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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3983 Post No. : 15071

“Chaand Mere Aaja”(1960) was produced and directed by Ram Daryani for Murli Movietone, Bombay. This social movie had Bharat Bhushan, Nanda, Lalita Pawar, Nalini Chonkar, Veena, Sapru, Rammurty, Amar, O P Devaskar, Anjali devi, Ishu Jageerdaar, Madhav Kale, Jeewan, Maruti etc in it.

The movie had seven songs in it. Four songs have been covered in the past. The last time that a song from this movie was covered in the blog was in 2011. India was cricket word cup champion those days. I was based at Nagpur those days. That is how far back it was . 🙂

Here is the fifth song from “Chaand Mere Aaja”(1960) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Rafi. Prem Dhawan is the lyricist. Music is composed by Chitragupta.

The song is picturised as a teasing song on Maruti and Nanda.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Prakashchandra.

Audio link:

Video

Song-Haaye re zara dekho o gori mudke (Chaand Mere Aaja)(1960) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Prem Dhawan, MD-Chitragupta

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra)

haaye rey zara dekho
o gori mudke
hum bhi toh khade hain raste mein
haaye rey zara dekho
o gori mudke
hum bhi toh khade hain raste mein
haaye rey zara dekho
o gori mudke hey ae

thhodaa saa hi paas hamko bulaao na
karo toh khayaal
aisey thukraao naa aa
thodaa saa hi paas hamko bulaao na
karo toh khayaal
aisey thukraao na
nazron ke maarey hain
hum toh bechaare hain
kab se padey hain raste mein
haaye rey zara dekho
o gori mudke
hum bhi toh khade hain raste mein
haaye rey zara dekho
o gori mudke ae

kitne hain naaz
kitni adaayen hain
dil toh hai ek
laakhon hi balaayen hain aen
kitne hain naaz
kitni adaayen hain
dil toh hai ek
laakhon hi balaayen hain
maaraa phiroon tab se
tere sang jab se
nainaa ladey hain raste mein
haaye rey zara dekho
o gori mudke
hum bhi toh khade hain raste mein
haaye rey zara dekho
o gori mudke hey ae hey

tere liye laakh gaaliyaan bhi khaayee hain
sar pe hazaar aafatein uthaayeein hain aen
tere liye laakh gaaliyaan bhi khaayeen hain
sar pe hazaar aafatein uthaayeein hain
sab ne sataayaa hai
toone bhi rulaayaa hain
phir bhi ade hain raste mein
haaye rey zara dekho
o gori mudke
hum bhi toh khade hain raste mein
haaye rey zara dekho
o gori mudke
hum bhi toh khade hain raste mein
haaye rey zara dekho
o gori mudke

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This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3983 Post No. : 15070

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My Railway related reminiscences- 2
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Couple of days back, I discussed a song of 1991, with my reminiscences of Hyderabad/ Secunderabad, where I was based at that time. Those were the early days of my career and that was my first posting.

That post gave me an idea that I should discuss my experiences of my stays in various places of India during my career. When I began to think about my experiences of those days, many interesting memories came to the fore. So I thought that I should discuss those memories (alongwith movies that I saw at those places) in a series form. I decided to name this series “my reminisces in Railways”. The article accompanyng the 1991 song thus began the fist part of the series.

Secunderabad was my fist posting, but that was preceded by period of probation which was during late 1980s and early 1990s. Those were the days when we would visit various places in Indian Railways located all around the country and undergo “training”. I describe it as “training” and not training because very few people actually trained at these places. It was more like site seeing and getting a first hand experience of how to manage to travel in trains, often without confirmed reservations and often without any confirmed accomodations at the places of our “training.” Those experiences were the real learning experiences for us.

People would form small groups of a few probationers and would travel and “train” together. My group used to be the smallest possible, viz two of us. 🙂

Most of these trainings were of one or two weeks. At the end of the “training”, we would be interviewed by the head of that organisation and then we would get a certificate that we had successfully completed the training. We used to dread the interview and would hope that the head would spare us and give us the certificate without actually interviwing others.

One of these training programmes took us to New Katni junction. We were supposed to undergo training in Diesel shed there. After the end of two weeks, the most dreaded occasion, viz interview with the head of the diesel shed, arrived. The head, one Mr Marcus, a very strict disciplinarian, started to grill the two of us on what we had learnt about diesel locomotives. Both of us were largely clueless on the subject and so I hoped that interviewer would vent his frustration equally on the two of us. My groupmate, Suresh had managed to memorise a few buzz words of Diesel locomotives and I was not familiar with even those words. So, I was singled out by Mr Marcus and he gave me a mouthfull. Learn from Mr Suresh, he at least knows a few terms about Diesel locomotives, I was told.

Suitably chastened, I came out and resolved that I would actually take the training seriously in future. But it was a resolution that I could never keep. 🙂

But that experience gave me an important life and management lesson. When a tiger appears before a herd of deer, the deers need not outrun the tiger. They only need to ensure that they outrun the slowest deer among them. 🙂 The tiger would catch the slowest of the deers and the other deers would escape.

While most trainings were for small durations and they were for probationers in small groups, there were some centralised trainings in large groups and of longer durations in designated locations.

For example, all probationers of all services had to mandatorily undergo two trainings. The first was called “Foundation”” course and it was followed by “Induction” course. These courses would be of one month duration and they would take place at Railway Staff College, Vadodara.

The need for centralised training of Railway officers was first felt in 1920s in pre independence era and a “Railway Staff College” was established in Dehradun in 1930. Within two years, some senior Railway Man decided that training of Railway Officers was a luxury that Railways could ill afford and so that “Railway Staff College” at Dehradun was closed down. Its premises were sold to Army. The present day Indian Military Academy at Dehradun is located where the original “Railway Staff College” stood from 1930 to 1932.

Two decades later, it was once again realised that training of Railway officers was not a luxury but a necessity so Railway Staff College was again established. This time it was set up at Vadodara. Railways took Pratap Vilas Palace of Vadodara on lease in 1949. Subsequently Railways bought this premise outright in 1964.

The magnificent Pratap Villa Palace was designed by Charles Frederick Stevens in 1914. Readers may recall that Bombay VT was built by Frederick Williams Stevens in 1887, who was the father of Charles Frederick Stevens. I find it interesting that Charles Frederick Stevens, though an Englishman was named in Marathi-Gujrati manner, viz. Name of the person, followed by father name, followed by Surname. 🙂

The first principal of Railway Staff College, Vadodara was Mr P C Bahl, from 1952 to 1956. His son Lt Commander Rajnish Bahl of Indian navy married film actress Nutan.

It was in this Railway Staff College that I underwent my Foundation Course. There were around 40 probationers in the batch. They were accomodated in hostel rooms, two probationers in each room.

I had decided that I would take Foundation course seriously, and as a part of my seriousness, I chose a room partner who himself was a serious student. No, not the abovementioned Suresh, but another person named Rahul.

Vadodara was (it still is) a nice place. Classes were held in day time for five days a week. Saturday and Sunday were free.

We would typically go out to watch night show of movies in Vadodara after dinner time. It was on one such night that Rahul suggested that we should go watch a new movie called “Dil”(1990). This movie had two newcomers in lead roles. The hero was one Aamir Khan, who had made a successful debut with “Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak” (1988). The leading lady was Madhuri Dixit, who had become an all India rage after the song “ek do teen” in “Tezaab” (1988).

We went for the night show of “Dil”(1990). We left our hostel at 9 PM and we were worried that we would be late for the show. But when we arrived there, we found that we were well in time. The previous show was still playing. We kept waiting and waiting. The earlier show ended after 10 PM. Our night show began at 10-30 PM, which is too late for a night show to start.

It was well past 1 AM when the show finally ended. In my younger days, I would remain wide awake and aware and would not miss any moment of the movie, not even newsreels and ads. But those days were in the past. I was feeling sleepy throughout the movie. So I missed much of the story and so I was not aware what was going on in the movie.

This movie “Dil” (1990) is not yet covered in the blog. Here is the first song from the movie to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Udit Narayan and Anuradha Paudwal. Sameer is the lyricist. Music is composed by Anand Milind.

The song is picturised on the lead pair of Aamir Khan and Madhuri Dixit, both looking so young and fresh faced vis a vis today. But then this movie had come three decades ago !

The song from the movie under discussion is titled “mujhe neend na aaye” , but it was a case of “mujhe neend hi neend aaye” for me in the movie hall in that show. 🙂


Song-Mujhe neend na aaye (Dil)(1990) Singers-Udit Narayan, Anuradha Paudwal, Lyrics-Sameer, Anand Milind
Chorus

Lyrics

aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa

mujhe neend na aaye
neend na aaye
neend na aaye
mujhe chain na aaye
chain na aaye
chain na aaye

mujhe neend na aaye
ho
mujhe neend na aaye
mujhe chain na aaye
koi jaaye jara dhundh ke laaye
najane kaha dil kho gaya aa
na jane kaha dil kho gaya
najane kaha dil kho gaya aa
na jane kaha dil kho gaya
mujhe neend na aaye
mujhe chain na aaye
koi jaaye zara dhoondh ke laaye
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya aa
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya

aa aa aa aa aa aa

haalat kya hai
kaise tujhe bataaun main
karvat badal badal ke raat bitaaun main
haalat kya hai kaise tujhe bataaun main
karvat badal badal ke raat bitaaun main

poochho zara poochho kya haal hai
haal mera behaal hai
poochho zara poochho kya haal hai
haal mera behaal hai
koi samajh na paaye kya rog sataaye
koi jaaye zara dhoondh ke laaye
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya

aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa aa

jaan se bhi pyaara mujh ko mera dil hai
uske bina ik pal bhi jeena mushqil hai
jaan se bhi pyaara mujhko mera dil hai
uske bina ik pal bhi jeena mushqil hai
tauba meri tauba kya dard hai
dard bada bedard hai
tauba meri tauba kya dard hai
dard bada bedard hai
kabhi mujhko hansaaye
kabhi mujhko rulaaye
koi jaaye zara dhoondh ke laaye
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya

mujhe neend na aaye
neend na aaye
neend na aaye
mujhe chain na aaye
chain na aaye
chain na aaye

aa aa aa aa aa aa

mujhe neend na aaye
mujhe chain na aaye
koi jaaye zara dhoondh ke laye
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3982 Post No. : 15069

In some cases, it is the voice – some people will impress you, attract you with their voice. Girish Karnad’s voice has one of the most relaxing sound quality that I have heard. And his presence, his demeanor, his being in a scene, on screen or on stage, always had the same expression of comfort and relaxation as his voice. Seeing him, listening to him, one could never imagine if this person could be moved to a hasty or an impatient action.

He passed away, the day before. The news said that he was 82. I was surprised, it couldn’t be. Over the years since I had first seen him live in a drama in Delhi – almost a millennium ago, and then through films and media images, he always seemed to be the same, never changing, nor ageing. Be it the memories and images from the 60s, 70s, or even recent. He always appeared to be the same.

So when I read this one line in a media news item, I was very taken aback. Sure, I had not seen him active for the past few years, but the thought process probably had never projected far enough to make believe that he was past his 80th. In fact, as I reviewed his filmography in preparation for this article, I find that 5 of his upcoming films are slated for released through the rest of 2019.

Mid 1960s to 70s was an era for the theatre in India. One sees an upsurge in the quality of drama, the subject matter handling by the playwrights and the abilities of the dramatists. If it was Badal Sircar in Bangla (east), it was Vijay Tendulkar in Matathi (west); if it was Mohan Rakesh in Hindi (north), it was Girish Karnad in Kannada (south). These playwrights brought in some very incisive, some very timeless creations, that brought a completely fresh air, breaking new grounds in understanding the human psyche – how the humans interact, with each other and within themselves, how the social influences mould the individual behaviors, and in reverse, how the human expressions manipulate the social conduct. And together, how they shape the movement of history.

Girish K broke out a very crisp and a surprisingly innovative line of enquiry, with his very first play – ‘Yayati’. Most of the readers will be familiar with this episode from the epic, Mahabharat. Yayati is a king in the lineage of the Chandravansh, the lineage of Chandra, the Moon God. He is portrayed as an irresponsible king, consumed by his obsession with young age and the pleasures to be derived from it. He is afraid of getting old. His wife is Devyani, daughter of Rishi Shukracharya. Sharmishtha is the name of one of the ladies in waiting of Devyani. Actually a princess herself from another kingdom, Sharmishtha becomes a bounden server to Devyani due to certain events. As the events unfold furhter, Yayati has an extra marital affair with Sharmishtha, who bears three sons for him. Devyani too has three children, one daughter and two sons. Devyani complains to her father, who is the purohit (high priest) of the demon clan. Incensed by the behavior of his son-in-law, he curses him to a premature and a prolonged old age.

Yayati is shattered. He goes to Shukracharya, begs for forgiveness and removal of the curse. Shukracharaya tells him that his curse cannot be reversed, but it can be transferred to a person willing to take on such a curse. Yayati is overjoyed, but the joy is short-lived as he finds out that no one is ready to accept his curse. Finally, one of his sons, Puru, agrees to take on the curse of his father, wanting to bring peace to his father. Yayati enjoys another one thousand years of youth, donated by his son Puru.

This is a well known tale, and it has its own share of interpretations, analysis and philosophical discourse in literary critique over the ages. Girish K stepped in and asked a question that was never asked for many a millennia. What about Chitralekha?

It is not clear whether this character by this name exists in the annals of Mahabharat. Girish K is alluding to, and enquiring about Puru’s wife. A man goes ahead and takes on the curse of old age for a thousand years. There is name and fame, for this sacrifice. But no one ever asked, what about his wife? What happened to her life and her time, and whether and how did she endure this abnormally changed circumstance foisted upon her. With certain modifications to the original plot, Girish K is the first scholar to ask this question.

This play came about during Girish K’s journey to England by ship in 1960. The version of Mahabharat by C Rajagopalachari was published in 1951. This version of the epic influenced Girish K, and he went on to create two great plays based on themes from this epic. By his own account, ‘Yayati’ came so naturally to him, almost as if someone was dictating and he was just transcribing. The writing of this play was completed on this sea voyage of three weeks. He was traveling to London, having been awarded the Rhodes Scholarship at the Oxford University. During his stay and studies, he completed a triple MA, simultaneously in philosophy, politics and economics. The second play, that was born out of the influence of Mahabharat, sat in his mind for almost three decades, and then was born as ‘Fire and Rain’, which was staged first time in 1995.

His other most celebrated theatrical creation is another view into the history of India. Titled ‘Tuglaq’, this play took the theatre world, the audiences and the socio-political commentators by storm when it was first staged in 1966. In 1972, this play was enacted by the National School of Drama, directed by Ebrahim Elkazi, and presented on the ramparts of the Old Fort (Purana Qila) in Delhi. Using the ruins of the Old Fort as the backdrop, the play was enacted, to a very critical acclaim. Personally, that was my first introduction to Girish K. Quite enchanted by the theatre scene in Delhi, I have seen this enactment of the play while I still was in school.

The play covers the last 5 years of the reign of Mohammed Bin Tuglaq. The protagonist, is portrayed as having great ideas and a grand vision, but his reign was an abject failure. He started his rule with great ideals of a unified India, but his kingdom degenerated into anarchy. His proclamation to move his capital from Delhi to Daulatabad, resulted in a massive exodus that brought misery and sorrow to a huge population. This was seen by the commentators as an allegory to the Partition of the country in 1947, and mass movement of people from both sides of the border.

In his later discussions, Girish K has revealed that the play was not originally written with an intent to comment on the then current political scenario in the country. Writing about the commentary on his play, Girish K has stated – “I did not consciously write about the Nehru era, I am always flattered when people tell me that it was about the Nehru era and equally applies to development of politics since then. But, I think, that is a compliment that any playwright would be thrilled to get, but it was not intended to be a contemporary play about a contemporary situation.”

Girish K started his theatre career in Madras, with a drama group called the Madras Players. Starting with ‘Yayati’ we see the development of a multi-faceted career that has lasted for almost six decades – author, teacher, playwright, director, stage actor, film actor, director of FTII Pune, chairman of the Sangeet Natak Academy – there is so much in his career to write and tell about.

His association with the cinema begins with ‘Samskaara’ (1970) and ‘Vamsh Vriksh’ (1972), both in Kannada, and both well recognized and well awarded films. Girish K was also the co-director of ‘Vamsh Vriksh’. The storylines for both films are a very strong statement on the evolving nature of human relationships, as each individual passes through his or her own pleasures, travails, dreams and anguish. The stories tell of compelling human emotions that drive human beings, to behave in manners that are quite out of the ordinary expectations. In ‘Samskaara’, Praneshcharaya (role played by Girish K), a devout Brahmin, is so convinced of moksha being the ultimate goal of life, and being so focused to achieve it, marries an invalid, so he can remain a celibate all his life. His antithesis is life is Narayanappa, a Brahmin who has given up the traditions – he eats meat and lives with Chandri, a lady of lower standing in the society. As the events unfold, Narayanappa passes away. His final rites become a controversy – a non-Brahmin cannot perform his rites, and no Brahmin in the village is ready to perform the rites for one who has fallen from the tradition. In the midst of all this, Praneshcharya one night wakes up in the lap of Chandri. Unable to reconcile with his own actions, he leaves the village in despair. Chandri secretly performs the last rites of Narayanappa and leaves the village too. In the last scene, Praneshcharya is seen returning to the village. Did he confess and atone for his actions? – the question remains unanswered.

‘Vamsh Vriskh’ is a complex narrative of the progression in a family, the interrelationships, the hidden connects and the invisible knowns. The protagonist, Srinivasa Shrotri, goes through many a tribulation in life, and tries to keep his mental peace intact. Having lost or settled all his affairs, he finally renounces householder’s life to become a sanyaasi.

In 1974, Girish K appeared in a children’s film ‘Jaadu Ka Shankh’. Not much more information about this film is locatable.

In the next three years, we see Girish K in three films that are outstanding statements of the new-wave cinema. In 1975, we see him in ‘Nishaant’ as the timid but principled schoolmaster, whose wife is abducted by the brothers of the landlord. The film has a kind of idealist ending, with the schoolmaster fatally attacking the landlord during a religious celebration and the entire village rising up against the landlord and lynching him and his entire family. In 1976 came ‘Manthan’ – the story of the white revolution in India. Girish K has played the role of Dr Rao, a chemist assigned in the rural areas, to help villagers determine the quality of their milk and to help free them from the clutches of the milk contractors by establishing co-operative societies. In 1977, we see Girish K in ‘Swami’, assaying the role of Ghamshyam, an upright and principled eldest son in the family, after passing away of his father, handling the family matters and his own personal life very maturely and with wisdom, in the presence of a hostile step mother.

In the next four decades , Girish K has appeared in almost 100 films, in Hindi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Malyalam and Assamese. I remember seeing him in ‘Man Pasand’ (1980), playing the role of Kashinath, a close friend of Pratap, the protagonist (role played by Dev Anand). Later, I have seen him in ‘Aasha’ (1980), ‘Ek Baar Chale Aao’ (1983), ‘Tarang’ (1984), till the waning interest in newer films kept me away. Ah yes, he was part of the dear ‘Malgudi Days’ series on the television, playing the role of Swami’s father. In his other directorial outings, he has directed ‘Godhuli’ (1977) and ‘Utsav’ (1984), films that have earned a lot of critical acclaim. He has also made a number of documentaries, like one on the Kannada poet DR Bendre (1972), ‘Kanaka-Purandara’ (English, 1988) on two medieval Bhakti poets of Karnataka, Kanaka Das and Purandara Das, and ‘The Lamp in the Niche’ (English, 1989) on Sufism and the Bhakti movement in India. Many of his films and documentaries have won several national and international awards.

Girish K’s accomplishment as an actor is simply his complete comfort with being the character he is playing. Watching him on the screen, one has this confidence that he knows all the ins and outs of the character he plays, and that in some incarnation he has lived that role himself. The authenticity of portrayal is simply magnificent.

In 1985, he appeared in the role of Pandit Shiv Shankar Shastri in the film ‘Sur Sangam’. The film, and his portrayal of the senior patriarchic exponent of classical music, are my all time favorite. I have written about this film in an earlier article with the song “Aaye Sur Ke Panchhi Aaye”. The film revolves around classical music and the story of Pt Shiv Shankar Shastri, one of the greatest living exponents of this art form. The story line brings in Tulsi (role played by Jayaprada), who is musically inclined and who reveres Shastri ji. The turn of events brings a certain unexplainable element – Tulsi is sexually assaulted, and the man responsible also throws down the portrait of Shastri ji. In a fit of violent anger, Tulsi slays the man with a shard of glass from broken portrait, runs off into the night, and boards a train departing from the local station. As destiny would have it, she barges into a first class coupe whose sole occupant is Shastri ji, who is traveling for participating in an out of town program. The two travel together, and return. Tulsi starts living in the same house as Shastri ji. He is a widower and has a girl child. Slowly, Tulsi becomes a part of the household. Being inclined for classical music, she also starts to practice while staying at Shastri ji’s home. One night, there is a special celebration at the temple of Lord Shiv. Shastri ji is to perform. Tulsi accompanies him, as usual. With the performance about to begin, Shastri ji motions Tulsi to pick up and play the taanpura in accompaniment. At this, all his participating disciples become incensed and leave the stage one by one. Tulsi rushes back home (and then leaves the household for good), the audience leaves and Shastri ji is the sole person left in the temple. In the absence of any accompaniment and musical support, he resolves to make his musical presentation regardless, to the Lord. And he presents this song, alone in a deserted temple, to Lord Shiv.

I picked this song specially, to highlight one aspect of Girish K’s artistic expressions, which was probably hidden until then. An accomplished performer, he has performed the dance steps as part of this song. Every review of the film at that time, commented on the dancer in Girish K. He revealed in an interview that he had taken on special dance training to prepare for this song. You can see the performance for yourself. It is no less than an accomplished and well trained dancer, presenting these steps in unison with the music.

This one song, in my humble opinion, is the best artistic performance that I have seen from Girish K. See the manner in which he starts his dialogue with the Lord. His singing, his facial expressions, his gestures and movements, all coalesce into a fluid expression of a conversation with Lord Shiv. No one else is present so this is a very private conversation, in which Shastri ji is telling the Lord to listen to His own sound coming from inside him. This entire clip is a one wonderful performance by Girish K that probably has not been surpassed.

It is a sad goodbye that we bid today. The person, the artist, and a scholar – it is truly a great loss to the cultural landscape of this sub continent that may never be made up.

One commentator has written about Girish K’s creations, that “. . . Girish Karnad allowed his characters to ask the questions, to struggle with the inconclusive, and hence his stories truly never ended.” Yes, that is the legacy of this multi-faceted artist – his creations, his stories, his characters – all still have a lot be explored for. That “struggle with the inconclusive” is so appropriate a passage dealing with the complex realities and relationships in the course of a human life. His stories have not really ended. And neither has his legacy.

Girish K – Rest in Peace. . . Enduring Peace

 

Song – Hey Shiv Shankar, Hey Karunakar  (Sur Sangam) (1985) Singer – Rajan-Sajan Misra, Lyrics – Vasant Dev, MD – Laxmikant Pyaarelal

Lyrics (Provided by Prakashchandra)

hey..ey..ey shiv shankar
hey..ey..ey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar
mere bheetar tum gaate ho
mere bheetar tum gaate ho
sun lo tum apna ye swar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

maun gaan ka dhyaan jamaaya
maun gaan ka dhyaan jamaaya
yog raag ko hi maana
tum hi baney ho taan praan ki
tum hi baney ho taan praan ki
mere tan mann ko paawan kar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

rudra been jhankar tumhaari
rudra been jhankar tumhaari
shudra janon se rahi ansuni
dhanya tumhi ho jaavo sureshwar
dhanya tumhi ho jaavo sureshwar
apne mukh se sun apna swar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar [

nabh chaaya ghan ghor bijuriya damke jhamke
adharon ki muskaan tumhaari cham cham chamke
aaaa aaaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaaaa
ghir ghir aaye megh bhayankar garaj garajte
goonja nupur naad tumhaara thirak thirkate
jhuk gaya matha ki tum ne haan kaha jis pal umapati
sheesh ki ganga dharaa par utar aayi chhal-chhalaati
ga ga re ni re ga ma
dha ni re ga re sa
geet ki har lehar par tum jhoom kar naacho nateshwar
aaj is anand varsha mein nahaao tum maheshwar
aaa aaaaaa aaaaaaj is anand varsha mein
nahaa..aavoo tum maheshwar
shiv shankar
maheshwar
shiv shankar
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaaa

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
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हे॰॰ए॰॰ए शिव शंकर
हे॰॰ए॰॰ए करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर
मेरे भीतर तुम गाते हो
मेरे भीतर तुम गाते हो
सुन लो तुम अपना ये स्वर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

मौन गान का ध्यान जमाया
मौन गान का ध्यान जमाया
योग राग को ही माना
तुम ही बने हो तान प्राण की
तुम ही बने हो तान प्राण की
मेरे तन मन को पावन कर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

रुद्र बीन झंकार तुम्हारी
रुद्र बीन झंकार तुम्हारी
शूद्र जनों से रही अनसुनी
धन्य तुम्हीं हो जावो सुरेश्वर
धन्य तुम्हीं हो जावो सुरेश्वर
अपने मुख से सुन अपना स्वर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

घन छाया घनघोर बिजुरिया दमके झमके
अधरों की मुस्कान तुम्हारी चम चम चमके
आsss आssss आssss आsssss आsssss
घिर घिर आए मेघ भयंकर गरज गरजते
गूँजा नूपुर नाद तुम्हारा थिरक थिरकते
झुक गया माथा कि तुमने हाँ कहा जिस पल उमापति
शीश कि गंगा धरा पर उतार आई छल-छलाती
ग ग रे नि रे ग म
ध नि रे ग रे स
गीत की हर लहर पर तुम झूम कर नाचो नटेश्वर
आज इस आनंद वर्षा में नहाओ तुम महेश्वर
आ आ आ॰॰आज इस आनंद वर्षा में
नहा॰॰आवो तुम महेश्वर
शिव शंकर
महेश्वर
शिव शंकर
आsss आssss आssssss


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3980 Post No. : 15068

———————————————–——————————————
Blog 10-Year Challenge (2009-19) – Song No. 34
——————————————————————————————
My Railway related reminiscences- 1
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When I look back into days gone by, I find that my recollections of the past can be divided neatly into decades. I have vague recollections of 1960s as I was quite young in that decade. 1970s is the decade that I recall most vividly as well as most fondly as I was as my precocious best in this decade, being in my teens in this decade.

I find that my recollections of subsequent decades are rather more vague. I can tell you what I was doing in 1975, but I do not have similar vivid recollections of 1985, 1995 or even 2005 !

The above applies to my recollections on Hindi movies and HFM as well. I cannot recall even one Hindi movie song of 2005 or 2015 if my life dwepended on it, but I can readily recollect dozens of songs of 1975.

Since our younger regulars never tire of reminding us that good songs were created in 1990s and later as well, I thought that I should try and discuss some songs from those years even though my recollections of those days are not as vivid as my recollections of 1970s. 🙂

Much of my 1980s was spent in my “higher” education. From 1990s onwards, I found myself posted in various parts of the country.

My initial postings were in South, in what was South Central Railway, with its HQ at Secunderabad. My initial days there were spent in twin cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad. My first posting was very much in that place. Later, I was posted at a small place in Marathwada called Purna.

I watched quite a few movies in Hyderabad/ Secunderabad. Those were Hindi movies, Telugu movies as well as English movies.

I was a firm believer that one should walk on foot in any new place wherever you wanted to go. That helped you familiarise yourself with various landmarks of the place. I applied my theory rigidly. I would walk six km daily from my residence to my workplace in the morning and then come back by walk in the evening. So I used to walk 12 km daily. 🙂

On weekends, I would plan to watch movies. I used to buy all the three English daily newspapers published in the city, namely Deccan Chronicle, Hindu and Indian Express. The three newspapers together form such a bulk that sometimes people would mistake me for a newspaper vendor. 🙂

I would look at the cinema hall ads to find which movies were playing in which movie halls. After identifying which movie to watch and where to watch, I would decide how to reach there.

It was sometime in 1991 or may be 1992 that I decided to go and watch “Phool Aur Kaante”(1991).

THe movie was playing in a movie hall in old city of Hyderabad. I stayed in Secunderabad near the Secunderabad Railway Stations at a distance of 15 km. How to reach there.

I boarded a local train from Secuderabad and reached Kacheguda Railway station. From there I walked towards old city, in the general direction of Hyderabad(aka Nampally) Railway station. I had a map of the twin city and I would consult it often to find locations of interest to me.

I kept walking on and on and came across old city, full of densely populated areas. I did not have to go Huderabad Railway station. The movie hall was somewhere in between Kacheguda and Hyderabad Railway stations.

I arrived the hall well in time so I had little difficulty buying a ticket for for matinee show. Now, show beginning at 3 PM is matinee show for me, as I was born and brought up in North India, but in Hyderabad, it was called first show there. I think it is still called first show in those parts.

That was not the only difference. What I knew as “cold” drink in north was called “cool” drink there. 🙂

I soon found lots of movie watchers arriving at the movie hall. Now, more than two decades later, I have read about the movie going audience of Hyderabad from our beloved inhouse encylopaedia Mr Arunkumar Deshmukh in many of his articles. Bulk of movie watchers who had gathered belonged to that kind. There were burkha nasheen females accompanied by lots of small kids. It was not as if this movie had a well known hero. This movie had debutants in lead roles. I wondered why all of them had so eagerly gathered to watch the movie where a newcomer was the hero.

The show began after some wait. It goes withot saying that bulk of movie watchers enjoyed the movie thorougly. I would have enjoyed this movie like them if I was two decades younger. But during these two decades, I had learnt thinks like “logical” thinking etc. I was applying logic on the movie and was not able to find much to enjoy. Now, the hero and heroine are college students. But they were hardly seen studying even for one minute. They would be seen singing dancing and romancing for the entire duration of the movie. Come on, how can one even get admitted to a decent college if all one does is teasing the female students and making passes on them. And in which college one finds females falling in love with the eve teaser. In real life India, such male students would get expelled from the college, and here in the movie he is being glorified. Moreover, how can such students even survive the academic rigours of college life ?

Moreover, I believe that one goes to college to study and not to romance. There is plenty of time and opportunity left in life in future for such romantic pursuits once you have successfully completed your studies and have become financially independent.

Conscientious movie watchers like me are in minority and no movie makers do any thing to appease movie goers like me. Movie makers merrily go on to make movies like this which are big hits at the box office and which are happily lapped up by simple minded movie goers.

I have covered one song from this movie in the past. That “past” happened to be 11 june 2009, viz exactly ten years ago. So, this movie becomes an ideal case of blog ten year challenge.

So here is the second song from “Phool Aur Kaante” (1991) on this day viz 11 june 2019, exactly ten years after covering the first song of the movie in the blog. This song is sung by Kumar Sanu and Anuradha Paudwal. Sameer is the lyricist. Music is composed by Nadeem Shrawan.

This movie was produced by Dinesh Patel and directed by Kuku Kohli. This movie had Ajay Devgun, Madhoo, Amrish Puri, Raza Murad, Raghunath, Jagdeep, Goga Kapoor, Suresh Chatwal, Aruna Irani etc in it. The movie was the launch vehicle of Ajay Devgun. His stunt master father Veeru Devgun was behind the production of this movie.

Watch the picturisation of the song. The song is quite enjoyable to listen to and watch to in you can switch off your conscience and sensibilities. But I have great difficulty doing that.

Nevertheless, here is this song from “Phool Aur Kaante” (1991) which was hugely popular those days and continues to remain so till this day.

Video (one stanza missing)

Audio (Full)

Song-Maine pyaar tumhi se kiya hai (Phool Aur Kaante)(1991) Singers-Kumar Sanu, Anuradha Paudwal, Lyrics-Sameer, MD-Nadeem Shrawan
Chorus

Lyrics

maine pyaar tumhi se kiya hai
tururururu
maine dil bhi tumhi ko diya hai
tururururu
maine pyaar tumhi se kiya hai
tururururu
maine dil bhi tumhi ko diya hai
tururururu
ab chaahe jo ho jaaye
main duniyaa se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon

maine pyaar tumhi se kiya hai
tururururu
maine dil bhi tumhi ko diya hai
tururururu
ab chaahe jo ho jaaye
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon
maine pyaar tumhi se kiya hai
turururu
maine dil bhi tumhi ko diya hai

ailaan yahi
karne aaya
main aaj yahaan
marne aaya
ruswa tujhe main
kar jaaunga
khaa ke zahar ab
mar jaaunga
khaa ke zahar ab mar jaaunga
maine pyaar tumhi se kiya hai
turururu
maine dil bhi tumhi ko diya hai
turururu
ab chaahe jo ho jaaye
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon

maine pyaar tumhi se kiya hai
turururu
maine dil bhi tumhi ko diya hai
aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa aaa

dilwaale agar
mil jaayen yahaan
phir neend kise
phir chain kahaan
ye
tere liye aahen
bharta hai dil
teri aisi baaton se
darta hai dil
teri aisi baaton se darta hai dil

maine pyaar tumhi se kiya hai
turururu
maine dil bhi tumhi ko diya hai
turururu
ab chaahe jo ho jaaye
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon

maine pyaar tumhi se kiya hai
turururu
maine dil bhi tumhi ko diya hai

baahon mein teri
din raat rahoon

jag chhod doon main
o tere saath rahoon
o saanson mein basa loon aaja tujh ko
tere bina jeena nahin mujh ko
tere bina jeena nahni mujh ko
maine pyar tumhi se kiya hai
turururu
maine dil bhi tumhi ko diya hai
tururururu
ab chaahe jo ho jaaye
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyar karoon
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyar karoon

maine pyar tumhi se kiya hai
turururu
maine dil bhi tumhi ko diya hai
turururu
ab chaahe jo ho jaaye
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon

main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon
main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon

main duniya se ab naa daroon
tujhi se main pyaar karoon


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3979 Post No. : 15067 Movie Count :

4134

“Kahaani Ek Chor Ki”(1981) was produced by Balubhai Shah and directed by S Ramnathan for Deepak International, Bombay. This obscure “social” movie had Jeetendra, Vinod Mehra, Mausami Chatterji, Laxmi, Nirupa Roy, Aruna Irani, Asrani, Madan Puri, A K Hangal, Ranjan, Master Titu, Ranjeet, Bhagwan, Chaandrashekhar, Sundar, Jairaj, Shukla, Major Anand, Mukri, Viju Khote, Yusuf, Raju, Ratna, Madhumati Sharma, Uma Khosla, Manik Chaudhary, Master Laddoo, Chiku etc in it.

This movie, which I had never heard of, despite being in the midst of movie watching spree, had four songs in it.

Here is the first song from the movie to appear in the blog. The song is sung mainly by Kishore Kumar, with a few words by Hemlata. Hasrat Jaipuri is the lyricist. Music is composed by Ravindra Jain.

The song is ip synced by Vinod Mehra (disguised as a bearded old man) and Laxmi (I hope I have identified her correctly. This song , picturised in a public garden,is apparently a ruse meant to sow seeds of doubt in the mind of Asrani, who is also visible in the songs towards the end.

With this song, “Kahaani Ek Chor Ki”(1981) makes its debut in the blog.


Song-Karishma ye kya meri jaan ho gaya (Kahaani Ek Chor Ki)(1981) Singers-Kishore Kumar, Hemlata, Lyrics-Hasrat Jaipuri, MD-Ravindra Jain

Lyrics

karishma ye kya meri jaan ho gaya
karishma ye kya meri jaan ho gaya
tujhse nazren milin
main jawaan ho gaya
tujhse nazren milin
main jawaan ho gaya
ae buddhe chal hatt
karishma ye kya meri jaan ho gaya
karishma ye kya meri jaan ho gaya
haan

aisi bijli hai tu
kya
aisi bijli hai tu
jo bhi chhoo le jhatka khaaye
main bhi jhatka kha gaya
jaaneman
aisi titli hai tu
are aisi titli hai tu
tere peechhe main jo bhaaga
barson peechhe aa gaya
aaya thha kis kaam se
kar baitha kya kaam
raam naam ki umar mein
tera hua ghulaam
haaye haaye
budhaape mein bhi imtahaa ho gaya
arre arre arre arre
budhaape mein bhi imtahaa ho gaya
ho ho ho

ghar ka de de pata
ae jaani ghar ka de de pata
yoon raste mein chhed khaani karte
aaye hai sharam
meri jaan maaf karna khaata
maaf karna khata
dhandha khota sahi
lekin banda dil ka hai naram
main logon ki mushqilen
karta hoon aasaan
dhan ke haathon bik gaya
na bechoon imaan
dekho jabhi to khuda
meharbaan ho gaya
hahaaha
waah bade miyaan

dekho khuda meharban ho gaya
tujhse nazren milin
main jawaan ho gaya
tujhse nazren milin
main jawaan ho gaya


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3979 Post No. : 15066

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 3
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Okay, okay, just before you sit up and ask again – “ये क्या हो रहा है”, a quick reminder that we are into this series of repeat songs. This is the third episode today.

There are well known, as well as obscure, instances existing in which the reused songs appear in the list of the songs of the latter film. The reuse listing of the song can appear as it is – a few examples being,

  • “Gori Zulm Karey Zulf Ka Bikhar Jaana” – this song appears in the listings for the film ‘Main Aur Mera Bhai’ (1961) and the film ‘Pyaar Banaa Afsaana’, an unreleased film from 1960s.
  • The four songs of the film ‘Ram Rajya’ of 1943 are reused in the film ‘Ramayan’ of 1954
    “Beena Madhur-Madhur Kachhu Bol…”
    “Ajab Vidhi Ka lekh Kisi Se Padha Nahi Jaaye…”
    “Jhoole Mein Jhool Laal, Jhool Tu Jhool…”
    “Tyagmayi Tu Gayi, Teri Amar Bhaawna…”
    Note: The music director for both films is same – Shankar Rao Vyas; and the lyricist of these four songs is also the same – Ramesh Gupta.
  • “Beeti Jaat Barkha Ritu Saajan Nahin Aaye” – this song appears in the listings for the film ‘Muraad’ (1939) and the film ‘Dharam Bandhan’ (1940).
  • Four songs of an unreleased film ‘Parda’ from late 1940s are reused in the film ‘Achhaa ji’ of 1950
    ‘Taqraar Ko Badal Do Pyaar Mein, Na Karo Chhed Bekaar Mein…’
    ‘Bhool Hai Kisi Ko Apnana, Vichaaron Mein Basana…’
    ‘Kisi Ke Bholepan Ne… Mere Mann Ko Kheencha…’
    ‘Bhar Jaaye Aasmaan To Aahon Ki Kya Khata…’
    Note: The lyricist (Indiwar) and music director (Shyam Babu Pathak) are the same. The film director (SH Thirani) is also the same.
  • Six songs of the 1957 film ‘Pawanputra Hanuman’ have been reused in the 1969 film ‘Hanuman Chalisa’.
  • Strange occurrence – two films of the same year, 1958 – ‘Rifle Girl’ and ‘Miss Toofaan Mail’ share the song – “Bheegi Hawa Mausam Jawaan, Masti Mein Dooba Saara Jahaan…”.
  • Rare occurrence, the same song is used in three films. The song is “Bhiksha De De Maiya Pingla, Jogi Khada Hai Dwaar…”. The films are ‘Bharthari’ (1944), ‘Raajyogi Bharthari’ (1954), and ‘Gopichand Bharthari’ (1965). Lyricist identified for these songs is Pandit Indra.
  • The song “Bolo Jaywantrao Ek Naam Prem Bhara. . .” appears in ‘Mera Imaan’ (1934) and ‘Swadesh Dewa’ (1946).
  • Interesting re-use – the song “Phool Chun Le Mere Baalam Ki Jaane Kab Daal Jhuke” appears in ‘Naubahaar’ of 1952 and then again in ‘Firdaus’ of 1953. Artist combination is the same – Sahir, Roshan, Lata.
  • Another one – “Baat Chalat Nai Chunari Rang Daali” – appears in film ‘Ladki’ of 1953 and then again in ‘Rani Roopmati’ of 1959.

Then there are films with the same list of songs.

  • ‘Satyanarayan’ of 1948 and ‘Bhikhaari’ of 1949
  • ‘Sushila’ of 1966 and ‘Subah Zaroor Aayegi’ of 1977
  • ‘Amar Kahaani’ of 1949 and ‘Kanchan’ of 1955
  • ‘Sipaahi’ of 1941 and ‘Jangi Jawaani’ of 1943
  • ‘Suhaana Geet’ of 1941 and ‘Toote Dil’ of 1947
  • ‘Ram Bhakti’ of 1958 and ‘Bhakt Raaj’ of 1950
  • ‘Paanch Dushman’ of 1973 and ‘Daulat Ke Dushman’ of 1987

Although not specifically confirmed, in most cases, the above list of film pairs with all songs the same, the situation is that the latter film is a somewhat modified, re-certified and re-released version of the earlier film.

The above sampling is in no way exhaustive. More such instances may be discovered by a more meticulous review of the song lists in Geet Kosh.

But then, this observation has also to be annotated by saying that there are exceptions. There are many known cases where the repeat songs do not appear in the official list of songs of the film. The song may have been used as is without any modifications. The song may be used as an abridged version i.e. the stanzas used in repeat form are less than the original version. Or even when the song may be used quite differently.

These repeat instances of songs do not appear in the list of songs of the latter film. This is confirmed by a quick review of the Geet Kosh listings, which are primarily based on the information from the film booklets, and/or information printed on the gramophone records – 78 rpm records or LPs/EPs. Casual reuse, we may call it. Of course, ownership / copyright / permissions etc. are things that have to be taken care of. But it is always fun to be watching a film (especially when watching for the first time), and one is suddenly confronted with an unexpected song. The song already has a life and existence of its own. And it has its own popularity and following. All of a sudden out of the blue, the song will make a surprise appearance in another film, in another time. And one is simply – wow, एसा भी होता है – such things happen too.

The first song in this series – “Aa Ja Re Pardesi. . .” belongs to this category. As does this fun song that I bring to your notice today. An iconic song – a very typical and very strongly a Mehmood song, from the earlier film ‘Gumnaam’ from 1965, makes an unexpected and surprise appearance in the 1968 film ‘Brahmchaari’. This time around, the song is performed by the Junior incarnation of Mehmood, and he has done a superlative job of presenting this song. This song does not appear in the list of songs of the film ‘Brahmchaari’, and hence, when it appears in the film, the mind takes a double take – okay wow, this song, here.

The situation can be labeled as a ‘male-child item song’ 🙂 . It is just there, does not really add to the storyline content of the film. The children of Shammi Kapoor’s private orphanage are together, along with Mohan Choti, the handy man around the house, and Rajshri, who has descended on to this ‘family’ as a distraught outsider with no place to go. The song is heard on a gramophone player, on which the 78 rpm record is playing.

As I said earlier, Junior Mehmood has done a remarkable job performing this song, at that age. Born in 1956, he was all of 12 years old when he performed this song. A little short in height for his age, this performance is really lovable.

This video clip contains two stanzas, one less from the original three. However, my hunch is that all three were initially included when ‘Brahmchaari’ was released. In this video clip also, as the action moves from the first to the second stanza, there is slight jump in the visual, indicating there might have been a cut made – and the middle stanza was deleted later, for whatever reason.

Avinash ji has been posting a mini series on Junior Mehmood performances in Hindi films, so I will skip getting into more details about this fun child artist. Somehow the natural transformation, as these child artists move from childhood to adolescence to adulthood, does not seem to happen. The success of what their performance is, and the kudos it has drawn, continues to overshadow this required transformation as one grows in years. Very few examples are where an artist of proven merit in child roles has also made a successful career once having grown up. But that discussion is maybe another article, or another series.

Meanwhile, enjoy this really likeable performance, which I am sure will prompt you to go and take a look at the original ‘Gumnaam’ song also. I myself sure did.

Song – Hum Kaale Hain To Kya Hua Dilwaale Hain  (Brahmchaari) (1968) Singers – Mohammed Rafi, Mehmood, Lyrics – Shailendra, MD – Shankar Jaikishan

Lyrics

khayaalon mein
khayaalon mein
khayaalon mein
khayaalon mein

jay hungaama
kahaan bhaag rahi tumen

kya hua. . .
kaale se darr gaye kya
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain
hum tere tere tere chaahne waale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain
hum tere tere tere chaahne waale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain

ye gore gaalaan tandaanaa
ye reshmi baalaan tandaanaa
ye solaa saalaan tandaanaa
haay tere khayaalaan tandaanaa
ye gore gaalaan tandaanaa
ye reshmi baalaan tandaanaa
ye solaa saalaan tandaanaa
haay tere khayaalaan tandaanaa
hum tere tere tere chaahne waale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain
hum tere tere tere chaahne waale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain

hamay maanaa ghareeb hain tandaanaa
soorat se ajeeb hain tandaanaa
par phir bhi naseeb hai tandaanaa
ke tere khareeb hain tandaanaa
hamey maanaa ghareeb hain tandaanaa
soorat se ajeeb hain tandaanaa
par phir bhi naseeb hai tandaanaa
ke tere khareeb hain tandaanaa
hum tere tere tere chaahne waale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain
hum tere tere tere chaahne waale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain
hamay kaale hain to kya hua dilwaale hain

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

ख़यालों में
ख़यालों में
ख़यालों में
ख़यालों में

जे हंगामा
कहाँ भाग रई तूमे

क्या हुआ॰ ॰ ॰
काले से डर गए क्या
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं
हम तेरे तेरे तेरे चाहने वाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं
हम तेरे तेरे तेरे चाहने वाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं

ये गोरे गालाँ तन्दाणा
ये रेशमी बालाँ तन्दाणा
ये सोला सालाँ तन्दाणा
हये तेरे ख्यालाँ तन्दाणा
ये गोरे गालाँ तन्दाणा
ये रेशमी बालाँ तन्दाणा
ये सोला सालाँ तन्दाणा
हये तेरे ख्यालाँ तन्दाणा
हम तेरे तेरे तेरे चाहने वाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं
हम तेरे तेरे तेरे चाहने वाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं

हमे माना ग़रीब हैं तन्दाणा
सूरत से अजीब हैं तन्दाणा
पर फिर भी नसीब है तन्दाणा
के तेरे क़रीब हैं तन्दाणा
हमे माना ग़रीब हैं तन्दाणा
सूरत से अजीब हैं तन्दाणा
पर फिर भी नसीब है तन्दाणा
के तेरे क़रीब हैं तन्दाणा
हम तेरे तेरे तेरे चाहने वाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं
हम तेरे तेरे तेरे चाहने वाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं
हमे काले हइं तो क्या हुआ दिलवाले हइं


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3979 Post No. : 15065

Today’s song is from film ‘Aaj Ki Baat’ (1955).

In one of his earliest posts, Atul ji had said that the Indian people like to talk about 3 things – politics, films and cricket. How true it was. . . till Whatsapp and Facebook became an obsession for most people in India. Now you see different, sometimes even strange topics being discussed with taste. Additionally, there are wise people to give you free doses of a variety of knowledge. In all this crowd, sometimes one finds even a few intelligent posts too !

Recently, I saw a video by National Geographic. It showed how a mother bear saves her wayward baby bear, from almost certain clutches of a hungry lion. Motherly love or love for children is a common factor among animals and humans. While animals try to protect their babies from enemies, starvation and life threatening situations, human parents try to provide the goodies of life and a paying career line to their children.

Film people are no different in this. Almost every successful star wishes that his children join this line and be famous and successful. However, they forget that in their own case they had struggled hard to earn their place in the life and more importantly they forget that talents are not necessarily hereditary !

When I chose today’s Talat song from film ‘Aaj Ki Baat’, I realised that this was the launching film for Ajit Chitnis – son of ace actress Leela Chitnis. Unfortunately, the film career of Ajit Chitnis never took off beyond his first and the only film. Actually, Ajit was a qualified commercial pilot, but he could not get a job in any air line. Consequently, he became a victim of alcoholism and was spoiled further. To help him settle in life, his mother-Leela Chitnis tried to bring him in film line. When she noticed her contemporary, Shobhana Samarth produced a film ‘Hamari Beti’ (1950), to launch her daughter Nutan, Leela too decided to produce a film to launch one of her two sons as an actor. She chose Ajit as he was elder and needed help. Manvendra (Leela used to call him as ‘Meena’) was not launched ceremoniously, but later he acted in 4 films in side roles. In his last film,’Ramu To Deewana Hai’ (1980) he even shared the credits with his mother. The history of most star sons in films is not very encouraging. In fact, success and failure ratio may be 10 to 90 percent in success and failures.

It is said that ‘No tree can grow under a Banyan tree’. This is absolutely true and applicable in film industry. Except in cases like the Kapoor family, i.e. Raj, Shammi and Shashi,who made their bright careers despite the shadow of their father and other brothers, we find that many of the sons, daughters, brothers or sisters of many popular and famous film stars were failures and never made it big in Hindi cinema.

We know cases like Suneil Anand, Nasir Khan, Tony Walker, Naina Sahu, Meera Joglekar, Ajit Chitnis, Rajendranath, Narendranath, Anoop Kumar, Mallika, Khursheed Jr., Simple Kapadiya, Shivangi Kolhapure,  Preeti Ganguly and many more. In spite of having all the backing of the famous family member, these and such many others just did not make it, because Talents are not always hereditary !

They all were given a fair opportunity to display their talent on the screen , but unfortunately despite their honest effort  their skill could not come out  & the viewers were left unimpressed . They were selected by big banners and well experienced directors were there to guide them. But  their talent remained hidden inside them and with their nonexistent artistry they disappointed their mentors. Non-actor Sohan Kapila was in the romantic lead of Filmistan’s ‘Babar’, which was released in 1960. This film was directed by Hemen Gupta, the distinguished director, who earlier had directed ‘Anand Matth’ (1952) for Filmistan. The film, also had the winning combination of Sahir and Roshan.  Dependable character actor Gajanan Jagirdar played the role of the great Mughal Emperor Babar . But the movie flopped, as the new hero failed pathetically to register  any emotion on his face. A big jolt for Seth Tola Ram Jalaan, who was already facing financial problems. Mr. Kapila appeared in 2-3 movies in inconsequential roles and disappeared from scene for ever. His daughter Padmini Kapila also pursued a career in films, but could not achieve much success .

There were many other actors like him, who got a chance to appear opposite illustrious heroines, unfortunately their effort did not make any impact on the cine loving public. Watching their miserable performance on the screen, no film maker came forward to sign them.  Out of sight is out of mind, it was matter of time when public as well as film industry forgot them.

‘Malhaar’, as the name suggests, is a musical film produced by the great singer Mukesh in 1951 . It had story by veteran actor SK Prem and its evergreen music was composed by Roshan. The movie had new comers Arjun and Shammi (Nargis Rabaadi). Arjun did get another chance in ‘Daku Ki Ladki’ (1954) to please the viewers with his emoting before the camera, but could not succeed and it was end of his career.

Rattan Chopra, the lucky boy was selected for films, among hundreds of aspirants. Mohan Kumar had suffered a huge set back when ‘Aman’ flopped. He  took the newcomer for ‘Mom Ki Gudia’ (1972) opposite Tanuja, with great hopes.  Unfortunately, the film failed to dispel the gloom and sank to the rock bottom. Acting was not his cup of tea, Rattan Chopra understood and wisely opted out of the race of stardom.

Director Amarnath introduced new comer Vijay Kumar in his 1954 offering ‘Alif Laila’ opposite Nimmi and Asha Mathur.  Sohan Kapila and Vijay Kumar had impressive physique, but had no clue about acting. The movie had lilting music by Shyam Sunder, which was his last contribution towards film industry. Helen for the first time got a chance to perform solo in the movie and for many decades she remained on top. But for Vijay Kumar it was his first & last chance.

Another non actor Premendra was introduced by old timer Vijay Bhatt in ‘Holi Aayee Re’ (1970), which was directed by his younger sibling Harsukh Bhatt.  It was pathetic to watch Premendra unsuccessfully trying to show case his imaginary ability in the field of acting .The movie flopped phenomenally and a huge investment made by Bhatt Brothers went up in a cloud of smoke.

There were some more like Pratibha Sinha, Archan Gupta, Jayant Gupta, Ashok Sharma,  Nusrat Kardar, Rajeev Kapoor, Manish Kumar, Navin Chandra, Aroop Kumar, Prashant, Shalini, Kaycee Mehra, Vikram, Shekhar Suman, Deepak Kumar, Ajay, Som Dutt and many more. Among them, some film names which I remember off hand are Deepak Kumar in ‘Aabroo’ (1968), ‘Ajay’ in ‘Wapas’ (1969), Som Dutt in ‘Mann Ka Meet’ (1968), Vikram in ‘Julie’ (1975), Rajeev Kapoor in ‘Raam Teri Ganga Maili (1985), Shekhar Suman in ‘Utsav’ (1984), Kaycee Mehra in ‘Chhabilee’ (1960) and Mem Didi (1961), Prashant in ‘Sehra’ (1963), Ashok Sharma in ‘Hamari Yaad Aayegi’ (1961), Ajit Chitnis in ‘Aaj Ki Baat’ (1955), Nusrat Kardar in ‘Dard’ (1947), Manish in ‘Saraswati Chandra’ (1968), Rajiv in ‘Nayi Umar Ki Nayi Fasal’ (1965), Aroop Kumar in ‘Bezubaan’ (1962) etc. There could be more such examples. Readers can give their comments.

According to what Leela Chitnis wrote in her autobiography, ‘Chanderi Duniyet’ (‘चंदेरी दुनियेत’), during the period 1952-53 she was in a very bad financial position. Her health had worsened due to a wrong operation and then a corrective surgery. Valuable time and all money was lost in this. To come out of this situation, she planned to produce a film launching Ajit. As the luck would have it, the film started in 1953, but took 2 years to complete. The rights were sold to a distribution company. They released the film first in Punjab, where it flopped miserably. Then it was not released anywhere at all and went into the cans forever. This was a great shock to Chitnis family.

The film had 8 songs. 2 songs are already discussed here. This is the 3rd song, sung by Talat Mehmood. Written by Raj Baldev Raj, it was composed by the ‘Gentleman Maestro’ – Snehal Bhatkar.

White full shirt, ironed white Pyjama, spectacles with big powerful lenses and the trademark white Gandhi Topi. He could easily be mistaken for a ‘Pandharpur Warkari‘ (a regular pilgrim to Pandharpur) or a member of a ‘Bhajani Mandali’ or simply a middle class ‘Marathi Manoos’. Such was the appearance of one of Hindi filmdom’s talented yet not so famous, music maestro VASUDEV GANGARAM BHATKAR or Snehal Bhatkar as we all love to know him.

In Hindi film music field, there were some talented composers like Ghulam Mohd, Mohd Shafi, Iqbal Qureshi, Daan Singh, C Arjun, Ramlal, Sardar Malik, Ajit Merchant, Jamaal Sen, Dattaram, Ganesh, Snehal Bhatkar etc., who could never reach the peaks of their careers. They really deserved this, but luck did not favour them. Big Banners never approached them and the losers were the lovers of music in India. They did not know, perhaps, how to sell their art. May be, they never wanted to enslave the music to gain name and fame, instead they preferred to settle for service to the music!

Bhatkar was one such composer. ‘Simple living and high thinking’ – never worked in this mayanagari, but he had no regrets. Till the end he was contented with whatever God gave him, whatever name and success he achieved. He was born into a family and grew in such atmosphere which was surrounded by traditional devotional music all around. In the lower middle class, the people had their entertainments in singing bhajans and doing keertans in temples en masse.

He was born on 17-7-1919. Vasudev G. Bhatkar knew at least 100 Bhajans by heart by the time he was in his 10th class. He was invited to sing in Ganesh Melas and other celebrations and soon became a well known name in the locality. Because of his singing and skills in playing harmonium and other instruments, he got a job in HMV in Bombay. Here he used to give accompaniment on harmonium to renowned classical singers. At the same time, taking cognizance of his singing skills, many Marathi bhavgeets and bhajans were recorded by HMV in those days. Some of them are popular in Maharashtra even today.

All the while, Bhatkar was looking for opportunity to compose in films. Sudhir Phadke, who too served in HMV and recorded some songs from 1943 to 1945, joined hands with Bhatkar and made a pair – Vasudev-Sudhir. They got a film of Baburao Painter ‘Rukmini Swayamvar’ in 1946 for music direction. The problem was due to his service in HMV, he could not openly work outside, hence he only gave his name as Vasudev. After this film the pair separated and Phadke went to give music to films like ‘Gokul’, ‘Aagey Badho’ etc. Due to financial constraints Bhatkar was unable to leave the job also.

In 1941, Bhatkar had come to know Kidar Sharma while recording songs for his film ‘Chitralekha’, which he was making for Ranjit Studios. Sharma had just come from Calcutta, to establish himself in Bombay. He had a knack of identifying talents. He gave chance to Bhatkar first to sing some songs with Leela Sawant in his film ‘Kaliyan’ (1944). After ‘Rukmini Swayamvar’, Kidar Sharma gave him his first break as independent composer in his ‘Neel Kamal’ in 1947. For this film, Bhatkar used the name  B Vasudev. Kidar Sharma had launched Raj Kapoor and Madhubala in adult roles as the lead pari in this film. It also launched Bhatkar, albeit in a pseudo-name. In the subsequent years Bhatkar used different names for different films-

  • ‘Suhaag Raat’ (1948) – as Snehal
  • ‘Sant Tukaram’ (1948) – as VG Bhatkar (he sang 6 songs also)
  • ‘Thes’ (1949) – as Snehal
  • ‘Sati Ahilya’ (1949) – as VG Bhatkar
  • ‘Pagle’ (1950) – as VG Bhatkar

After completing ‘Thes’ and ‘Sati Ahilya’, Bhatkar resigned from HMV.

He and Kidar Sharma were very good friends. Kidar gave him ‘Neki Aur Badi’ in 1949. He started the work. Meanwhile, Kidar Sharma met Roshan Nagrath in some musical event. Sharma was terribly impressed with Roshan and wanted to give him a break in his film. At that point of time, Kidar had just started work on ‘Neki Aur Badi’. He had a heart to heart talk with Bhatkar and Bhatkar gladly left the film for Roshan. Thus Roshan got his break with this film. Roshan never forgot Bhatkar’s magnanimity in his life and always respected Bhatkar.

In return Kidar Sharma gave ‘Hamari Beti’ (1950) to Bhatkar.  As he was a free bird now, Bhatkar started using the name Snehal Bhatkar from this film onward. Snehal was the short form of Snehalata, his daughter. Snehal Bhatkar did many Marathi films and recorded many bhajans in Marathi, which are ever popular. He did 27 films in Hindi and 12 films in Marathi. Out of 27 Hindi films, 9 were made by Kidar Sharma.

The song which made Mubarak Begum and Bhatkar famous in India was “Kabhi Tanhayion Mein, Hamari Yaad Aayegi” from the film ‘Hamari Yaad Aayegi’ (1961). (This film was was originally named ‘Jawaan Muhabbat’). Actually this song was to be done by Lata Mangeshkar. Lata had already recorded two songs for this film. Due to her extremely busy schedule she was unable to do this song, so she suggested the name of Asha Bhosle. However, already upset over Lata’s refusal, Kidar Sharma opted for Mubarak Begum and the rest is history-as they say. She made a gold of this song with her special voice.

After 1960, the musical scene in India was undergoing drastic changes and there was no space for composers like Bhatkar, who used minimum orchestra and dwelt upon melody. His films came after long intervals. Even Kidar Sharma left him after ‘Fariyad’ (1964) (only to return in ‘Pehla Kadam’ in 1980). Finally Bhatkar did his last film ‘Sehme Huye Sitaare’ in 1994, which featured his son Ramesh Bhatkar-who was already a popular hero in Marathi film, stage and TV. This obscure film did nothing good to Bhatkar.

After retirement Bhatkar devoted his time for children’s welfare and his original love – bhajan mandali singing.

Snehal or Vasudev Gangaram Bhatkar, together with cousin Devji Bhatkar and Panchambuwa Pandurang Shivalkar, was the founder member of ‘Vishwambhar Prasadik Bhajan Mandal’ in Dadar. It is still in operation after 50 years, with new set of singers. Bhatkar was very kind hearted. Every year, during Ganapati festival he used to visit his ancestral village ‘Bhate’ in Ratnagiri district and participate in singing bhajans.

Lata, Talat and Mukesh were his favourite singers. Talat, though has not sung many songs for him, his song “Zindagi Kis Mod Pe Laayee Hamein” from ‘Diwali Ki Raat’ (1956) was very popular. When rehearsals for this song were being done, Bhatkar had used only tabla and sitar for the practice session. The producer who chanced upon this rehearsal was so much impressed with this that he insisted recording the song only with minimum instruments. So, this song has only tabla, Sitar and another instrument for accompaniment.

Though there were many melodious songs composed by Bhatkar like, Khusro’s “Lakhi Baabul More Kaahe Ko Deeni Bides” sung soulfully by Mukesh in ‘Suhag Raat’ (1948); “Ro’oge Pachhtaoge” by Mukesh and Rajkumari in ‘Thes’ (1949); Lata’s “Chanda Tumko Laaj Na Ayee” from ‘Bhola Shankar’ (1951); Suman Kalyanpur’s “Haal e Dil Un Ko Sunaana Tha” from ‘Fariyaad’ (1964), except Kidar sharma no other big banner producer opted for Snehal Bhatkar. May be, his compositions were not so simple for common man to hum or sing, although they were quality songs.

Inspite of several melodious songs Bhatkar was never counted among the 1st line composers. Kidar Sharma also returned to him in 1980, but by that time Snehal Bhatkar was already on a descending track.

Snehal Bhatkar, a talented but not much applauded music director died peacefully on 29-5-2007 at his Dadar home.

Here is the song by Talat Mehmood from film Aaj ki baat-1955.

(My thanks to Shri MN Sardana ji for his post in ‘Voh Din Yaad Karo’ on Facebook, from which some information has been used herein.)

Song – Pyaar Ki Nazron Se Un Ko Dekhta Jaata Hai Dil (Aaj Ki Baat) (1955) Singer – Talat Mehmood, Lyrics – Raj Baldev Raj, MD – Snehal Bhatkar

Lyrics

aaaaaa aaaaaa
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaa
aaaaaa aaaaaa aaaaaaa
aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaaaa

pyaar ki nazron se un ko
dekhta jaata hai dil
pyaar ki nazron ki nazron se un ko
dekhta jaata hai dil
baat un ke saamne kehne se
ghabraata hai dil

kya hua mujhko
hai mere dil ki dhadkan tez tez
kya hua mujhko
hai mere dil ki dhadkan tez tez
thaamna mujhko ke seene se
uda jaata hai dil
baat un ke saamne kehne se
ghabraata hai dil

aaye hain wo zindagi
aaye hain wo zindagi
kadmon mein un ke daal de
kadmon mein un ke daal de
dil ko samjhaati hain nazren
mujhko samjhaata hai dil
baat un ke saamne kehne se
ghabraata hai dil

ho gai shaayad mohabbat
ho gayi un se mujhe
ho gai shaayad mohabbat
ho gayi un se mujhe
jab khayaal aata hai un ka
khud behal jaata hai dil
baat un ke saamne kehne se
ghabraata hai dil

———-———————————————–
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

आsssss आsssss
आsss आssss आsssss
आsssss आsssss आssssss
आsss आsss आsss आsssss

प्यार की नज़रों से उनको
देखता जाता है दिल
प्यार की नज़रों से उनको
देखता जाता है दिल
बात उनके सामने कहने से
घबराता है दिल

क्या हुआ मुझको
है मेरे दिल की धड़कन तेज़ तेज़
क्या हुआ मुझको
है मेरे दिल की धड़कन तेज़ तेज़
थामना मुझको के सीने से
उड़ा जाता है दिल
बात उनके सामने कहने से
घबराता है दिल

आए हैं वो ज़िंदगी
आए हैं वो ज़िंदगी
कदमों में उनके डाल दे
कदमों में उनके डाल दे
दिल को समझाती हैं नज़रें
मुझको समझाता है दिल
बात उनके सामने कहने से
घबराता है दिल

हो गई शायद मोहब्बत
हो गई उनसे मुझे
हो गई शायद मोहब्बत
हो गई उनसे मुझे
जब खयाल आता है उनका
खुद बहल जाता है दिल
बात उनके सामने कहने से
घबराता है दिल


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3977 Post No. : 15064

Today (8 june 2019) is the birthday of Dimple Khanna nee Kapadia (Dob 8 june 1957). She was 16 years old when her debut movie “Bobby”(1973) took Hindi movie world by storm. This dubut movie was goin to be her first and only movie for next decade. After “Bobby”(1973) came the surprise announcement of her marriage to the reigning superstar Rajesh Khanna in 1973. Rajesh Khanna at that time was 31, viz twice in age to her.

Two daughters, viz Twinkle and Rinke were born to her. She separated from Rajesh Khanna in 1982 and resumed her acting career in 1984.

In her second innings as an actress, she got “mature” roles, though she was only in her early 30s at that time.

One of her well acclaimed films of that era was “Aitbaar”(1985). This suspense movie was produced by Romesh Sharma and directed by Mukul Anand. The movie had Dimple Kapadia,Raj Babbar, Suresh Oberoi, Danny Denzongpa, Leena Das, Huma Khan, Sharat Saxena, Anupam Kher, Ghanshyam Roherra, Pradeep Singh, Shivraj, Pankaj Kapur etc in it.

The movie had five songs in it. Two of these songs have been covered in the past.

Today, on the occasion of the birthday of Dimple Kapadia, here is this song from “Aitbaar”(1985). This song is sung by Bhupinder Singh and Asha Bhonsle. Hasan Kamaal is the lyricist. Music is composed by Bappi Lahiri.

The song is picturised as a piano cum get together song. Suresh Oberoi is seated at the piano, whereas the song is lip synced by him and Dimple Kapadia, as Raj Babbar dances with Dimple.

The lyrics of this song were sent in by Prakashchandra ji.


Song-Aawaaz di hai aaj ik nazar ne(Aitbaar)(1985) Singers-Bhupinder Singh, Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Hasan Kamal, MD-Bappi Lahiri

Lyrics (provided by Prakashchandra ji)

aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa

aawaaz di hai aaj ik nazar ne
ya hai ye dil ko gumaan
dohra rahi hai jaise fazaayen
bhooli hui daastaan
aawaaz di hai aaj ik nazar ne
ya hai ye dil ko gumaan
dohra rahi hai jaise fazaayen
bhooli hui daastaan
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
laut aai hai phir roothi bahaaren
kitna haseen hai samaa
duniya se keh do
na hamko pukaren
hum kho gaye hai yahaan
laut aai hai phir roothi bahaaren
kitna haseen hai samaa
duniya se keh do
na hamko pukaren
hum kho gaye hai yahaan

jeewan mein kitni viraniyan thin
chhaayi thi kaisi udaasi
sun kar kisi ke kadmon ki aahat
halchal hui hai zara si
ho
jeewan mein kitni viraniyan thin
chhaayi thi kaisi udaasi
sun kar kisi ke kadmon ki aahat
halchal hui hai zara si
saagar mein jaise lahren uthhi hain
tooti hain khaamoshiyaan
dohra rahi hain jaise fazaayen
bhooli hui daastaan

aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
toofaan mein khoyi kashti ko aakhir
mil hi gaya phir kinaara
ham chhod aaye khwaabon ki duniya
dil ne tere jab pukaara
toofaan mein khoyi kashti ko aakhir
mil hi gaya phir kinaara
ham chhod aaye khwaabon ki duniya
dil ne tere jab pukaara
kabse khadi thhin baahen pasaare
is dil ki tanhaaiyaan
duniya se keh do
na ham ko pukaaren
ham kho gaye hain yahaan

ab yaad aaya
kitna adhoora
ab tak thha dil ka fasaana aa
yoon paas aake
dil mein samaa ke
daamaan na hamse chhudaana

ab yaad aaya
kitna adhoora
ab tak thha dil ka fasaana aa
yoon paas aake
dil mein samaa ke
daamaan na hamse chhudaana
jin raaston par tere kadam hon
manzil hai meri wahaan
duniya se kah do
na ham ko pukare
ham kho gaye hain yahaan


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3976 Post No. : 15063 Movie Count :

4133

Missing Films of 1960s – 111
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

“हम तो डूबेंगे सनम, तुमको भी ले डूबेंगे।“
(“hum to doobenge sanam, tumko bhi le doobenge”)

(I will drown no doubt my dear, but will take you down with me.)

Some conversations, some words, touch a certain nerve inside that they simply cannot be forgotten.  And some of them go even a step further.  Some such words become so indelibly ingrained in the collective memory of a society that they end up becoming a part of the current lingua franca, an idiom that normal people begin to use in everyday conversations.

The above dialogue is one such example. This phrase has become part of the Hindustani exchange – I am sure this is a matter of current experience for all of us. Let me tell you where this dialogue comes from. The earliest occurrence that I am aware of is this being used in a film – well, 68 years ago. The year was 1951. The film maker was Raj Kapoor. The film was ‘Aawaara’. The scene in reference is / was considered a daring scene in those times. Nargis and Raj Kapoor are seen in swimming costumes, in a splashing pool close to a beach. This comes a little before the song “Dum Bhar Jo Udhar Munh Phere. . .”.

Nargis invites RK to dive into the pool. RK feigns fear, as if expressing he does not know how to swim. This exchange is all through facial expressions. Nargis dives into the pool. RK follows. Nargis quickly scrambles out of the pool, then tells RK that the water is deep, and he might drown. RK lunges at Nargis’ hand and tries to pull her back into the pool, and speaks this dialogue – “हम तो डूबेंगे सनम, तुमको भी ले डूबेंगे।“.

The dialogues of ‘Aawaara’ (as also the story) are written by Khwaja Ahmed Abbas or KA Abbas for short. As a writer, he was associated with Raj Kapoor and RK Films all the way from ‘Aawaara’ in 1951 to ‘Henna’ in 1991. He had passed away in 1987. Raj Kapoor had started making ‘Henna’, but then he himself passed away in 1988. The film was completed by Randhir Kapoor.

The association he shared with Raj Kapoor lasted almost 4 decades. The association stands the testimony of ideology – KA Abbas was a very active member of both IPTA (Indian People’s Theatre Association) and PWA (Progressive Writers Association). And Raj Kapoor and his socialistic ideology as expressed in films like ‘Aawaara’, ‘Shri 420’, ‘Boot Polish’, ‘Ab Dilli Door Nahin’, ‘Jaagte Raho’ etc. These films have a focus on the underprivileged in the society, and are a call to make a better society.

The word “progress and progressive” attached with it has a history of its own. In 19th century England, the word progressive was the battle cry of all those who wanted a better deal for the underprivileged and wanted science and technology to spearhead the movement for social development. It stood for liberation and democracy. Munshi Prem Chand, doyen of Urdu writers, had delivered the Presidential Address of the first meeting of the PWA. It was a movement for the freedom-loving writers who were opposed to the status quo in the feudal-dominated Indian society. They thought that unless the Indian society was not transformed and the common masses were not in the driving seat, nothing could change. Writers like Krishan Chander, Ismat Chugtai, Saadat Hasan Manto, Ahmad Nadeem Qasmi, Ali Sardar Jafri, Sibte Hassan, Ehtesham Hussain, Mumtaz Hussain, Sahir Ludhianvi, Kaifi Azmi, Ali Abbas Hussaini, Makhdoom Mohiuddin, Farigh Bukhari, Khatir Ghaznavi, Raza Hamdani, M Ibrahim Joyo, Sobho Gianchandani, Shaikh Ayaz, Rajinder Singh Bedi, Amrita Pritam, Ali Sikandar, Zoe Ansari, Majaz Lucknawi, and yes, Khwaja Ahmed Abbas, made it the strongest literary movement.

My earliest introduction to Abbas Sb was sometimes in mid 1960s. Although we watched the movies diligently, on TV and on the big screen, it was not yet time to grasp all the names that came while the credits were rolling. Becoming familiar with the story writer or the art director or the choreographer, was still a few years hence. What stuck to my mind was really a very out of the way encounter. It was a tele-film which probably no one remembers any more. But somehow, that film and the name has simply remained glued in memory. It wasn’t accompanied by any pompous announcements etc. It was just a film, that happened to get telecast when I happened to be sitting in front of the television at a neighbour’s house one evening. The title of the film is ‘India, My India’. It was a very interesting documentary. Starting with the very early morning hour – like 5 am, the telefilm captured vignettes of rural and urban lifein India, from different parts of the country. For every hour, the location would change. And for the next about 5 minutes, the viewer was treated to a sampling of the local life and local color at that hour of the day, accompanied by a narrative description. Over a period of two hours, 24 different locations of the country were mapped into this documentary, showing life as it happens, at different times in a cycle of 24 hours. To my tiny intelligence, this was a wonderful new experience, and I am sure a wonderful new experiment for its creator.

Another place where this name was highlighted every week, was on the last page of the weekly tabloid – Blitz, published from Bombay and Delhi. Being a journalist household, we always had a huge selection of newspapers and magazines delivered every morning. Blitz was one of the weekly papers that was the staple of many member of our household (a joint family setup at that time). For me, Blitz was an attraction because it always carried something ‘scandalous and titillating’ 😉 . Of course, the name of KA Abbas was always prominently posted on the last page of the weekly edition, quite appropriately titled the ‘Last Page’. I remember I used to read it with interest, because it was always a wry and a sideways look at the socio-political current affairs. A good read, because it introduced many a names to my still fledgling memory, names that would become important in later decades.

KA Abbas was born in Panipat (now in Haryana). He came into a family of erudite scholars with a history of good education and social involvement. His father was a celebrated Urdu poet, Khwaja Altaf Hussain Hali, a student and scholar of Mirza Ghalib. His grandfather Khwaja Gulam Abbas was one of the leaders of the first war of independence in 1857 – the first celebrated martyr of Panipat who was blown from the mouth of a cannon. Abbas’s father graduated from Aligarh Muslim University, was a tutor of a prince and a prosperous businessman. He spearheaded an effort to modernise the preparation and manufacture of Unani medicines. Abbas’s mother, Masroor Khatoon, was the daughter of Sajjad Husain, an enlightened educationist. Abbas took his early education in ‘Hali Muslim High School’, which was established by his great grand father Hali. He was instructed in reading the Arabic text of the Quran. Abbas completed his matriculation at the age of fifteen. He did his B.A. with English literature in 1933 and LLB in 1935 from Aligarh Muslim University.

Abbas began his career as a journalist with ‘National Call’, a New Delhi based newspaper after finishing his BA. Simultaneously, while doing his LLB in 1934, he started ‘Aligarh Opinion’, India’s first university students’ weekly during the pre-independence period. In 1935, Abbas came to Bombay and joined ‘The Bombay Chronicle’. He occasionally served as a film critic. An event transpired and the film editor of the paper passed away. Abbas got promoted to be the editor of the film section.

While at The Bombay Chronicle, (1935–1947), he started a weekly column called ‘Last Page’, which he continued when he joined the Blitz magazine. ‘Last Page’, (‘Azad Kalam’ in the Urdu edition). This column continued till Abbas Sb passed away in 1987, making this the longest-running political column in India’s history (1935–87). A collection of these columns was later published as two books.

In 1936, a few months after having come to Bombay and starting work at ‘The Bombay Chronicle’, a meeting with Himanshu Rai and Devika Rani happened. As a result, the young journalist took his first steps into the film industry. He started working as a copywriter and a publicist for Bombay Talkies. And shortly thereafter, he sold his first story and screenplay to Bombay Talkies – the film being ‘Naya Sansaar’ (1941).

The world of Hindi cinema quickly opened up to him. Here was an energetic young man with liberal outlook and a new expression, seeking to inject a new wave into the world of cinema. ‘Naya Sansar’ was the first such offering. He won the Bombay Film Journalists Association (BFJA) award for the best screenplay in 1942, for this film.

1943 – the great famine of Bengal happened. A story took a foothold in his mind. He wrote the story, the screenplay, became a producer and a director also in the same step – the result was the 1945 release of ‘Dharti Ke Lal’. KA Abbas had fired the first volley of the neo-realist socially aware cinema in India. The film was made under the banner of IPTA.

In parallel, he wrote the script for Chetan Anand’s ‘Neecha Nagar’ and V Shantatram’s ‘Dr Kotnis Ki Amar Kahaani’. Both films were released in 1946.  ‘Neecha Nagar’ went on to win the Palme d’Or (Golden Palm) award at the Cannes Film Festival, in one of the three categories – the only Indian film to have that honor in the history of our industry.

In 1951, he set up his own banner – ‘Naya Sansaar’, and went on to create some very iconic films in the history of Indian cinema. Commercial success not being the criteria, the value of social awareness and the commentary on the state of current affairs in the society simply cannot be measured. A short sampling of his critically acclaimed work is as follows,

1951: Screenplay for ‘Awaara’, nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

1956: Screenplay for ‘Jaagte Raho’, won the Crystal Globe Grand Prix at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival in 1957 and the Certificate of Merit at the fourth National Film Awards.

1958 Screenplay and direction for ‘Pardesi’, nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

1960: Direction for ‘Eid Mubarak’ (children’s documentary) , got All India Certificate of Merit for the Second Best Children’s Film

1964: Screenplay, production and direction for ‘Shehar Aur Sapna, won the National Film Award for Best Feature Film

1965: Direction for ‘Hamaara Ghar’, won award at the International Film Festival, Santa Barbara, USA

1970: Screenplay, production and direction for ‘Saat Hindustani’, won the Nargis Dutt Award for Best Feature Film on National Integration at National Film Awards

1972: Screenplay, production and direction for ‘Do Boond Pani’, won the Nargis Dutt Award for Best Feature Film on National Integration at National Film Awards

Other major films he was associated with either as screenplay/story writer, producer, or director – or all of the roles, include ‘Aaj Aur Kal’ (1947), ‘Anhonee’ (1952), ‘Raahi’ (1953), ‘Munna’ (1954), ‘Shree 420’ (1955), ‘Chaar Dil Chaar Raahen’ (1959), ‘Gyaarah Hazaar Ladkiaan’ (1962), ‘Aasmaan Mahal’, (1965), ‘Bambai Raat Ki Baahon Mein’ (1967), ‘Mera Naam Joker’ (1970), ‘Bobby’ (1973), ‘Achaanak’ (1973), ‘Faaslah’ (1974), ‘The Naxalites’ (1980), ‘Love In Goa’ (1983), ‘Ek Aadmi’ (1988), and ‘Henna’ (1991).

As a journalist, he met with and interviewed several renowned world leaders and notable personalities – including the Russian Prime Minister Khrushchev, American President Franklin Roosevelt, Charlie Chaplin, Mao-Tse-Tung and Yuri Gagarin.

As a writer, he has authored more than 70 books in his lifetime in Hindi, Urdu and English.

In 1963, Abbas wrote, produced and directed ‘Shehar Aur Sapna’. This film is an experience totally different. The theme of the film is the dream city of Bombay, and the severe housing problem it faces. The myth of this city attracts thousands of young men who arrive here every day, with a dream of their own. But the harsh realities of making a living, and of having a roof on one’s head in this city, is an experience that can shatter many a tough determined minds.

The story is told through the experiences of Bhola, a young man – almost a village bumpkin, who comes to Bombay in search of livelihood, and Radha, a young woman also from a distant village, who is duped into a sham marriage, and is then plowed into flesh trade, from where she dares to escape, to start living on her own terms in this cruel and heartless city. For a time, their home is an abandoned drain pipe. Their support system is a trio of good samaritans, who themselves are inhabitants of the world of footpath dwellers – roles played by David, Anwar Hussain and Nana Palsikar. Manmohan Krishan plays the role of a wandering homeless poet (shades of ‘Matwaala Shaayar Ram Joshi’) who is a mute observer to all the events that transpire in the lives of this set of characters.

The progression of the storyline came as a shock to many who had never visited Bombay. No doubt the events depicted are dramatized to a certain extent, but surely they are also grounded in the realities of the living experience of this city. As the film comes to a close, the young couple are now parents to a newborn, their temporary shelter hosted by the three samaritans has been razed by bulldozers, to clear the way for an apartment complex being built by a rich builder, their drain-pipe home has finally found the purpose it was originally intended for – that is, the pipeline is laid and the drain pipe buried into the earth. The closing shot of the film shows the couple walking into a dying dusk, carrying the baby and their worldly belongings in a couple of makeshift shoulder bags, not knowing where to head – maybe towards a dream – a ‘sapna’, and nothing else.

A time of his own life that Abbas Sb has talked about in his writings and interviews – he too had slept of the footpaths of Bombay during his initial days in the city. As he prepared to shoot this film, he actually walked through the streets and bylanes of the city where the have-nots dwell in large numbers, at all times of the day and in all types of weather, to be able to recreate the landscape in the film to tell the story he wanted to. People making homes in drain pipes is a reality that he has seen and experienced. So it came quite naturally that he is able to present these sequences so convincingly.

The film is written, produced and directed by KA Abbas, under his own banner – Naya Sansaar, Bombay. The roles of the lead pair Bhola and Radha, are performed by Dilip Raj (son of the renowned P Jairaj) and Surekha Parkar. The rest of the cast is listed as Nana Palsikar, Manmohan Krishan, David, Anwar Hussain, Asit Sen, Jagdish Kanwal, Rasheed Khan, Ravikant, Ram Murty, Nazeer Kashmiri, Narbada Shankar, Moti Beena, Master Javed, and Pardesi amongst others.

Coming to the music of this film – the thing that makes the music of this film some sort of a rarity is the fact that it was never released on gramophone records. The songs of this film are essentially a recitation of poetry that occurs at four points in the story line. The poet protagonist is Manmohan Krishan. He is the one who sings all these four pieces, accompanying significant moments in this film. The lines of this poetry are penned by Ali Sardar Jafri and the music direction is by JP Kaushik (aka Jag Phool Kaushik).

The rare thing about these poetical pieces is of course their availability. These renditions were never released on gramophone records. Furhter, despite being an award winning film, the film itself has become a rarity, not available easily in public domain. Our dear friend from Jaipur, Pawan Jha, has uploaded one poetical segment elsewhere on YouTube. In absence of the availability of all the four pieces of poetry, I have extracted and edited the four pieces into a single video clip, from a copy of the film which itself is not the best. But no complaints – at least we have what we have. Small blessings that all the four poetical pieces are available. I debated and discussed with friends, whether this should be four different poetical renditions. As one listens to the four pieces, one can make out the one single thread that runs through these four pieces, giving credence to the Geet Kosh listings that lists these four pieces as parts 1 to 4. And so I felt it important to present them together as one poem with four parts. In the edited clip, I have included a very small segment of the film appearing just before each part presents itself in the storyline, to get a flavor of the backdrop against which each of these parts is presented.

The interesting thing about this post is that the film makes its debut today on our blog, and simultaneously, we can also declare it as yippeee’d – all the songs of this film are now posted. And it also brings us close, very close, to the culmination of this series of bringing on board the missing films of 1960s.

As one reviews the history of Indian cinema, one does not, should not categorize the luminaries like Satyajit Ray, Bimal Roy, Raj Kapoor, K Asif, Chetan Anand, Ritwick Ghatak, Mehboob Khan, Mrinal Sen, Rituparno Ghosh, Muzzafar Ali and the like. These legendary film makers each are a class unto themselves. And so is Khwaja Ahmed Abbas. His body of work put together may well form an institution that will be a matter of research and debate for decades to come. The medium of cinema is undoubtedly more rich, because KA Abbas worked on it. And because a compelling film like ‘Shehar Aur Sapna’ was created by him.

Born on 7th June, 1914, today is the 105th birth anniversary of this illustrious film maker. One of the very few whose dedication went exceptionally beyond the considerations of commercial success of his creations. His focus, his commentary, never wavered away from an acknowledged social responsibility of the medium of cinema. I fall back once again on the film ‘Aawaara’ and its dialogues – two samples.

Raj is running from the police and incidentally enters the home of Judge Raghunath and Rita. There is an exchange about the identity of the intruder. In a comic way, Raj is trying to convince Rita that he is a thief. And this is how he presents it –

“बस यही तो हमारे नए समाज का कमाल है।

जो चोर हैं, दूसरों की जेब काटते हैं, पब्लिक की आँख में धूल डालते हैं, मेरे जैसे फ़र्स्ट क्लास सूट पैंट पहनते हैं, उन्हें हम शरीफ समझते हैं। और जो ईमानदारी से मेहनत मजदूरी करके पेट पालते हैं, फटे पुराने कपड़े पहनते हैं, उन्हें चोर आवारा डाकू समझ कर धर लिया जाता है। ये पूंजीपति, ये काले बाज़ार वाले सेठ, ये मुनाफाखोर, ये ब्याज लेने वाले, ये सब कौन हैं। मेरी तरह चोर।“

“Bas yahi to hamaare naye samaaj ka kamaal hai.

Jo chor hain, jo doosron ki jeb kaat’te hain, public ki aankh mein dhool jhonkte hain, mere jaise first claas suit pant pehante hain, unhen hum shareef samajhte hain. Aur jo imaandari se mehnat mazdoori kar ke pet paalte hain, fatey puraane kapde pehante hain, unhem chor aawaara daaku samajh kar dhar liya jaata hai. Ye poonjipati, ye kaale bazaar waale seth, ye munaafakhor, ye byaaj lene waale, ye sab kaun hain. Meri tarah chor.”

And in the closing minutes of the film, as the court case against Raj is in progress, the judge invites Raj to say what he wants to, in his own defence. One part of that monologue goes like –

“आप जो चाहे मुझे सज़ा दे सकते हैं।

मगर क्या आप समझते हैं के मुझे फांसी देने से ये पाप क्रोध हिंसा और अपराध का जहर जो आपकी दुनिया में फैला हुआ है, ये दूर हो जाएगा।

मैं आपको अपनी जीवन कथा सुनाना नहीं चाहता। मगर इतना ज़रूर कहना चाहता हूँ, के अपराध के कीड़े मुझे खून में अपने माँ बाप से नहीं मिले थे। उस गंदे गट्टर से मिले थे जो हमारी गंदी चाल के पास से बहता है। वो गट्टर आज भी वहाँ बह रहा है। और अपराध के कीड़े अब भी उस में पल रहे हैं। और.. और सैंकड़ों हजारों बच्चे जो आस पास की चालों में रहते हैं रोज़ाना इन कीड़ों के शिकार हो रहे हैं। मेरी फिक्र ना कीजिये, उन बच्चों की फिक्र कीजिये, अपने बच्चों की फिक्र कीजिये। ऐसा ना हो

के एक दिन आप, और आप, और आप, और आपका बच्चा भी मेरी तरह इस कटहरे में बार बार कहे के मेरी रगों में भी शरीफ बाप का खून है।”

Aap jo chaahe mujhe sazaa de sakte hain.

Magar kya aap samajhte hain ke mujhe faansi dene se ye paap krodh hinsa aur apradh ka zehar jo aapki duniya mein faila hua hai, ye door ho jaayega.

Main aapko apni jeevan katha sunaana nahin chaahta. Magar itna zaroor kehna chaahta hoon, ke apradh ke keede mujhe khoon mein apne maa baap se nahin miley the. Us gande gattar se miley the jo hamaari gandi chaal ke paas se behta hain. Wo gattar aaj bhi wahaan beh raha hai. Aur apradh ke keede ab bhi us mein pal rahe hain. Aur. . aur sainkdon hazaaron bachche jo aas paas ki chaalon mein rehte hain rozaana in keedon ke shikaar ho rahe hain. Meri fiqr na kijiye, un bachchon ki fiqr kijiye, apne bachchon ki fiqr kijiye. Aisa na ho ke ek din aap, aur aap, aur aap, aur aapka bachcha bhi meri tarah is katehre mein baar baar kahe ke meri ragon mein bhi shareef baap ka khoon hai.

Touching upon the sordid realities of human existence, and the dichotomy of the crooked and dubious haves versus the helpless have nots just trying to survive. The dialogues bring home a message that is topical even today – a message that inevitably gets lost in the glitz of commercial compulsions.

His creations, his vision is exceptional. Even when he writes the story for ‘Bobby’ – yes it is a showman’s film, an RK creation. But beneath the formula drama, there is an effort to dissect and discuss the social divide of the rich-boy-poor-girl tale. It is was an RK film – one had a ice-cream flavored happy ending.

‘Shehar Aur Sapna’ is an out and out KA Abbas statement – the ending is poignant, rooted in the real world, but still colored with an idealist’s hope looking into the future – shades of “. . . Wo Subah Kabhi To Aayegi. . .”.

[Acknowkledgements – A part of this article is adapted from the material in multiple articles on Wikipedia.]

Song – Ye Shaam Bhi Kahaan Hui  (Shehar Aur Sapna) (1963) Singer – Manmohan Krishan, Lyrics – Ali Sardar Jafri, MD – Jag Phool Kaushik

Lyrics

(Part 1)

ye shaam bhi kahaan hui
ye shaam bhi kahaan hui
shaam bhi kahaan hui

patharon ki basti hai
patharon ka zinda hai
patharon ki deewaaren
jin mein qaid insaan hai
patharon ki sejen hain
patharon ka bistar hai
patharon ke takiye hain
patharon ki chaadar hai
neend aur sapne bhi
patharon mein dhalte hain
patharon ke seene mein
kitne paap palte hain
kitne paap palte hain

shaam bhi kahaan hui
ye shaam bhi kahaan hui
shaam bhi kahaan hui

(Part 2)

pathar ka bhagwaan yahaan hai
pathar ka shaitaan
pathar ke dil
pathar ke sar
pathar ke insaan
koi rasta kaise paaye
dil ka haal kisey samjhaaye
chaaron or khadi hai dekho
pathar ki santaan
pathar ki santaan

shaam bhi kahaan hui
ye shaam bhi kahaan hui
shaam bhi kahaan hui

(Part 3)

pyaar ko aaj nai
tarah nibhaana hoga
pyaar ko aaj nai
tarah nibhaana hoga
hans ke har dard ko
har gham ko bhulaana hoga
hans ke har dard ko

aansoo’on se jo bujhe jaate hain
aankhon ke chiraagh
aansoo’on se jo bujhe jaate hain
aankhon ke chiraagh
khoon e dil de ke unhen
phir se jalaana hoga
khoon e dil de ke unhen
phir se jalaana hoga
pyaar ko aaj nai

abhi khil jaayenge masle huye
kuchle huye phool
abhi khil jaayenge masle huye
kuchle huye phool
shart bas ye hai ke
seene se lagaana hoga
shart bas ye hai ke
seene se lagaana hoga
pyaar ko aaj nai

wo jo kho jaayen to
kho jaayegi duniya saari
wo jo kho jaayen to
kho jaayegi duniya saari
wo jo mil jaayen to
saath apne zamaana hoga
wo jo mil jaayen to. . .

(Part 4)

hazaar ghar hazaar dar
ye sab hain ajnabi magar
khabar nahin ke ab kidhar
mudegi apni rehguzar

yahaan se jaayenge kahaan
amaan paayeng kahaan
ye zindagi ki bebasi
ye bebasi ki zindagi..ee..ee

ye bebasi ki zindagi..ee..ee

shaam bhi kahaan hui
ye shaam bhi kahaan hui
shaam bhi kahaan hui

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

(भाग 1)

ये शाम भी कहाँ हुई
ये शाम भी कहाँ हुई
शाम भी कहाँ हुई

पत्थरों की बस्ती है
पत्थरों का ज़िंदा है
पत्थरों की दीवारें
पत्थरों के इंसान हैं
पत्थरों की सेजें हैं
पत्थरों का बिस्तर है
पत्थरों के तकिये हैं
पत्थरों की चादर है
नींद और सपने भी
पत्थरों में ढलते हैं
पत्थरों के सीने में
कितने पाप ढलते हैं
कितने पाप ढलते हैं

शाम भी कहाँ हुई
ये शाम भी कहाँ हुई
शाम भी कहाँ हुई

(भाग 2)

पत्थरों का भगवान यहाँ है
पत्थरों का शैतान
पत्थर के दिल
पत्थर के सर
पत्थर के इंसान
कोई रस्ता कैसे पाये
दिल का हाल किसे समझाये
चारों ओर खड़ी है देखो
पत्थर की संतान
पत्थर की संतान

शाम भी कहाँ हुई
ये शाम भी कहाँ हुई
शाम भी कहाँ हुई

(भाग 3)

प्यार को आज नई
तरह निभाना होगा
प्यार को आज नई
तरह निभाना होगा
हंस के हर दर्द को
हर ग़म को भुलाना होगा
हंस के हर दर्द को

आंसुओं से जो बुझे जाते हैं
आँखों के चिराग़
आंसुओं से जो बुझे जाते हैं
आँखों के चिराग़
खून ए दिल दे के उन्हें
फिर से जलाना होगा
खून ए दिल दे के उन्हें
फिर से जलाना होगा
प्यार को आज नई

अभी खिल जाएँगे मसले हुये
कुचले हुये फूल
अभी खिल जाएँगे मसले हुये
कुचले हुये फूल
शर्त बस ये है के
सीने से लगाना होगा
शर्त बस ये है के
सीने से लगाना होगा
प्यार को आज नई

वो जो खो जाएँ तो
खो जाएगी दुनिया सारी
वो जो खो जाएँ तो
खो जाएगी दुनिया सारी
वो जो मिल जाएँ तो
साथ अपने ज़माना होगा
वो जो मिल जाएँ तो

(भाग 4)
हज़ार घर हज़ार दर
ये सब हैं अजनबी मगर
खबर नहीं के अब किधर
मुड़ेगी अपनी रहगुज़र

यहाँ से जाएँगे कहाँ
अमान पाएंगे कहाँ
ये ज़िंदगी की बेबसी
ये बेबसी की ज़िंदगी॰॰ई॰॰ई

ये बेबसी की ज़िंदगी॰॰ई॰॰ई

शाम भी कहाँ हुई
ये शाम भी कहाँ हुई
शाम भी कहाँ हुई


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3976 Post No. : 15062

“Madmast” (1953) was directed by Jagdish Pant for Sweet Pictures. The movie had Ansari, Nirupa Roy, Shashikala, Shakeela, Sapru, Mukri etc in it.

This was a B grade movie which has been forgotten with time.

The movie had eleven songs in it. Two songs from this movie have been discussed in the past.

Here is the third song from the movie to appear in the blog.

This song is sung by Shamshad Begam and S D Batish. J C Pant is the lyricist. Music is composed by V Balsara.

Only the audio of the song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.


Song0-Main laal paan ki begam (Madmast)(1953) Singers-Shamshad Begam, S D Batish, Lyrics-J C Pant, MD-V Balsara

Lyrics

main laal paan ki begum hoon
main laal paan ki begum
begum begum begum hoon
main laal paan ki begum
main baadshaah hoon kaale kaa
main baadshaah hoon kaale ka
main baadshah hoon
hoon oon oon oon
kaale ka ji kaale ka
main baadshah hoon kaale ka

din raat karoon main tujhe pyaar
kuchh nagdi aur thhoda udhaar
phir kyun na tujhe ho itbaar
ik chat pat
ik chat pat
ik chat pat garam masaale ka
ik chat pat garam masaale ka
ik chat pat garam masaale ka
aa aa aa aa
kaale ka ji kaale ka
main baadshaah hoon kaale ka

begum to ab bhi hai begum
shaahon ki shaahi hui khatam
le jaao ye tooti tam tam m
kya kaam
kya kaam
kya kaam hai gadbad jhaale ka
kya kaam hai gadbad jhaale ka
kya kaam hai gadbad jhaale ka \
aa aa aa aa
kaale ka ji kaale ka
main baadshaah hoon kaale ka

main kahta hoon le lo kishmis
chup be kya bakta hai english
daudo logon daudo logon daudo logon daudo
daudo logon daudo logon daudo logon daudo
rararararara

?????
dil loot liya dilwaale ka
dil loot liya dilwaale ka
dilwaale ka
dilwaale ka
dilwaale ka
dilwaale ka
kaale ka ji kaale ka
main baadshaah hoon kaale ka
kaale ka ji kaale ka
main baadshaah hoon kaale ka

laal paan ki laal paan ki laal paan ki begum
laal paan ki laal paan ki laal paan ki begum
begum begum begum hoon main
begum begum begum begum
laa paan ki
laal paan ki be…gam

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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 15000 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3900 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15070

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1171
Total Number of movies covered =4135

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