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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Chal Diye Tum Kahaan, Rukiye Meharbaan

Posted on: June 30, 2017


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today (30 june 2017) is the birth anniversary of Kalyanji (30 june 1928-24 august 2000 ) of the well-known Kalyanji-Anandji music composer duo. Or K-A, in short. I’ve written here on the occasion of the anniversary of several artistes. Composers, lyricists, actors, directors.  In fact most of my posts here are to do with some occasion or the other.

But I’ve never written on K-A. They were a fixture during my growing up years – the 70s! So I thought it high time I should write a post on them – and this is as good an occasion as any.

There were three big composers in the 70s who dominated music for mainstream masaala cinema. RD Burman, of course. And the Laxmikant-Pyarelal duo too. The third one was K-A. I must mention Ravindra Jain too – he was also very popular, but he sort of carved his niche in a certain type of cinema. There might have been the occasional overlap but he was largely part of the small-budget, family film (typically Rajshri Productions) scenario.

Others had either left the scene, or were very limited in their work. SD Burman and Madan Mohan passed away in the mid-70s. Naushad had already decided to take a backseat – as had Ravi (though he did compose a bit). Ditto for OP Nayyar. The Shankar-Jaikishen name (now totally carried by Shankar) never got close to its past glory, with much of its music being rejected by the audience. So it too was at the fag end of its life. Khayyam was still around – but, just like in earlier decades, he composed just for a few films. Though, like throughout his career, it was top-notch music. There were others too, like Sapan Jagmohan. Again, very limited number of films.

There were two upcoming names that I remember. Rajesh Roshan and Bappi Lahiri. Both of them enjoyed a fair amount of success but were again not prolific enough in the 70s to disturb the dominance of the big three. It was only in the late 70s/early 80s, with the disco craze, that Bappi Lahiri suddenly became very hot property, dishing out hit after hit. He never looked back.

Anyway, this is about K-A, not others.

Now, K-A might not have been as prolific as the other two, but they had a good number of hits. And big ones at that. I think this is what always kept them in the public eye. RD Burman might have a string of hits, as might L-P.  K-A might not have that number to match. Then suddenly “Yaari Hai Imaan Mera” (film ‘Zanzeer’) becomes a super hit – in fact, it was Binaca Geet Mala (1973) No.1 for the year. And everyone notices. 🙂  In fact that year, K-A had 3 songs in the Binaca Geet Mala in the top 5. At no.3, was “Do Bechaare Bina Sahaare” from ‘Victoria No. 203’. And at no.5, was “Samjhauta Ghamon Se Kar Lo” from ‘Samjhauta’.

A similar story happened the very next year (1974). The top song in Binaca Geet Mala (1974) was “Mera Jeevan Kora Kaagaz” by K-A. That year, they had 3 more songs in the top 10. Of course, this couldn’t be sustained, but K-A would figure regularly in lists as their songs would be popular and usually catchy. I remember when I was in high school, one of the most popular songs amongst my classmates was “Tere Chehre Mein Wo Jaadoo Hai” from ‘Dharmatma’ (1975). Even “Tumne Kisi Se Kabhi Pyar Kiya Hai” from the same film was popular. Through the 70s and early 80s, K-A were known for a certain type of catchy, even loud, music.

For example, “Rafta Rafta Dekho Aankh Meri Ladi Hai” from ‘Kahani Kismat Ki’ (1973). Or, “Ye Mera Dil Pyaar Ka Deewaana” from Don (1978). Or, “Pyaar Zindagi Hai” from ‘Muqaddar Ka Sikandar’ (1978). Or “Laila O Laila” from ‘Qurbani’ (1980). Or  “Apni To Jaise Taise” from ‘Laawaris’ (1981). Each of these songs has a catchy beat about it, that caught on well with the audience. But it was not always this way.

If you listen to K-A songs before the 70s, you’ll find a very different type of composition. Perhaps it was the 70s decade that made them adapt accordingly. Not just the music, even the clothes were loud in the 70s. Loud prints and bell-bottoms. Just an observation – not criticizing them. I’ve worn them too. 🙂

Early in his career as an independent music director, Kalyanji Veerji Shah tasted success with ‘Samrat Chandragupt’ (1958), with the popular Lata-Rafisaab duet “Chaahe Paas Ho, Chaahe Door Ho”. At that time, Anandji (his brother) had not officially teamed up with him. Kalyanji also had another solo hit with ‘Post Box No.999’ (1958). A film with very popular songs like “Neend Na Mujhko Aaye” and “Mere Dil Mein Hai Ik Baat”. Anandji then joined him and they began composing under the Kalyanji-Anandji name in films like ‘Satta Bazaar’ (1959) and ‘Madaari’ (1959). In particular, the song “Dil Lootne Waale Jaadugar” from ‘Madaari’ was quite popular. At least I think it was, I remember hearing it off and on on Vividh Bharti in my childhood. 🙂

That was a Mukesh duet of course – and Mukesh would go on to form a very productive partnership with K-A.  They had many hits together – “Mujhko Is Raat Ki Tanhaai Mein Awaaz Na Do”, “Chhalia Mera Naam”, “Mere Toote Huye Dil Se”, “Humne Tujhko Pyar Kiya Hai Jitna”, “Jo Pyar toone Mujhko Diya”,  “Jis Dil Mein Basa Tha Pyar Tera”, “Main To Ek Khwab Hoon”, “Hum Chhod Chale Hain Mehfil Ko”, “Chandi Ki Deewaar Na Todi”, “Darpan Ko Dekha Tu Ne Jab Jab Kiya Singaar”,  “Chaand Aahen Bharega Phool Dil Thaam Lenge”, “Chaand Si Mehbooba Ho Meri”,  “Zubaan Pe Dard Bhari Dastaan Chali Aayi”, “Koi Jab Tumhaara Hriday Tod De”…and many more.

In the first half of the 60s, K-A are probably best known for the score of ‘Bluffmaster’ (1963), which had many popular songs, notably the famous Janmashtami song “Govinda Aala Re”. One of K-A’s biggest hits in their career was ‘Jab Jab Phool Khile’ (1965). All the songs of this film were huge hits – and are popular to this day.  The same year, they had a bit hit in ‘Himalay Ki God Mein’, so that was a big year for them.

Another huge hit for them was ‘Upkaar’ (1967). In fact, I think the first time I heard of them was when I heard the song “Mere Desh Ki Dharti” as a very young boy on radio. The Manna Dey song “Kasme Waade Pyaar Wafaa” from this film was also very well received.

There are other hits that come to mind. The song “Akele Hain Chale Aao” from ‘Raaz’ (1967), for example. And “Chale The Saath Milkar” and “Bekhudi Mein Sanam” from ‘Haseena Maan Jaayegi’ (1968). 1968 also saw the off-beat film ‘Saraswatichandra’ – known best for its music. Apart from “Chandan Sa Badan”, the dandiya song “Main To Bhool Chali” is a Navratri favourite even today. And then the romantic “Phool Tumhe Bheja Hai”, not to mention the philosophical “Chhod De Saari Duniya”.

1969 saw ‘Vishwaas’, with songs like “Aap Se Humko Bichhde Hue” and “Chaandi Ki Deewar” by Mukesh. Then 1970 was a HUGE year for them. ‘Johnny Mera Naam’ was one of the biggest hits of the year, with its songs hugely popular. ‘Safar’, a very different film had amazing music too, although very different from that of ‘Johny Mera Naam’. Then there was ‘Purab Aur Paschim’, again a film in which every song was a big hit. ‘Sacha Jhootha’ also had popular songs, none more so than “Meri Pyari Beheniya” (a song I was teased with, all my childhood, thanks to the “bhaiya Raja bajaayega baaja” line). Oh, and of course, “Yunh Hi Tum Mujh Se Baat Karti Ho”. There was also ‘Gopi’, the Dilip Kumar starrer. With songs like “Gentleman, Gentleman” and the popular bhajan “Sukh Ke Sab Saathi”. In all this, I don’t want to forget one of my Kishore favourites – “Sama Hai Suhana Suhaana” from ‘Ghar Ghar Ki Kahaani’. It’s a gem of a song that I’ve loved right from my childhood.

1971 saw them with ‘Maryada’, again with popular songs like “Gussa Itna Haseen Hai To”, “Chupke Se Dil De De”, “Dhol Sajna, Dhol Jaani” and others.  There was also “Aao Tumhe Mein Pyar Sikha Doon”  and “Darpan Ko Dekha” from ‘Upaasna’ that year.

1972 saw them with “Nainon Mein Nindiya Hai” from ‘Joroo Ka Ghulam’. And “Hamare Siwaa Tumhaare Aur Kitne Deewaane Hain” from ‘Apradh’. Both very popular songs.

I’ve already talked about 1973 with ‘Zanjeer’ but there was one song, one of my all time favourites, in that year too. If K-A had not produced any music ever – and had produced just this one composition, I’d still be very grateful to them. I’m talking about “Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas” from ‘Blackmail’. It is one of my all time favourite songs. One that I’ve heard (and sung) a zillion times.

So thank you, very much Kalyanji-Anandji for this one song. And for all the others too, of course.

Normally I would not list so many songs in a post but today I wanted to do it just to showcase K-A’s work. They are not the most talked-about composers – and that’s ok. Their work speaks for them.

K-A were among the earliest to host music shows. Their shows were very popular. Many newcomers got a chance through K-A.

By the way, K-A’s younger brother, Babla, was also into music, popular in his own right. His wife, Kanchan has sung songs for ‘Rafoo Chakkar’, ‘Dharmatma’ and ‘Qurbani’.  Both Babla and Kanchan are extremely popular in the Caribbean, thanks to their touring there and Kanchan singing a number of Bhojpuri songs. (The Caribbean has a strong Bhojpuri-Awadhi  link, thanks to indentured labour in the 19th and early 20th century).

Now, moving on to the song for this post. It is from the film ‘Ek Kunwari Ek Kunwara’ (1973). While I was searching for a song for today, I came across several  that I could have posted. I was on the verge of posting a song from ‘Ek Se Badh Kar Ek’ (1975) when this song caught my eye. It is a pleasant song – and I liked it the first time I heard it just a couple of days ago. But more than just the song, the situation piqued my interest.

It is a stage song. Leena Chandavarkar is performing, Rakesh Roshan enters – and while dancing, he tries to foist off a baby in a basket to her. She is reluctant to accept the baby. Pran, in the audience, seems to get a shock when he sees the baby basket. All very intriguing. So I decided I’d pick this song for today. But then, I wanted to see the film first  – I’m always more comfortable when I post a song whose context I know.

A baby has come into Leena’s possession, Rakesh Roshan takes care of it at the railway station (he is a co-passenger waiting in the waiting room with her. Leena disappears, he has no choice but to take the baby home.  He then searches all over town for her, to return the baby to her.

Purely by chance, he discovers she’s taking part in a charity event (oh, how many films have this charity event situation!), and decides to hand over the baby to her at the event.  In the song, there’s a brief scene with Kumkum. She’s taking care of the baby at Rakesh Roshan’s place – while she dozes off, Rakesh Roshan has picked up the baby.

I won’t give away more than this on the storyline because I think you should see the film – it’s a sweet film.  A comedy, directed by Prakash Mehra. Very different from his usual, more serious, films like ‘Zanjeer’ and ‘Muqaddar Ka Sikandar’.  Normally I find it difficult to enjoy an entire film due to stereotyped roles and trite dialogues but this one was quite nice. Sure, it has its typical moments but I’ve seen much worse.

Anyway, this much is enough to explain the context of this song. The words then become more meaningful. Like

dar dar bhatka maara maara
tumse milne ko main dobaara

Prakash Mehra directed a number of films for which K-A provided the music –  ‘Haseena Maan Jaayegi’, ‘Zanjeer’,’Ek Kunwari Ek Kunwara’, ‘Haath Ki Safai’, ‘Hera Pheri’, ‘Aakhri Daku’, ‘Muqaddar Ka Sikandar’, ‘Jwalamukhi’, ‘Desh Drohee’ and ‘Laawaris’. That’s quite a partnership!

I’ll leave you now with the song.


Song – Chal Diye Tum Kahaan, Rukiye Meharbaan (Ek Kunwaari Ek Kunwaara) (1973) Singers – Asha Bhonsle, Mohammed Rafi, Lyrics – Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD – Kalyanji Anandji

Lyrics (Provided by Prakashchandra)

chal diye tum kahaan
rukiye meherbaan
mere yaaraaa
ho
dildaaraaaa
ho
mere yaara dildaara
hai tumhaara hi sahaara
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho

chal diye tum kahaan
rukiye meherbaan
mere yaaraaa
ooo
dildaaraaaa
mere yaara dildaara
hai tumhaara hi sahaara
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
chal diye tum kahaan

dar dar bhatka maara maara
tumse milne ko main dobaara
o dar dar bhatka maara maara
tumse milne ko main dobaara
mushkil mein hai jaan hamaari
khul na jaaye bhed hamaara
dekho meri majboori
milna badaa hai zaroori
mere yaara
o dildaara
aisi karo na ishaara
ye raaz hamaara
chhupaane ke baad miley ho
chhupaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
chal diye tum kahaan

ab to hai duniya mein jaani
tumko meri laaj bachaani
ab to hai duniya mein jaani
tumko meri laaj bachaani
is mushkil se baaz main aaya
waapas le lo apni nishaani
samjho meri majboori
o jaana bada hai zaroori
mere yaara dildaara
nahin jaane doonga aise
tum haaye kaise kaise
sataane ke baad miley ho
sataane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
chal diye tum kahaan
rukiye meherbaan
mere yaara
o
dildaara
mere yaara dildaara
hai tumhaara hi sahaara
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
zamaane ke baad miley ho
chal diye tum kahaan
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

चल दिये तुम कहाँ
रुकिए मेहरबाँ
मेरे यारा
हो॰॰॰
दिलदारा
हो॰॰॰
मेरे यारा दिलदारा
है तुम्हारा ही सहारा
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो

चल दिये तुम कहाँ
रुकिए मेहरबाँ
मेरे यारा
हो॰॰॰
दिलदारा
हो॰॰॰
मेरे यारा हो दिलदारा
है तुम्हारा ही सहारा
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
चल दिये तुम कहाँ

दर दर भटका
मारा मारा
तुमसे मिलने को मैं दोबारा
ओ ओ
दर दर भटका
मारा मारा
तुमसे मिलने को मैं दोबारा
मुश्किल में है जान हमारी
खुल न जाये भेद हमारा
देखो मेरी मजबूरी
मिलना बड़ा है ज़रूरी
मेरे यारा
ओ दिलदारा
ऐसे करो ना इशारा
ये राज़ हमारा
छुपाने के बाद मिले हो
छुपाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
चल दिये तुम कहाँ

अब तो है दुनिया में जानी
तुमको मेरी लाज बचानी
अब तो है दुनिया में जानी
तुमको मेरी लाज बचानी
इस मुश्किल से बाज़ मैं आया
वापिस ले लो अपनी निशानी
समझो मेरी मजबूरी
ओ जाना बड़ा है ज़रूरी
मेरे यारा दिलदारा
नहीं जाने दूँगा ऐसे
तुम हाए कैसे कैसे
सताने के बाद मिले हो
सताने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
चल दिये तुम कहाँ
रुकिए मेहरबाँ
मेरे यारा
हो॰॰॰
दिलदारा
मेरे यारा दिलदारा
है तुम्हारा ही सहारा
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
जमाने के बाद मिले हो
चल दिये तुम कहाँ

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31 Responses to "Chal Diye Tum Kahaan, Rukiye Meharbaan"

Raja ji,

Thanks for a detailed analysis of Kalyanji-Anandji’s musical career, which to my mind, may be the first one in the Blog with such details (unless I missed) .

KA’s active years as a music director was during 1970-78 when they composed songs for 10-15 films a year. With nearly 1500 songs to their credit during their career 1959-94, I always wonder as to why KA did not have fans to the extent some of his contemporary music directors like S-J, Madan Mohan, O P Nayyar, R D Burman had. I think the answers to this partly lies with the Hindi film music lovers like me. I did not know that a few of the songs like ‘sama hai suhana suhana’ listed in the article were composed by KA though the songs were familiar to me.

A few years back, I had read a trivia about the song ‘kasme waade pyaar wafa ke’ from UPKAAR, 1967 composed by KA. When Kalyan ji came to know that this song would be picturised on Pran, he was virtually shattered. He pleaded with Manoj Kumar, the producer-director to drop the idea about this song as this would not only ruin the film, it would also ruin his career as a music director. Manoj Kumar did not budge from his decision. The song was originally to be sung by Kishore Kumar. When he came to know that the song would be picturised on Pran, he refused to sing. The song was later sung by Manna Dey. Later, Kalyanji agreed that the song became very popular because on the screen Pran sang with his heart and soul.

hullo Rajaji
Lovely Post…read start to finish…..changing myself continues
And like Sadanandji i thought “Joru Ka Ghulam” was RD’s work

And for a long time, I thought “Jab Jab Phool Khile” was Shankar-Jaikishen’s work. 🙂 I think I got confused between this film and “Jab Pyar Kisi Se Hota Hai”. For a long time, I even thought “pal pal dil ke paas” was RD. 🙂

Thanks, Sadanandji. I didn’t know about this “kasme waade” trivia.

You’re right about sometimes not knowing who the composer is. I’ve also been surprised by some songs that turned out to be K-A songs. For much of my teens, I thought Jab Jab Phool Khile was composed by S-J. And I even thought initially that “pal pal dil ke paas”, was composed by RDB. 🙂

Raja ji and Sadanand ji,
A very analytical article. The reason why the name of K-A did not become as famous as others mentioned above is because they were not attached with any particular big shots of Music.
Madan and L-P were the known favourites of Lata, OPN was that of Asha, RDB was always in top bracket with AB,Rajesh khanna and co. etc etc.KK was also attached to RDB. Those who supported K-A, were themselves not biggies, barring few-who did not do much for their fame.
Here are the top 10 MDs based on their number of songs, from one source. No stat will be foolproof in any case. This can be a guideline.
MD Films songs

L-P 519 2870
B.Lahiri 382 2104
RDB 334 1723
A.Malik 261 1652
K-A 255 1424
S-J 186 1280
CR 104 932
Rajesh Roshan 150 850
Ravi 110 819
R.Jain 126 753

-AD

Yes, I think this could be the reason, Arunji.
K-A used to fit in a film here or there, but at least in the 60s, didn’t have any steady backing of a big name. In the 70s, Prakash Mehra did take them on but that was 15 years after they started in the industry.
Looking at the stats above (even if they are only indicative), they give a good idea of relative work done by various composers.

🙂 lost the race
Atul ji, Sudhir ji

Aap donon ke paas mere dware bheje gaye iss gaane ke lyrics the…………

Sorry, Prakashji!
I didn’t know you had sent the lyrics, otherwise I’d have used those.
Maybe Atul/Sudhirji can provide a list of lyricked songs awaiting write-up. 🙂 This might encourage others to close that case. 🙂

Sorry Raja Sir

I thought that Sudhir ji had posted the article and wrote my comment without reading the post attentively, Sorry

Already corrected ☺️
Prakash ji

good quality video link:

Dancer Chinoo can be identified at 0:50

and in the audience seats alongwith Pran, Zeb Rehman(aka PreetiBala)can be identified at 5:39

Prakash ji

Thanks for the identification.

And yes, Zeb Rehman already listed, along with Jankidas, who sits next to her.

Rgds
Sudhir

Want to thank Sudhirji for not just editing my post to make it more readable but also to hyperlink all the songs I’ve mentioned. That must be a LOT of effort, seeing as I’ve mentioned so many. So thank you, Sudhirji.

A couple of them not hyperlinked – let me check if they’re not posted yet. If not, will write them up. 🙂

Also, I wrote up this mostly from top of my head. Forgot to mention one of their biggest hits – dum dum diga diga. 🙂 Also forgot to mention songs of Aamne Saamne, which were also quite popular. 🙂 Khair….

Raja ji,

Very welcome sir, 🙂

Yes, the ones not hyperlinked, are not yet posted, I already checked.

In any such sampling, one can not be exhaustive, so yes, many more gems and favourites get missed out.

Rgds
Sudhir

So “hamare siwa tumhaare aur kitne deewaane hain” (Apradh) has not yet been posted? Wow! It was very popular in my childhood. Mumtaz’ birthday is on 31st July – so this can be planned for that date. 🙂

But “bekhudi mein sanam” (Haseena Maan Jaayegi) has already been posted.

OK, yes, ‘Bekhudi Mein Sanam’ is a miss on my part.

Corrected now.

Other missing are “Laila O Laila” from ‘Apradh’; “Dhol Sajna Dhol Jaani” from ‘Maryada’.

Rgds
Sudhir

You did not mention “Khai ke paan banaaraswaala”. 🙂

Oh, I completely forgot about it! Utterly and totally! Really! You’ve got to believe me on this. 🙂

Thank you Raja Saab for the post and this song. I don’t remember to have listened it earlier. Well, neither have I watched this movie too.
During my last post I mentioned about the anniversaries in June, and at that time I have noticed that Kalyanji Bhai’s anniversary was coming on 30th. However I know that a ‘Special and Separate’ post was required and it is coming too 🙂 there on the blog.
Coming to the music of K-A, yes they have given us many many memorable songs and memories of the years when I was growing -The decade of 70s.
I too like all the songs you mentioned above and by others in the comments and many others that are yet to come.
The song from ‘Apradh’ – hamaare Sia’s was definitely frequently on radio then, however its ‘Tum mile pyaar se,mujhe jeena gawaara huaa’ that gives me more nostalgic feeling and this I like most. So I bought VCD of this movie 7/8 years back, since I had forgotten the movie, as I may have watched it with my elders in my childhood I think.
Thanks again for this ‘journey down memory lane’ and remembering the great music duo Kalyanji Bhai and Anandji Bhai.

Avinashji, this is a sweet movie, worth watching if you just want a timepass film. Koi tension nahin.
I agree that “tum miley” from Apradh is very nice. “Hamaare siwa” was more popular – this sort of thing happened a lot. You never know why one song becomes more popular than another. 🙂

Sudhirji, the song “Dhol Sajna” (Maryada) is already on the blog as “Tu bhi aaja ki aa gayi rut mastaani”. 🙂

Aah, yes,
My bad 🙂
Link is updated.

Rgds
Sudhir

Sudhir ji,
Call it my ignorance or any other thing, but i do not know the meaning of “My bad ”. I have seen and read this many times at many places, by many people,but nowhere could I get the full form or its meaning.
Would you ( or any one else) please enlighten me about this phrase ?
-AD

🙂 Arun ji,

This phrase is an American slang for the expression, “sorry, my mistake.”

Rgds
Sudhir

Thanks.

my bad Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

my bad. ​ US informal used for saying that you accept that you are wrong or that something is your fault: “You brought the wrong book.”

Meaning. My mistake – I’m to blame. Origin. This slang term originated in about 1970. At that time, that is, pre the widespread use of the Internet, slang terms …

My bad is more an informal saying you made a mistake. At least that’s … “My bad” literally means the same thing as “my fault” or “my mistake.

My bad definition and meaning | Collins English Dictionary
https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/my-bad
Aug 12, 2014 – My bad definition: my fault or mistake | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples.

I think we forget to mention the ‘Orchestra’ favorite – ‘chhotisi umar mein’ – of those years and others of ‘Bairaag-1976’
But then,there could be many ☺️

So many songs of K-A being mentioned here. It’s such a feast. I loved most of these songs as they were ‘live’ when I was younger.

Curiously, I thought Babla belonged to Jamnagar. Everytime Babla’s name ran in the credits during movies, the people in cinema halls in Jamnagar would burst into an applause, My cousin said it was because Babla belonged to Jamnagar.

K-A, I read, belonged to Kutch. Maybe Babla had some other connection to Jamnagar. Maybe came there for studies or something.

So much mehnat Sudhirji did, linking all the songs.

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(© 2008 - 2017) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than nine years. This blog has over 13600 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3300 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

13654

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1024
Total Number of movies covered =3736

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Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 3250 days.

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