in this article. These songs have been dear favourites from the radio listening days. And that makes this film all the more inviting, and interesting.

The film comes from the production house of Nigaaristan (India) Films, Bombay. It is produced by RL Sharma and is directed by Mohammed Husain. It must have been considered an important film in its time, considering the star cast. The players leading the cast are Ajit and Shakila. Other members of the cast include Nishi, Maruti, Manorama, Tiwari, Pran, Protima Devi, Murad, Rafiq, Kamal Mohan, Harun, Anwari Bai, Pal Sharma, Jagdish Kanwal, Nadir, Satish, Sadiq, Sarita, Kukku, Rajni, and Khurshid etc.

The film sports a total of six songs. The music director is Kalyanji Veerji Shah. So this turns out to be one of the handful of films, where Kalyanji Bhai is alone credited for the music. As it turns out, this is the last of the six films that carry the name of Kalyanji Bhai only. Althougt Anandji, the younger brother, has always been working with Kalyanji, it is only after ‘Chandrasena’ (1959) that the duo started to use Kalyanji-Anandji as the official name of their team. The six films of Kalyanji Veerji Shah are ‘Post Box 999’ (1958), ‘Samrat Chandragupt’ (1958), ‘Bedard Zamana Kya Jaane’ (1959), ‘Ghar Ghar Ki Baat’ (1959), ‘O Tera Kya Kehna’ (1959), and this film being yippeee’d today.

The film has four songwriters identified – Gulshan Bawra, Prem Dhawan, PL Santoshi, and Farooque Kaiser. Today’s song is by PL Santoshi. The assignment of specific lyricist to individual songs is included in the table below.

The singing voice is of Lata Mangeshkar supported by chorus. When I started to work on this post, my initial impressions were that this might be a children’s song. But no, this turns out to be quite a song for mature adults, especially ones who are smitten with the matters of the heart. If you are surprised by this assertion, then just check out the lyrics below and listen to the song. With lines like “Dekho Dekho Nazron Ka Signal Gira’ and ‘Jaane Jo Ulfat Ka Jaadu Wo Hi Chalen”, this song is in no way going to be counted as a song for children.

The film has made its debut on the blog way back on 18th December, 2011, just over six years now. Wow, it seems we are taking multiple years to completely bring on board all songs of individual films. But I assure you that on many occasions, it is just a reflection of the online availability of the songs themselves. Take the case of this film today – the final song that we are showcasing here, is not yet available anywhere on the internet, and I am posting it online from my collection for the first time today.

The earlier posted songs of this film are listed below.

 

Zaalim Zamaane Ne Itna Sataayaa Hai 5149 18-Dec-11 Gulshan Baawra
Naam Tera Leke Mohe Chhede Hai Zamaana 10451 5-Nov-14 Farooque Kaiser
Tere Mukhde Ki Dekhi Jhalak Jab Se 11232 30-Jun-15 PL Santoshi
Kehti Hoon Main Sach Sach 13633 6-Oct-17 Prem Dhawan
Kya Karoon Dil Kisi Pe Kho Gaya 13637 7-Oct-17 Prem Dhawan

 

So with this post, let us all welcome the film ‘Delhi Junction’ to the Yippeee land today. One more down today. . and many still to go.

[Ed Note: It was only after this song got posted that I took a breather, only to notice that Atul ji has also already welcomed another film (the previous post) to Yippeee-land today. It most certainly seems like the ‘yippeee-ing hour’, what with two films racing to Yippeee-land, just within minutes of each other. 😀 😀 ]

Song – Gaadi Dilli Waali Chali  (Delhi Junction) (1960) Singer – Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics – PL Santoshi, MD – Kalyanji Veerji Shah
Chorus

Lyrics

gaadi dilli waali chali
ye gaadi dilli waali chali
gaadi dilli waali chali
ye gaadi dilli waali chali
bina tikat le jaane waali
sab railon se rail niraali
chhuk chhuk karti chali
ye gaadi dilli waali chali
gaadi dilli waali chali
ye gaadi dilli waali chali

dekho paani aag bina ye kaisi chali
ye kaisi chali
balkhaati lehraati dulhan jaise chali
jaise dulhan chali
gaadi chali
gaadi chali
gaadi chali
gaadi chali
tedhi medhi oonchi neechi is ki gali
ye to chhuk chhuk karti chali
ye gaadi dilli waali chali
gaadi dilli waali chali
ye gaadi dilli waali chali

dekho dekho nazron ka signal ka gira
ji signal gira
dekho dekho aahon ka dhuaan utha
ji dhuaan utha
gaadi chali
gaadi chali
gaadi chali
gaadi chali
shor machaati pyaar jagaati seeti baji
ye to seeti bajaati chali
ye gaadi dilli waali chali
gaadi dilli waali chali
ye gaadi dilli waali chali

paas mein jinke dil ho baabu
wo hi chalen
ji wo hi chalen
jaane jo ulfat ka jaadu
wo hi chalen
ji wo hi chalen
tum bhi chalo
hum bhi chalen
tum bhi chalo
hum bhi chalen
jalne waali zaalim duniya dekhe khadi
ye to sabko jalaati chali
ye gaadi dilli waali chali
gaadi dilli waali chali
ye gaadi dilli waali chali

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
ये गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
ये गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
बिना टिकट ले जाने वाली
सब रेलों से रेल निराली
छुक छुक करती चली
ये गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
ये गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली

देखो पानी आग बिना ये कैसी चली
ये कैसी चली
बलखाती लहराती दुल्हन जैसे चली
जैसे दुल्हन चली
गाड़ी चली
गाड़ी चली
गाड़ी चली
गाड़ी चली
टेढ़ी मेढ़ी ऊंची नीची इस की गली
ये तो छुक छुक करती चली
ये गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
ये गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली

देखो देखो नज़रों का सिगनल गिरा
जी सिगनल गिरा
देखो देखो आहों का धुआँ उठा
जी धुआँ उठा
गाड़ी चली
गाड़ी चली
गाड़ी चली
गाड़ी चली
शोर मचाती प्यार जगाती सीटी बाजी
ये तो सीटी बजाती चली
ये गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
ये गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली

पास में जिनके दिल हो बाबू
वो ही चलें
जी वो ही चलें
जानें जो उल्फ़त का जादू
वो ही चलें
जी वो ही चलें
तुम भी चलो
हम भी चलें
तुम भी चलो
हम भी चलें
जलने वाली ज़ालिम दुनिया देखे खड़ी
ये तो सबको सबको जलाती चली
ये गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली
ये गाड़ी दिल्ली वाली चली


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Toady’s song is from film ‘Achhoot’ (1940),sung by composer Gyan Dutt and singer actress Vasanti.

The second world war started from 1939, but its effects started being felt in India after 1940 only. The Government became alert and sensitive. Lots of restrictions were put on Imports and Exports. All exports to Germany and Japan were banned. Foreign travel came under Government microscope. Imports were restricted to only essential goods. Raw film stock came under Government control (and naturally became available freely in black market at exorbitant price). Taking advantage of the situation, Government declared that those film production houses who help Government in its war efforts, by making films with pro Govt. themes, would get raw film on priority.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

First order of the day – a thousand congratulations to Atul ji, on the completion of 9 years of this blog. And congratulations to all us members of the bandwagon, together making this such a pleasurable journey.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

It is my turn today to celebrate a ‘Yippeee’.  I am not sure if I have specifically announced a ‘Yippeee’ in any of my earlier posts. Possibly that could have been before the term ‘Yippeee’ was coined. Today we announce the completion of posting of all songs of the 1956 film ‘Makheechoos’. The important thing for me is that the music is by that unsung genius Vinod.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Songs to Tickle Your Memory – 22
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Six films in all, from 1958 to 1960.  That is how long his career lasted.  As a solo music director I mean.  After this six films, the brothers opted to work as a duo, a combination that lasted his lifetime, creating phenomenal music for more than 250 films.

Remembering Kalyanji on the anniversary of his birth today (30 June).
Read more on this topic…


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 14600 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3700 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

14650

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Movies with all their songs covered =1147
Total Number of movies covered =4002

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